Regulation


Chicago's O'Hare Airport Expansion Subject of Heated Controversy Because of Increase in Jet Noise (Apr. 20, 2000). The Chicago Tribune printed an editorial about the expansion of O'Hare International Airport, its supporters and opponents. The editorial supports the expansion of the airport by adding a third runway.

Chicago's O'Hare Expansion Plans Fuel Debate Between Wealthy Corporations and Concerned Citizens (Apr. 20, 2000). The Chicago Daily Herald reported that a proposed new runway at O'Hare International Airport received support from wealthy corporations known for supporting political campaigns, but not from residents who live nearby.

Construction Company in Tuen Mun, China Pays $400,000 for Repeatedly Ignoring Noise Complaints (Apr. 20, 2000). South China Morning Post reported that the Chevalier Construction Company so often over the past two years that when it ignored four separate days of complaints because of jackhammering on Sundays and late at night, the Environmental Protection Department fined the company almost $400,000.

Illinois Towns Neighboring O'Hare International Angry Over United Airlines Recommendation for O'Hare Expansion (Apr. 20, 2000). According to the Chicago Tribune, United Airlines (the world's largest airlines) dropped a bombshell when it recently recommended construction of a new runway at O'Hare International Airport. According to the article, United has long stated that the airport could meet the demands of increased air traffic without expansion.

Increase in Flights at New York's LaGuardia Unauthorized and Neighbors are Angry (Apr. 20, 2000). The New York Daily News reported that air and noise pollution in Queens are about to become worse unless officials act now. Within a year, an increase of 400 flights into and out of LaGuardia is expected, and residents are outraged.

St. Bernard, Louisiana City Officials To Address Noise, Traffic and Parking Before Allowing Crawfish Festival To Take Place (Apr. 20, 2000). According to the Times-Picayune, the St. Bernard Parish Council won't grant another three-year lease to the Louisiana Crawfish Festival until it reviews noise, traffic and parking problems that face its neighbors.

North Carolina Residents Suspicious of FedEx Hub Business at Triad Airport (Apr. 19, 2000). The High Point Enterprise reported that a state representative visited the Indianapolis International Airport resulted in his having serious concerns regarding the impact of a FedEx cargo hub might have on the Piedmont Triad International airport and its neighbors.

Ohioans Ready to Take Legal Action Against Jet Noise from Cleveland International Airport (Apr. 19, 2000). According to the Plain Dealer, noise complaints from residents near Cleveland Hopkins International airport are on the rise, and a local city councilwoman called for legal action.

Rhode Island Night Club Owners Appeal Noise Violation: Claim it is Unconstitutional (Apr. 19, 2000). According to an article in the Providence Journal-Bulletin, the Town Council suspended a local business for violating an after-hours noise ordinance, but stayed the suspension when a Superior Court judge issued a temporary restraining order allowing the club to operate until a new court hearing.

Seattle Area Neighbors Pitted Against Each Other Because of Seattle-Tacoma Airport Flight Paths (Apr. 19, 2000). According to a report by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, over 300 angry residents attended a public hearing at a community center last night ordering city officials to kill the proposal that would put a flight path directly over their neighborhoods. The problem is, their neighbors in Beacon Hill, Madrona, Leschi and the Central Area already endure jet noise, and want support the proposal, which would channel some air traffic south.

Small St. Louis Airport Too Busy to Grow (Apr. 19, 2000). According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Spirit of St. Louis airport is the source of residents' complaints of noise and safety. The article said that the airport, once a small, recreational airport is now the third-busiest in the four-state area.

Burbank Airport Officials Delay Airport Expansion for Two Years: Noise Study to Come First (Apr. 18, 2000). According to the Los Angeles Times, Burbank Airport officials voted to conduct an in-depth noise study that may delay the construction of a $300 million airport complex for a minimum of three years. The article said extraordinary opposition to the expansion prompted the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority to give up on beginning construction.

California City Council Limits Older, Noisier Aircraft: Aviation Group Files Suit (Apr. 18, 2000). City News Service reported that the Los Angeles City Council voted in one body to limit the number of the older, noisier Stage 2 aircraft at Van Nuys Airport, and will phase out the older planes (made before 1984) by 2010.

Colorado Neighbors Want Quieter Home Remodeling (Apr. 18, 2000). The Denver Post printed an article about home remodeling and the neighbors who endure the subsequent noise, trash and portable toilets--according to a spokesman for the city planning department. Most people want to know what the working hours are so concerned neighbors call the city to inquire--about 2,500 per year.

Erroneous Planning Excludes Some Tennessee Homes From Noise Abatement Measures (Apr. 18, 2000). The Knoxville News-Sentinel printed this letter to the editor about the impact of an interstate highway on homes. Of special interest is the article's explanation of an error planning that resulted in a loss of noise abatement measures for one neighborhood. The letter is printed in its entirety.

New Jersey Town Council Approves Flight Path Shift (Apr. 18, 2000). The Asbury Park Press printed a number of special interest articles about Middletown, including this article about the Middletown Township Committee's adoption of a resolution proposed by the anti-noise group New Jersey Coalition Against Aircraft Noise. According to the article, the group wants to shift air traffic at Newark International Airport over the Shore area rather than over the North Jersey metropolitan area.

Boeing 727 to Get Performance Upgrade (Apr. 17, 2000). Aviation Week & Space Technology printed an article about a modification kit for Boeing 727 aircraft that is compliant with Stage 3 "noise-attenuation system for increased and heavy-gross-weight 727s." The article is technical in nature, explaining that the kit allows shorter takeoffs and increased "payloads at 'hot and high' airports."

Chicago Area Residents Voice Opinions on Train Whistles (Apr. 17, 2000). The Chicago Sun-Times printed an article about train whistles, noise, liability and personal responsibility.

France Close to Developing New Age Super Concorde: Noise Under Consideration (Apr. 17, 2000). According to the Aviation Week & Space Technology, the French are examining whether a successor to the Concorde would be feasible and competitive in the near future. Besides considering the financial feasibility, a task force overseeing five groups will focus on noise and emissions.

LaGuardia to Get 300 More Daily Flights (Apr. 17, 2000). According to Newsday, a new federal law may lead to the most significant increase in air traffic at LaGuardia Airport in decades--as many as 300 more flights a day. Safety and noise problems are of concern.

Some Residents in High Point, N.C. Like the FedEx Cargo Hub (Apr. 17, 2000). An article in the High Point Enterprise reported on some residents who support the proposed FedEx cargo hub project at Piedmont Triad International Airport, saying that personal imposition of noise should be weighed against a positive economic impact and job creation.

Coping With Noise Involves Action (Apr. 16, 2000). The Chicago Sun-Times printed an article about resolving noise complaints. The article, while brief, listed steps to take to resolve the complaint. The article recommended first solving the problem by going to the source and conducting a reasonable discussion.

Florida Airport Relocation Debate Gets Noisy (Apr. 16, 2000). an article in the Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reported that politics money and the proposed expansion of Witham Airport have accelerated greatly, and residents are calling for a vote on the issue in November and are organizing.

Noise Complaints Prompt North Carolinian to Write Letter (Apr. 16, 2000). The Sunday Star-News printed a letter to the editor from one person who says noise complaints should not be called in to the police, adding that downtown noise is part of downtown life. The letter is printed in its entirety.

EU Must Respond to Ban on American Hush Kits (Apr. 15, 2000). An article by the Associated Press reported that the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has given the European Commission (EU) until the end of June respond to the United States' complaints over its ban on hush kits--noise reducing technology for noisy jets.

New Hampshire Town Says No to New Subdivision Near Interstate 293 (Apr. 15, 2000). The Union Leader printed an article regarding the Manchester City Planning Board and controversy over Interstate 293. The article said that a landowner wants to build an 11-lot subdivision near the interstate, but the board already said no in 1999--because of noise. The article said that six homes would "actually have I-293 in their back yard."

Mobile Telephone Use in Spain Prompts Demand for Legislation to Curb Their Use (Apr. 15, 2000). According to The Guardian, the noise levels from mobile telephones is such a nuisance that people are demanding legislative action. The growth rate of mobile telephone use is higher in Spain than anywhere else in Europe, according to the article--from one million to 18 million in just five years.

Arizona Cities Challenge Zoning Changes and Developers Threaten to Sue (Apr. 15, 2000). The Associated Press printed an article from the Arizona Republic about developers who have threatened to sue several cities around Luke Air Force Base. The developers want zoning changes in order to develop the land within a 1988 noise contour. The cities want to keep the noise contour zoning because of safety hazards and noise, and to do otherwise would leave them vulnerable to potential lawsuits they could not afford.

State of Illinois Awaits Governor's Signature on Bill Outlawing Boom Cars (Apr. 14, 2000). The Copley News Service reports that the Illinois House of Representatives has passed a bill that will penalize drivers of vehicles playing stereos that can be heard at least 75 feet away from the vehicle. Police will be able to fine offenders $50 for violations. The bill will shortly be presented to Governor George Ryan for his signature.

Hazelwood, Missouri City Council Discusses Joining National Noise Organization (Apr. 13, 2000). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Lambert Field in Hazelwood, Missouri plans to expand. At a recent City Council meeting, members discussed noise levels in the neighborhoods they represent.

Yermo, California Couple Sues Union Pacific Railroad Over Engine and Horn Noise and Fumes (Apr. 13, 2000). The Associated Press reports that two residents in Yermo, California sued Union Pacific railroad for noise produced by trains in the rail yard located near their home. The San Bernardino County Superior Court had dismissed the suit on the grounds that complaints relating to railroad operations are governed by federal regulations, not state law. The couple appealed the case, and the Fourth District Court of Appeal has now ruled that the lawsuit can be reinstated because the couple are contending that the noise was due to harassment and not to normal railroad operations.

Austell, Georgia Railway Construction Site Produces Noise Complaints from Residents (Apr. 13, 2000). The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reports that construction work on the Norfolk Southern Railway train-to-truck transfer station in Austell, Georgia has angered residents in the small town because much of the work is done at night and prevents them from sleeping. County Commissioner Woody Thompson has come to the aid of the residents by issuing a formal complaint to the city of Austell, requesting enforcement of its noise ordinance, prohibition of nighttime work at the site, and watering of the site to prevent dust from filling the air around area homes.

New National Anti-Noise Organization Launched in United Kingdom (Apr. 12, 2000). The Press Association Newsfile reports that British individuals and groups against noise are supporting the formation of a new national organization called the United Kingdom Noise Assocation (UKNA.) Members of the new group have appeared before the House of Commons, asking that the British Government create a noise strategy and enforce anti-noise laws.

Homeowners in Exeter, England May Apply for Government Compensation Because of Exposure to Noise from Newly Opened Highway (Apr. 11, 2000). The Express and Echo in Exeter, England reports that residents living near a newly opened highway, the A30, may apply for compensation from the government through the Highways Agency. The homeowners are eligible for compensation under the Land Compensation Act 1973, which states that "there is a right to compensation when property is devalued by more than GBP 50 as a result of physical factors such as noise, vibration, smell, fumes, smoke and artificial lighting."

OSHA Plans to Design Hearing Rules for Construction Industry (Apr. 10, 2000). The Engineering News-Record reports that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is finally extending their 1983 hearing loss rule to include the construction industry. Charles N. Jeffress, assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health, made this announcement at a recent conference in Washington, DC on jobsite noise and hearing loss. The conference was sponsored by the Laborers' Health and Safety Fund of North America, OSHA, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

Virginia City, Nevada Says No to Noisy Helicopter Tours (Apr. 7, 2000). The Associated Press reports that residents of Virginia City, Nevada and other parts of Storey County are opposed to Sierra Gulf Helicopters and Virginia City Venture bringing helicopter tours to the area. The planning commission held a meeting last week, attended by 100 opponents. The planning commission decided to recommend that the County Commission turn down the request at its upcoming meeting next month.

Motorcyclists Who Patronize Restaurant in Fort Pierce, Florida Asked to Quiet Their Engines (Apr. 7, 2000). The Fort Pierce News in Florida reports that residents who live near Archie's Seabreeze Restaurant in Fort Pierce have complained vehemently about motorcycle noise from the patrons at the restaurant, which has been a motorcycle hangout for over fifty years.

Ridgefield Park, New Jersey Wins Supreme Court Case Against Railroad (Apr. 6, 2000). The Record in Bergen County, New Jersey reports that the New Jersey Supreme Court recently ruled that the village of Ridgefield Park, New Jersey can legally enforce local regulations against a railroad line in the town. The town is also allowed to inspect the railroad's maintenance facility. The railroad had alleged that federal regulations exempted it from obeying the town's ordinances and regulations.

Virginia Beach Mayor and Citizens' Group Debate Best Way to Request Noise Mitigation from Oceana Naval Air Station (Apr. 5, 2000). The Virginian-Pilot reports that Virginia Beach mayor Meyera E. Oberndorf has come under fire from the local Chamber of Commerce and from a citizens' group for failing to take a comprehensive approach to securing relief for the community from jet noise at the nearby Oceana Naval Air Station.

State of Oklahoma on its Way to Final Passage of Boom Car Law (Apr. 5, 2000). The Daily Oklahoman reports that the Oklahoma House of Representatives recently passed an anti-car stereo noise bill. Final language needs to be drafted on the bill, however, and it may not pass during this year's legislative session. The Senate passed the bill in March by a vote of 26-17.

Missouri Bill Introduced to Ban "Jake Brakes" (Apr. 2, 2000). The Associated Press reports that Roger Albright of Stewartsville, Missouri recently met with the Missouri Senate Transportation Committee to complain about loud truck "Jake Brakes" and to ask for legislation outlawing them. Albright claims that eighteen wheelers routinely engage the brakes on the road near his home, making it extremely difficult to sleep.

A Primer on Hushkit History and Worldwide Stage 3 and Stage 4 Air Emissions and Noise Standards (Apr. 1, 2000). Air Transport World reports on the two-year continuing battle between the United States and the European Union over emissions and noise standards in the airline industry. In particular, the article covers the controversy over hushkits and their restricted useage in clear, chronological terms.

Jet Skis Banned From Assateague Island, Maryland (Apr. 1, 2000). The Chicago Tribune reports that the U.S. National Park Service recently extended its jet ski and personal watercraft ban to include Assateague Island off the coast of Maryland and Virginia. The Park Service had earlier banned such watercraft at 358 of its 379 parks, recreation areas, and historic sites. Assateague was not included in the ban. The Park Service left it up to the exempted parks' superintendents to determine whether jet skis were harmful to wildlife in the park.

Worldwide Cooperation Needed in Adopting More Stringent Air Noise Controls (Apr. 1, 2000). Air Transport World published an article about the history during the past 23 years of the airline industry in adhering to Chapter 3/Stage 3 noise rules, both in North American and in Europe. The writer believes it is time to begin discussing more seriously defining and adopting Chapter 4/Stage 4 noise rules.

Burbank, California Airport Loses Request to Close Terminal Overnight (Mar. 31, 2000). The Los Angeles Times reports that FAA administrator Jane Garvey has recently declared that Burbank Airport will not be allowed to close its terminal overnight until it completes a noise study that could take up to two years to complete. The city of Burbank was hoping that closing the old terminal would help speed along their plans to build a new terminal at the airport. The project will now have to be put on hold.

Canadian Hunter's Guide, Widely Distributed to Children, Makes No Mention of Importance of Ear Protection (Mar. 31, 2000). The Toronto Star in Canada reports that the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters and the ministry of natural resources recently distributed a Hunter's Guide to Ontario schools. Nowhere in the guide was ear protection discussed. The Deafness Research Foundation says that shotgun blasts register at 130 decibels.

Flight Limits Placed on Grand Canyon National Park Tours Do Not Meet Goals of 1987 Law (Mar. 30, 2000). The Arizona Republic printed an editorial that discusses the recent limits placed on the number of flights in Grand Canyon National Park. However, the goals of a 1987 law that established flight-free zones over the park and called for "substantial restoration of natural quiet" still have not been attained.

New Federal Legislation Will Increase Air Traffic at Kennedy and Laguardia Airports in New York (Mar. 30, 2000). Newsday reports that US President Bill Clinton is due to sign legislation this week that would allow more regional jet traffic at Kennedy and LaGuardia Airports in New York. The legislation will also allow the "high-density rule," which has set strict flight number limits at the two airports for the past thirty years, to expire in less than seven years. The bill was approved by Congress on March 15.

Noise Complaints Prompt Consideration of Rules Against "Touch-and-Go" Training Exercises at Witham Field in Stuart, Florida (Mar. 30, 2000). The Palm Beach Post reports that Martin County officials are trying to respond to community complaints about noise at Witham Field in Stuart, Florida by drafting a law that would restrict "touch-and-go" takeoffs and landings there. They will closely study a similar law enacted by the city of Pompano Beach five years ago as they draft the Witham Field law.

United States and European Union Attempt to Reach Hushkit Compromise (Mar. 30, 2000). The Journal of Commerce in London, England reports on another effort between the European Union (EU) and the United States to settle the controversy over hushkits. The EU law banning hushkitted aircraft takes place on May 4. This would affect more than 700 US aircraft.

Protesters Would Like New Highway in Exeter, England to be Resurfaced to Make it Quieter (Mar. 29, 2000). The Express and Echo in Exeter, England reports that a newly-opened highway, the A30 running east from Exeter to Honiton, has been the focus of many complaints from residents who say that the noise from the road is excessive. They want the brushed concrete road to be resurfaced with bitumen, which is quieter.

US Government Announces Limits on Flights Over Grand Canyon (Mar. 29, 2000). The Arizona Republic in Phoenix reports that President Clinton announced on Tuesday that the number of flights that tour airplanes and helicopters may make over Grand Canyon National Park will be limited. The limits were established by the National Parks Service in conjunction with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Flights will be limited to 90,000 per year.

EU and US Negotiate Hushkits and Ban on Older Aircraft (Mar. 28, 2000). According to London's Financial Times, talks between the US and the European Union may lead to a compromise over "hushkits" because EU officials may delay the registration date for non-EU airplanes equipped with the engine mufflers to fly I into the 15-nation bloc.

Increased Traffic in St. Louis Prompts Requests for Sound Barrier (Mar. 27, 2000). An article in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch printed an op-ed article about increased traffic in the St. Louis area, prompting some mayors from area cities to take action against the noise.

Dallas Historic Airport To Develop Master Plan for Growth and Expansion (Mar. 26, 2000). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported that, Love Field in Dallas is facing increased commercial air traffic and city officials must develop a long-term plan for the airport since it is already overcrowded and cannot accommodate more traffic.

St. Louis City Officials Criticized for Dismissing Residents' Airport Noise Concerns (Mar. 25, 2000). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported on a news conference where regional officials, clergy and neighbors of Lambert Field sharply criticized St. Louis city officials for dismissing their noise concerns regarding the construction of a new runway and other improvements.

UK Officials Change Noise Rules With Support from Neighbors (Mar. 25, 2000). The London Free Press printed an op-ed challenging a recent column that criticized city officials for changing noise rules at outdoor concerts because of complaints.

UK Invests ƒ1.5M on Noise Abatement (Mar. 24, 2000). The Derby Evening Telegraph reported that in an announcement by transport minister Lord Macdonald, the British Parliament is poised to spend 1.5mƒ on noise mitigation for two English towns, Sawley and Sandiacre.

Local City Council in UK Calls for Public Forum on Airport Noise (Mar. 23, 2000). The Birmingham Evening Mail reported that a Midland city councilor asked for a public forum for residents to discuss Birmingham International Airport.

Seattle-Tacoma Airport's Change in Flight Plan Gets Support From City Officials (Mar. 23, 2000). According to the News Tribune reported that town officials in Washington state support a plan to reroute dozens of flights from Sea-Tac (Seattle-Tacoma) Airport, a plan which other cities do not support. flight paths.

NY Home Depot Too Big, Too Noisy, Too Much Traffic for Neighbors (Mar. 21, 2000). According to an article from Newsday, the new 24-hour Home Depot bordering Forest Hills and Glendale attracts so much vehicular traffic that its neighbors can no longer open their windows or get a good night's sleep.

Residents in UK Town Protest New Construction Project (Mar. 21, 2000). The Leicester Mercury reported that residents in this small town oppose a new warehouse because the building is a huge, ugly structure towers over their homes. They also state they were not informed of its significant size.

Senior Citizens in UK Protest Early Morning Truck Noise (Mar. 21, 2000). The Bath Chronicle reported that several senior citizens have complained to their local environmental health officers about loud early morning noises from trucks at the Gammon Plant. According to the article, they have made several attempts to speak with the plant's owner, to no avail.

Creve Coeur, Missouri City Council Divided on Need for Sound Barrier Construction Along Interstate 270; Public Hearings to be Held (Mar. 20, 2000). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Creve Coeur, Missouri City Council met recently to discuss the need for sound barrier construction along Interstate 270. Some members do not believe there is a need, and feel that the cost is too high. The Council discussed ways to request the state to change its funding formula in order to have the state pay more of the cost of the sound barrier construction.

English Businessman Files Appeal with the English Government Against a Local Government Ban Prohibiting Him From Constructing and Using a Personal Helicopter Landing Near his Home (Mar. 20, 2000). The Birmingham Evening Mail reports that Mr. Simon Farmer, a local resident and businessman, is concerned by the refusal of his local town councilors to allow him to build a helicopter pad on his property and use it to take off in and land his privately-owned helicopter. He has filed an appeal with Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott, who is Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions. The government's Planning Inspectorate will handle the appeal.

U.S. State Department Files Petition with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Concerning Possible International Law Violation by European Union for Banning Hushkitted Transports (Mar. 20, 2000). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports that the United States is concerned that the European Union's ban of hushkitted transports is illegal. The U.S. hopes that the petition it filed with the ICAO on March 14 will help settle the dispute. Hushkits are devices that were developed to help powerplants and aviation companies comply with the ICAO's Chapter 3 noise-emissions standards. Most hushkitted aircraft have been built in the United States. The United States claims that by banning hushkitted aircraft, the EU is unfairly penalizing U.S. aircraft companies, while simultaneously favoring European manufacturers who do not install hushkits, particularly Airbus Industrie.

Burbank, California Rejects Petition Barring New Airline Terminal Construction at Burbank Airport (Mar. 19, 2000). The Los Angeles Times reports that the Burbank City Council recently rejected a petition filed by Restore Our Airport Rights (ROAR) asking the city to deny Burbank Airport the right to construct a new terminal. The FAA agreed that the petition should not stop the airport from adding the terminal.

Proposed Amendment to Oklahoma City Ordinance, Designed to Reduce Nightclub Noise, Causes Concern Among Business Owners and Some Residents (Mar. 19, 2000). The Sunday Oklahoman reports that Oklahoma City Councilwoman Amy Brooks has drafted a proposed amendment to a city ordinance as a result of complaints from many of her Ward 2 constituents about late-night bar, nightclub, and restaurant noise in the Crown Heights neighborhood. Some other residents, and many business owners and concert promoters, strongly oppose the measure.

Witham Field in Stuart, Florida Opens New Control Tower; Citizen Group Concerned About Increased Noise as a Result (Mar. 19, 2000). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports that Witham Field is holding ceremonies on Monday to celebrate the opening of a new control tower. The Witham Field/Martin County Airport Watch Committee has objections to the new tower because it will increase noise levels in the area.

Federal Airport Bill Will Allow Airports to Spend More on Noise Mitigation; Will Also Cause Airport Growth and Increase in Air Traffic (Mar. 16, 2000). USA Today reports that airports around the country are waiting for President Clinton to sign the aviation bill recently passed by the U.S. House of Representatives. If the president signs the bill, many U.S. airports are expected to begin building programs next year. Los Angeles International Airport will use some of its allotted money on noise mitigation programs.

Rhode Island Schools Barely Outside Airport Noise Zone and FAA Refuses to Pay for Soundproofing (Feb. 22, 2000). The Providence Journal-Bulletin printed an article about two Rhode Island schools that are barely outside the high-noise zone around T. F. Green Airport, making them ineligible for funding from the Federal Aviation Administration for soundproofing. The schools are within 200 feet from the zone boundary, and both parents and teachers complain that the noise disrupts learning.

Alabama Airport Officials and Government Say No to Noise Limits: Residents Angry (Feb. 21, 2000). The Birmingham Post reported on a controversy among Birmingham International Airport, the Government and residents living near the airport. An advisory committee of the airport [Editor's Note: a committee with no power or binding vote] and the Government both claim that setting noise limits is impractical.

North Carolina Airport Attempt to Change Flight Path to Reduce Noise Fails (Feb. 19, 2000). According to an editorial in the News & Record, an attempt by airport officials to redirect flight paths is a bad idea, bad politics and bad planning.

Indian Government to Enforce New Noise Rules Under Environment Protection Act (Feb. 18, 2000). According to an article from the M2 Presswire, the Ministry of Environment and Forests is getting tough on noise pollution, a significant problem in India's cities and urban areas. The article said that the Noise Pollution Rules 2000 aim to regulate and reduce noise at the source.

Noisy New York Neighbor Source of Complaints but No Action (Feb. 18, 2000). Newsday printed a noise complaint letter in the Real Estate section. The letter and the response are printed in their entirety.

UK Nursery Wins Construction Appeal (Feb. 18, 2000). The Derby Telegraph reported that the owner of a nursery in Alvaston, England won an appeal that will allow her to complete construction of the nursery. Construction was interrupted when the Derby City Council discovered that the plans for the nursery included converting the garage into a baby unit, and had not been approved.

UK Planning Council Member Responds to Noise Complaint Against US Company (Feb. 18, 2000). The Journal printed this letter from a planning council member in England responding to a letter complaining about noise from Viasystem, a US electronics plant. In question are two fume abatement chimneys. The letter is printed in its entirety and defends the planning council's permitting process.

US to Discuss Aircraft Noise With EU (Feb. 18, 2000). The London Financial Times reported on plans for the US to join in a discussion with the European Union on aircraft noise in order to settle the controversial issue on "hush kit" technology. [Editor's Note: "Hush Kits" are not so quiet as the newer Stage 3 aircraft, and they pollute more.]

Chicago Area Airport Committee Promises More Pro-Active Position on Reducing Noise (Feb. 16, 2000). According to the Chicago Daily Herald, Arlington Heights' Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise

European Lobbying Group Supports EC Noise and ATC Initiatives (Feb. 16, 2000). According to the Air Transport Intelligence, European Commission (EC) spokesman Loyola de Palacio announced that a European airport lobbying group (ACI Europe)supports the EC's initiatives that address both jet noise and air traffic control (ATC) delays.

Maryland Senate Committee Wants to Limit County's Authority to Set Local Noise Ordinances (Feb. 16, 2000). According to an article in The Capital, a state Senate committee in Maryland is looking at legislation that would preclude county officials' setting their own local noise limits on regulating a Pasadena gun club. The reason: business would be at risk if legislation were enacted.

UK Puts Noise on the Map (Feb. 16, 2000). According to an article from Hermes Database, 12 million people in England are victims of intolerable noise levels from transportation and industry, and the Environment Minister, Michael Meacher announced the nation's first noise map of one city.

Minnesota Twin Cities Officials Pass Compromise Plan for Jet Noise (Feb. 15, 2000). According to the Minnesota Star Tribune, officials from Minneapolis and St. Paul voted to identify an area near the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport as uninhabitable because of jet noise from a new runway expected to open in 2003.

Northfield Center, Ohio Approves Noise Regulation (Feb. 15, 2000). The Plain Dealer reports on community events in the northeast Ohio metropolitan area. In Northfield Center, a noise regulation has been approved.

Hong Kong Government Wants To Sue Executives for Company Noise Violations (Feb. 3, 2000). The Agence France Presse reported that government officials in Hong Kong plan to pass a bill making executives liable for the noise their companies create because of a significant increase in noise complaints. Fines could be as high as $12,870 for the first offense. As of this writing, fines are levied against companies only.

Illinois City Council to Limit Construction Hours and Outdoor Speaker Decibel Levels (Feb. 3, 2000). According to the Chicago Tribune, the Naperville City Council submitted two changes regarding noise to the Plan Commission. One change would limit work hours for construction crews and the other would limit the decibel levels on outdoor speakers at businesses.

South Carolinians Organize Opposition to Port Authority's Plan for Container Port (Feb. 3, 2000). The Post and Courier reported that residents on Daniel Island will publicly oppose the State Ports Authority's (SPA) plan to establish a large container port on state land near the island. They've even formed their own organization, the Daniel Island Neighborhood Association.

City of Denver Appeals Fine Because of Airport Noise (Feb. 2, 2000). An article from the Associated Press reported that local cities around Denver won a $5.3 million fine against the city of Denver because of excessive noise from Denver International Airport (DIA). Denver is appealing the fine.

London's Theater District Too Noisy for Soho Residents (Feb. 2, 2000). An article from the Press Association Newsfile reported that Soho residents have taken political action against Westminster City Council's decision to allow another new night café in London's theater. Resident's claim that there are just too many night cafes, loud music and entertainment in the West End, London's theater and entertainment center, and that they interfere with their sleep.

Los Angeles City Council Unsure About Phasing Out Stage 2 Jet Aircraft (Feb. 2, 2000). According to the Los Angeles Times, the city council wants to talk to the FAA about restricting the number of noisy aircraft at Van Nuys Airport. The article said that city council members are uncertain of their ability to limit the number of Stage 2 aircraft, which are older and noisier than newer planes, from landing or taking off.

UK Government Panel On Sustainable Development Lists Noise Among Priorities (Feb. 2, 2000). The Hermes Database reported on a governmental panel in England that met recently to look at sustainable development, the environment and how that country views its own resources. What's remarkable about the panel is that it lists noise as one of the priorities, along with such topics as energy strategy, genetically engineered organisms, world trade and the ethics of biotechnology.

California Trains and Boom Cars Subjects of Residents' Complaints (Feb. 1, 2000). The Sacramento Bee printed these letters about train noise at night and loud car stereos. The letters are printed in their entirety.

Illinois Town Officials Receive Info on Airport Noise Study (Feb. 1, 2000). The Associated Press reported on an airport noise abatement study for Palwaukee Municipal Airport which will measure airport noise, identify exposure to it, and make a land use determination accordingly. The study will be completed in the spring of 2001.

Londoners Will Tolerate Noise if Construction of Main Thoroughfare Speeds Up (Feb. 1, 2000). According to the London Evening Standard, telecom cable contractors are disrupting traffic and business because they begin work on the Strand, London's main thoroughfare, from 7:30 am to 5pm. The article advocates a choice of working 24 hours a day until the work is finished or extending the hours from 6am to 8pm, stopping just in time for curtain at nearby theaters.

Noisy Neighbors Turn Down the Volume Before UK Environmental Officer Can Act (Feb. 1, 2000). According to the Leicester Mercury, an attempt by the local environmental health officer to act on noise complaints because the disruptive neighbors turn down the volume of their stereo before he arrives.

UK Town Council Grants Entertainment License After Noise Reduction (Feb. 1, 2000). The Herald Express reported that the public entertainment licenses for two inns have been granted only after the owners squelched the noise.

Wisconsin Circuit Court Judge Rules Local Noise Ordinance as Unconstitutional (Feb. 1, 2000). According to the Associated Press, a judge in Superior, Wisconsin ruled that the local noise ordinance is unconstitutional, and in effect reversing a decision by the village board.

Letter to the Editor Highlights Problems with West Virginia Quarry Bill, Including Lack of Protections from Noise (Jan. 26, 2000). The Charleston Daily Mail prints several letters to the editor, one of which talks about the problems with a quarry bill in West Virginia, including lack of noise regulation.

Airline Industry Organizations Applaud U.S. Decision to File a Complaint Against the European Union with the International Civil Aviation Organization Over It's Proposed Hushkit Ban (Jan. 25, 2000). M2 Presswire reports that several Airline industry groups applauded the U.S. decision to file a formal complaint with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) against the European Union's proposed ban on hushkitted aircraft. They emphasized that hushkitted aircraft meet international standards already set by the ICAO.

New York Environmental Chairperson Wants President to Reopen National Noise Office (Jan. 17, 2000). The New York Times printed this letter to the editor regarding noise. The letters appears in its entirety.

Singapore Enforces Noise Rules in Neighborhoods (Jan. 15, 2000). The Straits Times (Singapore) printed a response from Mike Chan, the head of the Housing Maintenance Section Housing Administration regarding a complaint about housing renovations.

Tax Break for Chicago Homeowners Near O'Hare Not on Town Ballots (Jan. 14, 2000). The Chicago Tribune reports that former state treasurer Pat Quinn's attempt to give property tax breaks to homeowners who live near O'Hare Airport failed to get support from local townships and municipalities. Only Stickney Township will put the question on the town's ballot.

Nevada Airport Authority's New Noise Study Seeks Public Input (Jan. 14, 2000). According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, the Washoe County Airport Authority board approved a new study reduce to noise around the Reno-Tahoe International Airport. In addition, the authority said it would aggressively seek public input.

New Jersey Lawmakers Design Strategy to Reduce Jet Noise at Teterboro (Jan. 14, 2000). The Bergen County Record reported that lawmakers recently met to design a strategy for reducing noise for North Jersey towns near Teterboro Airport, the nation's busiest non-commercial airport.

Florida Power Plant's New Location Promises Less Noise (Jan. 14, 2000). The Orlando Sentinel reported that when Reliant Energy came to Holopaw residents for the second time and told residents that its proposed 460-megawatt power plant would hum no louder than their refrigerators, residents told company officials it would still be too noisy.

UK Go Kart Track Subject of Noise Complaints and Controversy (Jan. 13, 2000). According to The Journal, Sunderland residents are so angry about the noise from the expansion of a nearby go-kart track that they've organized to challenge not only the noise but also the procedure for the track's getting a permit to open. Representatives from the Warden Law Action Group say the process was not democratic.

Texas City Councils Say Noise Regulation Difficult to Enforce (Jan. 13, 2000). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported that Southlake residents have had enough of the blower from a nearby car wash, and have lodged complaints to local officials just the city was reviewing its noise ordinance. The article explained some of the difficulties of writing an "enforceable noise ordinance," according to the city's head of code enforcement.

Noise from California Night Club Creates Neighborhood Tension (Jan. 13, 2000). The Sacramento Bee reported that Roseville residents can't enjoy their back yards, rest, read or sleep because of a neighborhood billiard business that plays live music, but the city council says the club doesn't violate the local noise ordinance.

Australian Airport Bans Airlines Because of Noise and Safety Concerns (Jan. 13, 2000). According to an AAP Newswire bulletin, the Victorian government banned Virgin Airlines from establishing its headquarter and barred it from temporarily using the city's Essendon Airport for an 18 month-interim until a new airport is built in Tullamarine. Governmental officials said the airline's 737 jets would create noise and safety risks in the suburban residential area.

UK Airport Fights Residential Developments: Local Officials Angry (Jan. 12, 2000). The Canberra Times reported on the opposition to residential housing by the owner of the Canberra International Airport. The article said that the airport owners want a cross-border agreement among local governments ensure that no houses are built under the airport's flight path

UK Nightclub Gets Permit For Live Jazz on Sunday (Jan. 12, 2000). According to the Bath Chronicle, a local bar has been given a license for live music and dancing on Sundays despite opposition from local residents.

Pennsylvania Township Delayed Expansion of Store Because of Noise Concerns (Jan. 12, 2000). The Intelligencer Journal reported that town's zoning board delayed a decision on granting a permit for expansion of a local convenience store after the first two zoning hearings included almost eight hours of testimony from residents opposing the expansion. The article said they feared the expansion would create light and noise problems and excessive traffic.

New York Environmental Group Links Helicopter Noise to Health Problems (Jan. 12, 2000). According to the Daily News, the Natural Resources Defense Council released findings from a recent study saying that helicopter noise can lead to health problems.

Local Residents in UK Divided Over Train Whistle (Jan. 12, 2000). According to the Calgary Herald, about 20 residents signed a petition against whistles from trains owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR).

North Carolinians Fight FedEx Hub at Airport (Jan. 12, 2000). An article in the Greensboro reported that residents near Piedmont Triad International Airport are poised to launch a campaign to stop FedEx from building a cargo hub.

Canadian Residents Challenge Shooting Range in Neighborhood (Jan. 11, 2000). According to the Edmonton Sun, about 200 Edmundton residents signed a petition opposing a shooting range at a local park because of safety and noise concerns. The Edmonton Nordic Ski Club proposed the park.

New Mexico City Officials Call for Quieter Airport (Jan. 11, 2000). The Albuquerque Journal reported that city officials approved an airport noise abatement ordinance, calling for changes at Santa Fe Municipal Airport.

Minnesota Airport Noise Consultants Disagree On Noise Impact Area (Jan. 11, 2000). According to the Star Tribune, a dispute between noise consultants resulted in a failure to define noise zones affected by jets using a new runway at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.

Community Advisory Board Near Columbus Circle, New York City Is Pushing for Audible Pedestrian Signals for the Blind; Some Residents and Businesses Worry About Potential Noise (Jan. 9, 2000). The New York Times reports that Community Board 4, near Columbus Circle in New York City, is pushing for audible pedestrian-crossing signals for the circle. Residents and business owners worried about noise from excessively loud or shrill crosswalks. The community board said that the crosswalks constantly adjust their volume too be audible above city noise without being excessive or shrill.

Boise, Idaho Airport Hopes Congress Will Reconsider Giving Local Authorities the Right to Restrict Noisy Aircraft (Jan. 7, 2000). The Associated Press State and Local Wire reports that federal representatives from Boise, Idaho met with residents this week to discuss noise problems from Stage-2 corporate jets at Friedman Memorial Airport in Hailey. A pending report may encourage Congress to allow cities to restrict noisy aircraft: a right that was taken away in 1990.

Wellington, New Zealand City Council Dismisses Complaints About Noise from Screaming Riders of a Bungy Ride as Insignificant (Jan. 3, 2000). The Waikato Times reports that the Wellington, New Zealand City Council dismissed complaints about noise from screaming patrons at a downtown bungy ride as not "a huge issue."

U.S. Threatens to File Complaint with the International Civil Aviation Organization to Pressure the European Union to Modify or Withdraw Its Hushkit Ban (Jan. 1, 2000). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports that the United States may file an official complaint with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) against the European Union's proposed hushkit ban, although a compromise may be reached before that. The U.S. says that when the ICAO eventually tries to work on Stage 4 standards, European companies won't want its equipment devalued any more than the U.S. does now.

Maine County Commissioners Want Public Advisory Committee on Airport Expansion (Dec. 16, 1999). According to the Bangor Daily News, county commissioners in Knox County, Maine have called for a public advisory committee to the master plan for the Knox County Regional Airport. Of particular interest are noise and air pollution.

US Claims European Union's Ban on Aircraft Noise Law Costs Billions: US Seeks Ban on EU Voting Rights (Dec. 10, 1999). The London Financial Times reported that the US may ask the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) to revoke the voting rights of European Union States if agreement is not reached next week at the US-EU summit in a dispute over aircraft noise.

Sound Walls in Salt Lake City, Utah Cause Controversy (Dec. 10, 1999). The Salt Lake Tribune reported that the Utah Transportation Commission rejected a plea from residents to tear down sound walls between Interstate 215 and Wasatch Boulevard in Salt Lake City even though residents hate them.

European Union Defers Hush Kit Legislation Until 2001 (Dec. 10, 1999). According to AFX European Focus, the European Commissioner for transport, Loyola de Palacio, said that EU passed legislation requiring certain aircraft to be equipped with "husk kits" to make them quieter may be delayed until after an international aircraft noise conference in Sept 2001.

European Union and US Battle Over Aircraft Noise Law (Dec. 10, 1999). The Journal of Commerce reported that the United States warned the European Union that it may retaliate against a controversial EU law that would limit aircraft noise.

Santa Fe, New Mexico Residents Address Noise Through Letters; One Criticizes Recent Editorial Calling Anti-Noise Residents "Fussbudgets", (Dec. 8, 1999). The Santa Fe New Mexica prints several letters to the editor, including two related to noise. The first criticizes a recent editorial that characterized noise complainants as "fussbudgets", while the second criticizes owners of barking dogs.

United States Asks European Union for Another Delay --This Time Indefinite -- of Anti-Hushkit Legislation; EU Says Delay -- If Any -- Will Have a Time Limit (Dec. 1, 1999). The Tulsa World reports that the United States is demanding another delay -- this time indefinite -- of anti-hushkit legislation that would require American airlines to use aircraft that comply with Stage-3 noise standards without the assistance of hushkits when in Europe. Officials here say the EU's real motivation is increased revenue for European airlines and manufacturers, not the protection of residents from noise pollution. Postponing the legislation until after newer international standards are due may keep pressure on the U.S. to continue cooperation, although the EU has said that any delay will not be indefinite.

Illinois General Assembly's Noise Law Struck Down Because It Bans Music But Not Advertisements From Being Heard At 75 Feet (Nov. 26, 1999). The Chicago Tribune prints an editorial which explains that a noise law, passed by the Illinois General Assembly in 1990, has been overturned because it played favorites with forms of expression by exempting advertising noise.

Illinois Municipalities with Ordinances that Exempt Ice Cream Truck Music From Noise Laws May Face Constitutionality Issues, Now that the State Has Thrown Out a Law that Does the Same (Nov. 24, 1999). The Copley News Service reports that since the Illinois State Supreme Court has thrown out an unconstitutional state law that exempted ice cream trucks and other advertisers from vehicle noise laws, many municipal noise ordinances in Illinois may have to be changed as well. State legislators originally wanted to protect ice cream trucks which were just "playing a jingle", but the court and anti-noise activists say "noise abatement is noise abatement."

French Officials Say Pollution-Reduction to Comply with Kyoto Conference Global Warming Protocol Should Be Coupled with Noise Reduction (Nov. 22, 1999). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports that French environmental officials believe that in working towards the carbon dioxide limits set by the U.N.'s global warming conference in Kyoto, researchers should also prioritize noise reduction. Turbines are 40% quieter than they were in the 1970s, and many further gains in noise reduction will result from work on non-engine components.

East Devon, U.K. Residents Are Dismayed to Learn that a New Law Banning Noisy Concrete Highways Don't Apply to the A30; Residents There Have Campaigned to Resurface the Road, but Traffic As Measured By the Number of Cars Don't Meet the Law's Required Minimum (Nov. 19, 1999). The Express and Echo reports that a new law passed in the United Kingdom bans noisy concrete highways, but the law doesn't apply to the controversial A30 because of a traffic minimum. Residents say that the law should have taken into account bothersome noise that isn't arbitrarily defined by traffic volume.

Gillette, Wyoming Mine Officials Say New Noise Regulations Are Unfair (Nov. 19, 1999). The Denver Post reports that new regulations by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) are being called unfair by mine officials in the Gillette, Wyoming area. The regulations call for a three-tiered "engineering, administration, and hearing protection" strategy, which officials say they are already following. They do say that they will be working on quieter mufflers and exhaust systems.

Jamaica, New York City Reverent Supports Congressional Bill to Force Concorde to Comply with Noise Regulations (Nov. 15, 1999). Newsday reports that a reverend in Jamaica, New York City has asked an old friend -- now influential in the U.S. Congress -- to help reduce aircraft noise from Kennedy Airport by supporting a bill passed by the House and pending in the Senate. The bill would force the heretofore exempt Concorde supersonic jet to comply with noise regulations, and would also strengthen those regulations for all aircraft.

China Makes Company Executives Liable for Noise Breaches Made By Their Companies (Nov. 13, 1999). The South China Morning Post reports that an amendment to the Noise Control Ordinance will make company executives liable for any noise violations that their company creates. While companies say making one person liable is unfair, government officials say that someone has to be made responsible since the current system isn't working well. Fines will range up to $200,000 for each offense, about ten times the current fines.

Coventry, England Parliament Member Backs Campaign to Allow More Local Regulation of Noise (Nov. 10, 1999). The Coventry Evening Telegraph reports that a Labour MP of Rugby and Kenilworth, U.K. is backing a campaign to give local authorities more power to regulate airport noise.

Columnist in Columbia, South Carolina Discusses Noise Strategies in Our National Parks (Oct. 16, 1999). The Sacramento Bee prints a column that discusses noise pollution in our national parks. The column discusses air-tour noise, raft-motor noise, and other problems in our national parks. She mentions that the National Park Service is currently drafting a policy that will require all parks to monitor their noise and establish natural sound levels as well as sources of the most intrusive human-made sounds.

Airports Across the Country, Including Dallas/Fort Worth in Texas, Are Almost Ready For the January 1st Federal Noise Standards to Come Into Effect (Sep. 20, 1999). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that Airports across the country, including Dallas/Fort Worth Airport (D/FW), are preparing to meet the January 1st deadline for new federally-mandated noise standards. The standards require the phasing out of all heavy "Stage 2" aircraft; Stage 2 aircraft with "hushkits" are quiet enough to be allowed under the standards. The airlines have known of the standards for 8 years, and 93 percent of the planes at D/FW meet the standards already. Some residents have noticed the difference, and some are still disrupted. The article also notes that D/FW has imposed their noise on fewer people as years have gone by even though traffic has increased, using several methods.

US Urges EU to Reconsider Noise Law that Will Forbid Additional Stage 2 Aircrafts -- Even When Muffled with 'Husk-Kits' -- from Operating in Europe; US Says Companies Have Already Lost $2.1 Billion in Aircraft Resale Value and Hush-Kit Sales (Sep. 20, 1999). The Business Times reports that the US is urging the European Union (EU) to reconsider noise laws that would ban additional Stage 2 aircraft from operating in Europe. The US says that the laws discriminate against older US Stage 2 planes with hush-kits which meet noise standards. The EU has already postponed implementation of the law. Now the US wants withdrawal of the legislation, and the EU seems willing to consider it if the US makes commitments to developing new Stage 4 international noise standards in the near future; talks on the new standards are currently at a stand still.

US and EU Nearing a Resolution to Tension Over EU's Aircraft Noise Regulations that US Says Would Unfairly Hurt Resale Market for Noisier Planes (Sep. 20, 1999). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports that the US and the European Union (EU) are closer to an agreement that would resolve tension over proposed airport noise regulations in Europe. The regulations would forbid noisier Stage 2 aircraft from being used, which the US says would unfairly hurt the resale market for their aircraft. The EU may agree to withdraw or modify the regulations if the US commits in writing to a definitive timeline for development of the next phase of noise standards: Stage 4. The US is already working with the European Commission to outline principles and "an appropriate level of economic protection for the existing Stage 3 fleet," although the EU wants more assurances that the US will remain committed.

After Years of Shifting Flight Paths From One Disturbed Community to Another, New York City Area Airports May Computer-Test Ocean Routes that Could Keep Noise Away From Residents (Sep. 19, 1999). The Asbury Park Press reports that after years of shifting flight paths from one disturbed community to another, the New York/New Jersey Port Authority may computer-test ocean routes. Parties involved are now considering the computer-modeling of ocean routes that would largely limit noise from climbing aircraft to areas over the ocean. Since the 1978 deregulation of the airline industry, increasing traffic and noise have caused the FAA to try -- unsuccessfully -- to mitigate noise by shifting flight paths. New Jersey Coalition Against Aircraft Noise's ocean route proposal may offer a better solution.

Cleveland, Ohio Boat Show to Include Courtesy Boat-Motor Noise Tests (Sep. 17, 1999). The Plain Dealer reports reports on several of Cleveland's upcoming sporting events, including a large boat show on the lake. The show will include courtesy engine-noise tests.

Continental Replaces All Older Jets with Newer, Quieter Ones at Cleveland, Ohio's Hopkins International Airport (Sep. 17, 1999). The Plain Dealer reports that Continental Airlines has replaced all of its older, noisier jets at Cleveland, Ohio's Hopkins International Airport with newer, quieter ones. The article notes that the airline decided to replace its older jets because of new noise regulations, but also because they expect to save $100 million each year in maintenance costs on the 103 aircraft they expect to replace nationwide. Local politicians are pleased with the step, although they worry that increased traffic after the 2002 completion of a new runway will keep the noise problem from getting better

Nevada Senators Add Rider to Spending Bill That Would Delay Noise Restrictions Planned for Grand Canyon National Park (Sep. 17, 1999). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that Nevada senators added a rider to an Interior spending bill that would delay implementation of new noise limits in Grand Canyon National Park. The senators say that air tour operators only want time to refute the methods used by the Park Service: methods they say are flawed. Environmentalists consider the rider a simple delay tactic, to be used to find other ways to reject the limits. In developing the limits, the Park Service is trying to comply with a 1987 congressional mandate to restore natural quiet to the park.

FAA Asks Congress to Hold Off on Filing Complaints Against EU's Anti-Hushkit Legislation, Saying that Productive Negotiations for Next Generation of Noise Standards May Encourage EU to Withdraw Legislation Themselves (Sep. 14, 1999). Air Transport Intelligence reports that the FAA has asked Congress to hold off on filing an official complaint against the European Union (EU) and its recent legislation that bans new planes from using hushkits to meet noise limits after May 2000. The EU is eager for U.S. participation in the development of new noise standards, and may be willing to withdraw their legislation if a proposed standard is being developed to otherwise address their concerns about noise. The anti-hushkit legislation -- as it now stands -- would prevent the addition of noisy, hush-kitted planes to European fleets after May 2000.

Federal Railway Administration Agrees to Review Applications for Grade Crossing Changes; Morris County, New Jersey Residents Are Eager for Changes that Would Allow Trains to Lay Off Their Horns (Sep. 10, 1999). The Record reports that the Federal Railway Administration (FRA) has agreed to review applications by Morris County, New Jersey communities -- pending for years -- to install devices at railroad grade crossings that would eliminate the need for early-morning horn blasts. Congress asked the FRA in 1994 to design safety rules that would eliminate the need for horns at grade crossing without compromising safety. Certain devices make it virtually impossible for cars to get onto the tracks when a train is coming: barriers that separate lanes, surveillance cameras, and four-gate systems. Standard regulations by the FRA could come out any time from three months to ten years from now.

Trade Officials Urge European Union to Revisit Regulation that Discriminates Against U.S. Planes with Hushkits (Sep. 10, 1999). The Financial Times reports that the U.S. undersecretary of commerce asked the European Union (EU) to withdraw a regulation that restricts some U.S. aircraft -- outfitted with noise-dampening hushkits -- from flying in the EU. The U.S. could lose $1.5 billion if the measure -- which would prevent hushkitted aircraft from flying to the EU by May of 2002 if they hadn't operated in the EU prior to May 1999 -- is put in place. The regulation was intended to phase out noisier aircraft over the densely populated EU, but the U.S. claims that the agreement doesn't meet international standards, since U.S. aircraft would be discriminated against while other noisier aircraft still operated.

Mine Safety and Health Administration Issues New Standards to Protect Miners from Prolonged Exposure to Dangerous Noise (Sep. 9, 1999). The U.S. Newswire reports that the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) will now require mine operators to monitor noise exposure and also make training, hearing tests, and hearing protection available to miners who are exposed to more than an 85 decibel average over eight hours. Hearing loss is one of the top occupational hazards among miners, and may reduce safety in the workplace.

Albuquerque, New Mexico Mayor Wants Airport Takeoffs to Turn South Instead of North to Avoid Communities (Sep. 9, 1999). The Albuquerque Journal reports that the Mayor of Albuquerque, New Mexico wants flights to always avoid northern communities by turning to the South after takeoff instead of North. The FAA is resisting the change, saying that routing all takeoffs to the South may cause safety problems, since many landings arrive from the South. Older planes, whether outfitted with noise-reducing hush-kits or not, gain altitude less quickly and cause the worst noise impact; most of these planes already take off to the South. Also, the North-South Runway closed in 1997 and helped to reduce the noise impact on the Northern communities.

Public Meeting in Goshen, Indiana to Discuss Limiting Train Whistle Noise (Sep. 9, 1999). The South Bend Tribune reports that a public meeting in Goshen, Indiana began a dialogue between city officials and residents on how to reduce noise from train whistles. Residents believe the whistles to have gotten shriller, louder, and less consistent in their number and pattern. Rail officials admitted that engineers sometimes use distinctive 'signatures', "personalizing them or using them to communicate with other engineers." While the Mayor noted that whistles can not be totally banned, new state legislation allows communities to regulate whistles at crossings with both lights and gates. Other communities have used measures such as curbing, vertical delineators, and nets. The council has rejected a resolution to regulate whistles on the local level, but has said it will consider an ordinance if a petition is presented. The Federal Rail Administration also intends to create new standards, which could trump any local ordinance.

Birmingham, UK Reporter Explains When an Annoyance Is an Official Nuisance, and How to Act Against It (Sep. 7, 1999). The Birmingham Evening Mail prints some questions and answers regarding when an annoyance is an official nuisance in the UK, and what action can be taken. Anything that injures land or enjoyment of land is a nuisance, including smells and noise. The same noise is also more or less likely to be a nuisance depending on the time of day and the type of zone it is in. An official nuisance may result in a noise-abatement notice, and court action of the notice isn't heeded.

National Noise Act in England Encourages Local Councils to Set Up Late-Night Teams of Noise Inspectors; Few Councils Take the Opportunity (Sep. 5, 1999). The Independent reports that Britain's Noise Act -- which encourages local councils to set up teams of late-night noise inspectors who patrol around the clock and issue immediate fines -- has been ignored by 94% of councils who say those programs are unnecessary and expensive. The Act encourages the use of teams between 11 PM and 7 AM to respond to noise violations; noise over 35 decibels can draw an on-the-spot 100 pound fine.

Residents of Fayetteville, Arkansas Say Ordinance to Regulate Construction of Cellular Towers Is Weaker than Original Draft (Sep. 2, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that residents of Fayetteville, Arkansas say that an ordinance that regulates the construction of cellular towers is weaker than the original draft. City officials claim that the ordinance limits the number of cell towers, and will encourage the use of existing towers. Residents complained that maximum heights and notification distances were increased, and the permissible noise limit was raised from no off-site noise to 50 decibels.

London Columnist Tells Citizens What Laws Exist For Use Against Noise Offenders (Aug. 31, 1999). The Times prints a piece by a London columnist discussing the citizen's recourse against noise offenders. While relying on local bylaws can result in buck-passing between understaffed police and the local council, the Crime and Disorder Act of 1998 provides a national law for citizens to use. In addition, the 1997 Harassment Act protects the public from nuisance behavior, and the two laws together can be used to levy fines and jail terms to noise offenders.

New York City Legislators Are Upset Over Unmitigated Noise From Long Island Railroad's Expanded Maintenance Yard; They Demand a Sound Wall, and Threaten to Withhold Other Funding (Aug. 31, 1999). Newsday reports that legislators in New York City are upset that an expanded railroad maintenance yard has gone into operation without a noise wall. Legislators are threatening to withhold funding for other railroad projects if the noise goes unmitigated. They plan to meet with railroad officials to discuss funding sources for the wall, while residents are calling a news conference to express their frustrations over the noise.

Love Field in Dallas, Texas Embroiled In Court Hearings Brought By Neighborhood Organizations to Stop Proposed Increase In the Number of Flights At the Airport (Aug. 30, 1999). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that several neighborhood organizations have joined in a court battle to keep Love Field in Dallas, Texas from adding flights. Officials want to take advantage of the 1997 relaxation of federal restrictions to increase the number of flights at the airport. Neighborhood organizations are opposing the flight increases "mostly on environmental grounds, including noise, air pollution, air safety and traffic congestion," and expect the fight to go all the way to the Supreme Court.

Ireland's Minister for Public Enterprise Tells Legislators She Hopes European Union Aircraft Noise Rule Will Be Amended; Her Spokesperson Says Ireland Neither Supports Nor Opposes the Rule (Aug. 26, 1999). The Irish Times reports that Ireland's Minister of Enterprise told legislators that she hoped for " an alteration to the European Union (EU) aircraft noise directive." Her official position says Ireland neither "champions nor opposes" the rule. According to statements after the fact, she meant to say that she hoped talks between the U.S. and the E.U. are progressing well. She has met with other EU officials to emphasize the plight of Irish businessmen who may lose money under the rule which bans the use of hush-kits on louder airplanes.

Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport Can't Back Bonds for Noise Reduction Efforts with Airport Revenue Because Revenue May Only Be Used for "Actual Costs" (Aug. 25, 1999). The Bond Buyer reports on several issues related to bonds, including an issue with bonds sought by the Minnesota Metropolitan Airports Commission. They want to back bonds -- to be used for noise reduction efforts -- with airport revenue. The FAA said that they can't, since the efforts represent "projected impact" and not "actual costs."

86% of United States' Commercial Jets are Stage 3 Compliant Already; FAA Expects Full Compliance by January 1, 2000 Deadline (Aug. 20, 1999). Air Transport Intelligence reports that 86% of the United States' commercial jets are now Stage 3 compliant, and it appears that 100% will be compliant by January 1, 2000. The tougher noise requirements, apply to all non-military aircraft weighing over 75,000 pounds: 7,538 aircraft in all.

Airlines at St. Louis' Lambert Field Airport Will Meet January 1, 1999 Deadline for Full Stage-Three Compliance (Aug. 20, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that airlines at Lambert Field in St. Louis expect engine noise on all aircraft to meet quieter stage-three requirements by January 1, 1999. St. Louis-based TWA was well behind that deadline at 75%. TWA is now acquiring a new aircraft every ten days, and will go from being the oldest fleet in the nation to the youngest by 2004. Anti-noise activists claim that stage-three aircraft will not necessarily be quieter

FAA Says It Will Conduct Independent Environmental Review at Orange County, California's El Toro Marine Base; Residents Approve of Non-Political Environmental Review, but Aren't Holding Their Breath (Aug. 20, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that according to its head, the FAA will conduct its own Environmental Review of a proposed commercial airport at Orange County, California's El Toro Marine Base. Environmental studies now being conducted by the Navy and the County are seen by residents as being politically motivated, and the promised scope of the FAA study was welcomed by them. But although residents welcome an independent review, they are not convinced that the FAA will necessarily follow through on their leader's promises.

Major US Airlines 86% Compliant with New Noise Standards (Aug. 20, 1999). The Associated Press reports that 86% of US commercial jets are now Stage 3 compliant, in accordance with a 1990 congressional law that requires compliance with the tougher noise standards by January 1, 2000. Stage 3 planes are 5 times quieter than the older, Stage 2 airplanes

Major US Airlines Poised to Comply With January 1, 2000 Noise Standards; See How Well They're Doing (Aug. 20, 1999). The Boston Globe reports that major U.S. airlines have spent $100 billion to comply with quieter Stage 3 engine requirements by January 1, 2000, and appear to be positioned to do just that. Major carriers are in good shape, but smaller carriers have approached the FAA, asking that they be allowed to fly with some Stage 2 aircraft after the deadline. Not all airlines are at the same point in converting their fleets. Though residents say the efforts are "admirable," they say that the difference for airport neighbors is negligible.

Connecticut's Bradley International Airport Confirms that FAA's Flight Path Directs Too Many Flights Over Nearby Enfield; Alternatives Include Earlier Turns (Aug. 19, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports that Bradley International Airport has confirmed that having planes turn after a relatively straight first four miles takes too many planes over nearby Enfield. Enfield officials were worried when the early summer tests increased aircraft noise substantially in their community but airport officials assured them today that the flight path shift will not be permanently adopted. The airport's noise consultant said that it knew four miles was too long, but the tests proved this to the skeptical FAA, which will probably now allow the turning point to be placed before the 4-mile point.

FAA Says Minneapolis' Metropolitan Airports Commission Can Not Use Airport Revenue for Future Noise Mitigation Because Such Money Must Be Used for Actual Costs (Aug. 17, 1999). The Star Tribune reports that the FAA has told Minneapolis, Minnesota's Metropolitan Airports Commission (MAC) that it can not use $30-million in airport revenue to mitigate noise because the expected work is not considered an "actual cost." The state legislature had designated the money in a law, and had thought it could fend off FAA disapproval "by including a provision that the MAC should not have to violate federal law or rules to comply with the state law."

Troy, Ohio Council to Vote on Noise Walls Today; Though Originally Leaning Towards Rejecting the Walls, A Study on Noise-Related Health Risks May Shift Their Vote (Aug. 16, 1999). The Dayton Daily News reports that the Troy, Ohio council will vote tonight on whether to approve 10-14-foot noise walls along Interstate 75. Consideration of noise-related health risks, coupled with a visit to one residence near the highway, may result in an approval for the walls. A "no" vote -- which was the original stance of the council -- would be referred to the top state transportation official because local sentiment favors the walls by over 90%

Motorboat Noise Tests Offered in Columbus, Ohio to Prepare Boaters for New Noise Limits (Aug. 15, 1999). The Columbus Dispatch reports that noise tests on Ohio lakes are being offered to boaters to test compliance with a new state noise law. The new law will limit a boat motor to 90 decibels at three feet and 75 decibels from the shore. Officers say most boaters are already in compliance.

Commons Representative From Leicestershire, U.K. Pushes For Regulation of Aircraft Activity Beyond Current Proposals, Including A Cap On Numbers of Flights (Aug. 5, 1999). The Leicester Mercury reports that a Commons representative from North West Leicestershire in the United Kingdom is calling for even more airport noise-control measures, especially at night, including restrictions on "the number of air traffic movements and the types of aircraft being operated, along with a control on the times of operation."

Oklahoma City Transportation Department Approves Noise Wall Where It Was Previously Said to Be Unfeasible; Change Of Heart Reflects New Uses for Road and New Noise-Dampening Materials (Aug. 3, 1999). The Tulsa World reports that the Oklahoma Transportation Commission has approved a 1,300-foot, $250,000 noise wall along a section of Interstate 44. The commission originally considered the wall as part of a 1990 highway contract. "Changes in the operation" of the road, as well as new noise-dampening materials have now made a noise wall possible.

Indianapolis International Airport Asks FAA to Require Higher Altitude Before Turning Over Communities to Reduce Noise Impact (Jul. 31, 1999). The Indianapolis News reports that in a noise study performed for the Indianapolis International Airport, the airport authority has asked the FAA to require pilots to climb higher before turning over communities in order to reduce noise impacts. The new requirements would require pilots to fly at least 4.5 miles before turning. Planes would not only fly higher but would also keep to a narrower corridor instead of spreading out over several communities. Already, the airport has bought over 1,000 homes for $100 million in the area, and this year 380 more residents have been offered noise-abatement in some form, such as soundproofing

Commissioners at Van Nuys Airport in Los Angeles Forbid Additional Noisy Aircraft from Airport, Set 2010 Deadline for Phasing-Out of Existing Noisy Planes (Jul. 30, 1999). Los Angeles Times reports that the Los Angeles Board of Airport Commissioners passed a rule that would forbid any additional Phase 2 aircraft - noisier than the newer stage 3 variety -- from using the airport. Existing Phase 2 aircraft can remain, but must be phased out by 2010. The rule has drawn criticism from both sides of the noise issue; anti-noise advocates say that the remaining noisy aircraft will still be a problem, while airport advocates say the measure is more "anti-airport" than "anti-noise."

Sea Plane Tours in New York City Will Soon Be Illegal, Despite Claims by Unlikely Supporters that They Disturb No One (Jul. 30, 1999). Newsday reports that a pending law in New York City will make seaplane tours -- which fly 1,500 feet above the East River -- illegal. Regulation is complicated, since the federal government regulates air space, the city regulates the marina, and the Coast Guard regulates the water. Some unlikely allies have emerged for the company; members of a local Community Board were convinced that the noise is not irritating, and teachers at the United Nations School say that the takeoffs and landing is far from disruptive.

Surprise, Arizona Disagrees With State's Law Requiring Use of Out-Of-Date Noise Contours to Zone Around Luke Air Force Base; Pentagon Sides With Surprise (Jul. 27, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that Surprise, Arizona's disagreement with state-required use of old noise contours from 1988 has gained support from the Pentagon. The newer, smaller 1995 contours will allow planners to zone more appropriately and avoid potential lawsuits from homeowners whose property value is lowered according to 1988 noise contours that show greater noise exposure than they currently receive

Federal Legislation to Set Standards Requiring Aircraft to Use Next Generation Stage Four Aircraft Engines By 2012 (Jul. 15, 1999). The Daily News reports that the pending introduction of the 1999 Silent Skies Act will require aircraft to meet next-generation Stage 4 engine-noise requirements by 2012. Stage 3 engines were 50% quieter than Stage 2, and now Stage 4 engines will reduce noise by an additional 40%.

Personal Watercraft in Pennsylvania Bother Many With Noise and Safety Risks; New Safety Requirement Aimed at Reducing Accidents (Jul. 15, 1999). The Morning Call reports that many users of Pennsylvania State Parks are irritated with the noise and unsafe operation of personal watercraft; many operators stay in the same area, creating a more constant noise than most other types of craft. Safety concerns have fueled a regulation that will soon require Pennsylvania operators to carry a Boating Safety Education Certificate. While PWCs made up 6.7 percent of registered boats last year, they were involved in 36 percent of accidents and 56 percent of collisions. Their two-cycle engines -- together with two-cycle engines of other boats -- burn oil and leak disproportionate amounts of oil and fuel into waterways. PWCs are barred from certain lakes as well as areas of the Delaware River. National Parks are considering a ban on PWCs altogether, citing that the focus of an operator on the thrill of the PWC itself means they are not actually "enjoying the resources of the park."

Swiss Air Warns Switzerland that Higher National Requirements for Compensation of Noise-Affected Residents Will Reduce Its Ability to Compete Internationally (Jul. 14, 1999). Flight International reports that Swiss Air has warned Switzerland's government that an increase in what they must pay to residents who deal with aircraft noise and must soundproof their homes will cripple their ability to compete nationally. Ticket prices would rise by about $5.25 each. Swiss Air says that it has invested heavily in newer, quieter aircraft and they shouldn't be asked to pay the additional money.

Performers Outside New Orleans' Churches Subject to Jail Time Under New Noise Law (Jul. 13, 1999). The Times-Picayune reports that a new Louisiana law requires street performers and other people to keep noise under 55 decibels within ten feet of a hospital or a church which is having a service. Violators may be subject to a 30-day jail term. The law originated from complaints that street performers in New Orleans were making it hard for parishioners in churches to hear the service. American Civil Liberties Union lawyers say the law restricts the free speech of performers and constrains the city's culture.

Pending Congressional Bills Designed to Increase Airline Competition Would End Limits on Regional Flights at Four Major Airports; Residents Worry About Increased Air Traffic (Jul. 12, 1999). Newsday reports that two new bills in Congress are designed to allow more regional jets into airports in New York City, Washington D.C., and Chicago. Planes with fewer than 70 seats would be eligible. The House bill proposes a total end to flight limits by 2007 and puts no limit on the number of exemptions; the Senate version restricts its exemptions to small planes for the foreseeable future, and allows the Transportation Department to set a limit on the number of exemptions. New York City residents worry about increased noise and pollution. New York Senators are pushing for guarantees that the bills, if passed, would improve air service and competition in upstate New York.

UK Town Councils Provide Noise Education For Neighborhoods (Jul. 8, 1999). According to the Sentinel, borough [town] councils in the UK have received so many noise complaints during the summer, prompting local officials to provide public education programs to help neighbors prevent noise before they make it.

Sacramento County Developers May Have To Disclose Airport Noise to Buyers (Jul. 8, 1999). According to the Sacramento Bee, the proposed Sunrise-Douglas development is near Mather Airport, and developers may be required to include an aviation disclosure statement to prospective buyers, informing them to expect aircraft noise since the development is near the airport.

Caged Dogs in UK Back Yard Cause for Concern Among Neighbors (Jul. 8, 1999). According to the South Wales Evening Post, residents in one community in South Wales is taking on its own town council because of one neighbor's hobby-- raising dogs, which are kept caged in his back yard.

Earth Is Noisy Planet Say Experts (Jul. 8, 1999). The Christian Science Monitor reports that only 50 years ago, most of the Earth's noises were natural ones rather than technological. Today, however, the opposite may be true. According to the report, astronomers claim that radio waves from communications satellites interfere with their radio telescope observations. The article also reports that aquatic animals such as whales and dolphins are at risk because, according to National Geographic Society oceanographer, Sylvia Earle, our arrogance accompanies our technology; we have not studied the impact or consequence our technology has in the air or oceans.

Illinois town Council To Update Noise Ordinance (Jul. 8, 1999).

Noise Action Day Celebrated in Smashing Ceremony (Jul. 8, 1999). An article in the Bristol United Press reports that one noisy rock fan in Gloucester lost his confiscated stereo system when it was crushed by heavy equipment in a ceremony to mark Noise Action Day.

Noise Action Day Prompts England's Environment Minister To Ask For Quieter, Gentler Neighbors (Jul. 8, 1999). An M2 Presswire article reports that England's Environment Minister, Michael Meacher, addressed an audience at a shopping center in Westminster on Noise Action Day, asking people to consider their neighbors and live quieter lives. Meacher told the audience that overexposure to noise has an adverse effect on our lives and our health.

Town Council In UK To Fine Noisy Neighbors (Jul. 8, 1999). According to the Bristol Evening Post, the town council has warned noisy neighbors to keep down the noise or go to court.

UK City Council Smashes Loud Stereo As Warning On Noise Action Day (Jul. 7, 1999). The Gloucester Citizen reports that the city council made an example out of one noisy neighbor by smashing his stereo in a ceremony on Noise Action Day.

UK Groups Say Noise Is Hazardous to Your Health (Jul. 7, 1999). According to the Times Newspapers, you can get sick from an over exposure to noise. Loud music, neighbors that fight, barking dogs and the do-it-yourselfer who uses a hammer and drill too long are all among the most emphatic noise complaints.

UK Town Councils Urge Quiet Reflection On National Noise Awareness Day (Jul. 7, 1999). According to the Derby Evening Telegraph, the North East Derbshire District Council called for day of quiet and consideration among neighbors in honor of National Noise Awareness Day.

Scotland City Gets a Noise Complaint a Day (Jul. 7, 1999). The Aberdeen Evening News reports that the Aberdeen City Council launched the third National Noise Action Awareness Day to educate residents about noise and its impact on others.

Letters To the Editor Tell of Residents' Protest Over LAX Expansion (Jul. 7, 1999). No more planes

Phoenix City Council OKs Noise Barriers For Arroyo Springs Residents (Jul. 7, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that Arroyo Springs residents will finally get relief from the overwhelming noise from cars and trailer trucks passing by on nearby Loop 101.

Illinois Shooting Range Faces County Opposition Over Staying Open (Jul. 7, 1999). According to the Des Moines Register, an indoor shooting range in rural Polk County is in danger of closing because its neighbors and county officials claim the noise is too much. They want it to move to a new location.

Illinois Speed Boater Challenges Noise Citation from County (Jul. 7, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that Mike Lovergine, a McHenry resident, is the first person ever to receive a $35 citation for making too much noise in his hih performance speedboat on Pistakee Bay, north of Johnsburg. The man plans to challenge the ticket in the County Circuit Court.

Increasing Noise Complaints in UK Prompts Activists to Call for Strategy (Jul. 7, 1999). The Press Association reports that noise is a health hazard as well as an irritant, but we're not doing enough to mitigate it.

Noise Action Day Reveals Noise Complaints On the Rise (Jul. 7, 1999). According to the Press Association, politicians are campaigning on Noise Action Day, asking people to be more thoughtful of their neighbors. The article revealed that noise complaints are increasing in number, especially noise from arguing neighbors, airplanes and loud music from nearby clubs. Local authorities, however, show no signs of enforcing a national noise policy.

Police in Rhode Island Town to Purchase ATV To Patrol Gravel Pits (Jul. 7, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that dirt bikers are no longer welcome on private property. About 400 acres of gravel pits near the New London Turnpike and Route 95 never have been a site for recreation, but dirt bikers have used them for some time without being challenged. That's all about to change because of the noise they make.

Utah City Council Puts Noise Barrier On Voting Ballot (Jul. 7, 1999). According to the Deseret News, residents in Farmington want the town to build noise barriers around Interstate 15, which is soon to be expanded. They were successful in getting over 1,000 signatures to have the issue on the city's Nov. 2 ballot.

Utah Residents Want Noise Barrier on I-15 (Jul. 7, 1999). The Salt Lake Tribune says that residents in Farmington, Utah want the city to build a sound barrier along Interstate 15. They've gathered over 1,000 signatures asking the city to accept state funding for a concrete slab from the Utah Department of Transportation. If the city declines, residents say they have over 25 percent more signatures than they need to get on the ballot at voting time in November.

California Residents Upset Over Gun Range Noise: Current Reduction Measures Not Working (Jul. 6, 1999). According to the Ventura County Star, some residents who live near Grant Park's Gun Range have filed numerous complaints about the noise from 9mm gunshots. And the sound-reduction measures, an earth berm and metal barriers, are required by the city, but aren't effective.

Students and Scientists Study Noise Impact on Whales (Jul. 6, 1999). According to an Associated Press article, scientists have studed whale feedings in the Massachusetts Bay between Cape Ann and Provincetown, and think that too much human noise from fishing vessels, whale watch cruises and leisure boats may have a negative impact on their health. Now students will begin a five-day study of the impact of noise on whales that feed along Stellwagen Bank one of the nation's 12 aquatic sanctuaries.

London Says New Rolls-Royce is Quieter Car (Jul. 5, 1999). The Air Transport Intelligence reports that if industry and state funding are available, the Rolls-Royce airplane will be quieter by 10 decibels (dB) by 2010.

France To Enforce Tough Noise Ban At Airport (Jul. 5, 1999). According to the Air Transport Intelligence, Stage 2 aircraft will no longer be able to land at Lyon-Satolas Airport at night in southeastern France. The French government approved new plans submitted by airport officials. Older aircraft such as old generation Boeing 727 may not land between 11:15 pm and 6:15 am.

Iowa Rural Residents and Ostrich Farmers At Odds Over Odor and Noise (Jul. 4, 1999). The Associated Press reports that an ostrich farmer in rural Greene County Iowa and a nearby neighbor may end up in court over the noise and odor from the 300-pound birds.

Insulation Before House Is Completed Is Cheaper (Jul. 3, 1999). In a question and answer column in the Times-Picayune, homeowners learn about insulating their houses and the cost of the work.

Proposed Legislation to Restrict Sound in Traditionally Musical New Orleans Square Threatens the City's Culture (Jun. 30, 1999). The Times-Picayune prints an editorial, in which the author points out problems with the currently pending Senate Bill 909 that would limit sound levels New Orleans' Jackson Square. The law would mean that "sound producing devices" could not be used in a public place "in a manner likely to disturb, inconvenience, or annoy a person of ordinary sensibilities." Further, the sound can't be more than 55 decibels within ten feet of an entrance to a hospital or place of worship. The author notes that the ambient noise in Jackson Square is already above that number, and that someone who coughs could be tagged as a violator if the mouth was considered a 'sound producing device." Violators could get up to 30 days in jail.

North Tynsdale, UK Developers Told To Limit Construction Hours or Pay Fines (Jun. 14, 1999). The Evening Chronicle reports three housing developers at a Tynesdale, UK development have been formally warned that failure to limit their work hours will result in fines.

Government of India Will Regulate Noise Pollution (Jun. 8, 1999). M2 Presswire reports that the Government of India's Ministry of Environment and Forests will set regulations to control noise pollution. Noise sources targeted will include firecrackers, construction, P.A. systems, amplified music, generators, and loud vehicles. In the case of firecrackers, manufacturers will be targeted as well. The action is based on the understanding that noise has "an adverse effect on human health and affect[s] the physical and psychological well being of the people." Regulators will seek to insure that existing ambient noise standards are not exceeded, and will give police power to enforce these regulations.

Supreme Court is Latest Court to Reject Environmentalist Arguments that Government Must Move More Quickly to Reduce Aircraft Noise over the Grand Canyon and Other National Parks (Jun. 8, 1999). The Tennessean reports that the Supreme Court rejected an appeal from seven environmental groups -- including the Grand Canyon Trust -- to more quickly reduce noise from planes flying over the Grand Canyon. In a similar case over helicopter landing pads -- used by tourism companies -- near Tennessee's Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the court similarly refused to hear arguments. In 1987, a federal law was passed that noted safety concerns and the negative impacts of noise from aircraft flying over the Grand Canyon; after years of study, a 1994 report said more noise reduction was needed. The FAA created flight-free zones and limited flights, to be in place by 2008. Air tour operators complained this was too fast, while environmentalists argued it was too slow.

British Parliament May Give Municipalities the Right to Close Roads to Reduce Traffic, Noise, and Pollution on National Car-Free Day and Other Days (Jun. 7, 1999). Times Newspapers Limited reports that as England prepares for the upcoming National Car-Free Day, which encourages motorists to voluntarily give up their car for a day, Parliament is considering granting municipalities the right to close roads on car-free days. Ministers have been impressed by French successes with road-closings; thirty-five French towns closed roads last year, "cutting car traffic by up to a third, and reducing noise and pollution"; then, local councils create detailed reports about public response, and reductions in noise and pollution.

Supreme Court Rejects an Appeal by Environmentalists that Claimed the Government is Moving Too Slowly to Reduce Aircraft Noise in the Grand Canyon (Jun. 7, 1999). AP Online reports that the Supreme Court rejected an appeal from environmentalists that claimed the government was moving too slowly to reduce aircraft noise from sightseeing flights over the Grand Canyon. The decision confirmed what lower appeals courts asserted: even the slow pace of progress is something, and it is unfair to say no steps have been taken. The appeal had claimed that at the current rate of action, "no delay is unreasonable." In contrast, a group of air tour operators have claimed the government is moving too quickly. Both claims have been rejected by appeals courts.

Los Angeles, California Leaf Blower Ban Would Be Lifted if Proposed Legislation Passes; Noise and Hours of Operation Would Be Limited Instead (Jun. 2, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that a bill that passed California's State Assembly would lift the current ban on leaf-blowers in many California cities and instead impose limits on noise intensity and hours of operation. Blowers would be legal between 9 and 5 during the week, and could only emit up to 65 decibels of sound; current gas-powered leaf blowers emit an average of 67-69 decibels. The Legislature called for an environmental impact study of leaf blowers earlier this year, and the sponsor of the bill in the Assembly may wait for the results of that study before submitting the bill to the State Senate.

Limited Regulation of Leaf Blowers Back in New Jersey State Legislature, Gardeners Happy (Jun. 1 1999). Bc Cycle reports that an impending bill in the California legislature, if passed, would limit cities and counties in their regulation of noisy leaf blowers. Gardeners are backing the legislation for the second time, claiming that bans and regulations on the noisy gardening tools threaten the use of the tool they say is essential in 19 New Jersey cities. (Jun. 1, 1999). SACRAMENTO - Bc Cycle reports that cities and counties would be limited in their regulation of noisy leaf blowers by an impending bill in the state Legislature.

Local Regulation of Leaf Blowers in New Jersey State Legislature Again (Jun. 1, 1999). The Associated Press reports that an impending bill in the California legislature, if passed, would limit cities and counties in their regulation of noisy leaf blowers. Gardeners are backing the legislation for the second time, claiming that bans and regulations on the noisy gardening tool will significantly curtail its use in 19 New Jersey cities.

South Carolina Judge Denies Residents' Challenge To Neighborhood Firing Range (Jun. 1, 1999). The Asheville Citizen-Times of South Carolina reports that a Buncombe County Superior Court judge has denied some Emma landowners a preliminary injunction against the owners of a Shelby Road firing range near their property, which is located in a residential area. A trial date has yet to be determined.

California Towns Consider Restrictions on Personal Watercraft, Residents Line Up On Both Sides (May 31 1999). The PM Cycle reports that jet skis, boats and all personal watercraft will face new restrictions at Donner Lake near Truckee. Noise, water quailty and safety are all concerns addressed in the regulations, according to the article. The article goes on to say that residents in Truckee and Donner Lake are calling for for sweeping changes in regulation of watercraft based on a similar ban at nearby Lake Tahoe. Other residents who support stricter regulation claim the new restrictions are not strict enough, while still others oppose the new restrictions claiming their civil rights are being violated, the article says. (May 31, 1999). TRUCKEE, Ca - Pm Cycle reports that jet skis and other personal watercraft will face new and sweeping restrictions at nearby Donner Lake in a proposal by the town council.

California Towns For and Against Restrictions on Personal Watercraft (May 31, 1999). The Associated Press reports that jet skis and other personal watercraft will face new and sweeping restrictions at Donner Lake in a proposal by the town council.

Congress and Air Tour Industry Criticize NPS Noise Proposal for Grand Canyon (May 31, 1999). Politicians and air tourism officials testified at a recent House subcommittee against a National Park Service Proposal (NPS) banning sections of the Grand Canyon as off limits to commercial tours according to the Weekly of Business Aviation. Both groups challenge the motives and methods of park service officials, claiming extremism has taken over.

Pile Drivers Move Residents Out of House and Home (May 31 1999). The Press reports that the incessant noise caused by pile driving at a highly controversial development area has caused people to move out of their homes. Some residents claim the city council willfully and knowingly deceived residents by issuing a construction permit without the public's knowledge. (May 31, 1999). The Press reports that Salisbury Street residents Jessica Gordon and Julie Robertson will move out of their flat because ever-present pile driving at a nearby controversial Park Terrace development has created unbearable noise. The article further reports that people across the road had also moved out, and other residents who work nights at a nearby casino couldn't sleep during the day. Residents contend that the construction is destroying the community, said The Press.

Pile Drivers Move UK Residents Out of House and Home (May 31, 1999). The Press reports that the incessant noise caused by pile driving at a highly controversial development area has caused people to move out of their homes. Some residents claim the city council willfully and knowingly deceived residents by issuing a construction permit without the public's knowledge.

AIRPORT'S REBATE PROGRAM HELPS LAND QUIETER FLIGHTS (May 30 1999). According to the Ft. Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel, airport officials at Palm Beach International Airport are paying airlines over $200,000 in rebates if they use quieter airliners. (May 30, 1999). The article also quoted Waters regarding the protocol airlines must follow the regulations. "If a carrier backslides from quarter to quarter, or if they increase number of nighttime Stage 2 operations, they get nothing," she said.

Airport's Rebate Program To Aid in Quiter Flights (May 30, 1999). According to the Ft. Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel, airport officials at Palm Beach International Airport (PBIA) are paying airlines over $200,000 in rebates if they use quieter airliners.

Residents in Orange County California Debate Proposed El Toro Airport (May 30, 1999). The Los Angeles Times printed letters to the editor against the opening a former military airport to commercial traffic in Orange County.

Airport Report Goes to Missouri City Council (May 29, 1999). The Kansas City Star reports that the Board of Aeronautical Commissioners unanimously approved a report on the environmental impacts of a proposed expansion of the Lee's Summit Municipal Airport. The report is scheduled to go before the City Council and, if approved, will go on to the Missouri Department of Transportation. Once approved by the department, the project will proceed. If it is rejected, the department will determine that a more in-dept environmental impact is needed.

Group Says Jet Skis Cause Great Harm to Air, Waterways (May 29, 1999). The Boston Globe reports that a Maryland conservation group and personal watercraft industry officials are clashing over pollution concerns caused by jet skis.

JET NOISE RATTLES AHWATUKEE FOOTHILLS; FLIGHT-PATH SHIFT ANGERS RESIDENTS (May 29, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that the residents of the Ahwatukee Foothill have complained that their once peaceful and serene neighborhoods are destroyed by increased noise from airplanes leaving Sky Harbor International Airport. The article says that although residents are pressuring local and federal officials for help, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said the problem may lessen somewhat on its own. (May 29, 1999). Phoenix, AZ - The Arizona Republic reports that the residents of the Ahwatukee Foothills have complained that their once peaceful and serene neighborhoods are being destroyed by increased noise from airplanes leaving nearby Sky Harbor International Airport.

Jet Noise Distrubs Arizona Foothills and Angers Residents (May 29, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that the residents of the Ahwatukee Foothills have complained that their once tranquil neighborhoods are being destroyed by increased noise from airplanes leaving nearby Sky Harbor International Airport.

Louisiana Racetrack Loses Bid to Block Town From Enforcing Noise Ordinance (May 29, 1999). An Associated Press article reports that on the eve of a special racing event, the Boothill Speedway in Greenwood, Louisiana lost its battle with the town's enforcement of a noise ordinance. Boothill Speedway owners were prepared for a fine because the special event would violate curfew and noise ordinances, but were not prepared for the ruling.

Louisiana Racetrack Loses; Noise Ordinance Wins (May 29, 1999). (May 29, 1999). An Associated Press article reports that on the eve of a special racing event, the Boothill Speedway in Greenwood, Louisiana lost its battle with the town's enforcement of a noise ordinance.

Bid For Noise Barrier Puts Arizona Town Council Against the Wall (May 28, 1999). A city councilwoman in Peoria wants the town council to approve a bid for a block wall between a busy avenue and nearby homes with acre-plus lots. Her proposal is controversial because she would be one of the wall's biggest beneficiaries. The town council voted to table the discussion until after her term expires in June. (May 28, 1999). Peoria, AZ - The Arizona Republic reports that Councilwoman Rebekah Coty wants a block wall built between Olive Avenue and the homes in West Olive Farms, a development in Peoria with acre-plus lots.

Bid For Noise Barrier Puts Arizona Town Council Against the Wall (May 28, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that a city councilwoman in Peoria wants the town council to approve a bid for a block wall between a busy avenue and nearby homes with acre-plus lots. Her proposal is controversial because she would be one of the wall's biggest beneficiaries.

Department of Transportation To Measure for Noise Along I- (May 28, 1999). The Plain Dealer reports that an engineer for the Ohio Department of Transportation will measure the noise level of vehicles traveling on Interstate 480.

Illinois Town Targets Loud Parties With Second Noise Ordinance (May 28, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that the Fox Waterway Agency's board of directors passed a second noise ordinance this year because of complaints about excessive noise on the waterway, not from boat engines but from loud parties.

Louisiana Residents Angered by Airport's Delay To control Noise (May 28, 1999). The Times-Picayune reports that residents of Kenner, a small town near the New Orleans airport attended a public hearing about airplane noise. The purpose of the hearing was to explain recommendations given by the federal government, but residents were suspicious that the hearing was merely window dressing, and that the results simply justify what airport officials are already doing.

California City To Sue Orange County Over Flights (May 27, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that the Irvine City Council took an aggressive legal position instead of merely accepting flight demonstrations scheduled at the Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro.

California Senate Approves Budget Increase For Airport Noise Remedies (May 27, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the California Senate approved a $400,000 budget increase to insulate homes in the flight path of Burbank Airport against noise.

California State Senate Oks Funds For Flight Path (May 27, 1999). The Los Angeles times reports that the state Senate voted to add $400,000 to the state budget for insulating 50 homes that lie under the flight path of Burbank Airport.

California Town's Support of Curfew Critical in Ending Airport Battle (May 27, 1999). According to the Daily News of Los Angeles, a turnover in airport commissioners from the Glendale City Council has resulted in an imminent end to a four year battle with the city of Burbank over a noise curfew and the expansion of the airport terminal.

City Council Approves Noise Abatement Policy (May 27, 1999). According to the Bangor Daily News, Bangor city councilors on the airport committee approved a noise abatement policy for Bangor International Airport. (May 27, 1999). BANGOR - According to the Bangor Daily News, city councilors on the airport committee approved a noise abatement policy for Bangor International Airport (BIA).

City Council Approves Noise Abatement Policy (May 27, 1999). BANGOR - According to the Bangor Daily News, city councilors on the airport committee approved a noise abatement policy for Bangor International Airport (BIA).

Commonwealth Court Examines Hazardous Noise for Workers' Compensation (May 27, 1999). The Legal Intelligencer reports two cases in which the Commonwealth Court has looked at the circumstances where a Workers' Compensation Judge may review and consider the facts of a case.

Fenton, Missouri Board of Aldermen Approved a Bill that Limits Noisy Construction to Roughly Daylight Hours (May 27, 1999). St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Fenton Board of Aldermen has limited the hours that construction companies can create noise to between 7 AM and sunset during the week, and between 8 AM and sunset on Saturdays and Sundays. Construction noise is defined as the work, related vehicular traffic and other noises that emanate from a construction site.

How Loud Can Sound Be? (May 27, 1999) According to The Hartford Courant, sound, which is measured in decibels (dB), ranges from normal conversation at 50 to 60 dB to the loudest sound tolerated by the human ear at about 120dB. The Hartford Courant gives several examples of different sounds that we hear in the course of a normal day. A soft whisper measures 30 dB. Trains can produce a sound measuring as high as 93 dB about 100 feet in advance. An alarm clock at two feet measures 80 dB. Immediate danger to the human ear is 120 dB, sound levels from a thunderclap or in front of speakers at rock concerts. (May 27, 1999). THE Hartford Courant reports on sound volume, which is measured in decibels, (dB). The article gives several expampls of different sounds that we can hear in the course of a normal day. Normal conversation measures about 50 to 60 dB. According to the Courant, the loudest sound that can be tolerated by the human ear is about 120 dB. Federal Railroad Administration officials, reports the Courant, say a train traveling 45 miles per hour or greater would produce a sound measuring a maximum of 93 dB. The article goes on to say that FRA regulations require train warning horns to be set no less than 96dB, to be heard 100 feet in advance. The article lists several other sounds that we hear: 30 dB -- a quiet Library or soft whisper; 70 dB -- busy traffic, noisy restaurant. At this level, reports the Courant, noise may begin to affect your hearing if exposure is constant. Subways, heavy city traffic, alarm clock at two feet, and factory noise all measure 80 dB. These noises are dangerous if you are exposed to them for more than eight hours. A Chain saw, stereo headphones, pneumatic drill measure 100 dB. According to the article, even two hours of exposure can be dangerous at 100 dB and with each 5 dB increase, the "safe time" is cut in half. Sound at a Rock concert in front of speakers, sandblasting, thunderclap measure 120 dB, and the danger is immediate, reports the Courant. At 120 dB, the article reports, exposure can injure your ear. A gunshot blast and a jet plane measure 140 dB, and the article reports that any length of exposure time is dangerous and may cause actual pain in the ear. At 180 dB, the sound at a rocket launching pad, noise at this level causes irreversible damage without ear protection and hearing loss is inevitable. The Hartford Courant data on decibel level was compiled by the Deafness Research Foundation for BlueCross and BlueShield of Massachusetts

How Loud Can Sound Be? (May 27, 1999). Sound, which is measured in decibels (dB), ranges from normal conversation (50-60 dB) to the loudest sound tolerated by the human ear (+120dB), according to the Hartford Courant. The article cites several examples of different sounds that we hear in the course of a normal day. A soft whisper measures 30 dB. Trains can produce a sound measuring as high as 93 dB about 100 feet in advance. An alarm clock at two feet measures 80 dB. Immediate danger to the human ear is 120 dB--sound levels from a thunderclap or sitting in front of speakers at rock concerts.

Illinois Airport Plans To Monitor Airplane Noise (May27, 1999). (May 27, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that esidents near Schaumburg Airport have registered so many complaints about airplane noise that airport officials are now monitoring noise levels. Officials added, according to the report, that pilots have emphasized their intent to be as considerate as possible of residents in the area.

Noise Control for Mines Criticized by Republican Senator (May 27, 1999). Associated Press reports Sen. Michael B. Enzi, R-Wyo., chairman of the Senate subcommittee on employment, safety and training is questioning the Clinton administration's proposal to require that mine operators protect workers from noise by buying quieter machines or rotating employees.

Overwhelming Majority of 50 Residents at Upper Saucon, Pennsylvania Town Board Meeting Oppose a Proposed Noise Ordinance to Restrict Firearm Discharge (May 27, 1999). The Morning Call reports that only three of more than 50 residents at a recent Upper Saucon, PA Town Board meeting supported a proposed ordinance to enforce noise levels; the ordinance would restrict shooting ranges to industrial zones.

Roselle (Chicago Suburb), Illinois' Schaumburg Airport to Monitor Noise Ordinance Compliance in Response to Resident Complaints (May 27, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that Schaumburg Regional Airport, on the outskirts of Chicago, plans to implement a noise abatement monitoring program in response to continued resident complaints. The program would track flights on random days and record whether pilots are legally high enough when they turn to fly over residential areas.

Vote On Noise Ordinance Delayed at Pennsylvania Township Meeting; More than 50 Protest Proposal (May 27, 1999). The Morning Call reports that over 50 residents attended an Upper Saucon Township Board of Supervisors meeting to stop a proposed noise ordinance that defines and enforces noise levels and restricts the location of shooting ranges.

Wayne, Maine Public Hearings Propose an Ordinance Forbidding Personal Water Craft on Local Ponds and a Change in How Noise from Alleged Noise Ordinance Violators is Measured (May 27, 1999). Kennebec Journal reports on a series of Wayne, Maine public hearings dealing with an ordinance to ban personal water craft on local ponds, and a change in measuring noise ordinance violations.

Board of Lehigh and Northampton Airport, Near Allentown, Pennsylvania Compromises to Begin Noise Monitoring Program Before Senate Funding Passes (May 26, 1999). The Morning Call reports that after heated debate, a compromise to begin a noise-monitoring program was reached at the Lehigh and Northampton Airport near Allentown, Pennsylvania. One grant meant to fund the program had been eaten up by other projects, and a second federal grant is still pending in the Senate. To avoid further delays, the Authority agreed to fund the design stages until the grant came through; then, those costs could be reimbursed and the necessary equipment could be purchased.

Chicago's O'Hare Airport Slacking on Use of Preferred Night Runways that Disturb Fewer Residents, but Introduction of Quieter Planes Helps to Lessen Noise Complaints (May 26, 1999). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that O-Hare Airport's "Fly Quiet" guidelines, created in 1997 to limit noise between 10 PM and 7 AM, are not always being adhered to. Use of two designated night runways, selected because their flight paths avoid most residential areas, has declined. Despite this fact, nighttime noise complaints have declined from 2,234 to 1,246, due in part to the phasing out of noisier "Phase II" aircraft.

Chicago's O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission Asked City to Identify Airlines Not Adhering to Preferred Flight Paths (May 26, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that O'Hare's Noise Compatibility Commission has asked city officials to identify which airlines stray from routes designed to limit airport noise in residential areas. Many flights are ignoring the designated runways, or turning earlier than suggested.

Consultants for Warwick, Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport Recommend Buying Homes as Most Cost-Effective Way to Reduce Noise Exposure to Residents (May 26, 1999). The Associated Press reports that consultants for Rhode Island's Airport Corp. have recommended the purchase of at least 135 homes who are exposed to 70 dB or more of noise from T.F. Green Airport over a 24-hour period. The recommendation came after many homes had already been soundproofed, and options such as extending a secondary runway were explored.

Consultants for Warwick, Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport Recommend Buying Homes as Most Cost-Effective Way to Reduce Noise Exposure to Residents (May 26, 1999). The Associated Press reports that consultants for Rhode Island's Airport Corp. have recommended the purchase of at least 135 homes who are exposed to 70 dB or more of noise from T.F. Green Airport over a 24-hour period. The recommendation came after many homes had already been soundproofed, and options such as extending a secondary runway were explored.

County Commissioners in Asheville, North Carolina Consult State Wildlife Commission Concerning Noise and Other Disturbance from an Airboat Operation on the French Broad River (May 26, 1999). The Asheville Citizen-Times reports that Buncombe County Commissioners will ask the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission for help in determining the environmental threats that a small airboat operation may have on the French Broad River. In addition to environmental concerns, citizens are worried about effects on other recreation, safety, and hearing.

Glendale, California's City Council Voted to Support a Proposed Curfew on Burbank Airport Night Flights (May 26, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Glendale, California city council voted to support a curfew on night flights at Burbank airport. For at least four years, Glendale's city council had been against the curfew, but with two new council members the council has come to side with the other members of the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority. The airport had already applied to the FAA for the curfew, and so the vote serves more to identify Glendale as a new ally in the city of Burbank's battle against unrestricted airport expansion and excessive noise.

Irvine, California's city council Sues County Over Planned Jet Noise Test at El Toro Marine Base, Insisting on Environmental Review (May 26, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that the Irvine, California's City Council will sue the County over a planned test of commercial jet noise at El Toro Marine base. The council wants the county to obtain an environmental review, and consider public safety issues involved, before the two-day test, during which noise from 27 takeoffs and landings will be recorded using 10 noise monitors. The study is intended to determine whether commercial jets can use the facility without excessive disturbance of the surrounding residential communities. The County supervisors, military and federal regulators have all approved the test, saying an environmental study is not needed.

Las Vegas, Nevada Air Tour Operators Upset Over Proposed National Park Service Rule To Limit Noise to Levels Below Ambient Sounds (May 26, 1999). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that Nevada's air tour industry believes a new rule proposed by the National Park Service could destroy their industry by limiting noise levels for Grand Canyon National Park. The rule would limit non-natural noise to 8 dB below natural sounds, although a federal court ruled that 3 dB above natural sounds would be sufficient; the park has been divided into different sound regions, so the natural noise limit would range between 20 and 40 dBs, depending on the location within the park.

New Noise Ordinance in Chicago's Fox River Allows Noisy Boats to be Identified By Ear (May 26, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that a new noise ordinance put in place by the Fox Waterway Agency will discard the old 90 dB noise limit for the subjective limit at which "peace is breached" on the Fox River. The ordinance was introduce because decibel meters were unreliable on the Fox River, where sound bounces off buildings, and many window-rattling violators were having their tickets thrown out in court. First, second, and third noise violations carry minimum $35, $200, and $500 fines respectively.

New Orleans International Airport's Noise Consultants Begin Study, Hold First in Series of Public Hearings (May 26, 1999). The Times-Picayune reports that Barnard Dunkelberg and Associates, a noise consulting firm for the New Orleans International Airport held the first in a new series of public hearings. The firm has begun their 15-month study which will evaluate the effect of airport noise on neighborhoods in nearby Kenner, Louisiana. Noise monitoring sites have been chosen, but which will be used on any day will remain secret.

Public Library Board in Fishers, Indiana OKs New Policy for Reducing Noise in Library and Suspending Privileges for Uncooperative Patrons (May 26, 1999). The Indianapolis Star reports that the Fishers, Indiana Public Library Board approved a new policy to deal with increasing noise-related complaints in their two branches. Problems have included parents yelling to their children, higher numbers of cell phone and pager disruptions, and disruptively loud conversations. The policy establishes a procedure of issuing a written or verbal warning.

Residents Upset at Noise from Sky Harbor International Airport's Increased Use of a Flight Path Over Arizona's Ahwatukee Foothills (May 26, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that since Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix increased its use of an older flight path over the Ahwatukee Foothills, residents have been subjected to increased noise. While many residents are upset, airport officials say they have no solution. Some local legislators are concerned, but maintain that this is fundamentally a federal issue.

Burbank, California's Airport Reworks Expansion Proposal, Reducing Terminal Size and Gate Count (May 25, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that Burbank Airport officials adjusted their expansion proposal to better address the concerns of Burbank's City Council. The adjusted document requests 30% less new terminal space, promises steps towards reducing noise in surrounding communities, and proposes that the number of gates be expanded to only 16; the airport would have the option to add three more gates in or after the year 2010. Burbank has long been concerned about airport expansion, and the airport commissioner says the revised proposal "gives the Burbank City Council long-term control over expansion of the terminal."

Citizen Criticizes Noise Ordinance Amendment as Poorly Written at Batavia, New York City Council Hearing (May 25, 1999). The Buffalo News reports that a noise ordinance amendment in Batavia, New York drew mixed reviews from citizens at the City Council public hearing. The amendment, targeting mainly barking dogs and loud music from cars, is intended to strengthen vague language from the original, setting "objective standards... for violations." One speaker said it was a "legal nightmare" suggesting that even ice cream trucks would be cited. One speaker of three said he would support the amendment, or anything to quiet the streets. The amendment will be voted on June 14.

Suburban Communities Surrounding Chicago's O'Hare Airport Say Soundproofing Should Include More Homes, Citing Noise Monitor Data Collected Independently (May 25, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the anti-noise Suburban O'Hare Commission (SOC) has been monitoring noise from the airport independently of the city. SOC claims that the data shows high levels of noise up to 80 decibels in communities not covered in this year's soundproofing eligibility list. Gigi Gruber, mayor of one nearby community, says "they average out the silent times with the noisy times and come up with a number. But when airplanes fly over, noise is still at a high level.

Poor Weather Forces Rescheduling of Noise Tests to Help Boaters Comply with New Noise Law on Chicago area's Chain o' Lakes (May 24, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that noise tests, designed to help boaters comply with a new noise ordinance on the Chicago area's Chain o' Lakes, were poorly attended due to miserable weather. The tests will be rescheduled for early June. The new ordinance starts with the state-mandated 90 dB limit for idling boats and 70 dB for moving boats, but gives marine officers the ability to determine excessive noise by ear since traditional noise-measuring equipment is designed for use on the open water.

Proposed Directive in Brussels, Belgium to Set Maximum Noise Levels for Lawn and Garden Appliances; Manufacturer Compliance May be Difficult (May 23, 1999). Times Newspapers Limited reports that a proposed directive in Brussels, Belgium will set limits on how much noise outdoor appliances can make. Manufacturers claim that a reduction of even two decibels could be disastrous for some products. A researcher at Southampton University's Institute of Sound and Vibration Studies said "To remove two decibels you have to remove half the sound energy. That would be quite an engineering achievement."

America West, Supported by Arizona Senator, Wants DC's National Airport to Loosen Rule and Allow Non-Stop Arrivals from Phoenix (May 18, 1999). Arizona Republic reports that America West Airlines, with support from Arizona Senator John McCain, supports pending legislation that would allow non-stop flights from Phoenix into the District of Columbia's National Airport. Currently, a 1966 'perimeter rule' designed to ease congestion and help nearby Dulles and BWI airports compete, disallows flights of over 1,250 miles to fly into National. Critics say the Air Transportation Improvement Act would not lower fares, and would just create more noise.

FAA Rules That Burbank, California's Airport Can't Forbid Night Flights (May 14, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the FAA has told Burbank, California's Airport that it can not impose a mandatory curfew on night flights, despite the fact that local noise restrictions were imposed in 1977. Burbank believed that these local restrictions, in place before the 1990 Airport Noise and Capacity Act that bars airports from making new noise rules, would allow them to impose a curfew.

FAA Tells Burbank, California Airport a Study Must Preclude Any Night-Flight Curfew (May 14, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that the FAA told California's Burbank airport that a noise study must preclude a night flight ban. The city of Burbank had sought a ban on flights between 10 PM and 7 AM, as well as a limit of the numbers of flights. City officials acknowledged the setback, but says it was committed to pursuing a curfew, either through a study or through a voluntary agreement with the airlines involved. A voluntary curfew already exists, though it is not always followed.

MP in U.K.s Parliament Sponsored a Motion to Require Local Governments to Examine and Control Airport Noise (May 13, 1999). The Leicester Mail reports that a county MP from the U.K.s Leicester community is co-sponsoring a parliamentary motion to require local governments to take noise considerations seriously at their regional airports. Other parliamentary members said the legislation would make local governments more responsible and take some pressure off of airports and developers who have traditionally had to fend for themselves regarding noise issues.

Chicago O'Hare Joins Airport Council International in Encouraging the FAA to Phase Out Older Planes, Allowing Much Quieter New Planes to Take Over (May 13, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that many U.S. airports and residents are concerned that while quieter planes are available, airlines are continuing to put hush-kits and performance-modification kits on noisier planes. While these kits quiet planes enough to meet year 2000 standards, the newer, quieter planes are up to 3 times as quiet. Some airports, including Chicago O'Hare, are joining Airport Council International in asking the FAA to phase out the older modified planes.

Stamford, Connecticut Noise Ordinance Enforcement Transferred to Police (May 12, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that Stamford, Connecticut's noise ordinance will now be enforced by police instead of city health inspectors. The change comes in response to continuing, frequent complaints about car stereos, construction, car alarms, and garbage trucks among other noise sources. Fines can be up to $99 per day, and noise limits depend on the type of zone (residential, commercial, industrial) the noise is in.

Stamford, Connecticut Noise Ordinance Enforcement Transferred to Police (May 12, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that Stamford, Connecticut's noise ordinance will now be enforced by police instead of city health inspectors. The change comes in response to continuing, frequent complaints about car stereos, construction, car alarms, and garbage trucks among other noise sources. Fines can be up to $99 per day, and noise limits depend on the type of zone (residential, commercial, industrial) the noise is in.

European Union Extends Deadline for Registering Hushkitted Aircraft; Hushkitted Aircraft Will Be Banned from European Union Airspace If Not Registered by April 1, 2000 (May 11, 1999). World Airport Week reports that the European Union has extended its deadline for registration of hushkitted aircraft. The deadline, pushed from April 1999 to April 2000, must be met by hushkitted aircraft if they wish to fly in European Union airspace after April 2002. The ruling is intended to require the use of newer, quieter jets, but compromises with the U.S. who argued their hushkit manufacturers were being discriminated against.

California Appelate Court Ruled Burbank, California Can Reject Burbank Airport's Expansion Plans, Making Compromise More Likely (May 7, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that a California appelate court decided Burbank, California can reject airport expansion plans. Burbank Airport had claimed that the city had given up such power when it formed a joint airport governing board with neighboring Glendale and Pasadena. The city, which is now in a much stronger bargaining position, hopes to force the airport to scale down its expansion plan.

Audience Complaints of Loud Trailers Lead Hollywood to Set Standard Volume Limits (May 7, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that audience complaints over loud trailers have led Hollywood to set volume limits. Since trailers are traditionally recorded louder than the feature to grab attention, turning trailers down in a movie theater can make the film too soft. After a test by Hollywood engineers last summer showed that some trailers can average more sound intensity that the New York Subway (92 decibels), the Trailer Audio Standards Association started thinking about new volume limits; this spring the new controls were unveiled which would turn down the loudest trailers by one-third.

Arden, North Carolina Airboat (May 5, 1999). The Asheville Citizen-Times reports that Mike Bumgardner, an airboat operator on the French Board River in Arden, North Carolina, will appear at the County commissioners meeting with some of his past passengers to protest the efforts to shut his operation down. Noise complaints and concerns about the environment from riverfront residents have prompted the commission to consider regulation of airboats, which would primarily affect Bumgardner.

Activist from National Campaign for Hearing Health Insists Airline Passengers Need Hearing Protection (May 4, 1999). USA Today reports that John Wheeler, president of the National Campaign for Hearing Health (NCHH) , insists that airline passengers need ear protection. He demonstrated on a twin-engine turboprop airplane that noise during banking maneuvers can reach 115 decibels; if this were a passenger's workplace, OSHA would insist on ear protection for periods of more than 15 minutes. Even during the quieter 110 decibel portion of the flight, OSHA would require ear protection for periods of more than 30 minutes.

Residents in California's Peninsula Communities Support Limits on Noise Levels and Operation Times for Leaf Blowers After One Peninsula Community Rejected an Outright Ban Last Year (May 4, 1999). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that residents in Palo Alto, California and other Peninsula communities support limiting noise levels from leaf blowers as well as hours of operation. A demonstration of four leaf blowers for the city council showed that noise from all of them exceeded the limits that the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) claimed they met. Currently, if police identify a blower emitting over 70 decibels -- the present noise limit -- they can fine the violator $104. The Palo Alto city council wants a public hearing to determine if there is support for an outright ban

Organization in Australia Seeks Ban on Jet Skis in Sydney Harbor and Restrictions Elsewhere (May 3, 1999). The Dominion reports that Australia's Sydney Coastal Councils Group is calling on the state government to ban jet skis from Sydney Harbor while restricting their use elsewhere. Water police reported 120 incidents last year -- a 30 percent increase -- and the risk to riders and others such as bathers who use the harbor is rising. Some councils in Sydney have received up to 10 calls a day complaining of physical danger and excessive noise.

Personal Watercraft Banned from Cape Hatteras National Seashore in Manteo, North Carolina (Apr. 29, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that federal officials have banned the use of jet-skis or personal water craft near Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Water craft will be banned from landing or launching from any beach in the Seashore, which encompasses 80 miles on each side of the islands. Operators must stay 150 feet from the Seashore along Pamlico Sound, but can be as close to the beach as they want where the Seashore has no jurisdiction. On private property they will still be allowed.

Previous Decision To Require a Landlord in London, England to Soundproof His Apartments from Noise was Overturned Because Existing Noise Act Exempts Vehicles on the Street (Apr. 27, 1999). The Press Association reports on a successful appeal in London, England by a landlord who was ordered to soundproof his apartments against traffic noise. The High Court ruled that although environmental laws require that apartments not compromise the tenants health, noise from street vehicles is not considered a statutory nuisance that could compromise health. The landlord had refused to soundproof his apartments, and was taken to court; his successful appeal frees him of the order for the time being. The presiding judges noted that railway noise was not exempted, though it was not an issue in this case.

Data Shows Americans Are Suffering Hearing Loss at Younger Ages; Loss is Due to Recreational As Well As Workplace Noise (Apr. 26, 1999). U.S. News & World Report reports that Americans are losing their hearing at younger ages -- sometimes even as teenagers -- than previous generations. While OSHA has worked to limit noise exposure in the workplace, little has been done to regulate recreational noise exposure. The article is laden with statistics and decibel values for common noise sources, as well as stories of individuals who have been affected by noise from sources such as the following: concerts, gunfire, the military, rallies, fire engines, and even music at health clubs. One startling statistic is that the Veterans' Administration has spent $4 billion dealing because of hearing loss from 1977-1998.

European Aircraft Muffler Law Tightened to Calm U.S. Fears (Apr. 26, 1999). The AFX News reports that European air transport legislation may be tightened in order to address U.S. concerns that planes not fitted with the proper muffler may be prohibited from flying into the EU and will lose value for resale.

New Anti-Nuisance Enforcement Procedures in Seattle, Washington Will Allow On-the-Spot Citations and Fewer Loopholes (Apr. 26, 1999). The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports that a new enforcement policy proposed in Seattle, Washington's City Council will help local police enforce laws against nuisances such as absentee landlords who don't remove junk from their properties, excessively loud parties and other noise, and "neighbors who operate obtrusive businesses out of their residences." In the past, the complicated enforcement process required several warnings, waiting periods, deadlines, and opportunities for appeals that provided many loopholes; one front-yard car-repair business operated through 30 years of complaints by manipulating the system.

Pasadena Park, Missouri Airport to Install Monitors in Community to Monitor Noise Levels (Apr. 26, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Lambert Field Airport will install computer-driven monitors in Pasadena Park in order to come into compliance with Federal Aviation Administration guidelines for noise mitigation. The airport also offers homes and businesses affected by the noise several compensatory options.

Greensboro, North Carolina Residents to Hear Status of FAA's Environmental Impact Statement on Proposed FedEx Facility and Runway at Piedmont Triad International Airport (Apr. 25, 1999). The High Point Enterprise reports that the Federal Aviation Administration will hold a public meeting for concerned citizens on the status of their environmental impact statement regarding the proposed Federal Express hub to be located at the Piedmont Triad International Airport.

Resident of Boston's Cambridge Neighborhood Maintains that Curfew on 'Through-Trucks' Will Keep Local Streets Quieter (Apr. 25, 1999). The Boston Globe prints a letter from Thomas Bracken, a member of the Truck Traffic Advisory Committee in Boston's Cambridge neighborhood. Bracken says that a proposed ban on the use of local Cambridge streets by late-night through-truckers with no local destination will quiet the streets; he holds that opponents in Belmont who believed the curfew would increase noise in their town are mistaken, and that the ban will benefit all communities within Boston.

Burbank, California Airport Neighbors Will Receive Funding to Soundproof Their Homes (Apr. 24, 1999). The Los Angeles Daily News reports that funding is being sought from the state by Senator Adam Schiff in order to help residents living near the Burbank Airport soundproof their homes from noise pollution caused by airflight.

O'Hare Residents Place an Ad To Combat Increased Daytime Air Trafic (Apr. 24, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that concerned communities near the O'Hare International Airport have taken out a full-page ad in order to motivate people to contact their lawmakers and voice their concerns about increased air traffic which they feel will lead to more noise pollution and collisions.

Opponents of El Toro Airport Question Safety and Noise Pollution Associated With Increased Air Traffic (Apr. 24, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that recommendations by the Orange County Board of Supervisors for enlarging the El Toro Airport to about half the size of the Los Angeles Airport are being met with opposition by those who say the airport will cause increased noise pollution for residents of neighboring communities as well as increase the likelihood of accidents due to the increased traffic.

Chain o'Lakes, Illinois Boat Owners Say Noise Ordinance is Unfair (Apr. 23, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that despite a concession towards the Chain o'Lakes Power Boat Association allowing them to use cutoff muffler switches, the boat owners are still upset with a noise ordinance that allows individual marine patrol officers to ticket them for sound violations without the use of a decibel meter.

Crownsville,Maryland Residents Debate the Ups and Downs of Rezoning (Apr. 23, 1999). The Capital reports that residents of Crownsville, Maryland have mixed opinions over whether or not residential properties should be upzoned from rural-agriculture and one house per acre, to two houses per acre. While some residents have much to gain, others have much to lose.

El Toro, California Flight Test Will Let Residents Sneak Preview Sounds of Proposed Commercial Flights (Apr. 23, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that a simulation of air traffic intended for an El Toro Marine Corp base has been approved and that the test flights will give neighbors an idea of what the noise would be like if the airport was used for commercial flights.

Japan Environmental Agency Will Put the Pressure on the Auto Industry to Produce Low-noise Trucks and Motorcycles (Apr. 23, 1999). The Jiji Press Ticker Service reports that the final phase of a noise reduction plan in Japan will begin in 2001 with the tightening of regulations for truck and motor cycle noise.

Logan Expansion Faces Legislative and Environmental Hurdles as Opponents Rally To Halt Runway Plan (Apr. 23, 1999). The Boston Globe reports that Senator Thomas Birmingham and environmental groups are rallying the EPA to halt the construction of a runway that they say will negatively affect residents of Chelsea and surrounding communities and that a supposed increase in flights does not warrant the construction.

Charleston, South Carolina Council To Decide Whether Barking Dogs Will Face The Long Arm of the Law (Apr. 22, 1999). The Charleston Post and Courier reports that one woman is up in arms over the barking dogs that are preventing her and her children from getting sleep. She is in full support of a proposed law that would fine dog owners who do not silence their animals.

Noise Activists Bussing Their Message Up to State Legislature Regarding Airport Expansion (Apr. 22, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that a citizen group formed to fight noise pollution emanating from Lambert Field is heading up to the Missouri Legislature en masse in order to get their point across.

Residents Hope Monitors at Schaumburg Regional Airport, Illinois Will Help Bring Back Some Peace and Quiet (Apr. 22, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that at Schaumburg Regional Airport in Illinois, citizen complaints have prompted airport officials to begin monitoring the noise levels of departures and arrivals in order to ensure that the airport is complying with FAA regulations.

San Carlos, California Airport Officials Eager To Proceed With Airport Expansion (Apr. 22, 1999). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that San Carlos Officials have voted to move ahead on construction of a longer runway which residents fear may lead to larger planes and increased noise pollution.

Seattle Club and Bar Owner Responsible for Well-being of Neighborhood Says City Attorney (Apr. 22, 1999). The Seattle Post-Intelligence reports that the proposed "Added Entertainment Law" has split the City Council as the responsibilities of club and bar owners are discussed with regards to how their establishment affects the rest of the neighborhood.

Malta, New York Residents say That Town Officials Are Not Doing Their Job When It Comes To Policing Local Speedway (Apr. 21, 1999). The Times Union reports that a citizen group in Malta, New York is accusing town officials of having special interests when it comes to regulating the Albany-Saratoga speedway.

Manatee County, Florida Officials Enforce Noise Ordinance To Bring Peace and Quiet To Neighborhoods (Apr. 21, 1999). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that the Manatee County has had so many noise complaints from residents that they have decided to crack down on offenders by giving the existing noise ordinance more of a bite.

Newport News, Virginia Residents Demand Peace and Quiet in Their Community (Apr. 21, 1999). The Newport News Daily Press reports that citizens of Newport News, Virginia want to put a stop to noise that is affecting their lives. Although the City Council is trying to find a solution to the noise problems that are plaguing residents, deciding which establishments will be liable for excess noise is causing some disagreement.

Oswego, Illinois Club Owners Seek Permission To Pump Up The Volume (Apr. 21, 1999). Chicago Tribune reports that club owners showed up at a village board meeting armed with radios in order to demonstrate that the allowable noise levels aren't all that loud.

U.S. Policy Makers Speak Out Against Ineffectual European Law Regarding Quieter Airplanes (Apr. 21, 1999). The International Herald Tribune recently printed an editorial by Rodney E. Slater, David L. Aaron and Stuart E. Eizenstat stating how they feel about the recent European Union "hush kit" rule that will supposedly bring more peace and quiet to airports on both sides of the Atlantic.

Vancouver, British Canada Residents Want Indy Car Race Out of Their Neighborhood (Apr. 21, 1999). The Ottawa Sun reports that a group of citizens in Vancouver, B.C. want the Molson Indy Car Race to leave their neighborhood despite race organizer's attempts to placate them with offers of free hotel rooms, field trips for children, and earplugs.

300 Witham Field Residents Vent Frustration Over Airport Noise and Pollution at Public Meeting (Apr. 20, 1999). The Palm Beach Post reports that residents who live near Witham Field in Stuart, Florida gathered at a public meeting to hear airport officials and experts address their concerns regarding noise and air pollution created by the huge jets taking off and landing at the airport.

Noisy Rooster in St. Tammany, Louisiana, Now Dead, Responsible For Making Barnyard Animals Immune From Noise Nuisance Ordinance (Apr. 20, 1999). The Times-Picayune reports that a rooster who couldn't keep quiet has caused a noise nuisance ordinance to be changed so that barnyard animals are exempt from being cited in rural areas of St. Tammany Parish in Louisiana.

Residents Gather To Express Their Opinion on Growth of Witham Field in Stuart, Florida. (Apr. 20, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports that there was a huge turnout for a community meeting held to discuss the future of Witham Field in Stuart, Florida. Residents have become increasingly concerned over the growing number of landings and takeoffs, as well as the increase in noise from large jets.

Residents Living Near San Carlos Airport, California Show Opposition to Proposed Runway Expansion (Apr. 20, 1999). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the proposition to expand the runway at San Carlos Airport in California is meeting with opposition from residents who say that the noise is already bad enough, and that a bigger runway will mean bigger planes and more noise.

Residents of Madison's East Side Get Sound Barriers To Quiet Noise From Expanded Interstate 90 (Apr. 20, 1999). Wisconsin State Journal reports that Madison, Wisconsin residents have received $3.7 million worth of sound barriers complements of the state government in order to quiet the noise arising from expansion of Interstate 90-94.

Residents of Palmetto, Florida Soon To Have More Peace and Quiet (Apr. 20, 1999). Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that a stricter noise ordinance has been passed in Palmetto, Florida which gives the City Council more authority in determining what "too loud" really means.

Too Many Gulls Drive a Waukegan, Illinois Man to Appeal Cannon Booms Used to Scare Birds Away (Apr. 20, 1999). Chicago Tribune reports that the propane cannons used to frighten nesting gulls away from the Waukegan, Illinois lakefront have one man fighting mad over the incessant noise.

Neighborhood Wants To Quiet the Noise From Private Race Track Belonging To Red Dog, Their Professional Motocross Neighbor (Apr. 19, 1999). The Pasco Times reports that the neighbors of a professional motorcycle racer want him to stop practicing on his private track located on his property. So far they haven't gotten anywhere, so they are taking their complaint to the County Commissioner.

Residents Near New Orleans Airport Want A Say in the Growing Noise Problem -- They'll Sue If They Have To (Apr. 19, 1999). The Times-Picayune reports that Kenner, Louisiana homeowners, sick and tired of noisy jets, are getting ready to sue airline pilots and airports at New Orleans International Airport for punitive damage under a bill sponsored by state Reps. Glenn Ansardi and Danny Martiny of Kenner.

Chicago Suburbs Struggle to Fairly Allocate O'Hare Soundproofing Money (Apr. 18, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports trustees in Elk Grove Village, Illinois, have approved a plan to select houses for soundproofing this year although it doesn't please everyone.

Florida Residents Complain of Increasing Noise from Witham Field Airport (Apr. 18, 1999). The Palm Beach Post reports residents of nearby communities are protesting noise and increased air traffic at Witham Field in Stuart, Florida.

Third Mass. Congressman Opposes New Runway at Logan Airport (Apr. 18, 1999). The Boston Globe reports a third Massachusetts congressman, citing noise pollution, recently joined the opposition of a new runway at Boston's Logan Airport.

Encroaching Development, Along with Noise and Safety Issues, Could Close Additional Arizona Air Bases (Apr. 17, 1999). The Associated Press reports as development and a growing number of people move to areas around Luke Air Force Base and Arizona's other military airports, the danger may be increasing for both residents and military bases alike.

Letter: Noise from Stuart Airport Robs Residents of Peace and Quiet in Former Florida Paradise (Apr. 17, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News published a letter from Dorothy Coutant of Stuart, Florida. Ms. Coutant contends increased noise at the nearby airport is robbing residents of peace and quiet. She writes:

NC Residents Seek Relief from Noise and Artificial Light (Apr. 17, 1999). The Morning Star reports the Ocean Isle Beach Planning Board will meet later this month to craft ordinances that regulate noise and outdoor lighting as neighborhoods expand on the North Carolina barrier island.

NH Business Loses 1st Round to Block Runway Plan; Will Return to Court to Collect Noise Damages (Apr. 17, 1999). The Union Leader reports a New Hampshire Superior Court judge yesterday refused to block a runway expansion at Manchester Airport, but the plaintiff will return to court to seek damages from noise.

Noise Expert Calls Plans for Illinois Power Plant 'Fatally Flawed' (Apr. 17, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports a noise expert testified Friday that an electrical generating plant near Woodstock, Illinois, may create enough noise to be considered a nuisance for neighbors.

Texas Residents Feel Betrayed by Reduction of Sound Wall (Apr. 17, 1999). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports the Texas Department of Transportation's decision this week to reduce a sound barrier wall between Trophy Club and the Texas 114 bypass by 420 feet is a betrayal of an agreement reached 10 years ago, residents and officials said yesterday.

With Noise Ordinance Vote, Arkansas Town Remains Quiet (Apr. 17, 1999). The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports residents of Eureka Springs, Arkansas, sent a message loud and clear Tuesday that they want a quiet little town.

Foes Insist Airport at California's El Toro Won't be 'Quiet and Friendly' (Apr. 16, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports despite a flawed study, opponents of an airport at El Toro insist noise from departing aircraft would disturb 250,000 California residents.

MN Lawmakers Vote to Address Airport Noise Before Building New Runway (Apr. 16, 1999). The Associated Press reports noise and pollution issues should be addressed before any more construction happens at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, a Minnesota House panel decided.

South Carolina County Considers Noisy Animal Ordinance (Apr. 16, 1999). The Post and Courier reports the Charleston, South Carolina, County Council, is working to create a fair and enforceable noise ordinance that will give relief to neighbors annoyed by animal noise.

US May Ban Concorde Landings in Retaliation for EU Hush Kit Restrictions (Apr. 16, 1999). The Financial Times reports the United States plans to ban landings of the Concorde airliner in the US if the European Commission restricts hush-kited aircraft in Europe.

U.S. Offers to Negotiate with EU to Avert Hush Kit Ban (Apr. 16, 1999). Reuters reports the United States said yesterday it had proposed a multilateral solution to prevent a retaliatory trade war over European Union plans to ban aircraft fitted with noise mufflers known as hush kits.

Bill Passes Louisiana House, Protects Churches from Outside Noise (Apr. 15, 1999). The Times-Picayune reports a Louisiana State House committee approved a bill Wednesday that would make it a crime to blast music or other noise within 200 feet of a church, hospital or courthouse.

Calif. Town Upholds Dog-Friendly Parks but says Pet Owners Need to Resolve Noise Complaints (Apr. 15, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports the Encinitas, California, City Council last night upheld the status quo at a "dog-friendly" park despite noise complaints from neighbors. Pet owners, however, were reminded to take responsibility in solving noise complaints from park neighbors.

Conn. Residents Say NIMBY to Heliport and Noise; Planning Commission Gets Final Say (Apr. 15, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports Salem, Connecticut, residents said Wednesday they fear a heliport proposed for their neighborhood will bring noise and safety concerns.

NC Town Amends Noise Ordinance, Debates Purchase of Noise Meters (Apr. 15, 1999). The Morning Star (Wilmington, NC) reports the Carolina Beach, North Carolina, town council took steps Tuesday night to eliminate disparities in its noise ordinance.

NY State Reps Work to Maintain Flight Restrictions at JFK and LaGuardia (Apr. 15, 1999). Newsday reports four members of the state's congressional delegation met with U.S. Transportation Secretary Rodney Slater yesterday to argue against lifting restrictions on the number of flights at New York City's two airports.

Taos, New Mexico, Will Fight Noisy Air Force Training Flights (Apr. 15, 1999). The Albuquerque Journal reports government officials and residents on Wednesday unanimously opposed a proposed low-level military flight training route across northern New Mexico.

English Court of Appeals Upholds EPA Noise Nuisance Notice Regarding Barking Dogs (Apr. 14, 1999). The Times Newspapers Limited reports a Court of Appeal on March 3 in Colchester, England, upheld the serving of a noise nuisance notice established by the 1990 Environmental Protection Act.

FedEx Expansion at NC Piedmont Airport will Damage Quality of Life (Apr. 14, 1999). News & Record (Greensboro, NC) published an editorial written in response to a defender of a proposed expansion of North Carolina's Piedmont Triad Airport to accommodate a Federal Express hub. The author, Joan Black, contends FedEx at the airport doesn't mean progress but rather a lower quality of life for residents of Guilford County.

Florida Residents Petition against Expansion of Noisy Sawgrass Expressway (Apr. 14, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel reports residents of one community have petitioned the Florida DOT against expansion of what they say is highway that's already too noisy.

Hull, Mass. Voices Grievances to Massport about Logan Air Traffic and Noise (Apr. 14, 1999). The Patriot Ledger reports town officials from Hull, Massachusetts, last night did not accept Massport's rationalization for an additional runway at Boston's Logan Airport. Instead, they voiced a list of airport-related grievances.

Ohio Town Protests Airport Expansion, Citing Noise and Decreased Property Values (Apr. 14, 1999). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports neighbors opposed to the expansion of the Warren County Airport in Lebanon, Ohio, presented town officials with a petition Monday asking for several restrictions.

Committee Urges Tests of Noise Controls Before Proceeding with Redevelopment Plan for Missouri, Housing Complex (Apr. 12, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports noise is a concern of a committee overseeing expansion of a housing complex in St. Louis, Missouri.

Editorial: Race Track in Haywood, NC, will Mean Noise and Turmoil for Residents (Apr. 12, 1999). The Asheville Citizen-Times published a rebuttal of Vesta Neale's guest column on Friday, March 26, advocating for a race track in Haywood County, North Carolina. Resident Peggy M. Setzer writes:

Foes of Third Runway at Boston's Logan Airport Question Environmental Justice of Project (Apr. 12, 1999). The Boston Globe reports opponents of a third runway at Boston's Logan Airport are wielding a new argument these days: environmental injustice.

Iowa Town Delays Race Track Until Reliable Noise Data Available (Apr. 12, 1999). The Associated Press reports a proposal to bring stock car racing to Iowa's Waterloo Greyhound Park has been put on hold after zoning commissioners raised concern over noise.

Neighbors Disagree over Sound Walls along Florida's U. S. 441 (Apr. 12, 1999). Tthe Sun-Sentinel reports not all residents are in favor of sound walls along U.S. 441 that cuts through Boca Raton, Florida, despite the planned expansion of the road from two to six lanes.

Neighbors North of Orlando International Airport Will Hear More Noise for Next 6 Months (Apr. 12, 1999). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports Orlando International Airport will begin resurfacing a portion of one of its busiest runways today, sending more noisy jets over the airport's neighbors to the north.

Texas Town Fines Low-Flying Plane; FAA Says Cities Don't Control Airspace (Apr. 12, 1999). The Austin American-Statesman reports in its latest attempt to control noise from the Addison Airport, the town of Fairview, Texas, recently fine a pilot for violating the town's noise ordinance by flying too low.

Long Island Towns Place Restrictions on Noisy Helicopters (Apr. 11, 1999). The New York Times reports in recent years the freedom to use helicopters has been reduced on Long Island as more and more towns have passed regulations restricting where they can take off and land. And in some areas where helicopters can still operate on private property, neighbors are becoming more vocal about the noise.

Ventura, California, Resident Says Firing Range is a "Noise Generator" Spewing "Aural Graffiti" (Apr. 11, 1999). The Los Angeles Times published a letter from John W. Wagner of Ventura, California. Wagner vehemently opposes the noisy pistol range in his city. Wagner writes:

ADOT Will Retest Noise Through Gap in Sound Wall near Mesa when Freeway Completed (Apr. 10, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports the Arizona Department of Transportation has decided to "wait and see" about a section of sound wall Mesa residents insist is needed to muffle noise from the Price Freeway.

Noise Barrier at Rifle Range in N. Warwickshire, England, Welcomed by Environmentalists (Apr. 10, 1999). The Birmingham Post reports the Defense Estates Organization has requested approval to build a sound wall at a rifle range near a nature conservation area in North Warwickshire, England.

Entire Kentucky Town Relocated in Unique Airport Noise Buyout (Apr. 9, 1999). The New York Times reports a Kentucky town near the Louisville International Airport agreed to an airport buy-out only if the entire town could be moved together. FAA officials consented to the request, the first of its kind in the United States.

Entire Kentucky Town Relocates to Escape Airport Noise (Apr. 9, 1999). The New York Times reports in the wake of a relocation effort by the Louisville International Airport, a Kentucky town has made a demand so unusual that that Federal Aviation Administration officials now say it could be a model for other communities.

Mass. Business Leaders and Politicians Choosing Sides in New Logan Runway (Apr. 8, 1999). The Boston Herald reports Boston business leaders last night stated their support for a new runway at Logan Airport along with Gov. Paul Cellucci and Logan Airport officials while Mayor Thomas M. Menino and some members of the state's congressional delegation strongly opposed the addition.

Iowa Stock Car Racing Proposal Tabled for Lack of Noise Data (Apr. 8, 1999). The Associated Press reports a proposal to bring stock car racing to Waterloo Greyhound Park has been put on hold after zoning commissioners raised concern over noise.

Automobile Noise Regulations Now Law in Raleigh, NC (Apr. 8, 1999). The News and Observer reports in attempt to regulate noise from high-powered car stereos, the Raleigh, North Carolina, City Council unanimously approved an automobile noise ordinance Tuesday.

Raligh, NC, Adopts Noise Ordinance to Govern Amplified Music (Apr. 7, 1999). The News and Observer reports the Raleigh, North Carolina, City Council approved a new noise ordinance Tuesday that will govern business where amplified music is played.

West Texas Ranchers Threaten to Sue Over Noise from Air Force Bomber Training (Apr. 7, 1999). The Associated Press reports a large group of West Texas ranchers and farmers have joined together to voice their opposition to Air Force bombing practice that they say will bring noise to ruin their way of life and spook their animals.

Town Near New Orleans Airport Vows to Fight New Runway Plan (Apr. 7, 1999). The Times-Picayune reports a proposed new runway at New Orleans International Airport has the support of the Louisiana Governor but the strong opposition of a nearby town that fears increased noise from roaring jets.

NC County May Use "Reasonableness Standard" to Measure Noise and Enforce Ordinance (Apr. 6, 1999). The Herald-Sun reports Durham County, North Carolina, in an effort to make its noise ordinance for enforceable, is considering revising the standards by which it measures noise.

RI Residents Question Justice of Proposed New Flight Tracks at T.F. Green Airport (Apr. 6, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports some Rhode Island residents who will likely hear more noise if proposed new flight paths become a realty at Warwick's T.F. Green Airport questioned last night the justice of such noise distribution.

New Noise Ordinance in Florida Town will Require Special Permits (Apr. 6, 1999). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports Palmetto, Florida, officials will seek public input on the city's proposed noise-control ordinance amendments at a hearing scheduled for May 3.

Saying, "You Can't Get Away from the Noise Problem," Seekonk, Mass. Zoning Appeals Board Denies Permit for Company (Apr. 5, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the Zoning Board of Appeals in Seekonk, Massachusetts, agreed with residents' noise concerns and denied a permit for a parcel-distribution center in a residential neighborhood.

Michigan Town Wants to Lower Volume on Noisy Car Stereos (Apr. 5, 1999). The Associated Press reports some residents of Saginaw Township, Michigan, want to see a change in a local noise ordinance that would focus on noisy car stereos.

Wisconsin Powerboat Group Challenges Noise Ordinance (Apr. 5, 1999). Chicago Tribune reports a powerboater association will ask for a repeal of a new boating noise ordinance enacted by a waterway authority in Wisconsin.

Noise Study of Bradley Airport Presents Dilemma for Suffield, Conn. (Apr. 5, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports the results of a mini-study show reducing noise in one part of Suffield, Connecticut, will only increase noise in another section of town.

British Columbia Town Restricts Noisy All-Night Dance Parties (Apr. 5, 1999). The Vancouver Sun reports the town of Richmond, British Columbia, has drafted a bylaw that will restrict all night dance parties, known as raves, in response to residents' noise complaints and criticisms of other kinds.

Brochure Informs Residents of Temporary Noise Shifts at O'Hare Airport (Apr. 5, 1999). The Chicago Sun-Times reports summer maintenance projects at O'Hare Airport are expected to create noise shifts over Chicago area communities.

US Rep. Charges Massport with Environmental Injustice in Plan for Third Runway at Boston's Logan Airport (Apr. 4, 1999). The Boston Globe reports a US Congressman representing districts near Logan Airport has objected to Massport's plan for a third runway on grounds of "environmental injustice," saying noise will be unequally distributed over poor, minority communities.

Queens Residents Vehemently Object to More Flights at New York Airports (Apr. 4, 1999). The New York Times reports New York residents have a hard time believing "The skies will be getting quieter" as the Federal Government considers eliminating flight caps at La Guardia and JFK Airports.

Judge Rules Florida Landowners Must Prove Decreased Property Value in Airport Noise Suit (Apr. 3, 1999). The Palm Beach Post reports a judge's ruling may have crippled the case of Palm Beach, Florida, landowners who claim their peace of mind is shattered by the noise of 85 air flights a day over their homes from Palm Beach International Airport.

Raleigh, NC, Home of Db (Decibel) Drag Racer Champion, Adopts Car Audio Ordinance (Apr. 3, 1999). The News and Observer reports in an attempt to control drive-by concerts, Raleigh, North Carolina, will likely adopt an ordinance prohibiting music that is audible 50 feet from a vehicle.

Roxbury, Mass., is Loser in Noise Turf Battle, Say Residents (Apr. 3, 1999). The Boston Globe reports the Runway 27 Coalition in Massachusetts now has former members saying one faction benefited at the expense of another community in its battle over noise pollution from Logan Airport.

Florida Town Restricts Lawn-Mowing Hours after Residents Complain of Noise (Apr. 2, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel reports the town of Margate, Florida, has crafted a new ordinance to specifically target lawn-mowing noise.

Friends of the Earth Supports EU Directive to Ban Noisy Aircraft in Europe (Apr. 2, 1999). According to the European Report, two non -governmental organizations have criticized the European Union for giving in to pressure from the United States to delay a ban on older and louder "hushkitted" aircraft in European skies.

Lawmakers Unite to Impose Noise Restrictions, Including a Curfew, at Teterboro Airport (Apr. 2, 1999). The Record reports federal and state lawmakers are urging the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to impose curfews at Teterboro Airport and force other restrictions on jet traffic to improve living conditions for neighboring residents.

RI Residents Invited to Comment on Plans to Limit Noise from T.F. Green Airport (Apr. 2, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports on Monday, residents of Cranston and Warwick, Rhode Island, will have a final opportunity to comment on a list of noise controls proposed for T.F. Green Airport, including significant changes in the flight paths over the city.

Advisory Board in Mass. Works to Protect Community from Power Plant Noise (Apr. 1, 1999). The Patriot Ledger reports Weymouth, Massachusetts, town officials are carefully considering noise and other pollution concerns at a proposed power plant.

Letters: California Residents Continue the El Toro Airport Debate (Apr. 1, 1999). The Los Angeles Times published two letters from California residents expressing their views about El Toro Airport issues. The first letter is written by Michael Steiner of Costa Mesa, California, who criticizes the idea of test flights at El Toro Airport. Steiner writes:

FAA Accused of Having "No Decency;" Residents of Queens, NY, Say More Flights and Noise at LaGuardia and Kennedy Unacceptable (Mar. 31, 1999). Newsday reports residents who live near New York's LaGuardia and Kennedy Airports met in Queens last night to tell FAA officials they are dead set against increased flights and the accompanying noise.

High School Prom Committee to Request Exception to Noise Ordinance in Newport Beach, California (Mar. 31, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports high school students in Newport Beach, California, have come up against a noise ordinance in planning the 2000 prom.

Highland Park, Texas, Works to Educate Public and Enforce New Leafblower Noise Ordinance (Mar. 31, 1999). The Dallas Morning News reports officials are working to make sure residents of Texas town follow a new leafblower noise ordinance.

Canadian Race Officials Offer Compensation to Residents Hit Hardest by Noise from 3-Day Event (Mar. 30, 1999). The Vancouver Sun reports in response to a health board's noise findings on last year's race, the Molson Indy is offering a noise compensation package to residents of a housing complex in Vancouver, British Columbia, during this year's three-day event.

EU Delays Hushkit Ban for One Month, Will Consult with US (Mar. 30, 1999). The New York Times reports the European Union today delayed for a month a law on aircraft noise that that has given rise to fears of a trade dispute with the United States.

EU Delays Vote to Ban Hushkitted Planes to Allow US to Propose Compromise (Mar. 30, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports the European Union's transport ministers have postponed a vote on the ban of older aircraft, giving U.S. officials more time to work with European Union executives on a compromise.

Opposition to Logan Expansion Builds in Massachusetts (Mar. 28, 1999). The Boston Globe reports the Massachusetts Port Authority's momentum to get a new runway built at Logan Airport is slowly being matched by the opposition of residents, activists, leaders, and politicians.

EU/US Continue to Disagree over Hushkit Regulations (Mar. 27, 1999). According to the European Report, the US Transportation Secretary told the press in Brussels that the airplane-hushkit dispute between the US and the European Union risks a new trade dispute

Noise Levels Rise in Europe to Unhealthy Levels (Mar. 27, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports noise is a problem in all major cities in Europe, and environmentalists and social scientists believe the shrieks and roars of urban life may cause serious long-term health effects.

Raleigh, NC, Revises Noise Ordinance to Regulate Businesses that Feature Music; Many Homeowners Remain Dissatisfied (Mar. 27, 1999). The News and Observer reports Raleigh, North Carolina, leaders said they tried to balance concern for neighbors' peace and quiet with the needs of a lively urban life when they drafted a revised noise ordinance.

Residents Seek Monetary Damages from Arizona Town, Claiming Lack of Airport Use Disclosure (Mar. 27, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports a group of residents is seeking monetary damages from the town of Gilbert, Arizona, for failing to enforce its own rules about airport disclosure.

Seattle Nightclub Owners Face Stricter Noise Ordinances (Mar. 27, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports proposals to reinforce noise regulations for nightclubs in Seattle neighborhoods are not sitting well with a number of club owners.

Chicago Official Insists Expanded O'Hare Terminal Won't Mean More Noise (Mar. 26, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports a Chicago official on Thursday defended Mayor Daley's planned terminal expansion at O'Hare International Airport as one that will not increase noise.

Illinois Boaters Object to Lake Noise Ordinance (Mar. 26, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports a number of Illinois residents are protesting a new ordinance that regulates noise from boats.

Neighbors of Seattle's Nightclubs want Peace (Mar. 26, 1999). The Seattle Times reports as a result of increasing complaints, Seattle and Washington state regulators are considering new noise, alcohol and entertainment regulations that club owners fear could ruin their livelihood.

Indiana Residents Along 146th Seek Solutions to Noise from Four Lanes (Mar. 25, 1999). The Indianapolis News reports Indiana residents who live along 146 Street are concerned with finding a way to minimize traffic noise when the new four-lane route is complete.

Arlington Heights Officials Cite Low Compliance with O'Hare Noise Commission's Fly Quiet Program (Mar. 24, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports the board of trustees in Arlington Heights, Illinois, is closely watching the city-suburban O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission these days and voicing its concerns about noise.

Clinton, Connecticut, Drafts Noise Ordinance (Mar. 24, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports the town of Clinton, Connecticut, is writing a noise ordinance in response to residents' complaints.

Letter: Scottsdale Resident Accepts Airplane Noise as Here to Stay (Mar. 24, 1999). The Arizona Republic published a letter from Michael Straley of Scottsdale, Arizona. Straley accepts airplane noise as a given and believes related safety concerns in the Scottsdale area are exaggerated. Straley writes:

Minnesota Orchestra Gets OK for Amphitheater, but Opponents Vow to Fight Noise Variance (Mar. 24, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports while the Minnesota Orchestra won approval Wednesday for an outdoor concert amphitheater, it still faces a number of major hurdles, including obtaining a noise variance.

Oklahoma City Threatens Legal Action to Stop Night Noise from Dig Operation (Mar. 24, 1999). The Daily Oklahoman reports Oklahoma City Council members said Wednesday they are willing to go to court if necessary to stop overnight dirt work near a northeast neighborhood.

Port of Seattle "Puts Kids First" and Funds Jet Noise Study at Highline Schools (Mar. 24, 1999). The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports the Port of Seattle yesterday agreed to fund the noise study for Highline School District whose schools are seriously affected by noise from nearby Seattle-Tacoma International Airport

Raleigh Committee Endorses Less Stringent Noise Law; Neighborhood Activists Discuss Strategy to Defeat Ordinance (Mar. 24, 1999). The News and Observer reports a Raleigh City Council subcommittee Tuesday endorsed, on a split vote, a noise ordinance that would allow music-playing businesses in neighborhoods.

Toronto Airport Authority will Test Departures over Industrial Corridors to Reduce Noise from Pearson International Airport (Mar. 24, 1999). Canada NewsWire Ltd. published a press release by the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) detailing the planned departure trials for the new north/sough runway at Lester B. Pearson International Airport, (LBPIA). The press release reads as follows:

Bills in the Mass. State House Could Block Logan's Proposed New Runway (Mar. 23, 1999). The Boston Herald reports supporters and opponents of a new runway at Logan Airport are expected to face each other this morning at a contentious Massachusetts' State House hearing on bills that would block the runway's construction.

Cell Phones are the Boom Boxes of the '90's (Mar. 23, 1999). The Buffalo News published an essay pronouncing cell phones the boom boxes of the '90's, creating enough public noise to annoy and offend.

Floridians Complain of Increased Jet Noise from Jacksonville Naval Air Station (Mar. 23, 1999). The Florida Times-Union reports more fighter jets have been flying training exercises from Jacksonville Naval Air Station -- a situation that has prompted complaints from Florida residents to the Navy and elected officials.

Opponents Call Proposed El Toro Test Flights a Waste of Money (Mar. 23, 1999). The Orange County Register reports the proposed El Toro flight demonstration plan that will be considered by the California's Orange County Board of Supervisors is under criticism from opponents.

Virginia Beach Amphitheater Too Loud for Neighbors (Mar. 23, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot reports for the second time in as many years, GTE Virginia Beach Amphitheater officials have agreed to turn down the volume of summer concerts, but nearby residents say noise from the venue is still too loud.

Inglewood, California, Burdened with Jet Noise from Los Angeles International Airport (Mar. 22, 1999). City News Service reports Inglewood, California, officials say their town in unfairly burdened with overflights from Los Angeles International Airport.

New Jersey Citizens' Group Sues to Stop Expansion at Newark until Noise Concerns Resolved (Mar. 22, 1999). The Associated Press Wire Services reports a New Jersey citizens' group has decided to sue to stop all expansion at Newark International Airport until the noise issue is resolved.

Noise Study at Louisville International Airport Makes Neighbors Key Participants (Mar. 22, 1999). The Courier-Journal reports a new noise study at Kentucky's Louisville International Airport is aimed at soothing eardrums as well as hard feelings that linger from expansion there a decade ago.

Some Neighbors of Nashville International Airport Wait a Decade for Noise Insulation (Mar. 22, 1999). The Tennessean reports while the majority of houses in the noise contour map for Kentucky's Nashville International Airport have been soundproofed, some residents are still waiting on a list began in 1992.

Anti-Noise Group Hires Law Firm to Battle Expansion at Newark Airport (Mar. 21, 1999). The Associated Press reports a New Jersey group has hired a law firm to battle all expansion at Newark International Airport until the issue of air noise is resolved.

Letters: Los Angeles Area Residents Speak Out About Airports (Mar. 21, 1999). The Los Angeles Times published the following letters from Los Angeles area residents about voters' rights in the wake of new and expanded airports. The first letter is from Leonard Kranser of Dana Point. Kranser writes to clarify the Safe and Health Communities Initiative:

Residents Predict More Noise and Isolation with Florida I-4 Expansion (Mar. 21, 1999). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports while the effort to rebuild Florida's Interstate 4 focuses on alleviating rush-hour traffic, residents along the highway fear increased noise, and isolation created by sound barriers.

Test Flights at El Toro Still Waiting Approval from Orange County Supervisors (Mar. 20, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports Orange County, California, supervisors will decide March 30 whether to grant final approval for several commercial test flights at El Toro air base.

US Transportation Secretary Headed to Europe to Tackle Airplane Noise Dispute with EU (Mar. 20, 1999). Agence France Presse reports the US Transportation Secretary will travel to Europe to tackle a US-European dispute over airplane noise.

Florida's Boca Raton Airport Begins Noise Study with FAA Grant (Mar. 19, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel reports Florida's Boca Raton Airport Authority received a federal grant Thursday for a noise study.

Public Summit Held on Proposed New Terminal for California's Burbank Airport; No Agreements Reached on Long-Running Noise Issues (Mar. 19, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports participants at a recent forum on a new terminal at California's Burbank Airport could not agree on whether to seek local or federal solutions to long-standing noise, safety, and regulation issues.

Air Traffic Controllers Join Others in Opposing Expansion at Missouri's Lambert Field Airport (Mar. 18, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports a leader of a St. Charles, Missouri, group fighting the expansion of Lambert Field said more people are joining St. Charles in filing court papers opposing the expansion plan.

Arlington Heights Panel Says O'Hare is Ignoring "Fly Quiet" Noise Abatement Program (Mar. 18, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports the Arlington Heights Village Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise plans to meet with O'Hare officials in an effort to convince the airport to turn down the volume.

Citing Noise and Increased Use, Neighbors Wants Restrictions Placed on Britain's Oldest Working Airfield (Mar. 18, 1999). The Western Daily Press reports a public meeting is being called over families' complaints that their weekends are being ruined by noise from light planes using Britain's oldest working airfield.

Editorial: City of Burbank's Noise Lawsuit Threatens Airport Safety (Mar. 18, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles published an editorial by Joyce Streator, president of the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority. In her editorial, Streator calls for the city of Burbank to stop holding hostage the safety of airport users and return to the bargaining table.

Ontario Board Rejects New Residential Development Near Pearson Airport (Mar. 18, 1999). Canada NewsWire Ltd., reports the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) celebrated victory with the Ontario Municipal Board's (OMB) decision to reject a residential development proposal in the City of Mississauga, which falls within the GTAA Operating Area.

Opinion: Too Much Noise about Navy Jet Flyover at Little League Park (Mar. 18, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune published an opinion article charging that the negative reaction to the recent Navy flyover at Solana Beach, California, is creating much more noise than the criticized incident.

RI Town Designates "Noise-Sensitive Areas;" Amends Noise Ordinance (Mar. 18, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the town of Richmond, Rhode Island, voted to approve amendments to its noise ordinance, creating a "noise-sensitive area" around certain public buildings.

City Council Panel Proposes Updated Noise Ordinance for Raleigh, NC (Mar. 17, 1999). The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC) reports a Raleigh, North Carolina, City Council subcommittee has drafted a new version of a much-questioned noise ordinance.

Maryland County Judge Will Visit Gun Range Before Ruling on Noise Case (Mar. 17, 1999). The Baltimore Sun reports a Maryland county judge will visit the site of a gun range before ruling on the noise case.

Penn. Town Passes Stiff Noise Ordinance to Preserve Quality of Life (Mar. 17, 1999). The Morning Call reports Bethlehem residents were heard Tuesday as the city council enacted one law to discourage noisy peace-breakers and started work on another to restrict BYOB clubs.

Proposed Ordinance in RI Town Would Create Decibel-Limit Zones (Mar. 17, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the Richmond Town Council will resume a public hearing tonight on a proposal to strengthen the town noise ordinance.

FAA Considers City of Burbank's Exemption Claim that Allows Mandatory Noise Curfew at Airport (Mar. 16, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports the FAA is considering the city of Burbank's claim that that Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport can impose a mandatory noise curfew under an exemption.

Illinois Waterway Agency Drafts Noise Ordinance that will Fine Noisy Boaters (Mar. 16, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports directors of a waterway in Illinois are planning to adopt an ordinance that will fine boaters for creating excessive noise.

Noise in New Orleans' French Quarter Neighborhood Equal to Industrial Zone Levels (Mar. 16, 1999). The Times-Picayune published a letter written by Winnie Nichols, French Quarter resident, and Paulette R. Irons, State Senator from New Orleans. The writers urge New Orleans city officials to appreciate the toll of noise on residents and take action to protect residents of the historic French Quarter neighborhood:

Speedway Moratorium Overturned in Haywood, NC; Noise Opponents Say County Caved in to Pressure from Fans (Mar. 16, 1999). The Asheville Citizen-Times reports an embattled speedway project may still happen in Haywood County, North Carolina, now that commissioners have lifted the racetrack moratorium.

Action Group wants Ban on Night Flights at Boca Raton Airport (Mar. 14, 1999). The Palm Beach Post reports Boca Raton, Florida, resident Ellen Lohr who lives northeast of the airport, wants a nighttime ban on all planes and wants a complete ban on what the Federal Aviation Administration calls "Stage One" planes, the loudest and oldest of aircraft. The FAA recently allowed the Naples airport to ban Stage One planes at night. The number of jets taking off and landing at the Boca Raton airport has dramatically increased in the last ten years. In 1990, there were just eight jets based at the airport. Today there are 45. And takeoffs and landings have jumped 42 percent in that time, from 96,000 in 1990 to 136,700 last year - one every four minutes if spread over every hour of every day. The airport's noise hot line logged 318 complaints in January and February, more than triple the amount from the same period last year. About half were for nighttime flights, though most flights occur during the day. When Ellen Lohr moved to Boca Raton in 1990, she fell in love with a relatively quiet South Florida suburb. Now, she's afraid it's turning into a transportation hub. "The planes here, they zoom over the houses," she said. "You can't talk, you can't sleep. It's gotten horrible. Since I've been living here, the quality of my life has severely deteriorated as a result of the noise from the airport," said Lohr, who founded the Boca Raton Airport Action Group (BRAAG) in 1996.

Islip, NY, Residents Demand Night-Time Curfew at MacArthur Airport (Mar. 14, 1999). Newsday reports residents of Islip, New York, are protesting late-night flights at MacArthur Airport and asking for a night-time flight curfew.

Noise Levels for Martin County, Florida, Ordinance May Be Too Low (Mar. 14, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports the Martin County, Florida, noise ordinance is the most restrictive of its kind in the area and could make enforcement difficult.

To Wall or Not to Wall? That is the Question in Salt Lake Valley, Utah, as Noise Walls are Vehemently Opposed by Some, Praised by Others (Mar. 14, 1999). The Salt Lake Tribune reports noise walls are a contentious issue in Salt Lake Valley, Utah. Some residents applaud their effectiveness against freeway noise while others decry their unsightliness.

BAA Says Fifth New Terminal at London's Heathrow Won't Increase Noise; Environmental Group Wants Flight Numbers Capped (Mar. 13, 1999). The Financial Times (London) reports BAA yesterday called for legislation to ensure the proposed fifth terminal at London's Heathrow airport did not lead to an increase in aircraft noise. However, a local environmental group said it still believes the additional terminal will unduly disrupt lives.

Reagan National Airport: Editorial Criticizes McCain Senate Bill; Supports House Effort (Mar. 13, 1999). The Washington Post published an editorial criticizing Sen. John McCain's bill that would, in part, increase slots at Reagan National Airport. The editorial takes exception to leverage that can be taken by the chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee in efforts to get certain bills passed, calling it "bad national policy."

New Noise Law in Daytona Beach, Florida, Relaxed During Spring Break (Mar. 13, 1999). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports Volusia County, Florida, leaders agreed that their new noise law was not intended to silence music during spring break at Daytona Beach.

Massport Promotes New Runway at Logan; Noise Activists Charge Misuse of Funds (Mar. 12, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire Associated Press reports the Massachusetts Port Authority is using paid advertisements to promote a new runway at Boston's Logan Airport, a move that has angered some airport and noise activists.

Letter: Former Chairman of Florida's Boca Raton Airport Authority Highlights Noise-Reduction Accomplishments of Group (Mar. 12, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel published the following letter from George W. Blank, past chairman of the Boca Raton Airport Authority and Chairman Emeritus, Federation of Boca Raton Homeowner Associations. Mr. Blank writes to advocate for the Airport Authority and inform readers of the work accomplished towards reducing noise during his tenure:

Illinois Residents Question Impartiality of Noise Experts Hired by Power Plant (Mar. 12, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports concerns over the effects of noise from a proposed electricity-generating power plant near Woodstock, Illinois, dominated the third night of public hearings. Some citizens question the impartiality of noise specialists hired by the power plant.

Florida Residents Get Cease and Desist Order for Noisy Nighttime Trucking Operations (Mar. 12, 1999). The St. Petersburg Times reports Hillsborough County, Florida, officials have put an end to noisy treks through Cheval by a company working on the Suncoast Parkway.

Town of Hull Organizes to Fight Third Runway at Massachusetts' Logan Airport (Mar. 12, 1999). The Patriot Ledger reports Massport has agreed to study the noise impact a new Logan International Airport runway would have on the Hull peninsula, a town whose residents have already had enough of airplane noise.

NJ Lawmakers Advocate for Quieter Skies in Aviation Spending Bill (Mar. 11, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports New Jersey lawmakers took some action Thursday toward making the skies quieter.

Canadian Transport Agency Agrees with Citizens, Orders CN Rail to Reduce Noise in Toronto Rail Yard (Mar. 11, 1999). The Toronto Star reports after listening to residents' noise complaints, the Canadian Transportation Agency has ordered CN Rail to reduce noise levels at a rail yard in Oakville, Ontario.

Night-Time Tests Banned at California Speedway after Noise Complaints Pour in from Residents (Mar. 11, 1999). The Press-Enterprise reports nighttime testing at the California Speedway will be prohibited, officials said Wednesday in response to hundreds of complaints by residents who suffered through noisy late-night and early-morning road tests two weeks ago in Fontana, California.

Illinois Residents' Noise Fears about Power Plant Not Quieted by Noise Experts (Mar. 11, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports despite noise experts testifying to the contrary, residents of Woodstock, Illinois, are opposed to a proposed power plant because they believe it will bring noise and air pollution and generally lower the quality of life in their region.

Environment Committee at Montreal International Airport(Dorval) Analyzes Noise Complaints (Mar. 11, 1999). The Gazette reports new procedures to reduce noise at Montreal International Airport (Dorval) have been in effect for one month, but it's too soon to judge their effectiveness.

Conn. Residents to Hear Results of Noise Study of Bradley Airport (Mar. 11, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports consultants hired by the Connecticut Department of Transportation, which operates Bradley International Airport, will report this month to residents the results of a noise study.

More Activity at Florida's Zephyrhills Airport Means More Noise for Residents (Mar. 11, 1999). The St. Petersburg Times reports life has gotten louder recently in Zephyrhills, Florida, where quiet living is disappearing for some residents as activity increases at the Zephyrhills Municipal Airport.

Bowing to US Pressure, EU Agrees to Postpone Ban of Hush-Kitted Planes (Mar. 11, 1999). EIU ViewsWire reports the European Union has given in to intense pressure from Washington, DC, and delayed a decision on plans to outlaw new aircraft equipped with 'hush kits.'

Editorial: US Rep. Criticizes Massport's Plan for New Runway at Logan Airport (Mar. 10, 1999). The Boston Globe published an editorial by Michael Capuano, US Representative from Massachusetts's 8th District. Capuano believes a third runway at Logan Airport should not be built for a variety of reasons including the fact it will increase noise in neighborhoods and communities already burdened with aircraft noise.

House Aviation Subcommittee Approves More Slots for O'Hare Airport (Mar. 10, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports a proposal to eliminate flight caps at O'Hare International Airport moved closer to reality on Tuesday.

Trash Truck Terminal in Quincy, Mass., Ordered to Keep Quiet Until 7 A.M. (Mar. 10, 1999). The Patriot Ledger reports the city license board of Quincy, Massachusetts, voted to keep a trash truck terminal quiet until 7 a.m. after residents complained of losing sleep due to early morning noise made by the company.

Ohio Residents Along I-480 Seek New Noise Tests and Sound Barriers (Mar. 9, 1999). The Plain Dealer reports in the wake of increased noise complaints from residents, the Ohio Department of Transportation will conduct a new noise study to determine if a section of Interstate 480 warrants sound barriers.

Wisconsin Auto Plant Gets Extension on Noise Abatement Plan While Neighbors Grow Impatient (Mar. 9, 1999). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports a Cedarburg, Wisconsin, automotive plant has been given another chance to get in compliance with noise laws, despite urgings by neighbors to start legal proceedings.

Wisconsin Town May Take Legal Action Against Auto Plant for Noise Violations (Mar. 8, 1999). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports the Common Council of Cedarburg, Wisconsin, may decide tonight to take legal action against Amcast Automotive for noise violations.

More Trains Mean More Noise in Winter Park, Colorado (Mar. 8, 1999). The Rocky Mountain News published an editorial saying springtime in Winter Park, Colorado, may bring in a wave of noise complaints as residents open their windows to warm, fresh air and the continuous blaring of train whistles.

Chicago Targets Homes to Soundproof Against Noise from O'Hare; Activists Question Accuracy of Noise Maps (Mar. 6, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports Chicago announced its annual soundproofing plan to insulate homes against noise from jets at O'Hare International Airport, officials announced Friday. Meanwhile, activists question the accuracy of noise contour maps used to determine the allocation of soundproofing funds.

Chicago Updates Soundproofing Plan to Include More Homes Affected by Noise from O'Hare (Mar. 6, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports the city of Chicago has updated its soundproofing plan to include homes located just west of O'Hare International Airport previously considered ineligible. Chicago will now soundproof homes in eight communities surrounding the airport.

Endorsement: Vote Yes on Expanding Boca Raton Airport Authority (Mar. 6, 1999). The Palm Beach Post published an editorial giving the newspaper's endorsement of a YES vote on the question of whether Boca Raton Airport should expand the authority to seven members in give more voice to city residents.

First in US: Naples, Florida, Succeeds in Banning Stage 1 Jets; Other Airport Communities Want Same (Mar. 6, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale) reports Naples Airport, Florida, is the first in the United States to receive Federal Aviation Administration approval to ban noisy Stage 1 jets.

Keep Your Music to Yourself; Colorado Town Teaches Lesson to Noise Scofflaws (Mar. 6, 1999). The Associated Press reports the town of Fort Lupton, Colorado, has devised a unique and effective penalty for those who violate the noise ordinance by blasting music from their cars.

House Considers Bill Lifting All Flight Limits at O'Hare; Residents Alarmed (Mar. 5, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports the most drastic proposal yet to ease flight caps at O'Hare International Airport will go through U.S. House committee discussions next week. Chicago area noise activists call the proposal "an accident waiting to happen" if it becomes reality.

Noise Limits Placed on Dairy Herd by Town Planners in the UK (Mar. 5, 1999). Farming News reports a local planning authority in Wales has placed noise restrictions on a herd of cows as a condition of a permit for a new diary building.

Ohio Citizens Want Solutions to Cargo Plane Noise (Mar. 5, 1999). The Dayton Daily News reports residents of Centerville-Washington Townships, Ohio, told FAA officials they want relief from night-time cargo plane noise.

Airport Influence Area and Noise Concern Residents Near Arizona's Williams Gateway Airport (Mar. 4, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports a federally funded noise study will be undertaken and a noise map reconfiguration to answer Arizona residents' concerns in wake of growth at Williams Gateway Airport.

Cleveland Homes Near Hopkins Airport Grandfathered to Get Noise Insulation Despite New Eligibility Rules (Mar. 4, 1999). The Plain Dealer reports Cleveland homes on perimeter of a new airport noise zone will receive sound insulation through grandfathering.

Florida Residents Frustrated by Noise; City Council Says it's Powerless to Intervene (Mar. 4, 1999). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports Punta Gorda, Florida, residents who say they're disturbed by music from Fishermen's Village, a complex of bars, restaurants and shops, aren't getting any help from their city council.

US Finds EU Aircraft Ban Proposal Unacceptable; Threatens Retaliatory Ban (Mar. 4, 1999). USA Today reports the United States threatened the European Union with a retaliatory aircraft ban if Europe follows through with prohibiting some US aircraft from Europe's skies.

An Eye for an Eye: US and EU Trade Aircraft Ban Threats, Citing Noise and Air Pollution (Mar. 3, 1999). AP Online reports the United States House of Representative is considering a bill that could ban the Concorde from American skies if the European Union follows through with its plans to prohibit hush-kitted US planes from flying over Europe.

Illinois Town Debates Opposing New Runways at O'Hare (Mar. 3, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports trustees of Mt. Prospect, Illinois, are debating whether to oppose new runways at O'Hare International Airport.

NJ Town Votes on Noise Ordinance; Residents Want Law to Cover More Noise Sources (Mar. 3, 1999). The Morning Call reports the Bethlehem, New Jersey, City Council Tuesday rejected suggestions to create a broad noise ordinance in favor of passing an uncomplicated noise law that targets the most frequent offenders.

Study Shows Fewer Noise Disturbed Residents if Pilots Use Shorter Runway at Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport (Mar. 3, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the final draft of Rhode Island's Airport Corporation's Part 51 noise study on T.F. Green Airport in Warwick arrived this week, giving residents a month to study it before a public hearing set for March 31.

US Official Sees New EU Aircraft Standards as Attempt to Control Market (Mar. 3, 1999). The Journal of Commerce reports at least one United States commerce official sees new European Union aircraft standards as a way to control the aircraft market.

Airport Noise is the Divisive Issue for Local Candidates in Boca Raton, Florida (Mar. 2, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel reports noise from Florida's Boca Raton Airport is the issue to debate with local elections a week away.

Calif. Town Considers Off-Road Vehicle Ordinance; Meanwhile, Posts City Property and Increases Enforcement of Noise Ordinance (Mar. 2, 1999). The Press-Enterprise reports the City Council in Calimesa, California, is considering adopting an off-road vehicle ordinance in response to residents' complaints of noise and other related disturbances.

EU May Postpone New Hush-Kit Rules that Would Ban Most US Aircraft from European Skies (Mar. 2, 1999). The Journal of Commerce reports Undersecretary of State of Economics, Business and Agricultural Affairs Stuart Eizenstat said in Brussels Friday there were signs that European governments would postpone new rules that would ban some US aircraft from their airspace.

Hanover, NJ, Says No to Walgreen Expansion; Board Requires Noise Study (Mar. 2, 1999). The Morning Call reports a plan to expand a Walgreen Co. distribution center in Hanover, Township, New Jersey, was rejected for failing to address neighbors' concerns, including noise and light pollution.

Noise-Burdened Mass. Neighborhoods Oppose New Runway at Logan, Look to Governor and Mayor for Support (Mar. 2, 1999). The Boston Globe published an editorial suggesting it is time for Governor Paul Cellucci's administration, and Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino, to reconsider plans to build a new runway for Logan Airport.

Palmetto, Florida, Looks to Remove Exemptions from Current Noise Ordinance (Mar. 2, 1999). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports spurred by noise from the Manatee County Fairgrounds, the Palmetto, Florida, City Council plans to tighten the town's noise ordinance, eliminating a number of exemptions.

Residents Refuse to Support Massport Plan that Shifts Logan Airport Noise from One Neighborhood to the Next (Mar. 2, 1999). The Boston Globe reports critics contend Massport's tactic to win support for a new runway plan at Logan Airport by promising that flights will decrease over the neighborhoods hardest-hit by noise has backfired.

Speedway Builder Threatens to Pull Out of Western NC When Third County Imposes Racetrack Moratorium over Noise and Traffic (Mar. 2, 1999). The Asheville Citizen-Times reports a 90-day racetrack moratorium in Haywood County may end plans for a new speedway in Western North Carolina.

Longboat Key, Florida Fights Plan to Divert Noise from Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport Over the Island (Mar. 1, 1999). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports while the plan is temporarily on hold, the debate continues about a controversial diversion of airport noise from Florida's Mainland to a section of Longboat Key. Population, economics, justice, and environmental concerns pepper the debate.

Residents Bothered by Noise from Wisconsin Sports Center Dissatisfied with DNR Report (Mar. 1, 1999). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports Wisconsin's Department of Natural Resources has developed a long-range plan for improving the McMiller Sports Center, including seeking ways to reduce gunfire noise, but nearby residents say more focus should have been placed on mitigating noise.

Letters from Calif. Residents Voice Opinions about Projected Noise from El Toro (Feb. 28, 1999). The Los Angeles Times published a series of letters from residents about the impact of noise on residents from proposed jet operations from El Toro airport near Los Angeles, California. Reacting to a previously published article about noise complaints from residents who live in an area deemed a "Quiet Zone," opinions varied. The first letter is from Edward F. Gogin Jr. of Trabuco Canyon, California. Grogin writes:

'Snowmobile' is a Fighting Word in Yellowstone National Park; Man and Motor Versus Natural Quiet (Feb. 28, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports the snowmobile's noise and pollution in Yellowstone National Park is the latest topic in a larger debate of how to appreciate nature on public lands in the United States.

Palmetto, Florida, Seeks to Create Enforceable Noise Ordinance with a 'Bite' (Feb. 27, 1999). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports noise complaints from a new arena has prompted the city of Palmetto, Florida, to rewrite their noise ordinance.

Burbank Attacks Credibility of Airport, Citing Noise Violations of Aircraft; Politicians Enter Fray Before November Elections (Feb. 26, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports the city of Burbank, California, claims the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport frequently violates the nighttime noise ban by flying older, Stage 2 aircraft.

Burbank Points to Stage 2 Violations, Says Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Not Interested in Controlling Noise (Feb. 26, 1999). City News Service reports the city of Burbank, California, accused the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority today of "massive violations" of noise regulations over the last three years, a charge the airport vigorously denied.

Henderson, North Carolina, Establishes New Noise Ordinance using Sound Levels (Feb. 26, 1999). The Asheville Citizen-Times reports Henderson County, North Carolina, has adopted a new noise ordinance, effective July 1, 1999.

Noise from Stereos and Car Alarms Spur Penn. Town to Adopt New Noise Ordinance (Feb. 26, 1999). The Morning Call reports the City Council of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, is set to approve a new noise ordinance after residents complained of loud music and the noise from car alarms.

Illinois Town Fears Politics will Result in Loss of Soundproofing Money to Mitigate Noise from O'Hare (Feb. 25, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports the town Bensenville, Illinois, believes it will lose soundproofing funds to mitigate noise from O'Hare International Airport due to political maneuvering.

U.S. May Retaliate with Concorde Ban if EU Enacts Ban on Hush-Kitted Aircraft (Feb. 25, 1999). The Financial Times reports the U.S. is considering a ban of its own if the European Union goes forward with a ban on older hush-kitted aircraft.

Calif. Marine Base Agrees to Change Helicopter Flight Path After Noise Complaints and Lawsuit (Feb. 24, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports in response to California residents' complaints about noise, Marine Corps officials said Tuesday they will shift the main helicopter flight path a mile south to avoid Del Mar and other suburbs.

Calif. Supreme Court Rejects Appeal; Rules in Favor of City of Burbank on Noise Impact Issue (Feb. 24, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports the California Supreme Court has upheld a ruling permitting the city of Burbank to argue that terminal expansion at the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport will increase noise in neighborhoods.

California Supreme Court Sends Back Burbank Airport Noise Impact Case to Trial Court (Feb. 24, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports the California Supreme Court has declined to review a case about noise impact area at Burbank Airport.

Illinois Town May Get Noise Wall after New Readings Show Elevated Noise Levels (Feb. 24, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports Ahwatukee Foothills residents who live near Interstate 10 in Arizona may be getting a new noise wall after citizens complained and one DOT worker recorded new noise level readings.

NY Congressman Introduces Bill to Reduce Noise from Newark Airport (Feb. 24, 1999). The Record (Bergen County, NJ) reports a New York lawmaker has introduced a bill to reduce aircraft noise from Newark International Airport.

Night-Time Train Whistles Bother Illinois Residents; Meetings Scheduled with Railroads. In Other Noise News: Vernon Hills Trustees Allow Weekend Construction (Feb. 24, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports residents in Vernon Hills, Illinois, annoyed by the sound of train whistles late at night, plan to join other towns in asking railroads to stop the noise.

Rep. Rogan Says FAA's Opinion on Noise Act Needed for Burbank and Airport Officials to Negotiate Noise (Feb. 24, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports U.S. Rep. James E. Rogan, from Pasadena, California, has asked the head of the Federal Aviation Administration to declare her opinion on whether Burbank Airport needs federal approval for flight restrictions.

Annapolis, MD, Residents Want Ordinance to Protect Them Against Nighttime Noise Disturbances (Feb. 23, 1999). The Baltimore Sun reports Annapolis, Maryland, residents seek an ordinance that will provide them with peace and quiet during the night.

Bill in VT House Would Ban Personal Watercraft from Most Vermont Lakes (Feb. 23, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports Jet Skis and other brands of the popular motorized water scooters may be banned on all but Vermont's four largest lakes.

Calif. Residents Fear More Noise from Expanded Runways at San Francisco International Airport (Feb. 23, 1999). The San Francisco Chronicle reports a San Francisco city supervisor wants to create a city policy prohibiting noise from San Francisco International Airport to exceed current levels.

Keep Your Music to Yourself; Florida County Adopts Noise Ordinance Aimed at Lowering the Volume of Boomboxes at the Beach (Feb. 23, 1999). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune published an editorial supporting the adoption of a noise ordinance to quell loud beach music in Volusia County, Florida.

Marines Agree to Conduct Noise and Pollution Studies to Settle Lawsuit Over Helicopters at Miramar, Calif. (Feb. 23, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports the U.S. Marines announced Tuesday an agreement to conduct air pollution studies and pay legal fees to settle a California lawsuit over the transfer of hundreds military helicopters to Miramar Marine Corps Air Station.

DC Residents Angry about Sen. McCain's Effort to Increase Flights at Reagan National Airport (Feb. 22, 1999). The Christian Science Monitor reports Arizona Senator John McCain(R) is proposing to increase the number of flights in and out of Reagan National Airport and to lift the 1,250-mile limit on outbound aircraft from the Washington DC airport.

Illinois Town Rejects Noise Ordinance as Too Broad and Restrictive (Feb. 22, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports late last week, the village board of Winfield, Illinois, voted to reject a proposed noise ordinance that many residents argued was unnecessary and too broad.

Impact Statement 'Flawed" Says Group Against Airport Runway Expansion in Leicester, England (Feb. 22, 1999). The Leicester Mercury reports activists in Leicester, England, are pressuring their district council to reject an environmental impact statement addressing expansion at a nearby airport on the basis that it's too limited in scope.

Neighbors Object to Noise from Dog Kennel in Spring Lake, Florida (Feb. 22, 1999). The Petersburg Times reports the noise from a dog kennel has pitted neighbors against the dogs' owner in Spring Lake, Florida.

US Calls EU Rule Against Hush-Kitted Planes Discriminatory (Feb. 22, 1999). The Journal of Commerce reports the Undersecretary of Commerce, David Aaron, called the European Union's plan to prohibit hush-kitted planes in European skies pointless and biased.

Mass. Communities Disagree on Logan Airport Expansion; Community Advisory Group Challenges Massport on Tactics, Disclosure, and Equity (Feb. 21, 1999). The Boston Globe reports critics ask tough questions of Massport's plans to new runway at Logan Airport. Residents on the Community Advisory Committee, who represent towns affected by Logan, want answers about airport capacity, long-range planning, equity, and value of residents' quality of life.

Promoters of Minn. Amphitheater Look to Other Venues for Tips on How to be a Good Neighbor (Feb. 21, 1999). The Star Tribune reports in its bid to build an amphitheater, the Minnesota Orchestra has studied similar amphitheaters for ways to be a harmonious neighbor while achieving financial and artistic success. Topics included noise control and community relations.

Resident in Van Nuys Airport Flightpath Proposes Noise Relief Plan (Feb. 21, 1999). The Los Angeles Times published a letter from Charles Mark-Walker, a resident of North Hills, California. Mr. Walker suggests a noise relief plan for nearby residents of the Van Nuys Airport. Walker writes:

Action Group Formed to Address Noise from Bars in Wellington, England (Feb. 20, 1999). The Evening Post (Wellington) reports tensions are mounting between inner-city residents and bar owners over complaints about loud music in Wellington, England.

Florida Politicians and Residents Rally at Boca Raton Airport for More Representation on Airport Board (Feb. 20, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel reports protesters gathered at Florida's Boca Raton Airport on Friday to win greater representation on the airport's governing board and more control over noise.

Durhan, NC, City Council Measures City Noise in Decision to Grant Permit to Recycling Business (Feb. 19, 1999). The News and Observer reports before deciding to issue a special use permit to a recyclables collector, Durham, North Carolina's, Town Council took some measurements of current noise levels in the city.

Henderson, NC, Looks to Revise Noise Ordinance Draft by Increasing Allowable Noise Levels (Feb. 19, 1999). The Asheville Citizen-Times reports Henderson County, North Carolina, officials are considering relaxing their proposed noise ordinance by allowing increased noise levels and exempting businesses and industries.

Arlinton Heights Noise Panel Opposes Expansion at O'Hare (Feb. 18, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports members of an Arlington Heights, Illinois, advisory panel on aircraft noise voted Tuesday to oppose expansion at O'Hare International Airport.

Citizens' Group Takes on Noise in Albuquerque (Feb. 18, 1999). The Albuquerque Journal reports a citizens' group is working to update Albuquerque's noise laws.

Complaints of Boca Airport Noise Intensify (Feb. 18, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel reports residents' complaints about noise from jets flying to and from Florida's Boca Raton Airport are getting louder.

Illinois Village Fights for Sound Wall to Muffle Tollway Noise (Feb. 18, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports the village of Bannockburn, Illinois, has launched a campaign to block tollway noise from the community.

Opponents of El Toro Airport in Calif. Fear Noise in "Quiet Zones" (Feb. 18, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports most noise complaints generated by John Wayne Airport in California last year came from areas miles away, in neighborhoods deemed "quiet" by the county. With much more air traffic planned at the proposed airport at El Toro, South Orange County residents fear there will no quiet zones for them.

US Charges European Union Ruling on Hush-Kitted Aircraft "Discriminatory" (Feb. 18, 1999). Agence France Presse reports the United States on Thursday condemned a recent move by the European Parliament to ban hush-kitted jet aircraft in the European Union.

US Could Outlaw Concorde if EU Proceeds with Ban on Hush-Kitted Planes (Feb. 18, 1999). The Commercial Appeal reports flights to the United States by the Concorde may be prohibited if the European Union follows through with its ban on jets that use hushkits to reduce noise.

Vote in Chicago Districts Links Midway Airport Noise to Property Tax Relief (Feb. 18, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports residents of Chicago wards put a non-binding referendum question on a ballot for Tuesday that makes noise pollution from Midway Airport a reason for property tax relief.

Additonal Flights at O'Hare Worry Arlington Heights' Residents (Feb. 17, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports a consultant for Chicago's aviation department told suburban leaders Tuesday that adding flights at O'Hare International Airport likely would make airplane noise more tolerable, especially at night.

Chicago Area Schools Compete for Slim Soundproofing Funds as O'Hare Considers Building More Terminals (Feb. 17, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports as Chicago officials consider building more terminals at O'Hare International Airport, 15 nearby schools are competing to be one of the four chosen this year to be insulated against jet noise.

Chicago Suburb Asks Legislators to Delay Lifting Flight Caps at O'Hare; Noise Panel Asks for Impact Study (Feb. 17, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports key members of the Illinois congressional delegation have been asked to withhold approval of legislation ending a cap on hourly flights at O'Hare International Airport until an impact study can be done.

Controversy over Sen. McCain's Bill to Increase Flights at Reagan National (Feb. 17, 1999). The Washington News Bureau reports Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., has caused impassioned protests in Washington with his bill that, among other things, would add 48 takeoff and landing slots at Reagan National Airport.

Florida County Commission Stands Neutral on New Jet Route, Urges FAA to Rule (Feb. 17, 1999). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports the Manatee County Commission declined to take a position on a proposed flight path from Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport that will reduce aircraft noise over Manatee while increasing noise over central Longboat Key, Florida.

Ontario Judge Rules Excessive Noise Violations Fall Under Criminal Code (Feb. 17, 1999). The London Free Press reports a man from Stratford, Ontario, with a history of disturbing his neighbors with loud music was fined $1,700 and prohibited from owning a stereo for the next two years.

Study Shows Noise from New Texas Airport will Affect 1,500 Residents (Feb. 17, 1999). The Austin American-Statesman reports an updated study on noise around a new airport in Southeast Austin, Texas, shows an increase in the number of residents who will be affected by noise from aircraft taking off and landing.

Leaders in Air Industry Disagree about Impact of New Noise Regulations (Feb. 16, 1999). The Journal of Commerce reports tougher noise regulations possibly grounding a number of large aircraft was the topic of discussion at a transportation and aerospace conference in Naples, Florida, last week.

Resident's Letter Urges Action Against Proposed Upgrades at Australia's Canberra Airport (Feb. 16, 1999). The Canberra Times published a letter from Murray May, a resident of Hackett, Australia, urging residents to take action about proposed upgrades at Canberra Airport to preserve property values and their quality of life. Mr. Hackett writes:

Residents of English Town Fight to Keep Noise Restrictions on Factory (Feb. 16, 1999). The Western Morning News reports residents of Barnstaple, England, are objecting to potential noise pollution if a factory destroyed by fire is rebuilt.

California State Fair Wins Noise Suit; Bills Two Residents $3.3 Million for Legal Fees (Feb. 15, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports two Costa Mesa, California, residents who lost a noise suit to the state-run Orange County Fair have been billed $3.3 million in legal fees for prolonging the suit.

Rhode Island Town Seeks Enforceable and Reasonable Noise Ordinance (Feb. 15, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the town of Westerly, Rhode Island, is updating its noise ordinance to make it easier to enforce.

Editorial: Despite Political "Mumbo-Jumbo," New Logan Runway Means More Noise for "Working Stiffs" (Feb. 13, 1999). The Boston Globe published an editorial contending that a new runway at Boston's Logan Airport is a done political deal, but only a quick fix. Meanwhile citizens who suffer from airport noise will only suffer more.

Illinois Resident Highlights Health Hazards from O'Hare (Feb. 13, 1999). The Chicago Tribune published a letter from Robert E. Pochron of Park Ridge, Illinois, who highlights the health dangers of air and noise pollution dispersed by O'Hare International Airport. Mr. Pochron writes:

Florida's Boca Raton Airport Considers PR to Quiet Noise Complaints (Feb. 13, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel reports Florida's Boca Raton Airport Authority may hire a public relations firm to improve its image with the public who is fed up with jet noise.

Los Angeles City Council Asks Van Nuys Airport for Noise Reduction Plan (Feb. 13, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports the Los Angeles City Council voted Friday to ask the Airport Commission to develop a new, balanced approach to reducing noise at Van Nuys Airport.

NH Legislature vs. Local Control in Speedway Noise and Traffic Fray (Feb. 12, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports the New Hampshire Legislature's decision to enter the traffic and noise dispute between the town of Canterbury and a major speedway raises questions about municipal control.

Mass. Moves Forward with Logan Runway Project Despite Objections from South Shore Residents (Feb. 12, 1999). The Patriot Ledger reports the new runway project at Boston's Logan Airport is being touted by the state as an economic boon while residents of at least one South Shore town predict increased noise pollution will be their lot.

Senators Approve Bill to Eliminate High Density Rule at Chicago's O'Hare Airport; Citizens Fear More Noise (Feb. 12, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports a US Senate committee on Thursday approved legislation that would increase the number of flights at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport.

Residents in Boca Raton, Florida, Object to Industrial-Like Sound Walls (Feb. 12, 1999). The Palm Beach Post reports residents along Florida's State Road 7 object to the aesthetics of federally mandated sound walls that will soon enclose their communities.

Singapore Turns Noise, Air, and Land Pollution Rules into Law (Feb. 12, 1999). The Business Times (Singapore) reports the Singapore Parliament yesterday passed a new bill which gives the Ministry of the Environment (ENV) power to enforce many existing noise, air and ground pollution controls.

Snowmobile Debate in US Parks Goes National with Petition from Green Groups (Feb. 12, 1999). USA Today reports a coalition of environmental groups in the United Sates is calling for the ban of recreational snowmobiles in national parks, setting off a contentious debate covering issues from noise and pollution to local economies and civil rights.

Local Washington Citizens' Groups Will Fight Increased Flights at Reagan Airport (Feb. 12, 1999). The Washington Times reports the US Senate commerce committee approved a bill yesterday that would add 48 takeoff and landing slots at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, double the number in last year's defeated bill.

US Senate Will Regulate Air Tour Noise in National Parks (Feb. 11, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports the US Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation today approved steps to address noise generated by airplane and helicopter tours over national parks.

EU Refuses to Delay Hush-Kitted Aircraft Restrictions Despite U.S. Plea (Feb. 11, 1999). The Financial Times reports the European Union's transport commissioner yesterday rejected US attempts to delay EU legislation that would restrict the use of older, noisier aircraft in EU airspace.

Chair of House Aviation Panel Will Visit Calif. to Discuss Burbank Airport Noise and Expansion Controversy (Feb. 11, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports Calif. Rep. James Rogan announced Wednesday he and the chairman of the congressional aviation subcommittee will meet with local officials in April to discuss the city of Burbank's long-running dispute with Burbank Airport.

In Wake of Noise Complaints, San Diego Council Asks Marines to Alter Helicopter Flight Patterns (Feb. 11, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports the San Diego City Council will ask the Miramar Naval Air Station to modify its helicopter flight patterns after a number of residents voiced noise complaints.

EU Hush Kit Ban Means Revenue Loss for US Aircraft Industry (Feb. 10, 1999). Agence Presse reports a senior US trade official Tuesday forewarned that a European Union anti- noise directive, which could be approved Wednesday, could threaten one billion dollars' worth of US aircraft and aircraft engine orders.

Mississippi House Approves Noise Pollution Immunity for Shooting Range (Feb. 10, 1999). The Commercial Appeal reports Mississippi state government endorsed civil immunity from noise pollution for a proposed firing range.

English Residents Say Helicopter Noise Disturbing Their Lives (Feb. 10, 1999). The Western Daily Press reports complaints from villagers in the English countryside about helicopter noise from a nearby air base has prompted a meeting with local officials to address their concerns.

Environmentalism or Protectionism? The EU and the US Spar about New Aircraft Standards (Feb. 10, 1999). AP Worldstream reports the European Parliament, against the wishes of the United States, on Wednesday approved a European Union proposal for new standards aimed at reducing aircraft noise and pollution.

Residents Question Noise Reduction Plan at Anchorage Airport in the Face of Continued Growth (Feb. 9, 1999). The Anchorage Daily News reports communities near the Anchorage International Airport say they're pleased that airport officials are addressing noise; nevertheless, some residents are skeptical the proposed measures will help.

Chicago Residents to Fight Washington Plan to Abolish High Density Rule at O'Hare Airport (Feb. 9, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports federal transportation officials called Monday for lifting the cap on hourly flights at O'Hare International Airport, a limit that nearby suburbs see as one of their strongest defenses against more jet noise.

Virginia Senate Approves Bill Giving Counties Power to Control Noise (Feb. 9, 1999). The Associated Press reports the Virginia Senate approved a proposal to give county commissioners in their state the power to control excessive noise.

Arlington Hts. Trustees Request Residents' Noise Complaints about O'Hare Airport (Feb. 9, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports village trustees in Arlington Heights, Illinois, asked residents to voice their concerns over aircraft noise and pressure state legislators about quality-of-life issues.

NY Community Groups Oppose Unlimited Flights at Airports; Say Current Noise Pollution a Health Threat (Feb. 8, 1999). Newsday reports, civic leaders and politicians from Queens, New York are protesting the Clinton administration's plan to end limits on the number of daily flights at LaGuardia and Kennedy Airports, saying the measure will only bring more noise, pollution and congestion.

Editiorial: Japan Government Should Adhere to Current Noise Standards (Feb. 8, 1999). Asahi News Service published an editorial by Asahi Shimbun that says with traffic noise pollution in Japan shows no signs of abating, the government should not ease noise standards.

Missouri Residents Want Noise Relief from Traffic but Disagree on Sound Wall (Feb. 8, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports residents disagree about a sound wall the Missouri Department of Transportation is building between the highway and their neighborhood.

Letters from California Residents about Van Nuys Airport and Expansion (Feb. 7, 1999). The Los Angeles Times published letters from California residents speak out about the expansion at Van Nuys Airport. The first letter is from Karl Gottesfeld of Encino who opposes expansion:

Texas Town to Test Alternative to Blaring Train Whistles (Feb. 7, 1999). The Dallas Morning News reports the city of Richardson, Texas, will test an alternative to train whistles which frequently disturb residents at night..

Environmentalists Want Snowmobiles Out of U.S. National Parks (Feb. 7, 1999). The New York Times reports a coalition of environmental groups in the United States wants to ban snowmobiles from the 28 National Parks that allow them. Noise, air pollution and safety are environmentalists' chief concerns.

Council Members Want to Rid Van Nuys Airport of Noisy Stage 2 Jets (Feb. 6, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports city council members from California's San Fernando Valley are dissatisfied with a recent economic-impact survey, and on Friday called for a plan to phase out noisy aircraft at Van Nuys Airport in California.

Los Angeles Council Members Tired of Studies, Want Limits Now at Van Nuys Airport for Noisy Jets (Feb. 6, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports two Los Angeles City Council members called Friday for an immediate limit on the number of older, noisier jets based at California's Van Nuys Airport.

The Politics of Noise vs. Economics at O'Hare International Airport; Editorial Praises Mayor Daley's Expansion Plan (Feb. 6, 1999). The Chicago Tribune published an editorial praising Chicago Mayor Richard Daley's expansion plans for O'Hare International Airport.

Two New Terminals Proposed at O'Hare Airport Bring Noise Questions (Feb. 6, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports the chairman of the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission on Friday asked for an analysis of how plans for two new terminals at O'Hare International Airport will affect noise in surrounding communities.

Florida Residents Bothered by Noise from Orlando Sanford Airport Even Though Levels Below FAA Limit (Feb. 5, 1999). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune Seminole reports jets flying over neighborhoods on their way to and from Orlando Sanford Airport are noisy, but according to recent tests and federal standards, they're not a noise problem.

NJ Lawmaker Takes New Approach to Reduce Jet Noise at Teterboro Airport (Feb. 4, 1999). The Record reports a New Jersey lawmaker has introduced a bill to reduce jet noise at the Teterboro Airport.

Rep. Hyde Needs House Speaker to Defeat Expansion at O'Hare (Feb. 4, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports two of Illinois' most powerful congressmen may be about to clash over expansion at O'Hare International Airport.

Third Noise Study Rejects Noise Barriers for NJ Town (Feb. 3, 1999). The Courier-Journal reports a third noise study of the Westport Road area where a Watterson Expressway interchange is planned in St. Matthews, Kentucky, has again concluded that concrete noise barriers are not warranted - despite residents' pleas.

Calif. Residents Threaten to Block New Cal State Stadium, Citing Noise and Traffic (Nov. 24, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports neighbors are vehemently opposed to a new football stadium at the North Campus of Cal State Northridge. Fearing noise, traffic, and a general deterioration of their neighborhoods, residents are circulating a petition and threatening to take the issue to court.

Noise Won't Fly as Reason for SFO Runways over Salt Bay (Nov. 24, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports San Francisco International Airport officials outlined a plan yesterday to build new runways over the bay. Environmentalists are skeptical.

Ohio Residents Oppose Firing Range; Noise and Loss of Property Value Among Objections (Nov. 24, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports a proposed police shooting range in Brunswick Hills, Ohio, brought our dozens of residents yesterday who voiced their objections to noise and loss of property value.

Residents Consider Noise Ordinance in Conn. Town (Nov. 24, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports Ellington, Connecticut, residents gathered Monday at a town ordinance meeting addressing noise and blight.

Barberton, Ohio, Passes Noise Law Targeting Boomcars; Equipment and Vehicles May be Confiscated (Nov. 23, 1998). The Plain Dealer published an editorial urging readers to move to Barberton, Ohio, to get some peace and quiet now that the town has passed a law authorizing the confiscation of car stereo equipment and vehicles from repeated noise offenders.

Firm Designs Quiet Office Next to O'Hare Airport (Nov. 23, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports a manufacturer of ceilings and walls has made its Chicago training center into a "shrine of soundproofing" in office park next to O'Hare International Airport.

Noise, Growth, Aviation Marketplace, All Figure into Chicago Airport Debate (Nov. 23, 1998). The Chicago Tribune published an editorial contending a new group f business leaders is recasting the question of Chicago, O'Hare Airport, and growth in the aviation marketplace. Should the focus be on accommodating growth or attracting it?

St.Charles County, Missouri, Joins Cities in Lawsuit to Block Expansion and Noise at Lambert Field Airport (Nov. 23, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports St. Charles County, Missouri, has joined the cities of St. Charles and Bridgeton in taking legal action against expansion at Lambert Field Airport. The lawsuit objects to increased noise among other issues.

Editorial: Minn. Politics and Bureaucracy Nix Citizens' Chance in Fighting New Runway at Metropolitan Airport (Nov. 22, 1998). The Star Tribune published an editorial contending a Richfield, Illinois, couple who fought runway noise at the Metropolitan Airport, and lost, learned a bitter civics lesson involving the mixing of politics and bureaucracy.

Environmentalists Protest Commercial Airport in Homestead, Florida; Noise and Pollution in Nearby National Parks at Issue (Nov. 22, 1998). The New York Times reports plans for turning the Florida's Homestead Air Force Base into a commercial airport have hit turbulence from environmental groups concerned about noise and air and water pollution in two national parks.

Florida Citizens Petition for Peace and Quiet; Ask for Regulation of Water Scooters (Nov. 22, 1998). The St. Petersburg Times reports a petition signed by residents of a Florida town who object to noise from water scooters has prompted the city to consider a new ordinance.

Illinois Town Considers Racetrack; Farmers Concerned about Noise and Drainage from Track (Nov. 22, 1998). The Pantagraph reports many residents support a new racetrack in Maroa, Illinois, despite some concerns expressed by area farmers about impending noise pollution and drainage from the facility.

Night Flights to Continue; UK Anti-Noise Groups Blast Government Decision (Nov. 22, 1998). The Press Association Newsfile reports anti - noise groups in the United Kingdom today bitterly attacked the Government's decision not to ban night flying at major airports in and around London, England.

Studio City, CA, Resident Criticizes Burbank Airport Authority for Neglecting Noise Mitigation (Nov. 22, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following Letter to Editor from a resident who is critical of Burbank Airport Authority for he sees is a lack of effort to mitigate the airport's noise impact on nearby residents. The letter from Studio City, California, resident Martin Briner reads as follows:

Calif. Judge Upholds Idling Train Ban in Neighborhood, Preserving Quiet (Nov. 21, 1998). The Press-Enterprise reports a California U.S. District Court upheld a ruling forbidding trains from idling and spreading noise and fumes in a west Colton neighborhood.

Florida Limits Homes Near Highways; Fears Losing Federal Money for Sound Walls (Nov. 21, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports a federal policy limiting home construction near highways is threatening to stop a controversial housing project west of Boynton Beach, Florida.

Florida Pig Farmers Ordered to Turn Down Music (Nov. 21, 1998). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports golfers in Stuart, Florida, won the first court fight Friday against the pig farmers they say are disrupting them with blaring music the farmers say calm their animals.

Florida Town Protests New Flight Path at Sarasota-Manatee Airport (Nov. 21, 1998). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports the Sarasota-Manatee Airport Authority has moved another step closer to using a new flight path that would shift jet aircraft noise to the center of Longboat Key, Florida.

Homeowners Near Indianapolis International Airport to Get Noise Assistance (Nov. 21, 1998). The Indianapolis News reports the Federal Aviation Administration has approved a new plan to reduce the impact of airplane noise from Indianapolis International Airport on homeowners in Plainfield, Indiana.

Two Calif. Airport Authorities to Share Noise Abatement Manager (Nov. 21, 1998). The Ventura County Star reports California's Oxnard and Camarillo Airport Authorities plan to create a position and a program to deal with complaints about noisy airplanes.

Two Developers Compete to Build Speedways in Asheville, NC; Noise Concerns Delay One Permit (Nov. 21, 1998). The Asheville Citizen-Times reports there are two efforts to build a racetrack in the Asheville, North Carolina, area. In response to one of the plans, Henderson County commissioners have imposed a 90-day moratorium on racetrack building while they work on a noise ordinance.

Annapolis, MD, Officials Draft Enforceable Noise Law (Nov. 20, 1998). The Capital reports officials in Annapolis, Maryland, are revising their noise laws to make them easier for police to enforce.

Blasting Company in Mass. Ordered to Cease and Desist, Ruled 'Noisome Use' (Nov. 20, 1998). The Telegram & Gazette reports a cease and desist ordered has been issued against a quarrying operation in Lancaster, Massachusetts, after the company was found in violation of town bylaws governing noise from blasting.

County Official Says Legal Hand Forced over Noise from Missouri's Lambert Field (Nov. 20, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports a St. Charles County Councilman believes a lawsuit could have been avoided over noise at Missouri's Lambert Field if St. Louis officials had been more cooperative.

County Says No Choice Left Except to Sue Over Noise from Missouri's Lambert Field Airport (Nov. 20, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports Missouri's St. Charles County Council decided Thursday evening to sue St. Louis over expansion plans at Lambert Field Airport, claiming the city's expansion plan is flawed and will dramatically increase noise levels.

FAA Says Noise Study for Florida Airport Not a Priority (Nov. 20, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports a study Florida's Boca Raton Airport must complete before it can further restrict noisy airplanes will not be conducted in the near future, if at all.

RI Town Goes to Court to Stop Night-Time Noise from Asphalt Plant (Nov. 20, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the noise from late-night paving in Johnston, Rhode Island, has turned into a legal issue.

British Colombian District Requests Respect for Noise Laws from Region (Nov. 19, 1998). The Vancouver Sun reports North Vancouver, British Columbia, has requested that Greater Vancouver regional district abide by local noise laws when they complete a number of projects next year beside Cleveland Dam.

Editorial Says Airlines Can Solve Dispute with Burbank, California, by Becoming Good Corporate Citizens (Nov. 19, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles published an editorial that contends airlines at California's Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport have the responsibility and power to end the dispute with the city of Burbank by showing respect for their host and its community and agreeing to abide by curfews.

Georgia Town to Send Officials to Airport Noise Symposium (Nov. 19, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports concerned about airport noise and expansion, members of the College Park City Council will return to Sand Diego in February for the 1999 Airport Noise Symposium.

Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport Gets New Runway Despite Residents Charge of Flawed Noise Impact Findings (Nov. 19, 1998). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports a new runway was approved for the Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota International Airport despite protests from citizens criticizing the environmental impact findings of jet noise on their community.

Noise Abatement Manager for California's Camarillo and Oxnard Airports (Nov. 19, 1998). The Ventura County Star reports California's Ventura County's Department of Airports is considering creating a position to deal with noise complaints from residents living near the Camarillo and Oxnard airports.

Noise and Pollution Concerns Prompt Maine Town to Set Moratorium on Tire Shredding Plant (Nov. 19, 1998). The Bangor Daily News reports the Fairfield, Maine, Town Council adopted a moratorium Wednesday on "bulk recycling facilities" in order to address residents' fears of noise, traffic, and safety issues about a proposed tire shredding plant.

North Carolina County to Create Noise Ordinance Before Allowing New Racetrack (Nov. 19, 1998). The Asheville Citizen-Times reports Henderson County Commissioners on Wednesday considered a first draft of a noise ordinance they will finalize before lifting a moratorium on the construction of any racetracks in the North Carolina county.

Penn. Residents and Cement Company Negotiate Design of Conveyor to Address Noise and Dust (Nov. 19, 1998). The Morning Call reports a residents' advisory committee to ESSROC Cement Corp discussed on Wednesday noise concerns about the Nazareth, Pennsylvania, manufacturer's proposed 1.7-mile conveyor.

Penn. Town Writes Noise Ordinance in Response to Complaints about Club (Nov. 19, 1998). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports the town of Forest Hills, Pennsylvania, is on its way to passing its first noise ordinance.

Ventura, Calif. Residents Protest Firing Range Noise; Police Officers Say Facility is Necessary (Nov. 19, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports residents of Ventura, California, want to close nearby firing range because of incessant noise, but county law enforcement agencies say range provides vital service.

Wisconsin Town Seeks Highway Noise Barriers to Protect Schools (Nov. 19, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports officials in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, have requested highway noise barriers to protect outdoor school activities from freeway noise.

City of Burbank, Calif. Wins Latest Court Suit over Noise and Expansion at Burbank Airport (Nov. 18, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports Burbank officials won a round in California Appeal's Court in their attempt to strike a noise deal with Burbank Airport.

Legal Battle Wages On; City of Burbank Latest Winner in Appeals Court over Noise Impact of Expansion at Burbank Airport (Nov. 18, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports in the Burbank Airport dispute, a state appeals court has ruled the city of Burbank, California, can proceed with one of its court cases against the Airport Authority on the issue of terminal expansion.

Noise Group Lists Goals in Fighting Noise from Chicago's O'Hare Airport (Nov. 18, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports an advisory committee in Arlington Heights, Illinois, is ready to present their new strategic plan to fight noise from O'Hare International Airport.

Noise Ordinance in Bristol, RI, Challenged and Repealed for Being Too Broad and Vague (Nov. 18, 1998). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports the town of Bristol, RI, has agreed to repeal a noise ordinance that was challenged in a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties of Rhode Island.

RI Town Delays Gun-Club Permit to Conduct More Noise Tests (Nov. 18, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports a Rhode Island zoning board delayed voting on a gun club permit so that the town can hire a sound expert to study how noise from the club would affect nearby residents.

Virginia Beach Amphitheater Successful, but Neighborhoods Want Their Quiet (Nov. 18, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports while concerts at the GTE Virginia Beach Amphitheater bring welcome revenue to the town, they also blast unwanted noise to surrounding neighborhoods, making for a mixed review.

Airports Commission Accuses Richfield of Using Insignificant Data to Halt New Runway at Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport (Nov. 17, 1998). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports the Metropolitan Airports Commission says the city of Richfield has been citing an insignificant noise study to try to stop plans for a new runway at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.

Airports Commission and Town of Richfield at Standoff Over Noise from the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport; Accusations Hurled from Both Sides (Nov. 17, 1998). The Star Tribune reports the Metropolitan Airports Commission and the city of Richfield, Minnesota, are at an impasse over reports on low-frequency noise from jets on a proposed north-south runway at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.

British Government Deems Nighttime Flying Ban Impractical at Country's Busiest Airports (Nov. 17, 1998). Press Association Newsfile reports the British Government today declined to ban night-time flying at Britain's two busiest airports, but continue to consider proposals to reduce noise levels at Heathrow and Gatwick airports.

City of Burbank Wins Appeal on Burbank Airport Ruling; Legal Battle Continues over Noise and Expansion (Nov. 17, 1998). City News Service reports a California state appellate court reinstated a lawsuit against Burbank Airport Authority by the city of Burbank, an attorney for the city said today.

Metropolitan Airports Commission and City of Minneapolis Agree to North-South Runway, Temporary Extension, and No Third Runway (Nov. 17, 1998). PR Newswire published the following press release detailing two agreements regarding development at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport reached between the Metropolitan Airports Commission (MAC) and the City of Minneapolis:

Ohio City Council Considers Increasing Fines for Violators of Noise Law (Nov. 17, 1998). The State Journal Register reports the Springfield, Ohio, City Council is considering increasing fines for violators of noise law.

Study Finds Noise Levels within Law at Conn. Crematory; Residents Continue to Object to Noise (Nov. 17, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports results of a noise study conducted at an Enfield, Connecticut, crematory did not solve a dispute between the funeral home and its neighbors.

Citizens' Group Sues Navy Over Jets at Virginia Beach Air Station; Uncovered Naval Report Predicts High Noise Costs to Homes, Schools (Nov. 16, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports a lawsuit filed against relocation of Navy Jets to an Air Force Base in Virginia Beach uncovered an unreleased Naval report estimating the high costs of noise-proofing local homes and schools.

Missouri County Allows Expanded Quarrying Operations Despite Residents' Objections to Increased Noise and Decreased Property Values (Nov. 16, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the Warren County, Missouri, Commission overturned a recommendation of the Planning and Zoning Commission Friday and voted to allow a company to expand its quarrying operation. Nearby residents object to the expansion saying it will bring increased noise and decreased property values.

South Carolina Police Gun Club Cooperates with Neighbors about Noise Complaints (Nov. 16, 1998). The Herald reports a Rock Hill, South Carolina, police firing range has drawn several noise complaints from neighbors, but the owners promise more quiet.

Mayors of City of Burbank Explain Hesitancy to Accept "Good Faith" Efforts and Uncertain Outcomes from FAA and Burbank Airport Authority (Nov. 15, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following perspective from Dave Golonski and Stacey Murphy, respectively mayor and vice mayor of the City of Burbank. In their opinions, agreement by the city to support expansion at the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport in exchange for a willingness to adhere to the results of a FAA noise study is an inequitable exchange, for the results of that study are uncertain and remove all incentive for the Airport Authority to work with the city to maintain quality of life for its residents.

What to do about O'Hare Airport? Opinions Vary on Issues from Expansion to Pollution and Noise (Nov. 15, 1998). The Sunday Gazette Mail reports the only aspects about Chicago's O'Hare International Airport that officials and residents can agree on is it's crowded but it pumps billions of dollars into the economy. On nearly everything else, including expansion, capacity, pollution, and noise, opinions vary and create strange political bedfellows.

Officials of Richfield, MN, and MAC Disagree Over Significance of Previously Unreleased Noise Study of New Runway at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (Nov. 14, 1998). The Star Tribune reports the city of Richfield, Minnesota, charges the Metropolitan Airports Commission withheld a noise study report that held information favorable to Richfield's efforts to secure state and federal noise mitigation funds to address low-frequency noise from a proposed new runway at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.

Noisy Leaf Blowers Replace Quiet Rakes in Suburban United States (Nov. 14, 1998). The Boston Globe reports the noisy leaf blower has taken its place alongside the snow blower and ride-on lawn mover as tools of modern suburban living outside Boston, Massachusetts, and throughout the United States.

Growth Brings Noise to Ohio Township, Including Din from Church Gatherings (Nov. 14, 1998). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports officials and residents of Hamilton Township, Ohio, are considering the merits of a noise ordinance in the wake of complaints about late-night noise from teen gatherings at a local church.

Business Reps. Convince Madison, WI, Commission to Reject Noise Ordinance (Nov. 13, 1998). The Wisconsin State Journal reports the Madison, Wisconsin, Economic Development Commission rejected a proposed noise ordinance Thursday.

NJ Farm Market and Neighbors Close to Settling Noise Dispute (Nov. 12, 1998). The Asbury Park Press reports a long-running dispute between a farm market in Holmdel, New Jersey, and neighboring residents who object to noise from the business, may be close to resolution.

Outdoor Amplified Music Banned on Public Property in Stuart, Florida (Nov. 12, 1998). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports a resident's complaints about noise has stopped the outdoor Sunday music in Stuart, Florida. Restaurant owners say the city's order has foiled their means of drawing business into downtown on Sundays.

Noise Ordinance Before Speedway, Say North Carolina County Officials (Nov. 11, 1998). The Asheville Citizen-Times reports officials in Henderson County, Florida, are considering a moratorium on the construction of racetracks until a noise ordinance is in place.

While Chicago Chamber of Commerce Pushes Growth at O'Hare, Citizens' Groups Stress Noise and Environmental Impacts (Nov. 10, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports the Chicago region could lose billions of dollars in economic activity if O'Hare Airport is not allowed to expand according to a report commissioned by the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce.

Avon, Ohio, to Get Noise Barriers Along Widened Section of Interstate 90 (Nov. 10, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports Avon, Ohio, will get noise walls built along Interstate 90 next year.

Two Chicago Suburbs to Get Mobile Monitors to Measure Noise from O'Hare (Nov. 7, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports mobile noise monitors will soon be placed in Arlington Heights and Rolling Meadows to measure noise from O'Hare International Airport.

Chandler, Arizona, Debates Runway and Heliport Issues at Local Airport (Nov. 6, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports Chandler, Arizona, officials Thursday debated the future of the city's airport, addressing such issues as the length of runways, relocating a heliport, and jurisdiction over the airport.

Airport Debate in Chandler, Arizona, Pits Residents who Want Quiet Against Supporters of Economic Development (Nov. 5, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports officials considering accelerating development around the airport in Chandler, Arizona, face opposition from residents who want peace and quiet.

Arizona Residents Become Noise Experts to Get Sound Wall Built (Nov. 4, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports residents of Ahwatukee Foothills in Arizona pleaded with the village planning committee Monday to build a noise mitigation wall near Interstate 10, claiming the noise is unbearable and driving their housing values down.

Truck Noise is a Greater Concern (Nov.1 1998). Fleet Owner reports that one reason for the high number of complaints is the sheer number of trucks. Truck traffic has increased almost sixfold between 1960 and 1995, according to the Dept. of Transportation (DOT). The other reason is that grass-roots anti- noise groups are no longer considered kooks by politicians. Congressional researchers say nearly 20-million Americans are exposed to noise levels that can lead to cardiovascular problems, strokes, and nervous disorders. Another 40-million are exposed to noise levels that cause sleep or work disruption.

Violators of Noise Pollution Laws Convicted in South China (Oct. 21, 1998). South China Morning Post reports more than 100 companies and individuals were convicted last month of noise pollution and other forms of contaminating the environment in South China.

Burbank Airport Begins Noise Study, Wants City to Abide by Night Flight Findings (Oct. 20, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports Burbank Airport commissioners voted unanimously Monday to begin a study that could lead to required anti- noise measures, which may include a mandatory curfew on night flights.

Burbank Airport Proceeds with Federal Noise Study; City Leaders Reluctant to Commit to Findings (Oct. 20, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports the Burbank Airport's governing body unanimously approved a noise study that could eventually lead to a federally ordered curfew. However, city officials in Burbank are reluctant to commit to findings and withdraw their opposition to a new airport terminal.

City Councilors Disagree about Banning Jet Skis on Vermont Lake (Oct. 20, 1998). The Associated Press reports Burlington, Vermont's, City Council is considering banning personal watercraft from Burlington Harbor on Lake Champlain.

County Supervisors Add Noise Monitoring to Flight Tests at California's El Toro (Oct. 20, 1998). City News Service reports county supervisors requested noise monitoring and night flights be added to a series of flight tests conducted at California's former El Toro Marine base, a site being considered for a commercial airport.

Noise from Crematory Gets Action from Conn. Town Council (Oct. 20, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports neighbors of a crematory in Enfield, Connecticut, were successful Monday night in getting their town council to take action after they voiced complaints about noise from the operation.

Residents in England Join Forces to Limit Fireworks and Associated Noise (Oct. 20, 1998). The Evening Standard reports anti-noise protesters have recruited former education minister Sir Rhodes Boyson in an effort to restrict fireworks parties to the week of November 5, to celebrate Guy Fawkes night.

Curfew Study could Lead to Deal between City of Burbank and Burbank-Glendale Airport (Oct. 19, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports commissioners of California's Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority will meet today to consider a noise study that could lead the federal government to impose a mandatory curfew on commercial flights.

House Votes Down Call for Increased Flights at NY's Busiest Airports (Oct. 19, 1998). The Daily News (New York) reports New York City residents in the borough of Queens, subjected for years to abnormally high levels of noise and air pollution, got a break last week when JFK and LaGuardia were denied flight increases.

RI Residents Say Quarry is Loud and Unwelcome Neighbor (Oct. 19, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports tests performed at a quarry in Cumberland, Rhode Island, show that the quarry meets federal noise and vibration standards, town officials say. Residents questioned the accuracy of the readings and insist the noise from quarry is unacceptable.

RI Town Moves Toward Drafting Enforceable Noise Ordinance (Oct. 19, 1998). Providence Journal-Bulletin reports noise problems from loud cars to early morning industrial operations prove challenging to Rhode Island residents.

Calif. Residents Voice Opinions about Costs and Benefits of Proposed El Toro Airport (Oct. 18, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published letters to editor from residents about the proposed El Toro Airport. Byron Edwards of Orange County is opposed to the new airport:

Los Angeles Resident Says Noise Problems at Universal Not Limited to Late-Night Filming (Oct. 18, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published a letter to the editor from resident Richard A. Cole of Toluca Lake objecting to expansion and noise at Universal's Park. Cole writes:

Singapore Government Offers Awards to Quiet Companies (Oct. 18, 1998). The Straits Times (Singapore) reports Singapore's government will award companies who reduce noise levels.

Burbank Airport's Airlines Reject Mandatory Curfews; Federal Noise Study May Lead to FAA Sanctioned Curfews (Oct. 17, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports most airlines serving California's Burbank Airport have refused to accept a mandatory curfew, leaving the airport authority to consider a federal noise study.

Burbank Requests Glendale Take Active Role in Calif.'s Burbank Airport Curfew Issue (Oct. 17, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports the Glendale City Council has scheduled an emergency, closed-door meeting today to discuss developments at California's Burbank Airport, where opposing factions have been discussing flight curfews.

House Nixes Added Flights at Reagan National Airport (Oct. 17, 1998). The Washington Times reports Congress won't be adding any new flights this year at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.

Burbank Airport Authority Criticizes City Officials for Refusing to Commit to Results of Noise Study (Oct. 16, 1998). City News Service reports the Burbank City Council today proposed contributing up to $250,000 for a study on noise levels at Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport, but airport officials were skeptical about the offer.

Cleveland Says Airport Expansion Doesn't Mean Noise Increase; Mayor Announces Plans for Further Expansion while Airport Neighbors Continue to Wait for Home Soundproofing (Oct. 16, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports the expansion of runways at Ohio's Cleveland Hopkins International Airport can happen while keeping any noise increase to a minimum, city officials said yesterday.

NH Couple Prosecuted after Neighbors Complain of Noisy Geese (Oct. 16, 1998). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports a New Hampshire couple is being prosecuted for noise violations after neighbors complained about noisy animals.

Airlines Consider Formal Curfew at Burbank; Agreement Could Lead to New Terminal (Oct. 15, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports more than half of the airlines that use Burbank Airport are considering accepting a formal curfew on night flights. Their acceptance of a mandatory nighttime curfew could pave the way for a new passenger terminal.

City Planners in Chesapeake, Virginia, Reject Speedway Based on Projected Noise (Oct. 15, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports noise was one of the environmental factors commissioners in Chesapeake, Virginia, cited in rejecting a proposed speedway.

Extended Limits on Noisy Planes at San Francisco Airport Applauded by Airport Group (Oct. 15, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports San Francisco International Airport has asked the FAA to extend a nighttime ban on Stage 2 aircraft.

Newport, Rhode Island, Waives Noise Ordinance for High School Football Games (Oct. 15, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports officials in Newport, Rhode Island, waived the noise ordinance for the season's remaining high school football games after neighbors complained of noise at a local field.

San Francisco Airport Asks FAA to Extend Nighttime Noise Ban on Stage 2 Jets (Oct. 15, 1998). The Associated Press reports the San Francisco International Airport has asked the FAA to extend a nighttime ban for some of the loudest jets in use.

Santa Fe Airport Neighbors Seek Noise Abatement Ordinance (Oct. 15, 1998). The Albuquerque Tribune reports a group of airport neighbors contend Santa Fe Airport officials are ignoring complaints about too many low-flying ear-piercing planes over homes in New Mexico at all hours.

St. Charles, Missouri, Council May Join Suit Against Lambert Runway (Oct. 15, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the St. Charles County Council is getting closer to joining in a lawsuit aimed at stopping the construction of a runway at Lambert Field, an expansion that would bring the airport two miles closer to St. Charles.

Town in Washington Adopts Noise Ordinance After Hearing Complaints about Car Stereos (Oct. 15, 1998). The Seattle Times reports the Woodinville, Washington, City Council has adopted a noise ordinance after receiving numerous noise complaints from citizens about loud car stereos.

Airport Foes Say Tests at California's El Toro Won't Show Long-Term Effects (Oct. 14, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports opponents of turning El Toro Marine Base into a commercial airport say planned testing will yield inaccurate results while airport boosters say test results will reduce residents' noise concerns.

Citizens' Group Says Study Shows Increased Flights at Dallas' Love Field Will Create Dangerous Noise and Traffic Levels in Texas Neighborhoods (Oct. 14, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports increasing flights at Dallas Love Field would lead to more noise and longer traffic delays on nearby streets, according to a study paid for by a neighboring homeowners group.

Critics Say Flight Tests at El Toro Won't Give Accurate Noise Picture (Oct. 14, 1998). The Orange County Register reports critics say El Toro flight tests next year won't give accurate noise picture at California's proposed airport site.

Florida's Martin County Enacts Noise Ordinance (Oct. 14, 1998). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports many residents of Stuart, Florida, are pleased with new noise restrictions adopted by the commissioners of Martin County.

Group Outlines Requests in Effort to Live with Noise from New Mexico's Santa Fe Airport (Oct. 14, 1998). The Santa Fe New Mexican reports residents who live near New Mexico's Santa Fe Municipal Airport will bring their requests to county commissioners in an effort to get support in lowering airplane noise.

Hearing Experts in England Call for Restrictions on Noise Levels in Cinemas (Oct. 14, 1998). The Evening Herald reports hearing experts in Plymouth, England, say film-makers are turning up the volume to dangerous levels which could lead to hearing loss.

Officials from Illinois' Palwaukee Airport Request Grant Money for Noise Study and Construction of Taxiway (Oct. 14, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports officials from Palwaukee Municipal Airport bid for millions of dollars in grants for airport improvements. Plans for the grant money include an update of a noise study and construction of part of a taxiway on the main runway's west side.

Outdoor Entertainer in Bath, England, Banned after Residents Complain of Noise (Oct. 14, 1998). The Western Daily Press reports a popular outdoor entertainer in Bath, England, recently received a citation for disturbing the peace.

Public Hearing in Austin, Texas, will Address Noise Study Projections for Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (Oct. 14, 1998). The Austin American-Statesman reports officials in Austin, Texas, will hold a public meeting tonight to discuss a noise study in preparation for the May 1999 opening of Austin-Bergstrom International Airport for passenger traffic.

Residents Say Generator a Noise Nuisance in England Town (Oct. 14, 1998). The Sentinel reports residents of Stoke, England, contend noise from a generator powering temporary traffic lights is making their life hell.

Santa Fe, New Mexico, Airport Neighbors Seek Noise Abatement Ordinance after "Flying Friendly" Program Fails (Oct. 14, 1998). The Associated Press reports neighbors of New Mexico's Santa Fe Airport are dissatisfied with the level of cooperation they've received from airport officials about noise complaints.

Texas Town to Meet about Leaf-Blower Noise and Pollution (Oct. 14, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports Highland Park, Texas, will address leaf-blower noise and pollution at a public meeting.

County Council Approves Noise-Reduction Plan for Washington's Boeing Field; Activists Not Satisfied (Oct. 13, 1998). The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports an ambitious program that will reduce aircraft noise at Boeing Field won the unanimous approval of Washington's King County Council yesterday. Some activists and airport neighbors disapprove of the plan.

Noise from New Jersey Firing Range Pits Neighboring Towns (Oct. 13, 1998). The Record reports the neighboring New Jersey towns of Allendale and Waldwick are engaged in a dispute over noise from a Waldwick firing range.

Virginia Speedway Gets OK from City Planners Despite Noise Concerns (Oct. 13, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports city planners in Chesapeake, Virginia have approved a controversial motorsports speedway, saying noise can be satisfactorily mitigated.

County Exec. Urges St. Charles to Join Lawsuit Against FAA Over New Runway Plan for Missouri's Lambert Field (Oct. 12, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports a St. Charles County leader is advising the county to join a lawsuit to overturn the approved expansion at Missouri's Lambert Field Airport.

Making Noise Laws Clear in Moorpark, California (Oct. 12, 1998). The Ventura County Star published an article about noise written by the Senior Deputy of the Moorpark, California. The law enforcement officer, Kory Martinelli, seeks to clear up some misconceptions about noise nuisances and the law.

Missouri Town Seeks Enforceable Resolution Over Noise from Lambert Field Airport (Oct. 12, 1998). St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the St. Charles County Council in Missouri is seeking a noise-reduction agreement with St. Louis regarding Lambert Field Airport. If no agreement appears to be forthcoming, St. Charles is threatening to sue the city of St. Louis.

New York Rally Protests Airport Noise and Its Health Effects on Children (Oct. 12, 1998). Newsday reports children and adults gathered in Queens, New York, yesterday to protest noise, pollution, and ill health effects from nearby airports.

Tourists in Canada Find Banff Too Noisy; Business Owners Seek Solutions (Oct. 12, 1998). The article reports Bonar Hunter, Banff's senior bylaw officer, said the town's general noise bylaw does not specifically regulate or enforce bar noise and that his team of four full-time officers only works until 10 p.m. during the summer, and 6 p.m. in the off- season. Most bars close at about 2 a.m. and that's where the trouble starts, hotel and motel officials said. Hunter is investigating and will report to town council. "We want higher profile by RCMP . . ." said Lanz, adding the noise is also becoming a problem for Banff's permanent residents. Banff RCMP agree the problem of early-morning party animals is getting worse and they expect final statistics on jailed drunks this year to be up 20 per cent. "There wasn't a lot of bad weather to drive people indoors so the kids stayed out longer and seemed to party harder than they normally do," said RCMP Sgt. Bob Peterson.

Citizens' Panel Suggests Limits on New York's County Airport; Noise and Water Pollution Top Concerns (Oct. 11, 1998). The New York Times reports a citizens' advisory board recommended limited expansion of New York's County Airport, citing a number of quality of life and environmental issues including noise pollution and water quality.

Resident Objects to Expanded Flights at Washington, DC's Reagan National Airport (Oct. 11, 1998). The Washington Post published a letter from a McLean resident who objects to expanded flights at Washington, DC's Reagan National Airport. Mary Wakefield writes:

Calif. Congressmen Seek FAA Exemption of Formal Review for Mandatory Curfew at Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport (Oct. 10, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports federal lawmakers from California are urging the Federal Aviation Administration to allow Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport to enact a mandatory curfew on nighttime flights without a formal review process, officials said Friday.

Landmark Noise Case Could be Foundation for Homeowners' Action Against Airport FedEx Hub in Greensboro, NC (Oct. 10, 1998). The News & Record reports a 52-year-old legal case may be ammunition for property owners near the Piedmont Triad International Airport who opposed a Federal Express hub and a third runway at the Greensboro, North Carolina, airport.

Martin County, Florida, Set to Approve Noise Restrictions (Oct. 10, 1998). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports commissioners in Martin County, Florida, are expected to approve noise restrictions Tuesday after months of debate.

Noise Sources and Solutions in Washington, DC, Area Neighborhoods (Oct. 10, 1998). The Washington Post reports that while noise may be an unavoidable part of apartment life in the Washington, DC, area, as it is elsewhere, developers, property managers, and tenants themselves can take steps to muffle their problems.

Colorado Village Seeks Input for Residents at FAA Hearing with Centennial Airport (Oct. 10, 1998). The Denver Post reports Greenwood Village officials want residents surrounding Colorado's Centennial Airport to have a voice in the battle between the airport authority and a commuter passenger service that has been banned from the airport.

'Quiet on the Lot' for Universal Studios if County Noise Restrictions Approved (Oct. 10, 1998). The Calgary Herald reports Hollywood's Universal Studios may be the first southern California studio to have noise restrictions on its lots.

Washington's Boeing Field Will Undergo Noise Reduction Efforts (Oct. 9, 1998). The Seattle Times reports the Metropolitan King County Council next week is expected to authorize the most extensive noise -reduction efforts in the history of Washington's Boeing Field.

Williams Gateway Airport in Arizona Considers Charging Landing Fees for Noisy Military Aircraft (Oct. 9, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports Williams Gateway Airport may start charging military aircraft for touch-and-go landings, the largest source of noise complaints from area homeowners.

Illinois' Rep. Hyde Says, "No New Flights at O'Hare;" House Bill Nixed (Oct. 9, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports a plan that could have added 30 daily commercial flights at O'Hare International Airport appears to be squashed for now. Local activists applauded the move.

Knoxville, Tennessee, Passes New Noise Ordinance (Oct. 9, 1998). The Commercial Appeal reports Knoxville, Tennessee, is setting stricter standards for quiet.

St. Charles Will Join Bridgeton Lawsuit Against Expansion at Missouri's Lambert Field (Oct. 9, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports officials in St. Charles, Missouri, are waiting for the full release of a federal report on the expansion of Lambert Field before joining Bridgeton in federal court to challenge that expansion.

Burbank Airport Authority Asks Carriers to Agree to Curfew (Oct. 9, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports airport officials at the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport have urged air carriers to accept an enforceable, mandatory curfew, officials said Thursday. Acceptance of a curfew could ease the longstanding dispute between the airport and the city of Burbank.

Overzealous Airline Lobbying Nixes Extra Slots at O'Hare; Anti-Noise Group Thrilled (Oct. 9, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports behind-the-scenes maneuvering by United Airlines gave a senator reason to nix additional slots at O'Hare International Airport.

LA Commission Approves Noise Restrictions for Universal Studios (Oct. 8, 1998). The Associated Press reports noise restrictions for California's Universal Studios were recently approved by the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission.

Calif. Residents Hope for Renewal of Settlement Agreement at John Wayne Airport (Oct. 8, 1998). The Orange County Register reports California's El Toro Airport issue and how it's resolved could have enormous implications for John Wayne Airport and nearby residents.

Residents Demand Formal Oversight at California's Universal Studios, Citing Existing and Projected Noise Problems (Oct. 8, 1998). The Hollywood Reporter reports the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission voted to recommend noise restrictions at Universal Studios in an effort to balance importance of film industry with noise concerns of residents.

Richfield, MN, Officials Take Airport Noise Concerns to Washington (Oct. 8, 1998). The Star Tribune reports Richfield, Minnesota, officials brought to Washington, DC, this week their fight against low-frequency airport noise in their suburban neighborhood.

Wisconsin Residents Object to Noise from Neighborhood Swimming Lessons (Oct. 8, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports a special planning commission hearing was held in Mequon, Wisconsin, to address the issue of noise from a residence where swimming lessons are given.

Illinois Highway Officials Refuse Lisle's Request for Noise Barriers (Oct. 7, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports Lisle, Illinois, officials pledged this week to continue the fight for noise barriers along a three-quarter-mile stretch of the North-South Tollway.

England's Birmingham International Airport Welcomes Quieter British Airways Planes (Oct. 7, 1998). The Birmingham Post reports British Airways has announced the purchase of new, quieter, and more environmentally friendly aircraft. The news is welcomed by England's Birmingham International Airport.

Vancounver's Residents Hand City Council a Petition Demanding Councilors Do Something About Rail Horns (Oct. 6, 1998). The Vancouver Sun reports that citizens of Maple Ridge, Vancouver, Canada want train whistles silenced. An 800-name petition asked that city councilors do something about high-volume air horns.

Residents Fear Expansion at Detroit Metropolitan Airport will Increase Noise; They Insist on Noise Study (Oct. 6, 1998). The Associated Press reports that residents fear the expansion of Detroit Metropolitan Airport will increase airport noise, despite county efforts to implement a noise abatement program.

City of Burbank Keeps Pushing for Noise Restrictions at California's Burbank-Glendale Airport (Oct. 6, 1998). Airports(R) reports city and airport officials are seeking ways to resolve the ongoing dispute over noise pollution, airline schedules and a terminal upgrade at Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport.

FAA Worried EU Will Limit Operation of Hushkitted Aircraft (Oct. 5, 1998). Aviation Daily reports the FAA is concerned that the European Union is getting ready to act unilaterally to limit the operation of hushkitted aircraft. According to the article, in a Sept. 14 letter, David Traynham, FAA assistant administrator for policy, planning and international aviation, told Michel Ayral, European Commission director for air transport, that a proposed EU regulation "would serve only to diminish the effectiveness of the ICAO process under a mistaken belief that U.S. carriers will transfer their Stage 3 hushkitted airplanes to EU registers after Dec. 31, 1999."

Trees Deemed Insufficient Noise Abatement for Plans to Widen Busy Roadway (Oct. 5, 1998). The Baltimore Sun published the following editorial regarding the use of trees to muffle the sound of vehicles on a heavily traveled route.

Editorial Praises Chicago's Ordinance Outlawing Loud, Annoying Car Stereos (Oct. 4, 1998). The Chicago Tribune published the following editorial praising Chicago's ordinance that outlaws loud, annoying music from car stereos.

Los Angeles Carrier Decides to Delay Early Morning Departures as a Result of Citizen Protests (Oct. 3, 1998). Los Angeles Times credits citizen protest with air carriers' decision to delay early morning take offs from Burbank Airport.

O'Hare's Noise Commissioner Urges the Panel to Take on National Issues to Reduce Noise (Oct. 3, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission is discussing whether to expand its campaign to Washington, D.C. in an effort to reduce noise levels back home.

Union Pacific Railroad Wants Ban on Idling Locomotives Lifted in Riverside, California (Oct. 3, 1998). The Press-Enterprise reports that Union Pacific Railroad is seeking a federal court ordered injunction to lift a ban on idling locomotives in Riverside, California.

Changes to Airspace Plan Charges Debate about Increased Flight Capacity at O'Hare International Airport (Oct. 2, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reported that a Federal Aviation Administration workshop for the public discussing airspace changes was vague about whether the changes would mean increased flight capacity.

County Tries to Block Expansion of Lambert Field Airport in St. Louis, Missouri (Oct. 2, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that St. Charles County may join others in a lawsuit against the Federal Aviation Administration to block the expansion of Lambert Field Airport.

Missouri Town Files Suit to Overturn Expansion at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport (Oct. 2, 1998). The Bond Buyer reports the city of Bridgeton, Missouri, filed suit against the city of St. Louis hours after St. Louis won approval for expansion of the Lambert-St. Louis International Airport.

Bridgeton Files Suit After FAA OK's Lambert Expansion; Various Factions Speak Out (Oct. 1, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday approved southwest expansion into Bridgeton at Missouri's Lambert Field. A few hours later, attorneys for Bridgeton filed suit in St. Louis Circuit Court to try to overturn the plan.

Business Challenges Village's Noise Ordinance in Court (Oct. 1, 1998). The Times Union reports that a long-standing scrap metal business is challenging Green Island's newly amended noise ordinance.

California Town Seeks to Set New Noise Standards (Oct. 1, 1998). The Press-Enterprise reports the town of Norco, California, is considering adopting operating standards that would restrict noise from a nightclub and an amusement center to a specific level of decibels.

Economic Developers See Benefits if Missouri's Lambert Field Expands (Oct. 1, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports economic development officials predict expansion at Missouri's Lambert Field would have a wide-ranging direct and indirect impact, creating thousands of new jobs, pouring billions of dollars into the local economy, and helping Lambert compete with airport hubs across the United States.

Missouri Alderman Sponsors Bill to Restrict Speedway Operations, Citing Noise Complaints (Oct. 1, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports a St. Peters, Missouri, Alderman is pushing a bill to further restrict noise from the St. Charles Speedway.

Residents Say Quality of Life Ignored in Expansion Plans at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (Oct. 1, 1998). The Associated Press reports Ohio residents of suburbs near Cleveland Hopkins International Airport fear more airport expansion will mean more noise.

Who Will Pay for Sound Walls Along Missouri's Interstate 270? (Oct. 1, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that after the state denied their request to pay for sound walls along Interstate270, Creve Coeur, Missouri, officials are considering their financing options to mitigate noise along the interstate highway.

Cedarburg, Wisconsin, Will Address Noise Complaints about Automotive Plant (Sep. 30, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports the city of Cedarburg, Wisconsin, is investigating complaints from neighbors about noise at the local Amcast Automotive Plant.

Chicago Alderman Seeks to Soften City's Noise Ordinance, Claiming Ban on Loud Car Music Hurts Retailers (Sep. 30, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports a Chicago, Illinois, City Alderman has introduced an initiative to amend the city's 1996 ordinance that bans loud music in cars. Opponents of the current noise ordinance say it hurts business at car-audio retailers.

Hearing on Rhode Island Gun Club Permit Request Continued; Neighbors Strongly Object to Club's Relocation (Sep. 30, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports a Rhode Island zoning board last night continued a hearing to a fourth night of review on a gun club's application for a special-use permit that would allow it to relocate, frustrating the club's lawyer.

Nearby Towns Say the Issue is Noise; Vow to Fight FAA Approval of Expansion of St. Louis, Missouri's Lambert Field (Sep. 30, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports if, as expected, the Federal Aviation Administration gives the green light to the $2.6 billion W-1W plan for expanding Lambert Field, the announcement will set in motion legal actions by public officials in St. Charles County.

Santa Fe, New Mexico, Takes Action Against Bar after Noise Complaints (Sep. 30, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reports a popular night spot in downtown Santa Fe, New Mexico, is forbidden from offering live music until the bar's owner complies with the city's noise ordinance, a city official said Tuesday.

City Council in Sunnyvale, CA, Discusses Leaf Blower Noise (Sep. 29, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports the city council in Sunnyvale, California, will meet to discuss the effect of noise on the community, including noise created by leaf blowers.

Maryland Village Requests Noise Barriers; Offered Trees Instead (Sep. 29, 1998). The Baltimore Sun reports residents of a Maryland village have been offered evergreen trees to buffer noise from a four-lane highway, although officials admit the vegetation will do little to mitigate the noise.

Medina, Ohio, Seeks to Enact Construction Noise Restrictions (Sep. 29, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports the city of Medina, Ohio, will adopt construction noise restrictions in response to complaints from residents who are losing sleep to a current building boom.

Opponents of Expansion at Missouri's Lambert Field Picket in St. Louis (Sep. 29, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports despite expected federal approval of Missouri's Lambert Field's expansion plan, three busloads of opponents picketed outside St. Louis City Hall on Monday.

Reno Air Agrees to Burbank Airport's Voluntary Curfew (Sep. 29, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Reno Air, which had sought to fly before 7 a.m. at Burbank Airport when the voluntary curfew lifts, decided it won't violate the curfew.

Third-Airport Proponents Object to FAA's Air-Use Plan at O'Hare (Sep. 29, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports third airport proponents objected Monday to the Federal Aviation Administration's plan for reconfiguring the use of Chicago's air space at O'Hare International Airport. Objectors say the proposed plan fails to address O'Hare's inability to safely handle growth.

Will New Flight Plan at O'Hare Bring More Noise? (Sep. 29, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports residents of Chicago's suburbs, airport activists, and other leaders fear a federal proposal to redesign flight paths would lead to increased flights at O'Hare Airport and more noise below.

Colorado County Considers Noise Standards for Oil, Gas Industry (Sep. 28, 1998). The Associated Press reports commissioners in La Plata County, Colorado, will reconsider a proposed noise standard for the oil and gas industry after industry officials claimed the restrictions are impractical.

Critics Say National Park Service Study of Aircraft Noise is False and Misleading (Sep. 28, 1998). The Weekly of Business Aviation(TM) reports critics of a National Park Service aircraft noise study at the Grand Canyon spoke on Capitol Hill last week.

European Union's Environment Commission Says it Will Propose Noise Pollution Legislation by the End of 1999 (Sep. 28, 1998). The Economist Intelligence Unit reports that the Environment Commission for the European Union has announced that it will propose, by the end of 1999, a legislative framework to extend ambient noise levels, beyond the current limits, for cars, lorries and aircraft.

Montreal Residents Suffer from Perpetual Transportation Noise (Sep. 28, 1998). The Gazette reports Montreal residents who are assaulted by noise from planes, trains and automobiles believe landlords and homeowners need to speak out about this quality of life issue.

Noise Study Focuses on Private Jets at Burbank Airport (Sep. 28, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports while Burbank city leaders fight a proposed new passenger terminal at Burbank Airport, citing noise factors, two private terminals that house the jets of Hollywood moguls such as Time Warner and DreamWorks SKG escape city scrutiny.

RI Planning Board to Hear Residents' Noise Concerns about Gun Club (Sep. 28, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports West Greenwich, Rhode Island, residents will have their turn tomorrow to present arguments to the Zoning Board of Review against allowing a gun club's request for re-location.

Expanded Flightpaths in England Bring More Noise; Additional 1 Million Homes Will Be Affected (Sep. 27, 1998). The Times Newspapers Limited reports the British government faces an outcry from residents over its plans for a huge expansion of flightpaths that will lead to at least 1m more homes being disturbed by aircraft noise.

Residents' Group in England Continues to Fight Noise from Shouting Inmates (Sep. 27, 1998). The Leicester Mail reports a community action group in Leicester, England, claims it is still fighting for some peace and quiet more than two years after voicing its concern about noise from a nearby juvenile detention center.

ConnDOT to Begin Noise Monitoring at Bradley International Airport (Sep. 26, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports residents of Simsbury, Connecticut, attended the last of three state Department of Transportation meetings on solving the noise problem at the increasingly busy Bradley International Airport.

Despite Noise and Safety Concerns, Senate Approves Plan to Increase Flights at Washington's Reagan National Airport (Sep. 26, 1998). The Washington Post reports the US Senate approved a plan yesterday to add flights at Washington's Reagan National Airport despite local fears that it would add to noise in neighboring communities and undermine business at Dulles International Airport.

Senate Approves More Flights from Reagan Airport; Washington, DC, Residents Expect More Noise (Sep. 26, 1998). The Washington Times reports residents who live near Washington, DC's Reagan National Airport are angry about Senate approval of a bill to increase flights at the busy airport. Residents say increased flights mean more noise and traffic.

Senate OK's More Flights at O'Hare; Critics Predict More Noise, More Health and Safety Problems (Sep. 26, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports a bill that could add 30 daily commercial takeoffs and landings at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport was endorsed Friday by the U.S. Senate. Activists say more planes means more noise and other serious problems.

Air Tour Industry Accuses Park Service of Exaggerating Noise Report to Expand Quiet Zones (Sep. 25, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports Congress was told Thursday by consultants to the air tour industry that National Park Service noise studies are seriously flawed.

Large Retail Complex Brings Noise and Traffic Concerns to Idaho Residents (Sep. 25, 1998). The Idaho Statesman reports plans for a retail complex in Meridian, Idaho, continue to spark concerns over noise and traffic from some nearby residents.

Leaders in Missouri Towns Travel to St. Louis to Voice Concerns over Airport Expansion (Sep. 25, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports St. Charles and Bridgeton leaders are planning a major presence Monday in downtown St. Louis to express their concern over expansion plans at Missouri's Lambert Field Airport. Intolerable aircraft noise lies at the heart of their opposition.

Noise in Nearby Towns Tops Issues at Airport Expansion Forum in New Orleans (Sep. 25, 1998). The Times-Picayune reports although the first forum didn't solve any problems, three Louisiana towns agreed Thursday to continue meeting about the expansion of New Orleans International Airport.

Seasonal Flight Paths at Hong Kong's Chek Lap Kok Shift Noise from Region to Region; Residents Take Turns Complaining about Noise (Sep. 25, 1998). The Hong Kong Standard reports Hong Kong's Chek Lap Kok Airport shifts flight paths with the seasons, and affected residents everywhere complain of the noise.

Seeking Relief, Conn. Residents Urge Expedience in Noise Study at Bradley Airport (Sep. 25, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports Connecticut residents affected by noise from Bradley International Airport urged consultants to avoid any delays of a planned noise study.

Senate Approves Regulation of Air Tour Noise in National Parks (Sep. 25, 1998). U.S. Newswire reports the United States Senate approved measures to address the problem of excessive noise from aircraft in national parks.

Eliminating Truck Noise in Illinois Town May Come at High Economic Cost (Sep. 24, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports an Illinois town is considering eliminating or rerouting truck traffic due to noise and pollution problems.

European Commission Requires Towns to Create Noise Contour Maps (Sep. 24, 1998). The Leicester Mercury reports noise blackspots in Leicester, England, will be targeted as part of pollution research mandated by the European Commission.

Federal Appeals Court Supports Noise Restrictions in Grand Canyon (Sep. 24, 1998). The Arizona Business Gazette reports a federal appellate court has refused to set aside new rules designed to curb aircraft noise at the Grand Canyon in the case of Grand Canyon Air Tour Coalition v. Federal Aviation Administration (97-1003).

Florida Town Adopts New Noise Ordinance (Sep. 24, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports city council members in Mascotte, Florida, hope to maintain peace and quiet in their community with the recent passage of an anti- noise ordinance.

Helicopter Pad at English Hotel Brings Noise Complaints from Neighbors (Sep. 24, 1998). The Birmingham Evening Mail reports a helicopter landing at a Birmingham, England, hotel is angering local residents who claim their peace and quiet is being shattered.

Montreal Airport Switch Brings Noise and Aggravation to Some Residents (Sep. 24, 1998). The Gazette reports Montreal, Canada, residents continue to call Aeroports de Montreal to rage about airplane noise since international flights were transferred from outlying Mirabel Airport to Dorval Airport a year ago.

Washington Area Lawmakers Object to Senate Bill Allowing Increased Flights at Reagan National (Sep. 24, 1998). The Associated Press reports a final Senate vote is expected Friday, despite some local opposition, to increase flights at Washington, DC's Reagan National Airport.

Competition for Early-Bird Flights at California's Burbank Airport Could Dispose of Voluntary Morning Curfew (Sep. 23, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Reno Air has requested that Burbank Airport in California allow flights in the early hours, but residents strongly opposed the idea due to possible increases in noise. The airport was set to decide on the request Tuesday, but delayed its decision until at least next week because of the public outcry.

Conn. Residents Petition for Relief from I-95 Noise (Sep. 23, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports close to 100 Connecticut residents who live along a stretch of I-95 have signed a petition calling for an investigation of escalating noise along the highway.

Even with Quieter Planes, O'Hare Neighbors Say Air Traffic Noise Increasing (Sep. 23, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports two reports released Tuesday by the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission highlight a contradiction in the controversy over airplane noise at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport. Even though air carriers use quieter aircraft, O'Hare's neighbors say noise has increased dramatically.

Glendale, Arizona, Considers Measures to Protect Residents from Freeway Noise (Sep. 23, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports Glendale, Arizona's, City Council is considering a number of noise-reduction measures to protect residents from freeway noise.

Home Depot Makes Noise on Long Island and Across the Country (Sep. 23, 1998). Newsday reports people across the country, including many on Long Island, New York, say Home Depot, one of the country's largest retailers, is a noisy neighbor that doesn't belong near residential neighborhoods.

Illinois Town Conducts Study to Solve Truck Traffic Noise (Sep. 23, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports noisy truck traffic through east-side residential streets in South Elgin, Illinois, may come to an end depending on the results of a village truck-traffic study.

Indianapolis Resident Says Police Unwilling to Enforce Noise Ordinances Downtown (Sep. 23, 1998). The Indianapolis Star published the following letter from Arthur J. Usher IV, an Indianapolis, Indiana, resident. Usher contends the city police are unwilling to enforce noise ordinances, making living in the city practically unbearable. Usher wrote:

Neighbors Accuse Wendy's Restaurant in Florida of Violating Noise Ordinance (Sep. 23, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports neighbors of a Wendy's restaurant in Pembroke Pines, Florida, say trucks making early morning deliveries are robbing them of their sleep.

New Zealand Residents Want Airport Noise Reduced Sooner than Later (Sep. 23, 1998). The Evening Standard reports at a meeting about airport generated noise attended by ratepayers and representatives from the Palmerston North city council, airport company, and Fieldair Engineering, New Zealanders' main message was, "Let's curb noise now."

Noise Complaints Rise as Tolerance for Noise Decreases in English Town (Sep. 23, 1998). The Grimsby Evening Telegraph reports noise pollution is becoming an increasing problem in East Lindsey, England, as residents become less tolerant of certain kinds of noise.

Pennsylvania Airport Buys More Land and Property to Create Noise Buffer Zone (Sep. 23, 1998). The Morning Call reports Pennsylvania's Lehigh-Northampton Airport Authority will purchase land and homes to reduce noise complaints from the Village of Schoenersville.

Plans to Add Go-Cart Track to Putt-Putt Golf Stopped in Mandeville, Florida (Sep. 23, 1998). The Times-Picayune reports that the Planning and Zoning Commission of Mandeville, Florida has rejected a proposal to build a go-cart track next to the Putt-Putt Golf Games.

Residents Circulate Petition to Silence Train Whistles in British Columbia Town (Sep. 23, 1998). The Vancouver Sun reports residents living close to rail lines in Maple Ridge, British Columbia, are renewing a campaign to get train whistles silenced.

Developers Plan Open Space Surrounding California's El Toro Airport (Sep. 22, 1998). World Airport Week reports developers for California's El Toro Airport have presented on open space plan to county executives, requesting a park surround the airfield.

NH Residents Oppose Power Plant, Voice Noise and Safety Concerns (Sep. 22, 1998). The Union Leader reports a group opposed to a power plant in Londonderry, New Hampshire, expressed concerns last night about noise, safety, and diminished property values to the Town Council.

Editorial Objects to Unsightly Highway Noise Barriers in U.S. (Sep. 21, 1998). USA Today published an editorial charging that while highway noise barriers block traffic noise for nearby residents, they also block scenic views for motorists and take the joy out of traveling in the U.S.

Florida Aviation Dept. Uses New Technology to Monitor Impact of Jet Noise (Sep. 21, 1998). The Journal of Commerce reports the Miami-Dade Aviation Department in Florida revealed a technology on Friday used to monitor airplane noise. This new system could mean significant implications for the air cargo industry.

Meetings to Focus on Mini-Study of Noise Sensitive Residential Areas Surrounding Conn.'s Bradley Airport (Sep. 21, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports residents will be able to voice their concerns about noise from Connecticut's Bradley International Airport at three meetings this week. Residents will be asked to give input on a planned "mini-study" of noise-sensitive areas.

New Early A.M. Flight at LA's Burbank Airport Likely to Increase Tensions Over Airplane Noise (Sep. 21, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that the administrators of Burbank Airport may allow early departures by Reno Air, angering residents already upset over airport noise.

Ohio Residents Offered Barriers to Soften Noise Impact of Highway Expansion (Sep. 21, 1998). The Columbus Dispatch reports the Ohio Department of Transportation doubles the number of lanes on I-270, and neighborhoods along Ohio's north Outerbelt will decide whether they want sound walls built between their homes and the highway.

U.S. National Park Ban of Personal Watercraft Causes Ire Among Fans (Sep. 21, 1998). The Christian Science Monitor reports after years of debate, the U.S. National Park Service has banned the use of personal watercraft (PWC) in its parks with a few exceptions.

NYC Resident Proposes Ban on Truck Traffic Through Neighborhood, Citing Noise, Health and Safety Issues (Sep. 20, 1998). The New York Times reports a resident's concern about noise, pollution, health, and safety issues caused by heavy truck traffic in her New York City neighborhood has led to a resolution to ban commercial traffic through that area. To go into effect, the ban now needs approval from the Department of Transportation.

European Union Mandates Noise Maps for Cities (Sep. 19, 1998). New Scientist reports every city in the European Union with more than 250 000 inhabitants will be required to draw up " noise maps" of their streets by 2002.

Maylaysia Limits Singapore's Use of Airspace; Could Mean More Noise for Both Countries (Sep. 19, 1998). Deutsche Presse-Agentur reports Malaysia's new restrictions on Singapore's use of Malaysian airspace could mean more aircraft noise for residents of both countries.

City Outlaws Nighttime Use of Loudspeakers in Lauderhill, Florida (Sep. 18, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports that a city commission in Florida has approved a noise ordinance that prohibits the use of loudspeakers near residential areas between 10 p.m. and 8 a.m. on weekdays.

Federal Grant Funds Relocation Program for Residents Near Georgia's DeKalb-Peachtree Airport (Sep. 18, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports a relocation program will be funded with a federal grant for residents who live near Georgia's DeKalb-Peachtree Airport.

Minn. Refuge Paid $20 Million for Loss of Quiet Due to Jet Noise (Sep. 18, 1998). The Associated Press reports that silence is worth at least $20 million, according to an appraisal of the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge.

Residents Demand Action on Jet Noise at NJ's Teterboro Airport (Sep. 18, 1998). The Record reports local New Jersey officials and residents fighting increased jet traffic demanded action at a demonstration at Teterboro Airport on Thursday.

Arlington Heights Questions O'Hare's Compliance with Fly Quiet Program (Sep. 17, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports an increase in the number of residents' complaints about noise from Illinois' O'Hare International Airport is causing Arlington Heights officials to question the City of Chicago about compliance with nighttime flying procedures.

Arlington Heights Updates Plans to Fight Noise at Chicago's O'Hare Airport (Sep. 17, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports Arlington Heights' Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise began drafting a new battle plan this week to fight airplane noise.

Long Beach, NY, Gives First Ticket for Violating Leafblower Ban Four Years After Law Enacted (Sep. 17, 1998). Newsday reports the City of Long Beach, New York, issued the first citation for violation of its leafblower ban, a law enacted in 1994.

Missouri's Lambert Field to Install New Noise Monitor to Aid Residents (Sep. 17, 1998). The Louis Post-Dispatch reports an easement was approved for a new permanent noise monitor to determine the amount of noise residents are subjected to from Missouri's Lambert Field Airport.

Nevada Home Owners Reject New Noise Zones Near McCarran Airport (Sep. 17, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports Nevada's Clark County Commission indefinitely postponed action Wednesday on a new, noise zone, due to vigorous opposition from residents near McCarran International Airport who fear property devaluation.

Noise is a Hot Topic in Yorba Linda, California (Sep. 17, 1998). The Orange County Register reports two of the hottest topics before the Yorba Linda City Council in California were discussed at the council meeting Tuesday. Both issues concerned noise and noise mitigation.

Plan to Move Concert Stage Only Moves the Noise, Doesn't Solve Problem, Say Calgary, Alberta, Residents (Sep. 17, 1998). The Calgary Herald reports some Calgary, Alberta, residents believe a proposed permanent stage at the west end of Prince's Island Park would only direct noise away from one location and bother residents in another area.

Richmond, British Columbia, Establishes Restrictions for "Raves" after Neighbors in Vancouver Complain (Sep. 17, 1998). The Vancouver Sun reports after numerous complaints about noise from a recent rave party in Richmond, British Columbia, town officials adopt restrictions.

Noise Complaints in the United Kingdom Decreasing (Sep. 16, 1998). The Birmingham Evening Mail reports environmental health officers in the United Kingdom announced the public may be becoming more tolerant of noisy neighbors.

Tourists Don't Like Noise, Say Business Owners who want Tough Noise Laws in Bar Harbor, Maine (Sep. 16, 1998). The Bangor Daily News reports several Bar Harbor, Maine, residents and business owners say the town is too noisy.

Virginia Beach Hires Consultant to Reduce Noise from Amphitheater (Sep. 16, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports Virginia Beach's City Council decided to hire a consultant to investigate ways to reduce the noise levels from the GTE Virginia Beach Amphitheater.

Council in Stroud, England, Committed to Dealing with Noise Issues (Sep. 15, 1998). The Gloucester Citizen reports members of an environment committee in Stroud, England, are committed to dealing with noise complaints.

Illinois Residents Object to Regulation of Law Mower and Snow Blower Noise (Sep. 14, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald published the following letters it received from Arlington Heights, Illinois, citizens in response to a report that the Arlington Heights Environmental Control Commission said it was looking at limiting the hours when people can operate lawn mowers. The first letter is from Jan Berkley:

Minnesota Town Gives Skateboarders a Park, but Noise Brings Complaints from Nearby Residents (Sep. 14, 1998). The Star Tribune reports while skateboarders in Stillwater, Minnesota, are excited about their new rink on the western edge of town, residents are complaining about the noise the skateboard facility brings to their neighborhood.

Most Residents in Chicago Suburb Object to Proposed Regulation of Lawn Mower Noise (Sep. 14, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald published a second set of letters from Arlington Heights, Illinois, residents responding to an article that reported the Arlington Heights Environmental Control Commission was considering imposing restrictions on homeowners' use of lawn mowers and snow blowers to regulate noise. Included as well are two letters from residents addressing other noise issues in Arlington Heights. The first letter about lawn mower noise is from resident Cathy Robertson:

Political and Social Issues Accompany Leaf Blower Controversies in U.S. (Sep. 14, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports with autumn comes falling the leaves, and for some residents and workers in states including Texas, Illinois and California, the re-emergence of the heated leaf-blower controversy is likely.

Cargo Business at Seattle's Boeing Field Brings Most Noise Complaints (Sep. 13, 1998). The Seattle Times printed the following letter to the editor from Mike Rees, President of Seattle, Washington's, Council on Airport Affairs. In his letter, Rees contends Boeing Field Airport stopped being a good neighbor when it increased air cargo business. Rees writes:

Changes in Lambert Field's Expansion Plan Means More Noise, Critics Charge (Sep. 13, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch of St. Louis, Missouri, reports opponents of Lambert Field's expansion plan contend that changes made in the proposal would generate more noise south of the airport than originally anticipated.

Editorial Urges Gilbert, Arizona, Town Council and Citizens to do Homework on Proposed Expansion of Williams Gateway Airport (Sep. 13, 1998). The Arizona Republic published the following editorial criticizing the Gilbert, Arizona, Town Council for blindly accepting the Williams Gateway Airport Authority's recommendations for zoning without considering its citizens and the common good.

Los Angeles Area Residents Debate Impact of Proposed El Toro Airport (Sep. 13, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following letters from residents California residents about the proposed El Toro Airport. The following letter was written by Leonard Kranser of Dana Point, California:

Snowmobilers Gather in NH to Discuss Noise and Other Problems that Threaten their Sport (Sep. 13, 1998). The Union Leader reports snowmobile enthusiasts met in Manchester, New Hampshire, yesterday to discuss how to keep trails open in the wake of numerous complaints from homeowners about the noisy recreational machines.

Truck Traffic Ban in Hillsborough, NC, the Beginning of Downtown Revitalization (Sep. 13, 1998). The Chapel Hill Herald published an editorial supporting the town of Hillsborough, North Carolina's, attempt to limit noisy truck traffic.

United Kingdom to Test Rubber Roads to Reduce Noise (Sep. 13, 1998). Times Newspapers Limited reports Colsoft, a new type of road surface, could come to the relief of United Kingdom residents plagued by traffic noise.

LA Planning Commission Recommends Noise Limits at Universal Studios (Sep. 12, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that resident outcry has convinced the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission to consider noise restrictions for Universal Studios.

Town Council in England will Investigate Ways to Reduce Excessive Noise from Music Festival after Residents Complain (Sep. 12, 1998). The Evening Herald reports the Plymouth, England, City Council is determined to address the issue of excessive noise from a free festival in 1999 after complaints about this year's event.

O'Hare Business Group Meets with Suburban Legislators to Drum up Support for O'Hare (Sep. 11, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports suburban legislators met Thursday with the Greater O'Hare Association of Industry and Commerce to discuss regional cooperation and support of O'Hare International Airport.

Editorial Criticizes Residential Growth Near Arizona's Luke Air Force Base (Sep. 11, 1998). The Arizona Republic published the following letter to the editor from Bill Lipscomb of Surprise City, Arizona. In his letter, Lipscomb warns citizens of the dangers of allowing residential growth under the flight paths at Luke Air Force Base. Lipscomb wrote:

Airport Activists Question Aim of O'Hare Meeting (Sep. 11, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports a closed-door meeting between Illinois state and local officials and airline executives Thursday caused some noise activists to suggest the aim of the meeting was to discuss expansion at O'Hare International Airport.

Government Rejects Activists' Attempts to Restrict Night-Flights at England's Largest Airports (Sep. 11, 1998). Times Newspapers Limited reports anti-noise groups lost their fight to restrict night-time flying at England's three major airports.

Exploring Methods to Quiet Fighter Noise at Tulsa International Airport (Sep. 11, 1998). Tulsa World reports military jets are the loudest aircraft at Oklahoma's Tulsa International Airport and cause the most complaints among airport-area residents. But a recent study found certain departure procedures can reduce noise from the military aircraft.

NY Town Debates Loud Train Whistles: Nuisance or Necessity? (Sep. 10, 1998). The Buffalo News reports Depew, New York, officials will consider banning train whistles at a public hearing Monday.

Bangkok Will Enforce Noise Limits on Noisy Canal Boats (Sep. 10, 1998). Bernama, The Malaysian National News Agency reports China's Bangkok Metropolitan Administration plans to regulate noise levels of passenger boats after operators were found to suffer hearing damage.

Editorial Calls on Florida Commissioners to Use Existing Laws to Quiet Raves (Sep. 10, 1998). The St. Petersburg Times published an editorial in which the author takes exception to Florida county commissioner Pat Mulieri's request to ban late-night outdoor dance concerts known as raves.

Airport Opponents Will Fight Cargo Flights at California's El Toro (Sep. 10, 1998). The Orange County Register reports a new effort is under way to start commercial air-cargo flights at the proposed El Toro airport next year. Airport opponents vow to fight the effort.

Citizens in Gilbert, Arizona, Demand to be Heard about Noise from Williams Gateway Airport (Sep. 10, 1998). The Arizona Republic published the following letter to the editor from Gilbert, Arizona, resident Nick Champion. In his letter, Champion challenges the town council's position on airport noise and its effects on residents' property values. Champion wrote:

City Officials in Quincy, MA, Act to Restore Quiet in Neighborhoods (Sep. 10, 1998). The Patriot Ledger reports city officials in Quincy, Massachusetts, are taking action to give residents relief from noise made by barges unloading oil and early morning dumpster pickups.

Court Case: NYC Nightclub Loses in Challenge to Charges of Excessive Noise Violations (Sep. 10, 1998). The New York Law Journal reports a case in which a nightclub failed in its challenge to charges of excessive noise violations. The summary, text, and discussion of the case follows:

Opponents Stand Ground Against Noise and Go-Carts in Louisiana Town (Sep. 10, 1998). The Times-Picayune reports Mandeville, Louisiana, residents still oppose plans for a go-cart track at a local miniature golf course, despite the owner's pitch that it will offer a positive recreational alternative for the area's teens.

FAA Says It's Illegal to Ban Commercial Traffic at Colorado's Centennial Airport; County Vows to Fight FAA (Sep. 9, 1998). The Denver Post reports there's controversy over bringing in commercial air traffic to Centennial Airport in Colorado's Arapahoe County.

Leaders Meet to Discuss O'Hare Airport; Noise Reduction Likely on Agenda (Sep. 9, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports Chicago's Mayor Richard M. Daley, state legislators, major airline executives, and north suburban business leaders will meet to discuss O'Hare International Airport on Thursday during a closed-door meeting.

Resident Opposes Larger Jets at California's Camarillo Airport, Citing Existing Noise Problems (Sep. 9, 1998). The Ventura County Star published the following letter to the editor about the existing noise jet noise problem at Camarillo Airport from resident Al Knuth of Camarillo, California. Knuth opposes proposals to allow larger jets at the airport. Knuth writes:

Hillsborough, NC, Restricts Truck Traffic to Make Town Quieter and Safer (Sep. 9, 1998). The Chapel Hill Herald reports an ordinance restricting truck traffic on Churton Street in Hillsborough, North Carolina, seems to be having its intended effect, making the area safer and more quiet.

Aircraft in U.S. Complying with Airport Noise and Capacity Act (Sep. 9, 1998). The Federal Department and Agency Documents reports airplanes in the United States are ahead of the required deadlines to transition to quieter aircraft, reports Secretary of Transportation Rodney E. Slater.

Florida Commissioner Asks for Review of County's Ordinances After All-Night Concert Sparks Noise Complaints (Sep. 9, 1998). The St. Petersburg Times reports last weekend's all-night "rave" party in Pasco, Florida, was noisy enough to prompt one county commissioner to seek a change in the way the county permits such events.

Florida Town Considers Banning All-Night Concerts After Noise Complaints (Sep. 9, 1998). The Tampa Tribune reports Pasco, Florida, is considering a ban on all-night outdoor music shows after a recent event resulted in dozens of drug arrests and noise complaints.

In Minnesota, Popular Personal Watercraft Bring Noise and Safety Concerns (Sep. 9, 1998). The Associated Press reports as personal watercraft grow in popularity in Minnesota, they are attracting more scrutiny with regards to noise and safety issues.

Housing Development Approved Near Illinois' Palwaukee Airport, Clause Prevents Noise Lawsuits from Residents (Sep. 9, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports the village board of Wheeling, Illinois unanimously approved a new subdivision on a piece of land north of Palwaukee Municipal Airport.

Calif. Residents Fear Extended Runway Means Larger, Noisier Planes (Sep. 8, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports a plan to extend the runway at California's San Carlos Airport makes neighbors fear bigger and noisier aircraft. Airport officials stress the project is necessary to increase airport safety.

Resident is Heavily Fined in England for Noise Disturbances (Sep. 8, 1998). The Nottingham Evening Post reports Richard Ramsey of Nottingham, England, has been fined for two breaches of a noise abatement notice.

Pilots' Strike Brings Some Quiet to Noisy World of Minneapolis, Minnesota (Sep. 8, 1998). The Star Tribune reports an unintended consequence of the pilots' strike against Northwest Airlines: natural quiet beneath the airport flight paths in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Increased Night Flights at O'Hare Limits Chicago's Fly Quiet Program (Sep. 8, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports Chicago's Fly Quiet program produces negligible results as night flights from O'Hare Airport increase.

Noise Decreases at Nashville Airport, But Some Tenn. Residents Still Wait for Home Soundproofing (Sep. 8, 1998). The Tennessean reports the Federal Aviation Administration is reducing the size of the noise contour map at Tennessee's Nashville International Airport, saying the airport is quieter than it was in 1993 when the map was made.

Is it Noise or Publicity that Prompts Residents to Call O'Hare Hotline? (Sep. 8, 1998). The Associated Press reports complaints about airplane noise from Chicago's O'Hare International Airport often come from residents in the towns that are the least affected by airplane noise problems.

Shared-Noise Strategy at Australia's Kingsford Smith Airport Criticized by Safety Experts, Air Traffic Controllers, Pilots and Others (Sep. 7, 1998). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports Australia's government shared- noise strategy significantly reduces capacity at Sydney's Kingsford Smith Airport while increasing safety concerns.

Debate Continues Over Use of Personal Watercraft as National Parks Service Proposes Rule (Sep. 6, 1998). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports national seashores in Florida and North Carolina are among several that would be exempt from a ban on Jet Ski-type watercraft under new proposed National Park Service regulations.

Increased Air Traffic and Noise Over Upper Manhattan Neighborhoods Due to Runway Work at La Guardia (Sep. 6, 1998). The New York Times reports New York City residents are annoyed by the increased flights over their neighborhoods in the last several months. The sharp rise in air traffic and its attendant noise are due to runway work at La Guardia Airport.

Airport Activist Calls New O'Hare Flight Path Plans 'Two-Lane Highways' (Sep. 5, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports new flight path plans favored by the Federal Aviation Administration at O'Hare International Airport are causing alarm in airport activists who fear more flights, along with increased noise and pollution.

Citizen Defends Noise Abatement Demands at Warwick's T.F. Green Airport (Sep. 5, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin published the following letter to the editor from Warwick resident Peg Magill defending noise abatement procedures suggested by citizens for Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport. Magill wrote:

English Resident Breaks Noise Laws; Town Destroys Stereo to Deter Future Violators (Sep. 5, 1998). The Daily Telegraph reports a residents' music system was demolished in public in Grantham, England, as a warning to those who persistently defy noise laws.

Neighbors of Pittsfield, Maine, Airport Object to Additional Hanger, Citing Noise, Traffic and Safety Concerns (Sep. 5, 1998). The Bangor Daily News reports Maine's Pittsfield planning board will meet Wednesday, Sept. 16, to review a conditional use application for a new hangar at the municipal airport. Neighbors are concerned about increased noise and traffic that the new structure may bring.

Texas Town Rejects Amphitheater, Noise and Preservation of Park Land Drive Decision (Sep. 5, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports Bedford, Texas, City Council members say a Park Board recommendation may prevent the chance for an amphitheater on city park land.

Who Should Enforce Noise Rules at a Florida Condominium Complex? (Sep. 5, 1998). The Tampa Tribune published the following question from F.P., a resident of Seminole, Florida, who wonders who should enforce noise rules at a condominium complex. F.P. wrote:

Albuquerque Considers Ordinance Restricting Heliports after Residents Complain of Noise from TV News Helicopters (Sep. 4, 1998). The Albuquerque Tribune reports the Albuquerque, New Mexico, Environmental Planning Commission is considering an ordinance restricting heliports after residents complained of noise from news helicopters that take off and land near their homes.

Finger Pointing and Blaming When Residents and Local Officials Discuss Noise from Warwick's Expanded T. F. Green Airport (Sep. 4, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports Warwick, Rhode Island, Councilman Gene Kelly held a meeting on airport noise last night. The incumbent mayor, a mayoral candidate, and a state airport official turned out to respond to residents' concerns about noise and expansion at Warwick's T. F. Green Airport.

Knoxville, Tennessee City Council Finds it Difficult to Please Everyone with Noise Ordinance (Sep. 4, 1998). The Knoxville News-Sentinel reports Tennessee's Knoxville City Council is working hard to establish enforceable noise regulations that will please business owners and residents.

Neighborhood Group Succeeds in Effort to Get First Noise Barrier Built in Maine (Sep. 4, 1998). The Bangor Daily News reports residents in one of Bangor, Maine's, noisiest neighborhoods won a battle Thursday to get a noise barrier erected against increasing noise from Interstate 95. Residents worry that prolonged exposure to the noise could result in hearing loss or other health problems.

New Flight-Control Plan at O'Hare Raises Concerns from Activists and Traffic Controllers (Sep. 4, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports the Federal Aviation Administration's plan to reconfigure flight paths for the Chicago area's airspace has launched a debate over whether the plan is a part of a strategy to increase flights at O'Hare International Airport. Meanwhile, air traffic controllers voice their safety concerns about the new flight plan.

New Orleans Enacts Noise Buffer Zone for Cathedral during Services (Sep. 4, 1998). The Times-Picayune reports the New Orleans City Council on Thursday placed limits on noise levels around a city cathedral during religious services after a lengthy dispute between the church and street musicians.

O'Hare Air Traffic Noise on the Rise in Chicago Neighborhoods; Frustrated Noise Panel Wants FAA Help (Sep. 4, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports despite the efforts of the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission, the noise problem at O'Hare appears to be worsening. Commission members are requesting from the Federal Aviation Administration stronger support of a plan to steer aircraft away from residential areas.

San Francisco Airport Gets Three Year Variance to Comply with California's Noise Standards; Local and State Leaders Oppose Extension (Sep. 4, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports California's San Francisco International Airport received a variance for another three years to comply with state noise standards and become a quieter neighbor.

Neighbors in Rural Florida React to Welding Business (Aug. 23, 1998). The Tampa Tribune reports that persons living in rural areas near Sydney, Florida are shocked to learn that the county can grant a rural home industry permit without a public hearing or other notice to nearby property owners.

Eagle Town, Wisconsin Needs State Action to Stop Clay Shooting Noise (Aug. 21, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that a new state law prohibits the restriction of gunfire noise at the McMiller Sports Center in Eagle Town, Wisconsin. The article says Wisconsin's Range Protection Bill prohibits local governments from using noise as an issue to regulate existing shooting ranges.

Final Hearing for Maine's Ban of Personal Watercraft Concentrates on Residents of Tunk and Donnell Lakes (Aug. 20, 1998). The Bangor Daily News reports that the recent law banning personal watercraft from 245 lakes and ponds under Maine's Land Use Regulation Commission's (LURC) jurisdiction came before the Commission for a final hearing. Landowners on two of the larger Hancock County lakes turned out in force both for and against the ban on personal watercraft.

Appellate Court Denies City its Noise Lawsuit against the Minneapolis Metropolitan Airport. (Aug. 19, 1998). The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports that the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals denied the city of Richfield its noise lawsuit against the Metropolitan Airport. The suit contested the validity of the environmental impact statement that the airport used to win federal approval for the airport's crosswind runway.

Los Angeles' Department of Water and Power Develop a Electric-Powered Leaf Blower that's Quiet (Aug. 18, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power have developed a new electric-powered leaf blower. The new machine is hoped to resolve problems related to the disputed ban on leaf blowers and earn the city money.

Planes Flying Below Recommended Altitudes Thwart Noise Control Efforts near Baltimore Washington International Airport (Aug. 18, 1998). The Capital reports that a state study concludes that about one-third of planes flying over Severna Park to Baltimore Washington International Airport are flying lower than the altitude recommended by the state to control noise.

Californian Columnist Writes about the "Wacky World of Leaf Blowers" (Aug. 15, 1998). The other cities with leaf-blower bans tend to be environmentally cool places like Carmel and Santa Barbara, cities that have little else in common with L.A. With bans in Santa Barbara and L.A., Ventura County is sort of surrounded by the crusade -- without being part of it.

Residents Distressed by Outdoor Dinner Parties Decide to Take Action (Aug. 14, 1998). Calgary Herald reports that a group of residents are upset about the late-night noise emulating from the Cross House Garden Café in Calgary, British Columbia. They say the outdoor parties are ruining the quiet tranquility of the community and are circulating a petition that requests the city to withhold permission for the garden tents to go up each summer.

Committee Bans Personal Watercraft Banned within 1,200 of San Francisco's Shoreline (Aug. 14, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the San Francisco Board of Supervisors reported unanimously to ban personal watercraft within 1,200 feet of the city's shoreline.

City in East China Reduces Noise, Can Hear Birds Sing (Aug. 12, 1998). China Daily reports noise control measures have been used to reduce noise in Yantai, a coastal city in East China's Shandong Province. Cars are forbidden to blow their horns in the urban districts and no sirens are allowed to sound. Broadcasting music and advertisements outdoors has also been forbidden in commercial areas since June 1.

Small Town Turned Suburb Suffering from Noise Pollution in Pennsylvania (Aug. 12, 1998). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports that life is miserable for some township residents in Adams, Pennsylvania. Residents complained to the Township Supervisors about noise emanating from dirt bikes and industrial functions. They are asking town supervisors to adopt a noise ordinance so noisemakers can be brought to court.

Salem, Virginia, Residents Want Noise Wall, Not Re-location When I 81 Expands (Aug. 11, 1998). The Roanoke Times & World News reports residents of Salem, Virginia's, Stonegate community prefer a noise wall to relocation when Interstate 81 is widened.

Warwick, RI, Mayor Suggests Ways for Airport to be a Good Neighbor (Aug. 11, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin published the following editorial by Lincoln Chafee, mayor of Warwick, Rhode Island, about Warwick's T.F. Green Airport. Mayor Chafee outlines ways for the airport to be a good neighbor:

Editorial Says Jet Skis Ruin Peace and Quite of Canadian Lakes (Aug. 11, 1998). The Vancouver Sun published an editorial about personal watercraft ruining the peace and quiet of Canadian lakes.

Rhode Island Airport Corporation Hears Residents' Proposals for Noise Reduction at T.F. Green Airport (Aug. 11, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports Rhode Island's state Airport Corporation will sponsor a public meeting Thursday to focus noise and ways to reduce it from Warwick's T.F. Green Airport.

City and FAA Asked to Lower Decibel Level for Homes to Qualify for Insulation from LAX Noise (Aug. 11, 1998). Copley News Service reports the FAA has been asked by the Los Angles County Board of Supervisors to change noise standards so more homes will qualify for federally funded noise insulation from the Los Angeles International Airport.

Commetary Says Stricter Rules Justified for Noise Reduction in Addis Ababa (Aug. 11, 1998). The Monitor published an editorial advocating the new strict noise regulations in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The writer believes it's better to enforce controls now before the city becomes hopelessly polluted.

FAA Exec. Will Try to Resolve Dispute between City of Burbank and Airport (Aug. 10, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports Jane Garvey, the chief executive of the Federal Aviation Administration, will arrive in Burbank, California, on Tuesday to try to secure an end to the 16-year war over the proposed expansion of Burbank Airport.

Madison Imposes Restrictions in Stadium Area After Residents Complain of Noise (Aug. 10, 1998). The Capital Times reports new, tougher rules in Madison, Wisconsin, will limit hours for outdoor beer gardens during this season's University of Wisconsin football games.

Enforce Noise Abatement Laws on Illinois' Waterways, Says Editorial (Aug. 10, 1998). The Chicago Tribune published an editorial criticizing the lack of enforcement of quiet boating on Illinois' inland waterways.

County Aviation Official Says New Nevada Airport Necessary (Aug. 9, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal published the following editorial by Randall H. Walker, director of Nevada's Clark County Department of Aviation. Walker advocates for the Ivanpah Airport project, deeming it a necessity to accommodate the Las Vegas Valley's future needs. Walker writes:

Two NY Residents Sue Company for Excessive Noise and Vibrations (Aug. 8, 1998). The Buffalo News reports two Forestville, New York, residents who live near a manufacturing plant have filed a multi-million dollar lawsuit charging excessive noise and vibrations.

Executive's Helicopter Permitted Daily Trip Despite Maryland Residents' Complaints about Noise (Aug. 8, 1998). The Washington Times reports Rite Aid Chairman Martin Grass has received permission from Baltimore County officials to take off and land in his company helicopter at his home in Lutherville, Maryland, despite complaints from neighbors about the noise.

Minn. Town Objects to Airport Expansion, Citing Noise Concerns and Charging Breach of Promise (Aug. 7, 1998). The Star Tribune reports despite pressure from the Metropolitan Airports Commission (MAC), officials and residents in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, object to expansion of their "reliever" airport because they fear an increase in noise and an alteration in their quality of life.

Noise Levels Shift Back to Usual After Summer Work at Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport (Aug. 7, 1998). The Star Tribune reports on Monday about 170 daily airplane takeoffs will be shifted back to their usual runways at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, meaning quieter skies for some nearby communities and a return to the usual noise level for other areas.

Conn. DOT to Assess Need for Sound Barriers Along Section of I-91 Expansion (Aug. 7, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports that in an effort to determine whether there is a need for sound barriers, the state Connecticut Department of Transportation has begun to monitor traffic noise in neighborhoods along I- 91 in Rocky Hill.

ACLU Says Noise Ordinance in Bristol, RI, Violates First Amendment, Files Lawsuit (Aug. 6, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the ACLU of Rhode Island has filed a federal lawsuit charging that the town of Bristol's noise ordinance violates the First Amendment.

Penn. Residents Want Noise Ordinance Enforced at Club in Neighboring Town (Aug. 6, 1998). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports residents of one Pennsylvania town are bothered by noise coming from a club just over the line in a nearby town. Forest Hills residents are pushing for Wilkinsburg to enforce its own noise ordinances.

Court Orders Couple to Quiet Lovemaking after Neighbors Complain of Noise in Ipswich, England (Aug. 6, 1998). The Mirror reports an Ipswich, England, man has been ordered to keep his lovemaking sessions quiet or face eviction.

Arizona Residents Battle Runway Expansion, Fearing Noisier Skies (Aug. 6, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports residents who live near Arizona's Chandler Municipal Airport object to proposals to lengthen one of the airport's two runways and to rezone most of the land around it for commercial or industrial development.

Group in Dallas Suburb Unites to Quiet Leafblower Noise (Aug. 6, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports some residents of Highland Park, Texas, have formed a group to muster support and convince officials to ban leafblowers in their Dallas suburb.

As Air Traffic Increases at San Francisco Airport, More Towns Affected by Jet Noise (Aug. 6, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports the outrage over jet noise is spreading to communities further and further south of the San Francisco International Airport as air traffic increases.

NJ Bill Would Replace Earsplitting Train Horns with Bells at Crossings (Aug. 5, 1998). The Record reports a New Jersey state bill, introduced in the Assembly last week, would require trains to use bells instead of loud horns at grade crossings at a town's request.

Maine Residents Object to Noise from Salvation Army's New 1,421 Seat Pavilion (Aug. 5, 1998). The Portland Press Herald reports on opening night of The Salvation Army's new pavilion in Old Orchard Beach, the noise was already too loud for neighbors. The group received a summons from police to appear in court for violating the town's noise ordinance.

Florida County Drops Grandfathering Clause in Proposed Noise Ordinance (Aug. 5, 1998). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports Martin County, Florida's, proposed noise rules could cost some businesses thousands of dollars to be in compliance.

Not all Agree 'the Louder the Better' as Decibel Levels Rise in U.S. Films (Aug. 5, 1998). USA Today reports movies in the United States sound louder these days because they are being recorded louder, say industry insiders. Movie goers' responses to the pumped up volume vary.

Trains in New Jersey May be Required to Use Bells Instead of Horns (Aug. 4, 1998). The Record reports that New Jersey's state legislature is setting forth a bill that calls for trains to use locomotive bells instead of horns. The bill is seen as a potential solution to a dilemma that has upset some Morris County residents since NJ Transit started commuter train service to Manhattan.

Resident Questions Fairness of Noise Ordinance in Montgomery, Alabama (Aug. 3, 1998). The Montgomery Advertiser published the following letter from Hal Johnson of Montgomery, Alabama. The letter criticizes Montgomery's noise ordinance. Johnson wrote:

Gloucester Resident is Fed Up with Industry's Nighttime Noise and Absence of Nighttime Enforcement Officers in Canada (Aug. 3, 1998). The Ottawa Citizen published an editorial from a resident of Sawmill Creek Housing Co-operative in Gloucester, Canada. The editorialist is fed up with the nighttime noise of 18-wheelers and forklifts loading and backing up at the nearby Dicom Express courier company. She claims hundreds of years of Common Law jurisprudence has established that although property owners have the right to enjoy their property to the fullest, they are not entitled to inconvenience others in the process. According to her letter, the City of Gloucester has the responsibility of enforcing the noise bylaw but the bylaw officers do not work at night. The letter reads as follows:

Police May Be Able To Slap Fines on Drivers with Loud Car Stereos Under Bethlehem’s Newly Proposed City Ordinance (Aug. 3, 1998). The Morning Call reports that local police in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania may soon be in pursuit after drivers using high-wattage car stereos. The police will be able to slap hefty fines on noisemakers if the mayor is successful in getting the new city ordinance passed.

No Peace and Quiet? In Maryland, Call Noise Cop (Aug. 2, 1998). The Sun reports in an effort to respond to a new focus on noise, Maryland's Department of the Environment now employs a state noise cop.

Judge Finds Methanol-Powered Leaf Blowers Permissible under Los Angelesí Ordinance, Which Was Intended to Ban Use of the Machines near Residences (Aug. 2, 1998). Los Angeles Times reports that gardeners in Los Angeles, led by a Latino gardeners union, are considering conversion of their gasoline-fueled leafblowers to methanol. Such a conversion would exploit a loophole in the recent ban on gas-powered leafblowers and allow their continued use. A city judge recently dismissed a case against a gardener because he was using methanol-fueled blowers. The decision agreed with a June ruling in a similar case.

Expected Increase in Air Travel Seen as Justification for Airport Expansion and Development in Southern California (Aug. 2, 1998). The Sacramento Bee reports that air traffic in Southern California is expected to double over the next 20 years. Plans are in the works for both (1) expansion at the Los Angeles International Airport and for (2) development of a new airport at Orange County’s El Toro Maine Corp Air Station after it closes next year. The anger of residents is being waged against both plans. And seventy-five (75) million travelers are caught in the middle.

Noise Teams Help Maintain the Quiet in Middlesbrough, England (Aug. 1, 1998). The Northern Echo reports that the fight to quieten town pubs and clubs has been a success in Middlesbrough where “OUT-of-hours” noise patrols are used. According to the article the patrols function as noise teams and were first put out on the town’s street four years ago to crack down on weekend levels.

Nuns in Dallas, TX, Continue to Negotiate with City about Protection from Traffic Noise (Aug. 1, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports negotiations continue between a group of Carmelite nuns who want to protect their property from increased traffic noise and the city of Dallas, Texas, that wants to expand two roads adjacent to the sisters' convent.

O’Hare Impact Study Warranted According to Mayor of Park Ridge, Illinois (Jul. 30, 1998). Chicago Tribune published the following poignant commentary from the Mayor of Park Ridge, a suburb of Chicago, and neighbor to O’Hare International Airport. The commentary takes issue with the opinion of the Chicago Tribune’s editorial board which concluded that any review of the environmental impact of safety, noise and air pollution implications from a shift of 100 military slots at O'Hare International Airport to commercial usage will, in all likelihood, show minimal adverse impact.

California County Votes to Ban Homeowners From Suing Proposed El Toro Airport Over Noise (Jul. 29, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Orange County, California supervisors decided to require "avigation easements" from all new homeowners near the proposed El Toro Airport. Mission Viejo Company, a developer, will now build 1,800 housing units. Anyone buying one of the units must sign an easement promising not to sue the airport over noise problems, but real estate agents are also required to disclose explicit details about potential jet noise.

Study Finds 400 More Homes Will be Impacted by Noise in Burbank Air Traffic Growth (Jul. 29, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that a study released Tuesday found that air traffic growth at the Burbank (California) Airport will increase the number of homes impacted by noise by about 400, raising the total to about 2,700, during the next 12 years. The report will be presented today to the airport's Community Study Advisory Committee, made up of airport officials and community stakeholders. The article notes that the study adds fuel to the long legal and political battle between airport and city officials over a proposed expansion at the airport. City officials want to replace the terminal but not expand the facility because of the potential increase in traffic and noise. Airport officials want to increase the airport form 14 to at least 19 gates for economic development and safety reasons.

Washington Columnist Tells Camper That Noise Wall Along Campground Isn't Likely (Jul. 29, 1998). The Seattle Times printed a column in which a reader said he and his family like to camp at the Crystal Springs campground along Interstate 90 near Snoqualmie Pass in Washington. But, the reader said, the increase in traffic along the Interstate has made the campground very noisy. He asked who he can write to ask for a noise barrier separating the campground from the Interstate. The columnist responded that there is no chance of getting a noise wall built in that area.

Florida Officials Pave Way for Large Development by Prohibiting Future Residents From Suing Over Aircraft Noise (Jul. 28, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports that the City Council in Orlando, Florida voted on Monday to approve an agreement that mostly prohibits future residents in a project known as Vista East from suing nearby Orlando International Airport over airplane noise. The article explains that the council's action paves the way for the $500 million residential and commercial project to begin.

California's Universal Studios Prepares to Start Major Construction Project (Jul. 27, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that in Los Angeles, California the second phase of Universal Studios' proposed 3.3-million-square-foot expansion. The project in its entirety is being looked at by county planners. It's scale had been diminished after residents complained last year, but the second phase construction could bring the project up to the size of its original grandeur. The second phase would develop 250,000 square feet to eventually be used to expand Universal's City Walk attraction.

Disney Project in California Attempts to Mitigate Construction Impacts (Jul. 27, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that contractors working on a major construction project at Disneyland in Anaheim, California are taking special methods to cut down on the negative impacts of the project, including dust, noise, traffic, and other impacts.

Knoxville, Tennessee, Plans to Update City's Noise Ordinance (Jul. 27, 1998). The Knoxville News-Sentinel reports Knoxville, Tennessee's City Council agenda for Tuesday night includes proposals to update the city's thirty-year-old noise ordinance to make it more enforceable.

Scottish Resident Upset About Neighbor's Plan for a Pigeon Loft (Jul. 27, 1998). The Aberdeen Evening Express reports that a resident in the Aberdeen, Scotland area has applied for permission to build a loft for racing pigeons in the shared back yard of his council apartment. However, the article says, the next-door neighbor is opposing the plan, saying the pigeons will create noise and make a mess. Planning officers at the Aberdeen City Council have recommended that councilors approve the plan, and the issue will be discussed at Thursday's planning committee meeting.

The Devastating Effects of Noise Pollution and Some Ways to Ease its Impact (Jul. 27, 1998). Time Magazine reports noise pollution is increasing across Europe. While noise can damage health and destroy peace of mind, there are ways to lessen its impact.

FAA Proposes New Flight Paths for Some Jets at Seattle Airport to Reduce Noise (Jul. 26, 1998). The News Tribune reports that a new plan has been proposed that would shift some nighttime flight paths at the Sea-Tac Airport in the Seattle, Washington area to reduce noise over Federal Way. There are conflicting accounts of whether the plan has been proposed by the Federal Aviation Administration or the office of U.S. Representative Adam Smith. The article reports that a similar proposal involving daytime flights was rejected by the FAA in April, surprising and disappointing many local officials.

Some Residents Angry at Hefty Fines for Noise Violations in New Jersey Shore Towns (Jul. 26, 1998). The Record reports that towns along New Jersey's shoreline are attempting to keep life peaceful during the busy summer season by imposing stiff fines for noise pollution, disorderly conduct, and public urination. The rules have angered some residents, but local officials say the high fines are an effective deterrent.

California State Legislator Revives Bill to Prohibit Local Leaf-Blower Bans; Bill Headed for Assembly Floor Vote (Jul. 25, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that a state law -- that prohibits local bans on leaf-blowers -- which was originally proposed to counter Los Angeles' gas-fueled leaf-blower ban passed last January seems likely to pass. The bill failed last year, but now even those who oppose the bill say that it may pass due to Republican support. The Local Government Committee just passed it by 7-3, and the Assembly will vote soon.

Canadian Columnist Gives Long-Term Strategies for Reducing Noise and Air Pollution (Jul. 25, 1998). The Gazette printed an editorial that argues to reduce noise and air pollution effectively, we need to price energy sensibly, pass common-sense environmental laws, and foster an aesthetic of peace and quiet. The editorial writer discusses some examples of noise problems and solutions in the Montreal, Quebec area.

Environmental Impact Report of Redevelopment District in California City Finds Noise and Other Problems Can be Mitigated (Jul. 24, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Ventura, California City Council will hold a public hearing on August 26 to address a proposed redevelopment district. The project would improve the quality of many older, run-down buildings in an attempt to lure private investment in the area. An environmental report was drafted to consider the project, and five potential problems were outlined. They were traffic, school crowding, air pollution during construction, noise, and historic preservation. The problems can be planned for, however.

Gripe Session on Airport Issues Held in Rhode Island Town (Jul. 24, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that about 165 residents attended a "gripe session" in Warwick, Rhode Island last night and aired their feelings about noise and development at the T.F. Green Airport. The session was held by City Councilor Gerry Gibbons. Also attending the meeting were Lincoln Chafee, Warwick's Mayor, George Zainyeh, the Democratic candidate for mayor, and Elaine Roberts, executive director of the state Airport Corporation.

Group Holds Annual Airport Noise Conference in Colorado (Jul. 24, 1998). The Rocky Mountain News reports that the National Organization to Insure a Sound Controlled Environment (NOISE), based in Washington, is holding its annual conference through Saturday in Thornton, Colorado. The article notes that members of the group are mostly elected officials, but community groups and airport officials also belong to the organization.

Japanese Commission Says Railway Company Should Compensate Some Residents Near Track, But Residents Vow to Take Matter to Court (Jul. 24, 1998). The Asahi News Service reports that Japan's Environmental Disputes Coordination Commission has said the Odakyu Electric Railway Company should compensate 34 Tokyo residents who experience noise levels of 70 decibels or more from nearby rail tracks. But the Commission said the rail company doesn't have to compensate many more residents who have complained about the noise and asked for a ruling from the Commission. According to Yasuyuki Kinoshita, a spokesperson for the residents, the residents will take the case to court to stop the company's plan to elevate the rail line.

Maryland Residents and Developer Fight Over Rezoning Land for New Strip Mall (Jul. 24, 1998). The Baltimore Sun reports that the Howard County Zoning Board in Ellicott City, Maryland considered a request yesterday about re-zoning a parcel of land across from the Long Gate Shopping Center on Montgomery Road from residential to commercial uses. Triangle Development Corporation wants to build a five store strip mall on the site, the article says. While nine residents objected to the re-zoning, saying the area is becoming too commercial, two residents living on the site support the re-zoning because, they said, the area has become intolerable due to noise, traffic, bright lights, and restaurant odors. The board is expected to make a decision Wednesday, the article says.

Columnist Argues That Hong Kong Residents Don't Have a Case on Jet Noise From New Airport, But They Should Have Been Told About Flight Path Routes (Jul. 23, 1998). The South China Morning Post printed an editorial in which the writer argues that residents complaining about jet noise coming from the flight paths of the new Chek Lap Kok airport in Hong Kong don't have a case against the government. But, the editorial says, the government should have informed residents about the flight path routes, or at least provided a channel through which they could easily find out the information.

Maryland State Officials Enlarge Airport Noise Zone, Throwing a Wrench in Developer's Plans (Jul. 23, 1998). The Baltimore Sun reports that the Maryland Aviation Administration changed the noise zone boundary, an area in which homes cannot be built, for the Baltimore-Washington International Airport in March. That move has angered developer Earl Armiger, who already had started plans for a 31-home development in Elkridge that now falls within the noise zone. Armiger has appealed to the Board of Airport Zoning Appeals, asking for permission to build in the noise zone. The board is scheduled to hear the case on October 16.

U.S. House Subcommittee Votes to Allow Denver Airport to Pursue Funding for Sixth Runway (Jul. 23, 1998). The Denver Post reports that the House Appropriations subcommittee on transportation voted Wednesday to approve a $47 billion transportation spending bill for 1998-1999 that would allow the Denver (Colorado) International Airport to compete for funding to build a sixth runway. The article notes that the bill is scheduled to be voted on by the full House and Senate in coming weeks.

Airline Companies Place More Orders for Hushkits to Meet Noise Regulations (Jul. 22, 1998). Flight International reports that AvAero Aircraft Noise Reduction and the Nordam Group, two companies that specialize in installing Boeing 737 hushkits, have collected orders and options for more than 500 hushkits, used to quiet jet engines. The article notes that both companies have reported a new flurry of activity in the hushkit market as deadlines for meeting the Stage 3 noise regulations approach.

California Residents Call for More Noise Protection With Highway Project (Jul. 22, 1998). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that the City Council in San Diego, California unanimously approved a plan yesterday to mitigate some of the impact of the construction of state Route 56 through Carmel Valley. The plan requires a buffer zone between the freeway and surrounding land, extensive landscaping, limited lighting, and limited grading. In addition, the plan outlines steps that must be taken to protect wildlife and offset environmental damage caused by the freeway. But some residents living near the project asked for more restrictions, including an agreement that the freeway would never be widened beyond six lanes.

Columnist Ridicules Noise Rules Governing Canadian Folk Fest (Jul. 22, 1998). The Calgary Sun printed an editorial that ridicules the noise rules governing the upcoming Calgary Folk Music Festival on Prince's Island in Calgary, Alberta. The columnist says the folk festival is singled out by residents in upscale neighborhoods, who have made local officials impose unnecessarily stringent regulations.

Florida City Council Rules That Resident Must Get Rid of Basketball Court (Jul. 22, 1998). The Press Journal reports that the code enforcement board in Boca Raton, Florida voted 3-2 Monday that a resident has to get rid of a concrete slab in a vacant lot used as a makeshift basketball court because she couldn't produce a permit for the slab, which was poured in 1965. The issue arose when a resident who lives near the vacant lot complained about the noise from the basketball games.

Proposed Home Depot Store Meets With Resistance from New Hampshire Neighbors (Jul. 22, 1998). The Union Leader reports that a public hearing was held last night at the planning board meeting in Merrimack, New Hampshire on a proposal for a Home Depot store on Route 101A. About 25 residents who live near the proposed store attended the meeting and raised concerns about noise, traffic and the store's proposed location on well-head property.

Virginia Residents Raise Concerns About Noise Related to Interstate Widening Project (Jul. 22, 1998). The Richmond Times Dispatch reports that about 80 residents of the Richmond, Virginia area attended a meeting yesterday about a proposed project to widen the Interstate 64 corridor between Richmond and Hampton. Concerns about increased noise dominated the meeting, the article says. The Virginia Department of Transportation (DOT), along with their consultants, are almost finished with their two-year study of the corridor, and are proposing six alternatives.

Washington County Commissioners Deny Wal-Mart Request to Rezone Property (Jul. 22, 1998). The Spokesman-Review reports that commissioners in Spokane County, Washington Tuesday unanimously denied a request by Wal-Mart to rezone residential property for a regional shopping center on the north side of Seattle. Residents who had opposed the rezoning because of the size, lights, noise, traffic, and possible 24-hour operation of the store were thrilled with the decision. The article notes that Wal-Mart has not yet announced whether it will appeal the decision to the Superior Court.

FAA Makes No Decision on Missouri Airport Expansion Plan; Opponents Say FAA Will Reject Plan (Jul. 21, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that officials with the Federal Aviation Administration met with Leonard Griggs, the director of Lambert Field near St. Louis, Missouri, on Monday to discuss plans for Lambert's proposed expansion. However, the article says, the federal agency gave no indication on whether it intends to approve the controversial expansion plan. Meanwhile, some opponents of Lambert's expansion predicted that the FAA would soon reject the plan. A meeting between FAA Administrator Jane Garvey and a delegation of local officials on the same topic is slated for Thursday in Washington.

Pennsylvania Residents Angry Over Idling Trains by Their Homes (Jul. 21, 1998). The Morning Call reports that about 25 residents turned out for the borough council meeting in Emmaus, Pennsylvania Monday to demand that restrictions be placed on where Conrail trains can idle their engines. The article explains that boundaries were set in previous years regarding where trains can idle, but residents say the rules are not being enforced. Two weeks ago, residents asked council members to consider an ordinance banning the noise and pollution from the trains. Meanwhile, the article says, Conrail officials say an ordinance isn't necessary and they will start enforcing the boundaries.

TV Helicopters Break New Mexico City's Noise Laws; City Officials Want to Mediate Problem (Jul. 21, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reports that a recent study in Albuquerque, New Mexico found that three area television stations have news helicopters that operate above the city's noise laws. The article notes that the city monitored the stations helicopter ports in March and April in response to residents' complaints about the noise, fumes, and potential danger of the helicopters taking off and landing near their homes. City officials have offered to set up meetings between the news stations and the residents. Some residents said they are unhappy with the city's response.

Colorado City Steps Up Enforcement of Noise Ordinance (Jul. 20, 1998). The Denver Post reports that police in Aurora, Colorado have stepped up enforcement of the city's noise ordinance that passed in 1995, responding to residents' complaints. The article says residents were warned with an insert in their water bills this month to keep the noise down.

Editorial Argues that FAA Should Take Greater Role in Determining Flight Patterns at Proposed California Airport (Jul. 19, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed an editorial that says the Federal Aviation Administration should be more involved in determining feasibility of the El Toro Airport in Orange County, California. Currently, debates over takeoffs to the East and North are not grounded in the way that they would be if the FAA -- whose prime responsibility is assuring safety and efficiency of airport operations -- would give a firm opinion on the safety of the proposed runways usage.

Judge Hears Case on Motorcycle Course in Rural Wisconsin; Residents Angry About Noise and Afraid of Course Owner (Jul. 19, 1998). The Wisconsin State Journal reports that residents are angry about the noise from a motorcycle course in Dunn, Wisconsin. Earlier this month, Dane County Judge Richard Callaway heard arguments in the dispute, and could rule on it Tuesday when the hearing resumes. County officials have argued that the course's owners have violated zoning laws that prohibit a motorcycle course on land zoned for farming, and failed to get a proper erosion control permit to move dirt to build the course. Many residents who object to the motorcycle course are afraid of the course's owners, who have done jail time and had additional brushes with the law. Meanwhile, the town of Dunn board will hold a public hearing Tuesday on a proposed ordinance to limit "disorderly conduct with a motor vehicle" that appears to be aimed at controlling the motorcycle course.

Residents in Ontario Start Picketing Courier Warehouse Over Noise, While City Takes Company to Court (Jul. 19, 1998). The Ottawa Citizen reports that residents in the Blossom Park area of Gloucester, Ontario are planning a week-long protest against Dicom Express, a courier warehouse located near their homes, over noise that comes from the facility's trucks. Meanwhile, the city of Gloucester last week decided to take the courier company to court for violating the city's noise law. But officials with Dicom Express said the suit will be thrown out, as an earlier suit by the city was, because the company is located in an industrial zone.

"Dear Abby" Column Says Communities Have Banned Ice Cream Truck Noise, But Insists Trucks are Still a Great Old Tradition (Jul. 18, 1998). The Charleston Daily Mail printed a "Dear Abby" column in which a reader wrote in describing the offensive nature of the music coming from new ice-cream trucks. Abby responded that many communities have banded together to restrict noise from ice-cream trucks, but she also printed letters from other readers who said ice-cream trucks bring back great memories.

Editorial Advocates Regulations on Jet Skis in Florida (Jul. 18, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune printed an editorial that argues that Florida communities should place restrictions on Jet Skis, or personal watercraft, and enforce the regulations. Otherwise, the editorial says, a ban could lie ahead.

Indiana Resident Asks How to Get Relief From Noisy Dog (Jul. 18, 1998). The Indianapolis Star reports printed a column in which a resident of Indianapolis, Indiana asked whether there is a county ordinance that protects residents from neighbors' dogs that bark incessantly. The columnist responded by outlining the law enforcement process that the resident could undertake.

Louisiana Noise Activist's Property is Firebombed for the Third Time (Jul. 18, 1998). The Times-Picayune reports that a servant's quarters building behind the home of Stuart Smith, an activist who has demanded a crackdown on noisy bars in the French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana, was set fire to on Friday about 5 a.m. Smith said this is the third firebombing of his property in what he believes is a campaign of intimidation for his activism.

Calfornia State Assembly Member (Jul. 17, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles printed an editorial by George Runner, a California Assembly member (R-Lancaster, Palmdale, Santa Clarita), arguing that the Los Angeles City Council passed an arbitrary and unfair ordinance when it banned gas-powered leaf-blowers. The writer notes that the Assembly's Local Government Committee narrowly approved a bill that would overturn that ban. The editorial says that Republicans in the Assembly advocate an approach that allows local governments to establish noise standards as technologies develop without seriously damaging the gardening industry.

Jet Skis Targeted as Polluters of Michigan's Great Lakes (Jul. 17, 1998). The Detroit News reports that scientists and others this summer are targeting personal watercraft with significantly polluting Michigan's Great Lakes. Millions of gallons of unburned fuel are being poured into the lakes from the inefficient two-stroke engines on Jet Skis and other personal watercraft, experts say. The article notes that state bills on Jet Ski restrictions have passed the House and Senate and are bound for Governor Engler's signature. The bills address issues of safety, training, and law enforcement related to personal watercraft, but don't address water pollution.

Judge Lifts Some Noise Restrictions at California Amphitheater (Jul. 17, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that a Superior Court judge in Costa Mesa, California ruled Thursday that some noise restrictions must be lifted at the 18,500-seat Pacific Amphitheatre at the Orange County Fairgrounds. But, the article notes, the judge ruled that a restriction limiting decibel levels at the edge of the amphitheater can remain in place.

Maine Residents Try to Build Consensus for Noise Wall Near Interstate (Jul. 17, 1998). The Bangor Daily News reports that residents living near the Interstate 95 Broadway exit in Bangor, Maine continued their work Wednesday on getting a noise wall installed along the highway. The article notes that the Maine Department of Transportation has set aside $200,000 to build a wall, but state officials say they won't build the wall unless they get consensus from the residents on the issue. Some residents, the article says, have opposed the wall, saying it would be too intrusive in their neighborhood.

Montreal Police Monitor Neighborhood by Helicopter, Angering Residents (Jul. 17, 1998). The Gazette reports that police in Montreal, Quebec have been regularly patrolling the Mile End district of the city by helicopter for the past several weeks to secure the area from crime. But residents are complaining about the helicopter's noise, saying it keeps them from sleeping and the searchlights make them feel like they're in a war zone.

Resident Says Washington State Airport Officials Didn't Follow Federal Guidelines in Noise Mitigation Program (Jul. 17, 1998). The Seattle Times printed the following letter-to-the-editor form Minnie Brasher, a Burien, Washington resident, regarding noise from the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport:

Residents Near California Amphitheater Worry About Judge's Ruling Eliminating Some Noise Restrictions (Jul. 17, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that residents living near the Pacific Amphitheatre in Costa Mesa, California are afraid that a Superior Court judge's ruling Thursday that lifted some noise restrictions at the concert venue will result in unbearable noise. The article notes that the judge's ruling eliminated residents' control over the site's sound covenant.

U.S. Senate Strikes a Deal for 30 More Flights at Chicago Airport Instead of 100 (Jul. 17, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that a U.S. Senate committee brokered an agreement Thursday that calls for 30 more daily commercial takeoffs and landings at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport instead of the 100 flights proposed last week. The article notes that the revised bill still must be approved by the full Senate and then reconciled with a House bill that calls for 29 new daily commercial flights.

California Judge Strikes Down Strict Noise Restrictions at Amphitheater (Jul. 16, 1998). The City News Service reports that Orange County Superior Court judge Robert Thomas today struck down strict noise restrictions at the Pacific Amphitheatre in Costa Mesa, California. The article explains that the parties in the lawsuit were the Orange County Fair and Exposition Center, which owns the amphitheater, the Nederlander Organization, which sold the amphitheater to the fair, and homeowners living nearby. The article notes that the judge set a subsequent hearing for August 21 to determine the exact language of the final document which will accompany the ruling.

California Planning Commission Votes to Skip Environmental Study in Converting Residentially Zoned Land to Commercially Zoned Land (Jul. 16, 1998). The Fresno Bee reports that the Planning Commission in Fresno, California voted unanimously Wednesday to consider the question of re-zoning 26 acres of land from residential to commercial uses without conducting an environmental impact report. As a result, the article says, the city will decide in August whether to re-zone the land. Staff members at the city planning department and some residents opposed re-zoning the site without an environmental report to assess the impacts of re-zoning on traffic, noise, and aesthetics.

D.C. Residents Try to Shut Down Noisy and Dangerous Nightclub (Jul. 16, 1998). The Washington Post reports that residents in Washington, D.C. are trying to shut down the Palace nightclub, in the 300 block of Kennedy Street NW. Residents living near the club say the club is noisy, creates traffic problems, and most of all, is dangerous to the surrounding community. A shoot-out outside the club occurred Sunday, and a stabbing occurred in April. On Tuesday, about 24 local residents demonstrated outside the club, calling for its closure. The article explains that a recently passed law, the Suspension of Liquor Licenses Amendment Act, may help residents in their fight, because it allows the alcohol licenses of establishments to be suspended when violence in or near the club endangers the community or the police.

Editorial Applauds Proposal by National Park Service to Ban Personal Watercraft (Jul. 16, 1998). The St. Petersburg Times printed an editorial that argues the proposal by the National Park Service to ban Jet Skis at national parks would improve health and safety conditions at our parks. The editorial goes on to say that state and local governments should impose similar restrictions on Jet Skis near coastal and lake shores. The issue is especially important for Florida, the editorial says.

Entertainment Center Approved in California, Despite Some Residents' Objections (Jul. 16, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that the Planning Commission in Garden Grove, California on Wednesday unanimously approved a proposal to build Riverwalk, a $400 million entertainment center along Harbor Boulevard, despite some residents' concerns about noise, traffic, and parking. The article notes that the development includes a half-mile circular stream surrounding jazz clubs, restaurants and shops, a 16-to-24-screen movie-theater complex, a 500-room hotel, an entertainment center with a bowling alley, an ice-skating rink, and a virtual-reality arcade. The project now must gain approval from the City Council. Meanwhile, residents can comment on the draft environmental impact report for the project until August 14.

New York Town Police Train More Police to Use Decibel Meters, Increasing Enforcement of Noise Law (Jul. 16, 1998). Newsday reports that the city of Long Beach, New York has doubled the number of police officers qualified to use decibel meters in order to enforce the city's noise ordinance. City officials said the noise ordinance and the decibel meter training has resulted in a less noisy community.

North Carolina Residents Want to Know How Airport's Growth From FedEx Hub Will Affect the City (Jul. 16, 1998). The News & Record reports that residents in Greensboro, North Carolina concerned about a proposed FedEx hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport called on the Airport Authority Wednesday to lay out how the hub and the airport's growth will affect the city. Residents are worried that the proposed growth to accommodate FedEx will result in unacceptable levels of noise, traffic congestion, and air pollution. Meanwhile, the state House gave final approval Wednesday to a series of economic incentives for FedEx, including $115 million in tax breaks over 20 years.

Proposal for Police Shooting Range in England Draws Concern (Jul. 16, 1998). The Northern Echo reports that the police force in County Durham, England has proposed using the site of an old quarry at Running Waters, three miles southeast of Durham City, for an outdoor shooting range. But, the article says, some residents and councilors are objecting to the plan.

Virginia Citizens Group Files Lawsuit Against U.S. Navy Over Plan to Bring Military Jets to Town (Jul. 16, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports that a citizens group filed a lawsuit against the secretary of the U.S. Navy on Wednesday, seeking to postpone the transfer of 10 military jet squadrons to Oceana Naval Air Station near Norfolk, Virginia until a study is done on the impacts of the jets on the region.

Washington, DC Residents Fear Increasing Noise if Senate Bill Increases Airport's Flights (Jul. 16, 1998). The Washington Times reports that residents living near the Reagan National Airport in Washington, DC aren't happy about a proposal to add 24 more daily flights at the airport. The article explains that the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee on Tuesday approved a bill that would add the flights. But residents say they already experience too much jet noise. The bill must still be passed by the full Senate and then reconciled with a similar bill passed by the House.

Activist Decries Lack of Public Process for Proposed Air Cargo Airport in Nevada (Jul. 15, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal printed an editorial by Randy Harkness, chair of the Southern Nevada chapter of the Sierra Club, regarding a proposed air cargo airport near Jean, Nevada. The writer criticizes an earlier editorial in the paper on the subject, and goes on to say that the proposed airport could create many noise and environmental problems. The project should not be undertaken without a complete public process, which is not now happening, the writer says. The Sierra Club is opposing a provision regarding the airport in an appropriations bill because it would further prevent public input, the editorial says.

Florida Airport Officials Ask Condominium Developer for Noise Liability Waivers, But Developers Refuse (Jul. 15, 1998). The St. Petersburg Times reports officials at the Albert Whitted Municipal Airport in St. Petersburg, Florida are worried about the location of Vinoy Place, a proposed condominium development below the final approach path for one of the airport's runways. The article says airport officials asked the developers to require buyers to sign liability waivers, protecting the airport from noise lawsuits. But developers, on the advice of the city's legal department, have refused; however, they say they will provide full disclosure to buyers about the airport's proximity.

Florida Resident Says Newspaper Shouldn't Print Comments About Jet Noise From People Living Far From Airport (Jul. 15, 1998). The Palm Beach Post printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Marilyn Jordan, a West Palm Beach resident, regarding noise from the Palm Beach International Airport:

Maryland Councilor Calls for Police Enforcement of Noise Ordinance (Jul. 15, 1998). The Capital reports that Alder Board member Louise Hammond of Annapolis, Maryland this week called for police to enforce the noise ordinance against traffic noise in the downtown.

Proposed Noise Controls on Aircraft Testing at New Zealand Airport May Be Relaxed (Jul. 15, 1998). The Evening Standard reports that the city council resource management and regulatory committee in Palmerston North, New Zealand voted Monday to proceed with the public notification of a variation to the proposed district plan that would allow noise from the testing of aircraft engines at Palmerston North Airport to be louder than the district plan proposes.

Residents in New Mexico Complain About Noisy Training Flights (Jul. 15, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reports that residents living near the Four Corners Regional Airport in Farmington, New Mexico are angry about noise from the training flights initiated by the Mesa Air Group. According to the article, residents had hoped that after Mesa Air Group officials announced recently they would be moving their operation, that the noisy training flights would leave the area. But Mesa officials said their subsidiary, the pilot training company Mesa Pilot Development, would remain at the airport and would be increasing flights. Residents are expected to air their complaints at a meeting today of the Farmington Airport Advisory Commission. The commission plans to make a recommendation to the City Council on how to resolve the problem.

Rhode Island Zoning Board Postpones Public Hearing on Gun Club Permit (Jul. 15, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that the Zoning Board of Review in West Greenwich, Rhode Island postponed a public hearing last night on a special-use permit sought by the Wincheck Gun Club, because the club's two expert witnesses were unable to attend and because board members requested site plans for the proposed club. More than 50 residents concerned about noise attended the meeting and waited two-and-a-half hours without getting a chance to speak. The Zoning Board moved the public hearing to its August 25 meeting.

U.S. Senate Committee Approves 100 More Daily Flights at Chicago's Airport (Jul. 15, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that the Senate Commerce Committee voted 11-9 Tuesday to approve legislation that could add 100 commercial flights per day at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, the world's busiest airport. Senators voted on the legislation after listening to a last-minute, unannounced appeal against the bill from U.S. Senator Carol Moseley-Braun (D-Illinois), who is not a member of the committee. The article notes that the legislation is part of a national aviation bill, and it now advances to the full Senate, where a fight is expected between senators who want to increase flights around the country and those who represent constituents battling airport noise and traffic.

Washington Resident Applauds State Supreme Court and National Park Service for Banning Jet Skis (Jul. 15, 1998). The Seattle Times printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Christina Wilsdon, a Seattle resident, regarding noise from personal watercraft:

Electronic Monitoring System Used in Grimsby, England, to Combat Noise Nuisances (Jul. 14, 1998). The Grimsby Evening Telegraph reports an English town of Grimsby is using an electronic monitoring system to combat noise pollution.

Hong Kong Residents Complain About Jet Noise, But Officials Refuse Compensation for Residents Outside Noise Contour (Jul. 14, 1998). The South China Morning Post reports that China's Civil Aviation Department has received about 300 complaints from residents since the Hong Kong airport opened. While residents continue to protest, government officials say that compensating residents who live outside the "noise contour" is out of the question. Meanwhile, decibel levels on the ground below the flight path range from 60 to 70 decibels.

Residents in Washington State Object to Airport Expansion, But Officials Pass Expansion Plan (Jul. 14, 1998). The Seattle Times reports that residents in the old Georgetown neighborhood of Seattle, Washington already experience significant jet noise from Boeing Field. Despite their objections, however, the Metropolitan King County Council yesterday unanimously approved a proposal to bring more cargo flights to the airport and move the runway closer Georgetown's homes. The proposal now moves to county environmental reviews. But, the article says, given yesterday's unanimous vote, the plan is likely to get final approval from the council sometime next year.

California Airport Completes Soundproofing Demonstration Program, and Offers Soundproofing to More Residents (Jul. 13, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that nine families living near the Burbank Airport in Burbank, California were the first to have soundproofing against jet noise installed in their homes in an airport-sponsored program. Now, the airport plans to spend $110 million to soundproof 2,300 more homes in Burbank, Sun Valley, and North Hollywood over the next 10 to 15 years. The article says that airport officials are hoping their success at soundproofing the first nine "demonstration" homes will encourage more families to sign up for the program, will help meet government sound-reduction mandates, and will generate goodwill in the community over their controversial plan to build a larger air terminal. But the city of Burbank, which is opposing the airport expansion, has not backed the soundproofing program, saying it is a stopgap measure and not a cure for jet noise. In addition, the city has objected to the agreement residents must sign with the airport pledging to never sue the airport over noise, smoke, or vibration in exchange for the free soundproofing.

Editorial Says Jet Ski Ban in Some Washington Lakes Makes Sense (Jul. 13, 1998). The Columbian printed an editorial that argues Jet Ski bans make sense in some Washington lakes. In national parks and other important natural areas, Jet Skis are not appropriate, the editorial says. But on other lakes, such as the Lacamas Lake near Vancouver, Washington, seaplanes and motorboats already have shattered the silence and residential developments have eliminated much of the former natural setting. On such lakes, the editorial argues, Jet Skis should be banned only if they can be shown to be environmentally harmful.

Maine's Acadia National Park is First National Park to Ban Jet Skis (Jul. 13, 1998). The Bangor Daily News reports that Acadia National Park, near Bar Harbor, Maine, has become the first national park in the country to ban personal watercraft in its lakes and ponds. The article explains that the Maine Land Use Regulation Commission and the National Park System currently are working on rules that would restrict personal watercraft on many water bodies throughout the country. According to the article, Acadia used the state's Great Ponds law to achieve its ban. Meanwhile, the National Park Service is considering banning Jet Skis at nine other national parks, including Mount Ranier in Washington and Voyageurs in Minnesota.

Maryland Developers Seek to Develop Land Near Highways, While County Officials Struggle to Protect Future Homeowners From Traffic Noise (Jul. 13, 1998). The Baltimore Sun reports that the counties around Baltimore, Maryland are increasingly facing a problem as developers try to build on land parcels close to major highways, and residents demand noise walls. But the State Highway Administration will not build noise barriers to protect any neighborhood that was built after the roads were constructed. State officials instead are recommending that county officials develop local policies to protect future homeowners from highway noise. As a result, counties are requiring developers to build further away from highways, build their own noise walls, or take other steps to mitigate noise.

Washington State Supreme Court Rules That Jet Skis Can Be Banned (Jul. 13, 1998). NBC News Transcripts reports that the Washington state Supreme Court has upheld a county ordinance that bans Jet Skis as noise pollution in the San Juan islands, north of Seattle, Washington.

Congressional Plan to Add Flights at Chicago Airport Draws Sharp Outcry from Residents (Jul. 12, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports residents living near the O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois last week sharply protested a proposal by U.S. Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) to add 129 commercial flights per day at the airport.

Environmental Impact Statement Process Begins on FedEx Hub in North Carolina; Meanwhile, Residents Angry at Airport for Not Considering an Alternate Expansion Plan (Jul. 12, 1998). The News & Record reports that a consulting firm is expected to be hired in the next three weeks to begin compiling an environmental impact statement for a plan to build a FedEx package-handling hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport in Greensboro, North Carolina. The airport's plans include constructing a third runway parallel to the existing main runway. Meanwhile, residents who oppose the FedEx hub offered airport officials a compromise map which they believed would have reduced the impact of the hub, but officials rejected it, angering residents.

Florida County Government and Two Federal Agencies Target Personal Watercraft With Restrictions and Research (Jul. 12, 1998). The Houston Chronicle reports that a wide range of groups has started to criticize personal watercraft, saying that the machines are too noisy and unsafe. Among the critics are law enforcement officers, anglers and recreational boaters, waterside homeowners, and safety officials. The most recent critics include officials in Florida's Monroe County, the National Park Service, and the National Transportation Safety Board. The article goes on to outline the actions of each of the three agencies, and lists many safety statistics related to Jet Skis.

More Than 40 Noise Walls Needed Near Freeways in Southern California, But State Has No Timetable to Build Them (Jul. 12, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports California state officials identified more than a dozen locations in the Los Angeles area in 1989 that needed noise walls to protect residents from traffic noise. But, the article says, those noise barriers haven't even been funded, let alone built. Since then, state officials have identified 27 others that are needed in the San Fernando Valley, but there is no timetable to build them. Now, legislation that would build the noise walls by 2008 is being held up in the Legislature because Northern and Southern California lawmakers are fighting about who should get more money for the noise barriers.

Residents Oppose Pennsylvania Shopping Center, Saying it Will Bring Traffic and Noise (Jul. 12, 1998). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports that residents in Cranberry, Pennsylvania are opposing a proposed 550,000-square-foot regional shopping center because they believe it will bring additional truck traffic and noise to their neighborhood. At a township planning commission meeting on Wednesday, residents voiced their concerns. At the end of the meeting, planning commissioners asked for another meeting with developers to address questions raised by residents and staff members at the township.

Residents on New York's Long Island Want Noise Walls, But State Won't Build Them (Jul. 12, 1998). Newsday reports that residents in many communities on Long Island, outside New York City, are complaining about traffic noise near their homes. While many residents have asked that noise walls be built in their neighborhoods, the state Department of Transportation will only consider building walls in neighborhoods next to major highway construction projects. Only one community on Long Island, Plainview, has succeeded in getting money for a noise wall without a major road construction project underway, the article says.

FAA Will Get Involved in Fight Over California Airport Expansion (Jul. 11, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports California Representatives Howard Berman (D-Mission Hills) and Brad Sherman (D-Woodland Hills) announced Friday that they will lobby the federal government to resolve the long-running dispute over expansion of the Burbank Airport. The Representatives also announced that Jane Garvey, the head of the Federal Aviation Administration, will come to Los Angeles on August 11 to mediate a solution to the fight between city of Burbank and the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority. The city is involved in legal battles with the airport authority over the proposed airport expansion, saying the airport's plans will cause more jet noise for its residents. The Representatives made their announcements at a summit on Los Angeles area airport issues sponsored by the Valley Industry and Commerce Association.

Scottish Planning Committee Delays Ruling on Noise Problems at Quarry (Jul. 11, 1998). The Aberdeen Press and Journal reports the Highland Council's Ross and Cromarty area planning committee, near Aberdeen, Scotland, has delayed a ruling on noise problems by the quarry operator Leiths, on its Tor Achilty quarry near Contin, until September. The committee is set to consider a breach of the quarry's planning conditions related to noise levels. Committee members delayed their ruling in order to allow the quarry to finish work which is intended to minimize the noise.

Chicago Suburb Officials Urge Residents to Call Senators About Proposal to Add More Flights at O'Hare (Jul. 11, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that local officials in Itasca and Wood Dale, Illinois are urging residents to call Illinois' two senators to protest a plan to add 100 daily flights at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago. The article notes that the proposal is championed by Senator John McCain (R-Arizona), the chair of the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee, and is scheduled for a final vote in the committee on Tuesday.

Illinois Congress Members Seek to Halt Senator McCain's Plan to Add Flights at O'Hare (Jul. 11, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Illinois Congress members stepped up pressure on Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) Friday, trying to stop him from moving forward on his plan to add 100 daily flights at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago.

Two Loud Virginia Amphitheater Concerts Anger Residents (Jul. 11, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports that a pair of rock concerts at GTE Virginia Beach Amphitheater in Virginia Beach, Virginia have resulted in the heaviest noise complaints this season about the amphitheater. City officials and representatives of Cellar Door, a company that operates the amphitheater, will meet Monday to again discuss ways of keeping the noise down, the article says.

California Residents Protest Raceway Expansion (Jul. 10, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that about 50 people attended a meeting yesterday before the Sonoma County (California) Board of Zoning Adjustments to debate the draft environmental impact report of the expansion of the Sears Point Raceway in the Santa Rosa area. The article says residents in Sonoma Valley are opposed to the expansion, saying it will bring more noise, traffic, and visual blight. The article notes that public comments will be taken through July 27, and then will be incorporated into the final environmental study. Meanwhile, Sonoma Valley Citizens Advisory Commission unanimously passed a resolution recommending the zoning board reject the current environmental impact report and redraft it with adequate mitigation plans.

Washington Officials Angry About Plan by Senator McCain to Add Flights at National Airport (Jul. 10, 1998). The Washington Times reports that the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee yesterday approved new rules that would allow 24 more planes per day to fly into Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport and lift restrictions on how far away the flights could come from. Senator John McCain (R-Arizona), the chair of the committee, is the chief sponsor of the bill, and says that the provisions would allow more competition in the Washington market. But local officials said McCain was meddling in their affairs for the benefit of Congress members who want more convenient flights to Washington. The committee still must take up the bill on Tuesday to approve final amendments, the article notes. If approved by the full Senate, the bill would have to be reconciled with a similar bill in the House. That bill would add only six flights at Reagan National, and would eliminate the restriction on long-haul flights.

Senator McCain Gets Praise and Criticism for Flight-Related Bill (Jul. 10, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that Arizona Senator John McCain was praised by many on Thursday for a bill to reduce aircraft noise over national parks, but was then criticized by citizen groups opposed to a provision in the bill which would increase flights at such airports as Chicago's O'Hare and Washington's Reagan National. McCain also was accused of pushing the bill in order to benefit America West Airlines, based in Tempe, Arizona. The bill would allow America West to fly non-stop from Phoenix to Washington's Reagan National Airport. The article notes that the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, which McCain heads, gave preliminary approval to the bill, and will return next week to consider some minor amendments.

NYC Loses Appeal to Prevent More Flights at La Guardia (Jul. 9, 1998). Newsday reports a federal appeals court has upheld the U.S. Department of Transportation's plan to add 21 daily flights into New York's LaGuardia Airport.

NYC's Heliport and Helicopter Master Plan Criticized by Activists (Jul. 9, 1998). The New York Times reports a study of New York City's heliports and helicopter flights supported a current ban on tours from one heliport in the city, but failed to endorse new regulations for helicopter flights. The results of the study produced mixed reactions from activists, politicians, and industry representatives.

Legislation Will Address Noise from Air Tours in National Parks (Jul. 9, 1998). U.S. Newswire issued the following press release concerning regulation of air tours over national parks:

Senate Plan to Add Flights at Chicago Airport Draws Angry Reaction from Local Residents and Officials (Jul. 9, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that activists in the Chicago, Illinois area are angry about a bill in the Senate that would add 100 daily flights at O'Hare International Airport. The bill is scheduled for a vote in a Senate committee today, the article notes. It would still need the approval of the full Senate, and then would need to be reconciled with a House bill.

Airport Noise Shifts from One Town in China to Another; Environmental Groups Demand Compensation for Residents (Jul. 9, 1998). The South China Morning Post reports airport noise has shifted from Kowloon to Lantau and Sha Tin despite promises that Chek Lap Kok would solve the problem, green groups said yesterday.

Ariz. Sen. McCain Backs Proposal to Add More Flights at O'Hare; Chicago Area Residents Outraged (Jul. 9, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports Chicago area residents reacted with outrage to a U.S. Senate proposal to add 100 daily flights at O'Hare Airport.

U.S. National Park Service Announces Plans to Ban Jet Skis in Certain Areas (Jul. 8, 1998). Greenwire published the following press release saying the National Park Service has proposed banning jet- propulsion personal watercraft (PWCs) from many of the waterways it oversees because of pollution, noise and safety concerns:

N.Salt Lake Gravel Pit Cooperates with Neighbors, Gets Noise Variance Extension (Jul. 8, 1998). The Deseret News reports a North Salt Lake gravel pit operator has been granted an extension on a noise variance. City officials say the extension is the gravel company's reward for its cooperation in response to residents' noise complaints.

National Parks Service Ban on Jet Skis May Affect California Sites (Jul. 8, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports personal watercraft would be banned from all national parks as early as next year because of safety, noise and environmental concerns under rules proposed by the National Park Service. In California, personal watercraft could still be operated at the discretion of the local superintendent at units administered by the Park Service.

FedEx and Airport Reject North Carolina Residents' Proposal for Alternate Hub Site (Jul. 8, 1998). The News & Record reports FedEx and Piedmont Triad International Airport officials on Tuesday rejected an alternative site for the company's new hub and declined to change their plans to build a third runway. Officials still plan to meet with residents about noise and safety concerns.

Neighbors Claim Noise Increase at Firing Range in Grafton, MA (Jul. 8, 1998). The Telegram & Gazette reports the Grafton, Massachusetts, Board of Selectmen last night held a hearing last night to discuss complaints from neighbors of a firing range who claim noise have dramatically increased in recent years.

Neighbors of Noisy Racetrack in PA Urged to Call Police with Complaints (Jul. 8, 1998). The Morning Call reports neighbors of a Silverdale, Pennsylvania, racing track complained Monday to the city council about excessive noise and dust. They were advised to report their complaints to police in an effort to get the noise ordinance enforced.

Personal Watercraft Ban Proposed by National Park Service (Jul. 8, 1998). The New York Times reports personal watercraft such as Jet Skis could be banned from all national parks because of safety, noise and environmental concerns under rules proposed by the National Park Service.

New South Wales Considers Curfews to Cut Road Traffic Noise (Jul. 8, 1998). AAP Newsfeed reports the New South Wales government is considering night curfews on some roads to cut traffic noise, the Daily Telegraph reported today.

Citizens Group Says it Will File Suit Against the Navy for Bringing Jets to Virginia (Jul. 8, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports that Citizens Concerned About Jet Noise in Virginia Beach, Virginia plans to file a lawsuit challenging the U.S. Navy's decision to move 10 squadrons of Hornet jets to the Oceana Naval Air Station in Virginia Beach. The group has hired an attorney and will meet Thursday to discuss the issue and solicit donations. The group has until July 16 to file the suit, the article notes.

Long Beach, NY, Bucks Trend and Considers Lifting Leafblower Ban (Jul. 8, 1998). Newsday reports the city council of Long Beach, New York, is considering rescinding its ban on leafblowers within the city. Critics say the ban was never enforced in the first place, charging even city workers violated the ban.

Steel Company Makes Noise Reduction Efforts to Appease Neighbors in Walsall, England (Jul. 8, 1998). The Birmingham Evening Mail reports a dispute has been resolved between residents and a Walsall, England, steel firm over alleged late night noise.

MBTA Includes Whistles in T Noise Study; Neighbors Hope for Noise Mitigation (Jul. 7, 1998). The Patriot Ledger reports the MBTA has agreed to study the noise impact of the trains on Boston's Old Colony lines, including the whistles that engineers blow four times at each street crossing.

NJ Resident Cited for Noise; Neighbors Say Police Acted Too Slowly (Jul. 7, 1998). The Record reports although police issued a ticket to the hostess of a noisy Fourth of July reggae party on Saturday night, angry neighbors say the officers acted too late to save their holiday from being ruined by loud music and crowds of people overflowing onto the street.

Weston, Florida, Gets Serious About Enforcing Quiet (Jul. 7, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports several residents of Weston, Florida, urged the City Commission to approve a code limiting "loud and raucous noise." The noise code was unanimously approved.

London Case Pending on Landlords' Liability in Noise Nuisance Matters (Jul. 7, 1998). The Lawyer reports judgment is pending in a London case which will determine landlords' liability in respect to noise nuisance.

Court of Appeal Will Hear Challenge of Noise Abatement Notice Served to English Pub (Jul. 7, 1998). The Lawyer reports a Gosport, England, pub is at the center of a pending test case over procedures to be followed by courts dealing with complaints of noise nuisance.

Gun Club Relocation Endorsed by Rhode Island Planning Board Despite Opposition from Residents with Noise Concerns (Jul. 7, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the West Greenwich, Rhode Island, Planning Board voted last night to recommend that the Zoning Board of Review approve an area gun club's relocation. The recommendation came despite two dissenting votes and a number of residents expressing noise concerns.

Maine Passes Comprehensive Law Regulating Noise and Operators of Personal Watercraft (Jul. 6, 1998). The Portland Press Herald reported Maine's new watercraft regulations take effect on Thursday. Years of complaints about noise and safety issues concerning the personal watercraft led to the most comprehensive law of its kind yet passed in Maine.

Olmstead Falls, Ohio, Fights Noise and Expansion at Cleveland Hopkins Airport (Jul. 6, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports residents and public officials in Olmsted Falls, Ohio, have been working together to prevent more aircraft noise from the planned expansion at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport.

Communities in the Buffalo, New York, Area Draft Noise Ordinance with Car Stereos in Mind (Jul. 6, 1998). The Buffalo News reports New York's Erie County Sheriff's Department and other area police agencies are trying to crackdown on drivers who blast high-powered car stereos.

Residents in Babylon, NY, Oppose Expansion of Republic Airport, Fearing Increased Noise and Property Devaluation (Jul. 5, 1998). Newsday reports Babylon, New York, residents oppose expansion of Republic Airport, saying more runways mean larger planes and more noise, along with more pollution, property devaluation and the higher probability of accidents.

Residents of Rural LA County Say Peace and Quiet Ruined by Hunt Club; They Will Appeal Club's Permit and Seek Legal Action if Necessary (Jul. 5, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that neighbors of ranch land that is being used for "bird shoots" by a hunting club are upset at the noise and have appealed a decision to allow the activities to continue. They promised to file lawsuits if necessary.

Solana Beach, CA, Drum Group Cooperates with Noise Laws to Keep Meeting Place (Jul. 5, 1998). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports a drumming circle group in Solana Beach, California, will be allowed to continue to meet at a county park after they worked work out a solution to stay within the noise laws.

ElToro Airport Activists Network with Anti-Airport Groups Worldwide for Support and Lessons (Jul. 4, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that those fighting El Toro Airport in Orange County, California have found allies over the Internet in the U.K., South Africa, and Australia who are fighting the same airport problems.

Monitors Track Noise But Don't Reduce Noise from BWI Airport, Residents Say (Jul. 4, 1998). The Capital reports the Mary land Aviation Administration monitors noise daily from BWI Airport to make sure aircraft stay within the allowed noise levels. Residents commend them for these noise abatement measures, but they say it does nothing to reduce the amount of noise they are exposed to.

Pilots' Union Objects to Takeoffs Proposed at El Toro Airport; They Say Safety Risks Outweigh Noise Concerns (Jul. 4, 1998). The Orange County Register reports the Air Line Pilots Association this week released its response to two Orange County, California, safety studies of El Toro Airport's takeoffs.

English Town Promotes Noise Awareness Day with Education (Jul. 3, 1998). The Herald Express reports the Council in Teignbridge, England, went into action to spotlight Noise Awareness Day launched by the National Society for Clean Air.

Residents Protest Expansion at Washington's Boeing Field; They Say Noise Rattles Windows Now (Jul. 3, 1998). The Seattle Times reports at a council meeting yesterday, residents in Washington's South Seattle neighborhoods protested a plan that would increase air traffic at Boeing Field and move the airport's runway closer to their neighborhoods.

Firefighter Landlords in England Protest Station Noise (Jul. 2, 1998). The Evening Post (Wellington) reports in England two firemen are complaining that the station where they work is too noisy for tenants in apartments next door. The two firemen happen to also be the landlords of the adjacent apartments.

Noise Pollution is a Growing Problem in United Kingdom (Jul. 2, 1998). The Sentinel reports that noise pollution is a growing problem in the Newcastle area in the United Kingdom, and residents are becoming more aware of their rights to have a peaceful life. The article goes on to detail the noise problems of two residents in the Stoke area, and to detail how officials at the Newcastle Borough Council advise people to deal with noise problems.

Proposed Settlement Fair in Tennessee's Memphis Airport Case, Editorial Says (Jul. 2, 1998). The Commercial Appeal published the following editorial contending that the settlement proposed by the Tennessee's Memphis/Shelby County Airport Authority to resolve a class-action lawsuit filed by homeowners is "fair and reasonable." The editorial says:

San Francisco Supervisor Proposes Entertainment District after Residents Make Noise Complaints (Jul. 2, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports San Francisco's Supervisor Gavin Newsom is proposing the city create an entertainment district to balance needs of clubs and residents in the South of Market section of the city.

Some Montreal Residents Say Neighborhoods and Bars Don't Mix, Citing Noise and Traffic (Jul. 2, 1998). The Gazette reports bars and restaurants in residential area of Montreal have become controversial. Residents complain about noise. West End business owners say they are working to peacefully co-exist in neighborhoods.

UK Government's Aware of Misery Noise Can Cause; Promotes National Noise Awareness Day (Jul. 2, 1998). M2 Presswire published the following press release stating that the United Kingdom's minister responsible for environmental noise declared the government's support for National Noise Awareness Day. The press release read as follows:

Carmelite Nuns Ask for Noise Buffer from New Roads; Texas Town Says Wall Too Expensive (Jul. 1, 1998). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports two former mayors and a former city councilwoman spoke to the City Council last night on behalf of a group of nuns who say the expansion of two roads threatens the serenity of their south Arlington, Texas, monastery.

City in Scotland Publishes Guide for Residents with Noise Problems (Jul. 1, 1998). The Aberdeen Press and Journal reports the City Council of Aberdeen, Scotland, is addressing the growing noise pollution problem by publishing noise reduction guidelines for residents.

Cleveland's City Council Asks FAA to Follow Through on Home Insulation Despite New Noise Exposure Map (Jul. 1, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports Cleveland City Council members are working to make sure residents near Cleveland Hopkins International Airport who have waited years to get their homes insulated from jet noise actually receive the government-financed improvements. The council is also urging the Federal Aviation Administration to block the sale of land north of the airport unless a consultant conclusively determines the land is not needed for the airport.

Group Meets with Pilots to Discuss Ways to Reduce Suburban Noise from O'Hare (Jul. 1, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports members of the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission met with two chief pilots from United and American airlines Tuesday to brainstorm ideas for reducing noise pollution in the Northwest suburbs.

Leaf Blower Bill to Overturn Local Controls Gets Approval in California Assembly (Jul. 1, 1998). The United Press International reports legislation to overturn local controls on leaf blowers has been narrowly approved by the California Assembly's Local Government Committee.

Letter Says the FAA Fails to Protect Citizens' Interests in Expansion of Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (Jul. 1, 1998). The Plain Dealer published the following letter from Matthew Englehart of Olmsted Falls, Ohio. In his letter, Englehart questions the employment of the firm hired to study the impact of expansion of Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. Englehart also criticizes the FAA for failing to provide checks and balances for airport planners. Mr. Englehart writes:

Sounds of Silence Rare in North Lincolnshire, England; Noise Complaints Increase (Jul. 1, 1998). The Scunthorpe Evening Telegraph reports complaints about noise pollution are on the rise in the English towns of North Lincolnshire. But the Health and Public Protection Committee can help residents bothered by noise.

Councilman Says Constituents Will Suffer for Burbank Airport Expansion in Noise, Traffic and Pollution (Jun. 30, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles published the following editorial by Dave Golonski, a Burbank City Council member. In his response to a recent commentary about the expansion of California's Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport, Golonski contends his constituents will pay for the current plans for airport expansion in noise, traffic, and pollution.

Noise Regulations for Watercraft in Maine (Jun. 30, 1998). The Central Maine Morning Sentinel reports new laws regulating motorboats, including limiting the noise levels of all powerboats go into effect next week in Maine.

Residents Consider Proposal to Quiet Washington's King County Airport Inadequate (Jun. 30, 1998). The Seattle Times reports yesterday, after months of community protests over noise from Washington's King County International Airport, a King County Executive proposed a compromise that some residents already consider inadequate.

Calif. County Court to Decide Volume Level at Pacific Amphitheater (Jun. 29, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that the Pacific Amphitheater at Orange County, California's fairgrounds is still a source of tension, even now that a noise lawsuit is over.

County Vows to Sue if Noise Pact not Reached with Lambert Field Airport (Jun. 29, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports Missouri's St. Charles County will file a lawsuit to stop any expansion plan at Lambert Field unless it gets an agreement that aircraft noise will be lowered from present levels.

France will Phase out Noisier Jets at Charles de Gaulle Airport (Jun. 29, 1998). AP Worldstream reports the French government on Monday agreed to phase out noisier jetliners at Paris' Charles de Gaulle Airport by 2002.

Noise Complaints Increase 20 Percent in English Towns (Jun. 29, 1998). The Gloucestershire Echo reports complaints about noisy neighbors are on the increase in the English towns of Vale of Evesham and Broadway.

Calif. Residents Don't Want Concrete Plant to Relocate to Weimar (Jun. 28, 1998). The Sacramento Bee reports Weimar, California, residents were pleased Thursday morning when the Placer County Planning Commission voted 3-2 to deny Manuel Brothers Inc. a conditional use permit for a concrete batch plant on Canyon Way. Residents oppose the plant relocation based on concerns about noise pollution, increased traffic, and property devaluation.

Feds Fund Three Sound Barrier Projects in NYC (Jun. 28, 1998). The Daily News reports Congress and the White House have approved a multi-million-dollar spending for transportation projects aimed at easing New York's traffic flow along Queens streets, and reducing noise pollution for neighbors of the borough's highways.

For Peace and Safety's Sake, Virginia Needs to Regulate Personal Watercraft, Says Editorial (Jun. 28, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot of Norfolk, VA, published the following commentary advocating for stronger rules for personal watercraft.

Homeowners in Tennessee Say Property Values Have Fallen on Their Homes From Noise and Air Pollution (Jun. 28, 1998). The Knoxville News-Sentinel reports that more than 20 residents of the Eagle Bend neighborhood in Clinton, Tennessee say their property values have fallen and the assessments on their homes should be reduced because of the air and noise pollution coming from the nearby Carden Farm Industrial Park. The residents appeared before the Anderson County Board of Equalization recently, and presented a petition to the board contesting what residents say are the "high property tax reappraisals" on their homes.

Motorcycle Fans and Foes Meet about Noise in NYC (Jun. 28, 1998). The New York Times reports a large group gathered Tuesday in Greenwich Village, New York, to talk about noise from motorcycles with altered mufflers.

New Laws on Maine's Waters Restricting Noise and Personal Watercraft (Jun. 28, 1998). The Portland Press Herald reports as Maine's busiest boating season begins next weekend, game wardens are gearing up to enforce new boating laws - including restrictions on noise levels and the minimum age for operating personal watercraft.

Planning Commission Rejects Preschool Expansion in Calif. Neighborhood When Residents Stress Noise and Traffic Concerns (Jun. 28, 1998). The Sacramento Bee reports plans for an expanded preschool in Shingle Springs , California, were rejected Thursday by the El Dorado County Planning Commission. Opponents pressured commission to reverse its initial approval, citing the inappropriateness of the site in a neighborhood and pointing to noise and traffic concerns.

Airport Noise Level Plans Require Future Homes to be Soundproofed (Jun. 27, 1998). The Evening Standard reports rural New Zealand residents living under flight paths are concerned about how proposed new noise level limits near Palmerston North airport will affect future homes and additions to existing properties.

Jacksonville Considering New Enforceable Noise Laws (Jun. 27, 1998). The State Journal Register reports the city of Jacksonville, Florida, is looking at a new proposal to restrict noise in neighborhoods.

Memphis Airport Authority Votes to Settle Class-Action Noise Lawsuit (Jun. 27, 1998). The Commercial Appeal reports the Memphis/Shelby County Airport Authority unanimously approved a proposed $ 22 million payment to area homeowners Friday designed to settle a 9-year-old airport noise suit.

Sea-Tac Airport Authority and Opponents to Enter Mediation (Jun. 27, 1998). The News Tribune reports the Port of Seattle and opponents of its proposed third runway at Sea-Tac International Airport have agreed to negotiation talks with a nationally known mediator.

Chicago Town Says it Qualifies to Vote on O'Hare Noise Commission (Jun. 26, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports the city of Rolling Meadows, Illinois, wants to have more say about how soundproofing efforts are funded by becoming a voting member of the Chicago-funded O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission.

Columbus Resident Advocates for Preservation of Quiet Streets and Neighborhoods (Jun. 26, 1998). The Columbus Dispatch published the following editorial by Columbus resident, Joe Motil. He opposes the building of a major thoroughfare through an historic section of the city, which he says will bring noise, traffic, and the destruction of urban green space and a neighborhood. Motil writes:

Congressman's Approval Could Allow Controversial Sixth Runaway at DIA (Jun. 26, 1998). The Rocky Mountain News of Denver, Colorado, reports the chairman of the Transportation Committee has given his approval, freeing up money for a much-disputed sixth runway at Denver International Airport. Some opponents will still fight the runway, based on noise issues.

German Court Rules in Favor of Neighbors; Enforces Quiet Times at Home (Jun. 26, 1998). AP Worldstream reports Germany's Constitutional Court refused Friday to hear an appeal of a controversial ruling that came from a neighbor's complaints about noise coming from a house for mentally handicapped men.

Wisconsin Town Wants to Beef Up Nuisance Ordinance to Quiet Motorbike Noise (Jun. 26, 1998). The Capital Times reports residents of Dunn, Wisconsin, say motorbikes racing on a nearby track keep them awake at night, but the owner of the property says he's a good neighbor who regulates racing hours.

City Official Wants Voting Rights for Rolling Meadows on O'Hare Noise Panel (Jun. 25, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports an Illinois alderman in Rolling Meadows is urging that his city secure voting rights on the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission

GA County Says Yes to Outdoor Music for Restaurants but Noise Ordinance Still in Effect (Jun. 25, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports for the second time in recent months, county commissioners in Gwinnett, Georgia, changed the alcohol law to allow restaurants to play music outside their buildings.

Madison, WI, Proposes Stricter Noise Ordinance (Jun. 25, 1998). The Wisconsin State Journal reports a proposal to toughen Madison, Wisconsin's noise regulations may please residents but irk businesses.

New Noise Group Aims to Silence Critics of Boca Raton Airport (Jun. 25, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports a new group, Supporters of Aviation Resources Inc., (SOAR), says complaints about airplane noise during the past year have been exaggerated. Its aim is to silence criticism of the Boca Raton Airport.

New RAF Flight Paths No Improvement for some in Scottish Villages (Jun. 25, 1998). The Aberdeen Press and Journal of Aberdeen, Scotland, reports new flight paths designed by the RAF to reduce noise for villages around the Tain bombing range in Easter Ross are making life noisy and miserable for one farmer.

Noise Insulation Plans Revealed for Homes Near New Zealand Airport (Jun. 25, 1998). The Dominion reports residents who live near New Zealand's Palmerston North airport will hear tonight about new regulations that affect the noise insulation of new homes.

Ballpark Approved by Illinois Village Trustees Despite Residents' Objections to Noise and Traffic (Jun. 24, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald Cook reports Schaumburg trustees unanimously approved final plans for a publicly financed minor-league ballpark Tuesday, despite objections of noise and traffic congestion from some homeowners.

Enviromental Groups Oppose Air Cargo Hub in Nevada's Ivanpah Valley (Jun. 24, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports environmentalists said Tuesday they oppose Clark County's plans for a new airport in the Ivanpah Valley because it would disrupt national parks, stimulate more urban growth, and increase air and noise pollution.

Florida's Martin County Strives to Write Enforceable Noise Ordinance (Jun. 24, 1998). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports commissioners in Martin County, Florida, are working to develop a constitutionally sound ordinance to control noise nuisances.

New Monitoring System at Port Columbus Will Identify Noisy Flights (Jun. 24, 1998). The Columbus Dispatch reports a state-of-the-art monitoring system planned for Port Columbus should help airport officials better identify the source of noisy flights that give residents sleepless nights.

Providence Resident Wants Police to Enforce Noise Pollution Laws (Jun. 24, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin published the following editorial from resident Edward Moncada, encouraging police enforcement of noise regulations in Providence, Rhode Island. Moncada writes:

Arlington Heights Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise to Update Goals (Jun. 23, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports the village of Arlington Heights has requested the Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise re-issue their plan for mitigating airplane noise in the village's airspace.

Columnist Criticizes Louisville International Airport's Noise Monitoring System (Jun. 23, 1998). The Courier-Journal published a column by Bob Hill that contends officials in charge of the $700 million expansion of Kentucky's Louisville International Airport are deaf to noise pollution concerns of residents.

Expanded T.F. Green Airport Brings More Noise to Rhode Island Residents (Jun. 23, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the newly expanded T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island, is bringing new noise to its host city, afflicting almost 4 square miles of neighborhoods with enough noise to make them eligible for house soundproofing at taxpayer expense.

Long Beach Township Cancels Ordinance Regulating Ice Cream Vendors (Jun. 23, 1998). The Asbury Park Press reports New Jersey's Long Beach Township officials have rescinded an ordinance that had limited the days and streets on which ice cream vendors could operate. The canceled ordinance was passed last year after residents complained of noise and fumes from the ice cream trucks.

New Jersey Town Debates Ordinance in Effort to Preserve Quiet Time (Jun. 23, 1998). The Asbury Park Press reports a proposed ordinance in Spring Lake, New Jersey, to limit noise pollution produced lively discussion at last night's Borough Council meeting.

Resident Says Noise Ruins Lives in English Town (Jun. 23, 1998). The Gloucestershire Echo published the following letter to the editor about the ill effects of noise from a resident of High Street, Cheltenham, England:

San Francisco Airport Receives Multi-Million Dollar Package to Reduce Noise (Jun. 23, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports California's San Francisco International Airport received a multi-million dollar grant yesterday intended to make SFO more safe and efficient. About $11 million will go toward airfield work, while the rest of the funds will be devoted to noise reduction, including $4 million for soundproofing homes in South San Francisco and San Bruno.

Airport Sound Monitors and Radar Systems Identify Noise and Keep Airlines Honest (Jun. 22, 1998). The Courier-Journal of Louisville, Kentucky, reports an increasing number of airports are using sound monitors and radar systems to track the exact paths of arriving and departing airplanes. This information can be used to assist in noise abatement measures.

California's Kings County Passes Noisy Party Ordinance (Jun. 22, 1998). The Fresno Bee reports an ordinance was recently approved to fine hosts of noisy parties if California's Kings County Sheriff Department has to make a return visit to quiet the site.

Louisville Airport Accused of Negligence in Monitoring Noise and Residents' Complaints (Jun. 22, 1998). The Courier-Journal reports Louisville International Airport has done little to track the impact of noise from changes in runways and flight patterns that have occurred under the airport's $700 million expansion.

Noise Mitigation Measures Needed in U.S. Schools to Reduce Interference with Learning (Jun. 22, 1998). The Portland Press Herald reports classroom noise and reverberation is a fundamental and little understood issue that interferes with learning at schools in Maine and across the nation, experts say.

Use of Personal Watercraft Prohibited Near Some Shores in the Florida Keys (Jun. 22, 1998). The New York Times reports County Commissioners in Monroe County, Florida have approved an ordinance that prohibits operating personal watercraft within 1,200 feet of 14 beaches and resorts from Key West to Key Largo. The Personal Watercraft Industry Association, an association that represents five manufacturers of personal watercraft, plans to file suit in a Federal court asking that the ordinance be repealed.

Sound Wall in Developers' Plans Sparks Controversy in Calif. Town (Jun. 21, 1998). The article reports initial plans for the Heritage Park Estates project included a 14-foot-high sound wall, but members of the town staff suggested installing an earthen berm instead. "We have looked at several different options on how to mitigate the sound and how to meet the town's concerns about preserving a semirural appearance to the project," Remington said after the meeting. "Just doing an earthen berm would require a massive amount of dirt to be moved." A berm would involve moving 12,000 to 14,000 cubic yards of dirt to the site, an effort that would cost $120,000 to $140,000, Remington said. "That's a big pile," he said. The berm also would result in the loss of 11 lots.

Study Predicts High Noise Levels for Planned Housing near Colorado's Buckley Air Base (Jun. 21, 1998). The Rocky Mountain News reports a recently released report by the Air Force concerning noise levels from Buckley Air National Guard Base may force Aurora, Colorado, city planners to reconsider already-approved developments.

Noise Concerns from Airport Delay New School in Las Vegas (Jun. 20, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports noise concerns may stall construction for a new high school planned near Las Vegas' McCarran International Airport.

Noise From a Skating Park Has Homeowners in Neighboring Development Upset in Wilmington, North Carolina (Jun. 18, 1998). The Morning Star reports that noise from a skateboarding business has neighbors living nearby upset. The business, Eastwood Ramp Park, is located in an industrial park that was started before the residential subdivision and according to the article, does not violate any ordinance for nonresidential location. Neighbors have petitioned the County Commissioners to amend the county's noise ordinance to force the business to tone it down.

National Parks Service Proposes Ban on Jet-Propelled Water Skis, with Limited Exceptions (Jun. 17, 1998). The Seattle Times reports that the week of June 15, National Parks Service proposed a ban on personal watercraft from thousands of pristine lakes and rivers in national parks, while simultaneously permitting them on waterways where they have traditionally been used. The proposal from the parks services does not establish the complete ban sought by some environmentalists, but it does effectuate a total ban in some areas.

Speedway Expansion Challenged by Residents' Group in Loudon, New Hampshire (Jun. 17, 1998). The Union Leader reports that the New Hampshire International Speedway (NHIS) track in Loudon, New Hampshire admitted in court that it built more seats than permitted by the Loudon Planning Board. A citizens' group opposed to the expansion are taking legal action.

St. Paul City Council To Consider Emergency Measure to Ban Late-Night Train Whistles in Minnesota (Jun. 17, 1998). The Minneapolis Tribune reports the St. Paul City Council will be asked to consider an emergency ordinance to end late-night train whistles that are disturbing the sleep of hundreds of St. Paul residents.

Claim Made that a Labor Federal Government Would Ensure A Decrease in Noise Impact from Airport in Adelaide, Australia (Jun. 16, 1998). Australian General News reports that a spokesperson for the opposition transport, Lindsay Tanner, said today that a Labor federal government would decrease the impact of aircraft noise around Adelaide Airport. "A Labor government will ensure that every home in Australia seriously affected by aircraft noise is entitled to equal access to insulation," Tanner was quoted saying in the article.

New Zealand's Palmerston North Airport and Its Surrounding Development Given New Limits (Jun. 16, 1998). The Evening Standard reports that new noise limits for Palmerston North Airport in New Zealand have been set. The limits were set after consideration was given on the parts of the Manawatu District Council, the Palmerson North City Council, and Palmerston North Airport Company.

Residents of Riverdale, New Jersey Suffer from Non-Stop Quarry Blasts; Legal Restraints Prevent Local Regulation (Jun. 16, 1998). The Record reports that city officials have decided to hold back on adopting an ordinance to regulate stone quarry operations because they want the ordinance to be legally unassailable. A proposed amendment to the ordinance was tabled giving the mayor and council extra time to enable city officials to hire experts and complete several reports to tailor the ordinance.

Las Vegas Residents and Business Owners Question McCarran Airport's Agenda in Widespread Buyout Tactics (Jun. 15, 1998). The Las Vegas Business Press reports some residents and business owners in areas surrounding Las Vegas are questioning the agenda of McCarran International Airport's seemingly aggressive but selective buyout procedures.

Maryland Navy Base Proposes More Flights; Public Makes Few Comments at Hearing (Jun. 14, 1998). The Washington Post reports that the Patuxent River Naval Air Station in St. Marys County, Maryland wants to expand its flight operations. Officials at the base held the first of four public hearings on the proposal Wednesday, drawing a crowd of about 50 people. The meeting didn't provoke much comment or controversy, the article says.

Indiana Residents Question Highway Officials About Road Widening Project (Jun. 13, 1998). The Indianapolis Star reports that residents in Noblesville, Indiana who will be affected by the proposed widening of 146th Street, questioned Hamilton County highway officials this week about the noise, safety, and necessity of the project. The article notes that the county will hold four more public meetings next week to discuss the proposed project.

Proposal to Land More Planes at California Airport Has Some Calling for More Noise Study (Jun. 13, 1998). The Ventura County Star reports that a sub-committee of the Aviation Advisory Commission in Camarillo, California reviewed a proposal Thursday to allow additional Boeing 727 planes to land at the Camarillo Airport. Channel Islands Aviation wants to land one or two Boeing 727s per week in order to refurbish them and increase their cargo capacity. In addition, the company wants to build a large hangar to perform the retrofitting work. The plan must be approved by the Board of Supervisors and the city of Camarillo, and now will move to the full Aviation Advisory Commission, the article notes.

Canadian Folk Festival Music Permit is Appealed by Residents Who Want No Late-Night Music (Jun. 12, 1998). The Calgary Herald reports that residents in the Hillhurst-Sunnyside area of Calgary, Alberta are appealing a festival permit of the Calgary Folk Festival that allows musicians to perform after 10 p.m. on two nights next month at Prince's Island Park, a festival site. The article says that the city waived its own noise bylaw to allow the music to play until 11 p.m. on Friday, July 24 and Saturday, July 25. The appeal will be heard before the city's license appeal board next Thursday, the article notes.

Early Morning Truck Noise Angers Colorado Residents and Sparks Zoning Debate (Jun. 12, 1998). The Denver Post reports that residents in Commerce City, Colorado are opposing the proposed re-zoning of a lot to industrial use due to the noise from early morning trucks at the site. The article notes the land is zoned for agricultural uses, but the owner said he has been used the property for industrial purposes and paying industrial taxes since 1958. County commissioners believe they may have reached a compromise, the article says.

Legality of Private Go-cart Track Questioned in Milwaukee, Wisconsin (Jun. 12, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that private property owners have threatened to sue the Town Board for its decision to stop construction of a private go-cart track.

Columnist Believes County Governments Should Regulate Quarry Mining in New Jersey (Jun. 12, 1998). The Record printed an editorial which describes the extensive quarry mining industry in Passaic County, New Jersey, and the long fight between miners and residents over noise, dust, vibration, and other problems. The editorial argues that both the state and local governments regulate facets of quarry mining, and the system is not working. County governments are better suited to regulate the industry, the editorial says.

Opponents of California Gravel Pit Operation Sue County (Jun. 12, 1998). The Press-Enterprise reports that opponents of the Owl Rock gravel pit project near Riverside, California have filed suit against Riverside County and its supervisors, alleging officials failed to properly assess the impact of the project when reconsidering it in December. The article says that Rural Communities United, a group of property owners, residents, and business owners, filed suit June 1 in Riverside Superior Court. The group asks that County Supervisors hold new hearings and rescind their approval of the project's environmental impact report. In addition, the article reports, the group is seeking an injunction to prevent any work from being started at the site.

Railroad Company Says it Will Build Rail Yard in Texas City, Against City's Wishes (Jun. 11, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports that officials with the Kansas City Southern Railway Company said Wednesday they would build a 15-track rail yard in Wylie, Texas. The rail yard was part of a controversial project proposed by the railroad that voters rejected almost a year ago. The railroad company no longer plans to build a business park and truck shipping center, which were part of the earlier project, the article says. City officials fear that building a rail yard will leave the city with more trains and noise, but no economic gain. Residents who fought the earlier proposed project were dismayed at the announcement.

Newport Beach, Calif. Seeks to Restrict Noise from Bars and Restaurants (Jun. 11, 1998). The Orange County Register reports California's Newport Beach City Council on Monday voted to strengthen code enforcement to monitor noise coming from bayfront eateries, and require acoustical studies for all future bayfront restaurants.

Ohio Neighbors Upset About Quarry Noise; No Relief is in Sight (Jun. 11, 1998). The Columbus Dispatch reports that Yvette and Leon Blauvelt, residents of Hamilton Township, Ohio, have complained about noise from a sand and gravel operation near their home. But after investigating the complaints, Columbus officials have said the quarry doesn't violate any city zoning regulations.

Minnesota City Sues Airport Commission Over Shifting Jet Noise to Their Community (Jun. 11, 1998). The Star Tribune reports that the city of Richfield, Minnesota is suing the Metropolitan Airports Commission in the U.S. Court of Appeals for shifting jet noise from the Minneapolis - St. Paul International Airport to their community. City officials are suing to stop the daily use of the airport's crosswind runway that has shifted flights away from south Minneapolis and sent them over Richfield and Bloomington instead. The court case is expected to last at least two months, the article says.

Local Missouri Officials Will Meet With FAA Over Airport Expansion Plan (Jun. 11, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that officials in St. Charles County and Bridgeton, Missouri will meet Tuesday with Susan Kurland, the associate administrator for airports at the Federal Aviation Administration, over plans to expand Lambert Field. According to Joe Ortwerth, a St. Charles County Executive, the meeting should resolve whether the FAA will conduct a "real time" simulation study that would produce data about the noise levels of the proposed expansion.

Judge to Rule on Sound Limits at Pacific Amphitheater in Orange County, California (Jun. 10, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that Judge Robert E. Thomas is scheduled to rule on the validity of Orange County's noise restrictions at a hearing June 30. The ruling will be made in relation to Pacific Amphitheater, a 18,500-seat venue owned by the Orange County Fair.

Developers' Plans to Build Subdivision Near Tennessee Army Helicopter Base is Scuttled (Jun. 9, 1998). The Tennessean reports that plans for a subdivision near the Fort Campbell Military Reservation near Clarksville, Tennessee have been scuttled due to concerns about noise from the Sabre Army Heliport and other reasons. Developers say that Army officials did not raise noise concerns until they already had invested money in roads and other infrastructure for the subdivision. Now, developers believe they have no alternative but to sell the land to the Army, but say they stand to lose millions on the deal.

Missouri Residents Oppose Plan for Shopping Center in Rural Area Due to Noise and Traffic (Jun. 8, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Planning and Zoning Commission in Wildwood, Missouri is considering a plan to re-zone 18 acres of land from residential to commercial use, paving the way for a shopping center at Highways 100 and 109. But residents attending a meeting of the commission said they opposed the project because it would increase noise and traffic, and destroy the green space and rural atmosphere of the town.

Macho Men Buy Increasingly Larger Power Lawn Tools, Causing Noise and Air Pollution (Jun. 7, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that this year, Americans will purchase more than 22 million gas-powered lawn and garden tools -- a record number, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. The article says large lawn tools, purchased and used by men, has become a social phenomenon of the 1990s suburbs. But, the article says, the large lawn tools produce excessive noise and air pollution.

Massachusetts Zoning Board Rules that Quarry Violates Noise Bylaws (Jun. 7, 1998). The Sunday Telegram reports that the Zoning Board of Appeals in Lancaster, Massachusetts has upheld a March ruling by the city Building Inspector that the quarry owned by P.J. Keating Co. is violating town bylaws governing noise from blasting and truck traffic, and must be closed down. A cousin of the quarry owner last year asked the Building Inspector to issue a cease and desist order for noise at the quarry, after the cousin was denied a permit to open a competing quarry in the same area due to noise issues.

Resident Decries Residential Development Near California Airport (Jun. 7, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Sal Del Valle, a resident of North Hills, California, regarding jet noise and residential development near the Van Nuys Airport:

Los Angeles School District Installs Air Conditioners in Schools That Exceed District's Own Noise Limits (Jun. 7, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Los Angeles (California) Unified School District is using funds from Proposition BB to install air conditioners in schools that exceed the maximum noise levels set by the district. According to the article, the school district resisted efforts to allow experienced companies do the work, approved purchasing air conditioning units that exceed noise limits, and insisted that units be mounted rigidly against walls, which increases noise. Officials from the school district acknowledge the problem, but said they overlooked the noise issues in order to get air conditioning in the schools as soon as possible. So far, about 3,300 air conditioning units have been installed, most of them in San Fernando Valley schools. The district is not yet taking steps to remediate the situation, and installation of the noisy units continues.

Proposed 24-Hour Gas Station Angers Pennsylvania Residents (Jun. 7, 1998). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports that residents are objecting to a 24-hour gas station proposed for Route 19 in Peters Township, Pennsylvania, saying the development will create constant noise, traffic, and bright lighting near their homes.

Chicago Noise Commission Seeks Commitment From Air Cargo Companies to Phase Out Noisier Jets Ahead of Schedule (Jun. 6, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission, a Chicago group formed by the city's mayor, has decided to seek a written commitment from the air cargo carriers at O'Hare International Airport to phase out older, noisier aircraft engines before the year 2000. (By 2000, all jets must comply with quieter, Stage 3 noise standards set by federal regulations.) The article says that the decision was the result of a "cargo summit" meeting held May 28 between the commission and representatives of 10 air cargo carriers.

City Councilor Proposes Allowing International Flights at Burbank, California Airport (Jun. 6, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that right in the middle of the ongoing debate over expansion at Burbank, California's Burbank Airport, a Pasadena representative from the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority suggested the introduction of international flights at the airport. He wants a feasibility study to be done before a design is approved for the proposed 19-gate terminal.

Ohio Residents Battle Truck Noise and Dust From Noisy Warehouse (Jun. 6, 1998). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that residents in Cincinnati, Ohio are complaining about the noise, dust, and other problems at the Carthage Mills warehouse complex near their homes. In response to the problem, Cincinnati Mayor Roxanne Qualls has introduced a motion that would change the zoning in the area to residential uses only, which would force Carthage Mills to move.

Residents Object to New Nightclub in Scotland, But City Recommends Approval (Jun. 6, 1998). The Aberdeen Press and Journal reports residents in Aberdeen, Scotland are protesting a bid to convert the Q Brasserie on Alford Place from a restaurant into a nightclub. Residents say there already are many nightclubs in the area, and another one would only increase the levels of late-night noise and disturbances. But, the article says, Peter Cockhead, the city's planning and strategic development director, has recommended that the change be allowed. The planning (development control) committee will consider the application next Thursday.

Seattle Set to Approve Floatplane Takeoffs and Landings Near Downtown Pier (Jun. 6, 1998). The Seattle Times reports that city officials in Seattle, Washington are set to approve a project that would allow float-planes to take off and land 72 times a day near Pier 54 on Elliott Bay, after reviewing the proposed project for more than a year. If permitted, the project would allow Kenmore Air to operate 20-minute scenic trips from a 25-foot float off the pier. Meanwhile, some residents who live in the downtown are opposing the project, saying it will bring more noise. If the project is approved, the article notes, it likely will be appealed and will face a more lengthy review.

Texas City Settles Lawsuit With Nightclubs Suing to Overturn Noise Ordinance (Jun. 6, 1998). The Austin American-Statesman reports that officials with the City of Austin, Texas have settled a lawsuit with the East Sixth Street Community Association and 10 nightclubs that had sued to overturn the city's noise ordinance. The article explains that the noise ordinance will stay in effect, but police will adopt new methods and use new equipment to measure the noise coming from nightclubs.

Colorado Air National Guard Base Releases Noise and Safety Study (Jun. 5, 1998). The Denver Post reports that officials at Colorado's Buckley Air National Guard released results on Thursday of a noise and safety study that looked at impacts on Aurora and Arapahoe County, the communities most affected by the base's aircraft operations. The study, known as the Department of Defense's Air Installation Compatible Use Zone Study, was intended to provide non-binding guidelines for local governments as they develop land-use plans in areas surrounding the military installation. The article notes that although residents living near the base have complained about the noise, the city of Aurora has continued to approve residential developments near the base.

Ohio Politicians Win Concessions from Railroad Companies Seeking Changes to Freight Traffic (Jun. 5, 1998). The Plain Dealer printed an editorial that argues the mayors in the Cleveland, Ohio area, along with congressional representatives, should feel they've served their constituents well in their successful campaigns to win concessions from two major railroads seeking to alter the pattern of freight traffic through Northeast Ohio. The editorial says that Representative Dennis Kucinich and Cleveland Mayor Michael White were especially successful in getting CSX Transportation and Norfolk Southern to commit tens of millions of dollars to mitigate the impact on residents living near the tracks.

Railroad Agrees to Spend $13.1 Million to Mitigate Noise on Ohio Tracks (Jun. 5, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports that Cleveland (Ohio) Mayor Michael White and officials from CSX Transportation agreed yesterday in a last-minute deal to a plan that would help mitigate noise if a proposed railroad merger goes forward. CSX Transportation and Norfolk Southern Railroads have proposed purchasing and dividing the Conrail lines through Cleveland, and the federal Surface Transportation Board currently is considering the deal. But many local officials initially opposed the plans, and Mayor White was set to register his objections to the merger yesterday before he reached an agreement with railroad officials. CSX officials agreed to pay $13.1 million to help offset the noise and potential environmental and safety hazards anticipated in Cleveland due to the increased train traffic, and to divert some trains away from East Side neighborhoods. The federal agency is expected to rule on the merger on Monday.

Residents Complain About Noise From Massachusetts Wal-Mart (Jun. 5, 1998). The Telegram & Gazette reports that residents living near a Wal-Mart on Route 12 in West Boylston, Massachusetts have long complained about noise from the store. The dispute may be nearing resolution, the article says, but if it does not end soon, town officials are ready to take the company to court for not complying with noise regulations. Town officials say representatives from the store have made promises in the past and have not lived up to them.

Amsterdam Airport Raises Fees for Noisy Aircraft Starting in August (Jun. 4, 1998). AFX News reports that officials at the Schiphol Aiport in Amsterdam, Netherlands said they will raise the charges for daytime and nighttime landings and take-offs by the noisier Chapter 3 planes starting on August 1. The airport's actions come after the transport ministry approved the plans. The charges are intended to motivate airlines to fly quieter planes and to reduce night flights, according to airport officials.

Pennsylvania Towns Oppose Bus-Only Roadway (Jun. 4, 1998). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports that officials in Edgewood and Swissvale, Pennsylvania, as well as officials in some other Pittsburgh suburbs, plan to step up their opposition to a planned extension of the Martin Luther King Jr. East Busway. Officials said they oppose the bus-only roadway extension because of the additional air pollution, noise pollution, additional traffic, and unsightly noise walls it would create.

Scottish Hotel Owner Threatens Neighbors With More Noise After They Object to Hotel's Extended Hours (Jun. 4, 1998). The Aberdeen Press and Journal reports that a hotel owner in Ballater, Scotland threatened neighbors with loud music after the neighbors objected to plans to extend the hours of operation of the hotel. The Aberdeenshire (South) licensing board yesterday approved the hotel owner's application for extended hours for six months, on the understanding that the owner seeks advice from Aberdeenshire Council's environmental health department on noise control.

Maryland County Approves Plans for Massive Development, Pending Satisfactory Noise and Traffic Mitigation Measures (Jun. 3, 1998). The Washington Post reports that the County Council in Prince George's County, Maryland voted 8 to 1 yesterday to approve plans for National Harbor, a massive entertainment and retail development, as long as the developer first addresses noise and traffic concerns. The decision came after the County Council created special rules for the project last summer to speed up its approval process, including a provision that stipulated the developer did not have to submit a detailed site plan for the project. The $1 billion project still must be approved by the National Capital Planning Commission, the article notes, which is conducting an environmental study of the project and is not expected to vote on the issue until late 1998 or early 1999.

Noise at National Parks Creates High-Level Debate (Jun. 3, 1998). The Gannett News Service reports that noise in U.S. national parks has created an intense debate between hikers, conservationists, personal watercraft manufacturers, tour plane operators, and the federal government. This summer, the article says, Congress and the Clinton administration are considering actions to lower human-made noise in national parks. In addition, the National Park Service intends to adopt strict rules regulating the use of personal watercraft, or Jet Skis. And, the Senate Commerce Committee is scheduled to vote this summer on a bill by its chair, John McCain (R-Arizona), to restrict tour planes and helicopters above national parks. At the same time, the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Park Service are working on a new regulation that would require each national park to adopt a management plan to detail how many sightseeing flights should be allowed and what routes they should take.

South Carolina Judge Rules He Doesn't Have Jurisdiction Over New Noise Issues Raised by Group Opposing Speedway (Jun. 3, 1998). The Post and Courier reports that an administrative judge in South Carolina Tuesday ruled that he doesn't have jurisdiction to address issues raised by a group opposing the construction of a racetrack near Francis Beidler Forest outside Charleston, South Carolina. The group wanted to air their concerns about racetrack noise before the judge, especially in light of recent news that the forest might be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. But the judge ruled that he can't consider the issues unless the South Carolina Board of Health and Environmental Control returns the case to him for a new hearing. That board is expected to consider the matter this summer.

Canadian Shakespeare Theater Company Wants Jet Ski Bylaw Enforced During Their Performances (Jun. 2, 1998). The Calgary Herald reports that members of the Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan theater company in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan want the city police to enforce a bylaw that prohibits Jet Skis from using the portion of the South Saskatchewan River near the company's performance tents on the river banks.

Church Official Visits California Neighborhood During Church Service to Experience Noise Level (Jun. 2, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that to determine how loud church services at the Christ Our Redeemer AME Church were, the vice president from Orange County's Interfaith Council stood outside for much of the service last Sunday. Residents said that the congregation was being quieter than usual because they knew that people were listening, but the council representative concluded that closing the doors seemed to contain the sound.

Florida County Planning Staff Recommends No Ban on Airboats on River (Jun. 2, 1998). The Press Journal reports that planning staff members in Indian River County, Florida have recommended that the County Commission not pass a ban on airboats on the Sebastian River during its meeting today. Planning staffers said there is not enough evidence of negative impacts to ban airboats, but they did recommend consideration of banning all boats more than 25 feet in the narrow stretches of the river. The issue came before the commission after dozens of residents who live on or near the river in Roseland complained about noise from a commercial airboat tour operation. Meanwhile, officials in Brevard County are watching the vote closely, because they also have been asked to regulate airboats on their part of the river.

Illinois Town Denies Wal-Mart Expansion, Citing Noise Concerns (Jun. 2, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that village board members in Lake Zurich, Illinois voted 5 to 1 Monday to deny a request for a Wal-Mart expansion. Some board members said Wal-Mart hadn't been a good corporate citizen, while others said the proposed expansion would locate truck traffic and noise closer to residences.

Police Step Up Patrols in Public Parks to Curb Noise from Teenage Motorcyclists in Nottingham and Boxtowe, England (Jun. 2, 1998). The Nottingham Evening Post reports that teenage motorcyclists have been annoying residents in Nuthall streets and other areas around the city that are near Broxtowe Country Park in England. The article says police are stepping up patrols in the park to stop the youngsters who are riding there illegally.

Rhode Island Marina Gets Okay to Expand Despite Residents' Concerns About Noise (Jun. 2, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that the Town Council in Barrington, Rhode Island voted 4 to 1 to approve a request from Brewer's Cove Haven Marina last night to re-zone Rodeo Drive from residential to waterfront business. The decision allows the marina to expand its business onto a 14,600-square-foot plot between Rodeo Drive and Bullock's Cove and south of marina's main property, the article notes. Residents living near the marina objected to the change, saying it could change the residential character of the neighborhood. The Town Council went against the advice of the Planning Board, which last week said that the marina's expansion was not consistent with town's Comprehensive Plan and may set a precedent for changing zoning on single plots.

Texas Judge Dismisses Three Noise-Related Lawsuits Against Airport (Jun. 2, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports that a judge last week dismissed three noise-related lawsuits by residents in Irving, Texas against the Dallas / Fort Worth International Airport. The decision has prompted airport officials to seek dismissals of more than 200 similar claims. Meanwhile, a lawyer for some of the residents said he is considering whether to appeal or seek a new trial.

California Neighbors Fight Church Over Noisy Services (Jun. 1, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that in Costa Mesa, California, residents have pushed city officials to implement noise restrictions on a particularly noisy church. The building, which is used by Christ Our Redeemer African Methodist Episcopal Church as (COR-AME) well as the United Pentecostal Church, must keep its doors closed, minimize amplification, and avoid congregating in the parking lot. The Pentecostal Church will comply, but the other church has said it will continue its services as they have been conducted.

International Pilots Association Opposes Israeli Bill That Would Prosecute Pilots Who Violate Noise Abatement Procedures (Jun. 1, 1998). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports that the International Federation of Air Line Pilots Associations (IFALPA) is concerned about legislation proposed in the Israeli Knesset that calls for criminal prosecution of pilots who violate noise abatement procedures. The bill was sent back for review after concerns were raised by IFALPA and the Israeli Air Line Pilots Association.

European Commission Plans to Ban "Hush Kitted" Planes by 2000 (Jun.1 1998). Air Cargo World reports the European Commission plans to ban "hush-kitted" planes in the near future.

FAA Should Propose Serious Flight Plan to Reduce Noise at New Jersey Airport, Activist Says (May 31, 1998). The New York Times printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Ellen Traegar, a Rockaway, New Jersey resident and president of the New Jersey Coalition Against Aircraft Noise, regarding noise from the Newark Airport:

California City Attorney Says Grading and Excavation Project is Legal; Residents Disagree (May 30, 1998). The Press-Enterprise reports that John Harper, the city attorney in Norco, California delivered a written opinion to city officials and residents Friday that says the city permit for grading and excavation work on Beacon Hill off Norconian Drive is legal. At Friday's meeting, residents said they didn't agree with Harper's opinion and would consult their own lawyer. The article notes that residents have complained about the truck traffic, noise, and dust associated with the project that has been going on for almost three years. The city council will take up the topic of residents' complaints at Wednesday's city council meeting, the article says.

Florida City Starts Ticketing Motorists With Loud Car Stereos After Court Ruling (May 30, 1998). The Palm Beach Post reports that police in Port St. Lucie, Florida have started to issue tickets to motorists with loud car stereos, after an appeals court ruling upheld a state noise law earlier this month. The article says that police can issue tickets if car stereos can be heard more than 100 feet away.

Florida County Commission Passes Land Regulations that Restrict the Size of Some Community Facilities in Residential Areas (May 30, 1998). The Florida Times-Union reports that the Clay County Commission in Green Cove Springs, Florida passed a package of land development regulations Tuesday that restricts larger churches, child-care centers, and other community facilities in residential areas. The regulations were passed to preserve established residential areas from development that could increase traffic and noise, the article says. The regulation changes stemmed partly from residents' opposition to proposed day-care centers adjacent to residential areas on U.S. 17 south of Orange Park.

Spokane Mayor Courts Native American Festival by Allowing Violation of City's Noise Ordinance (May 30, 1998). The Spokesman-Review reports that John Talbott, the Mayor of Spokane, Washington, met with organizers of the Spokane Falls Northwest Indian Encampment and Pow Wow Friday and made concessions to ensure that the event will be held as usual this August at Riverfront Park. The article notes that event organizers had announced earlier this week that the event wouldn't take place this year because the city and the American Indian Community Center, which sponsors the festival, couldn't come to agreement about certain fees and regulations. But the mayor made several concessions, the article says, including allowing the pow-wow to continue past 10 p.m., which violates the city's noise ordinance.

California Residents Win Noise Victory, as State Turns Down Banquet Hall's Liquor License Request (May 29, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that residents of condominiums in Los Angeles's Marina del Rey won a decade-old fight on May 14 when the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control rejected a request for a liquor license for the Fantasea Yacht Club, which holds banquets at the site. On Thursday, the article notes, Fantasea backers filed papers to appeal the license denial, in a process that could continue for a year or longer.

Local Massachusetts Official Will Meet With Federal Aviation Administration About Airport Noise (May 29, 1998). The Patriot Ledger reports that Richard Neely, the Select Board Chair in Milton, Massachusetts, has set up a meeting for June 29 with Jane Garvey, the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration and the former director of Boston's Logan International Airport, to discuss airplane noise at Logan. The article notes that jet noise has afflicted Milton and other towns for years, but local officials have not been able to get the FAA to address their complaints.

New York Policy Doesn't Fund Road Noise Barriers on Existing Roads, Unlike Minnesota and Ontario (May 29, 1998). The Buffalo News reports that New York State Department of Transportation officials have said they don't budget money to build noise barriers along existing expressways. But, the article says, Minnesota and Ontario have funded noise barriers along existing expressways since the 1970s, according to officials.

Noise and Safety Considerations for Ice Cream Trucks Are Issues for Some in Salt Lake City (May 29, 1998). The Deseret News reports that summer and ice cream season are approaching, but some in Salt Lake City, Utah are worried about noise and safety considerations. The article interviews two owners of ice cream truck companies about the issues.

Scottish Council Turns Down Application for Off-Road Driving Center (May 29, 1998). The Aberdeen Press and Journal reports that the council in Aberdeenshire, Scotland voted 5-3 to reject an application for planning permission for an off-road driving center in Deeside. The article says that the company Making Treks was asked earlier by the council to undertake an independent noise-pollution survey related to the proposed project. Company officials say they commissioned the survey, which concluded that there would be no noise pollution, but councilors ignored that information or were not given the results of the survey before voting. The company intends to appeal the decision, the article says.

Washington School District Rejects Airport Money for Noise Study Because There Are Strings Attached (May 29, 1998). The Seattle Times reports that officials with the Highline School District near Seattle, Washington yesterday rejected the Port of Seattle's offer to pay for a jet-noise study because they say it is too restrictive. The Port operates the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, the airport explains. Last week, Port officials announced they would pay up to $350,000 for a noise study in the school district. But Highline officials have already started their own noise study, and they say using the Port's money would force them to start the study over. Highline officials asked that the Port instead help pay for the study already underway.

Georgia County Commissioners Turn Down Request for Helicopter Pad in Residential Area (May 28, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports that the Coweta County (Georgia) Board of Commissioners voted 5-0 last week to reject a request for a special-use permit for a helicopter port at a residence. The article notes that the commissioners expressed concern over noise and safety issues related to the request.

Tennessee Man Mounts Siren on Tractor to Retaliate Against Nearby Gun Club (May 28, 1998). The Tennessean reports that J.C. Hillin, a resident of Wartrace, Tennessee, was cited for disorderly conduct after he mounted a siren on his tractor to retaliate against noise from a nearby gun club. Yesterday, Hillin, a veteran county commissioner, waived his right to a preliminary hearing in Bedford County General Sessions Court and was bound over to the grand jury. The next session of the grand jury convenes on June 22, the article says.

Canadian Accordian Player Refuses to Lower the Volume at his Outdoor Performances (May 27, 1998). The Toronto Star reports that an accordion player in Bronte, Ontario has been asked by residents and police to lower the volume at his outdoor concerts at Bronte Harbor, just across from the Lakeside Marketeria on Bronte Road, and move to a new location. But the musician refuses to accommodate the requests. Police say they may ask a judge to impose restrictions on the musician's entertainment.

Ice Cream Trucks Get Increasing Criticism Around the Country (May 27, 1998). The Telegraph Herald reports that ice cream trucks are facing a growing list of communities where they are not welcome. The trucks have been blamed for noise pollution, poor nutrition, traffic hazards, and attracting pedophiles as drivers, and laws restricting ice cream truck operations have sprouted around the country. The article goes on to focus on one ice cream truck operator who runs trucks on the Massachusetts - Rhode Island border.

Illinois Village Officials Consider Noise Pollution Ordinance (May 27, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that officials in Villa Park, Illinois are considering a noise pollution ordinance in order to address complaints from residents of Willow Pointe Condominiums that trucks parked at a Motel 6 make noise all night. The article says that several residents have recently demanded that the village control noise from parked trucks, especially those with refrigeration units.

Canadian Residents and Officials Protest for a Decade About Illegal Airfield, Without Resolution (May 26, 1998). The Vancouver Sun reports that residents and officials in Surrey, British Columbia have been fighting to have the Airflow Ultralight Aviation airfield in the 4900 block of King George Highway shut down for a decade, without result. The article explains that the airfield owner has never had a business license and the land has never had proper zoning for an airfield since opening in 1981, but local politicians refuse to enforce a city zoning bylaw and shut down the airfield. Now, the article says, it may be too late for the city to get rid of the airfield because officials have allowed it to operate for so long. In the latest development, the Surrey City Council last week again postponed a decision on the airfield.

Chicago Resident Approves Actions to Lower Car Stereo Noise (May 26, 1998). The Chicago Tribune printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Kathryn Kinnerk, a Chicago resident, regarding noise from car radios, car horns, and motorcycles:

Florida County Officials Consider Whether Some Airboats Should Be Banned on a River (May 26, 1998). The Press Journal reports that officials in Brevard County, Florida have deferred action on a proposed ban on airboats on the Sebastian River until Indian River County officials decide whether to regulate airboats on its portion of the river. The article says that the Indian River County Commission will hold a public hearing on the issue June 2 in Vero Beach. Large airboats operated by commercial tourism companies have drawn criticisms from residents on the river because of their noise.

Pennsylvania Residents Group Opposes Wal-Mart Superstore (May 26, 1998). The Morning Call reports that residents in Lower Macungie Township, Pennsylvania have formed a coalition to oppose a 203,750-square-foot Wal-Mart superstore and three outbuildings proposed for a site adjacent to Hamilton Boulevard and Lower Macungie Road. Residents are opposed to the development because of the noise and traffic it will create, and because of the large scale of the project. The article says that residents and the developer will square off tonight at a Planning Commission meeting at which each side will get time to present their case.

Air Tour Group Alleges the Park Service Overstated Noise Impact of Flights Over Grand Canyon (May 25, 1998). The Weekly of Business Aviation reports that the United States Air Tour Association (USATA), an industry group of commercial air tour operators, charged last week that the National Park Service significantly overstated the noise impact of flights over Grand Canyon National Park.

Australian Court is Told That Airport Flight Path Changes to Remove Noise from Neighborhoods Were Politically Motivated and Illegal (May 25, 1998). AAP Newsfeed reports that the councils in Randwick and Woollahra, Australia have filed a lawsuit alleging that Environment Minister Robert Hill acted for political reasons last July when he made a decision to introduce a long-term operating plan (LTOP) for planes using the Sydney airport. The LTOP was introduced for the improper purpose of reducing noise from coalition-held federal electorates north of the city, according to attorneys for the plaintiffs. Former Transport Minister John Sharp is also accused of making politically motivated decisions, the article says. The case currently is being argued before the Federal Court, and is expected to last at least five days.

Two Czech Cities Decide to Wall Off Their "Problematic" Gypsies (May 25, 1998). The International Herald Tribune reports that officials in Usti Nad Labem and Pilsen, Czech Republic have decided to wall off what they call "problematic" public housing residents, mainly low-income Gypsies, because officials say they destroy the quality-of-life of their neighbors. The walled-off areas will be guarded by round-the-clock police patrols. Some say the walled-off areas will be the equivalent of a ghetto for the residents, the article says.

More Flights at Dallas' Love Field Would Break Moral Contract with Residents to Limit Noise, Says Editorial (May 24, 1998). The Dallas Morning News published the following editorial about the current litigation over flight limits at Dallas' Love Field Airport. The editorial reads as follows:

Oregon Airport Officials End Experiment to Reroute Planes Due to Noise Complaints (May 24, 1998). The Columbian printed an editorial that says the Port of Portland, which operates Portland (Oregon) International Airport, ended an experiment last Wednesday to reroute jets after hundreds of people complained about the noise. The editorial argues that the complaints are understandable, and that the representation of Vancouver, Washington on a new formal panel to address airport noise issues will be important for the community.

Residents Weigh in on Noise From California's Van Nuys Airport (May 24, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letters-to-the-editor from George Jerome, chair of the Van Nuys Citizens Advisory Council, and Anne Carver, co-chair of the airport committee of the Sherman Oaks Homeowners Association, regarding noise from the Van Nuys (California) Airport:

Japanese Court Orders Noise Pollution Compensation for Residents Living Near U.S. Air Base (May 23, 1998). The Mainichi Daily News reports that the Fukuoka High Court in Naha, Japan ordered the government Friday to compensate residents living near the U.S. Kadena Air Base for noise pollution caused by late-night flights. The court agreed with residents that the jet noise has inflicted psychological damage, but rejected a demand to have the flights banned.

Texas City Officials Argue With Nuns Over Erecting a Noise Wall and the Purchase Price for Land (May 23, 1998). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that city officials in Arlington, Texas are arguing with nuns at the Carmel of the Holy Trinity monastery over the price of some land the city wants to buy from the nuns to expand a street. In addition, the nuns want the city to build a noise wall to protect their property from increased traffic noise, but city officials won't agree to do so. The article notes that negotiations continue, but the city also filed documents this week to initiate an eminent domain hearing, in which court-appointed commissioners would determine the fair market value of the property.

California Residents Complain About Development Project They Say is an Illegal Rock Quarry (May 22, 1998). The Press-Enterprise reports that residents in Norco, California told the City Council Wednesday that they want relief from the noise, dust, and traffic problems caused by an earth-moving and removal operation at the western base of Beacon Hill. The operation is ostensibly attended to be a prelude to a large development, but some residents and city officials believe it has become a mining operation.

Cargo Companies at Mather Airport Oppose Nearby Development (May 22, 1998). The Sacramento Business Journal reports cargo companies at Sacramento's Mather Airport fear if new development is allowed closer to the facility, it will be the end of the new hub.

Japan Awards Residents Damages for Airbase Noise; Turns Down Request for Night Time Ban (May 22, 1998). Agence France Presse reports an Okinawa, Japan, court ordered the Japanese government to award monetary compensation to citizens who suffer from aircraft noise.

North Carolina Racetrack Owner Reduces Race-Car Noise Limit to 90 Decibels (May 22, 1998). The Asheville Citizen-Times reports that the owner of the Asheville Motor Speedway in Asheville, North Carolina has decided to limit noise from race-cars to 90 decibels, starting this week. The article notes that 90 decibels is between noise level of a common vacuum cleaner and a circular saw.

Denver Monitors Noise from Motorcycles after Residents Complain (May 21, 1998). The Denver Post reports residents of Denver, Colorado's, Lower Downtown are complaining about motorcycle noise, and the city is listening.

Missouri Zoning Commission Denies Expansion of Children's Center, Noise and Other Concerns (May 21, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the Creve Coeur, Missouri, Planning and Zoning Commission rejected the expansion plan of the Ranken Jordan Children's Rehabilitation Center. Citizens' objections ranged from the center's plan to use aluminum siding to concerns about noise.

Nevada County Commission Delays Decision on New Noise Guidelines for Residents Near Airport (May 21, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that the Clark County (Nevada) Commission on Wednesday postponed a decision about whether to adopt new noise guidelines for homes and businesses near McCarran International Airport. The guidelines would adopt a new map that shows noise levels around the airport. Many of the residents and merchants that live in the proposed 60-decibel zone are angry at the proposal, believing it would lower their property values.

Police in Ohio Town Step Up Campaign to Eliminate Loud Car Stereos (May 21, 1998). The Dayton Daily News reports that police in New Lebanon, Ohio have instituted a strict campaign to reduce loud car stereo noise, after receiving numerous resident complaints on the issue. The article notes that New Lebanon already has an ordinance that prohibits the use of car stereos that disrupt the comfort and peace of residents.

County Board Reduces Noise Restrictions to Allow Second Amphitheater Near Omaha (May 20, 1998). The World-Heraldwriter of Omaha, Nebraska, reports plans are moving forward for Omaha's second major open-air amphitheater after the county board reduced restrictions despite residents' noise concerns. The new facility will test the Omaha area's ability to support large open-air entertainment events.

Effective Buffer Zones Between Commercial and Residential Areas Critical in Olathe, Kansas (May 20, 1998). The Kansas City Star published an editorial about city officials response to problems plaguing Kansas' Olathe Station. It is the editor's opinion that stronger rules for development are needed to prevent future difficulties with noise and lighting between commercial and residential districts.

Florida County Commission Sues Nightclub to Reduce Noise (May 20, 1998). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports the Manatee County Commission will sue a nightclub to force it to lower the noise level after residents lodged complaints.

Georgia Residents Oppose Metal Recycler Fearing Noise (May 20, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports that despite outraged neighbors, planning commissioners in Gwinnett County, Georgia, approved the building of a metal recycler.

Group of CA Residents Charge Marine Corps Plans to Reduce Air Noise Inadequate (May 20, 1998). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports a plan to quiet helicopters and jets flying out of Miramar Marine Corps Air Station was unveiled yesterday by the Marine Corps and San Diego City Councilwoman Barbara Warden's committee of residents. But people who sued last year to stop the Marines from bringing helicopters to Miramar say that there's nothing new about the plan and that it won't reduce noise.

Kentucky Residents Seek Noise Barrier at New Interchange; City Council Joins Effort (May 20, 1998). The Courier-Journal reports the St. Matthews City Council last week joined residents in an effort to persuade the state to add noise barriers to a new interchange at Westport Road and the Watterson Expressway.

LAX Residential Soundproofing Program Enters Second Phase (May 20, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that as part of the soundproofing program for residents, being undertaken by Los Angeles International Airport, another contract was awarded today. It was the fourth contract awarded that will be part of the program's second stage.

Local Florida Commission Hesitates to Ban Airboats; Waits for Outcome in Nearby Community (May 20, 1998). The Press Journal reports the Brevard County Commission voted Tuesday to postpone action on requests to ban airboats from the waterway despite concerns from residents about noise and other environmental issues.

Orlando Airports Strive to Avoid Lawsuits about Noise from Residents of New Development (May 20, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority wants to advise would-be residents of the soon-to-be-developed Naval Training Center property: Don't forget about the planes.

Sound Walls Needed on Louisiana's I-10 According to State Officials (May 20, 1998). The Times-Picayune reports residents concerned about state plans to construct 10- to 24-foot-high noise -barriers along Interstate 10 will get a final chance to be heard in two public hearings this week.

Texas Residents Complain About Noise from Rock Concert (May 20, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports that residents in Arlington, Texas complained about excessive noise and obscenity during the first paid concert Sunday at the ballpark in the Arlington amphitheater. The event featured 10 bands, drew almost 30,000 fans, and produced music that could be heard up to three miles away. The article says that some residents asked City Council members at a Tuesday meeting to not allow such events at the amphitheater again.

Truck Noise at Chicago Motel Deprive Condo Residents of Sleep (May 20, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports semi-tractor trailers parked in the back of a Motel 6 in Villa Park, Chicago, are causing nearby residents to lose sleep.

Baltimore City Council Discusses Bill to Ban Amplifiers in Lexington Market (May 19, 1998). The Baltimore Sun reports the Baltimore City Council introduced a bill yesterday to ban the use of amplifiers in the Lexington Market area after merchants complained.

Long Island Group Opposes Noise and Night Flights at MacArthur Airport (May 19, 1998). Newsday reports that as the New York Town of Islip prepares to expand the terminal at Long Island MacArthur Airport, a group of residents is urging town officials to focus on the problem of airport noise.

Opponents of El Toro Airport Point to Study of Health Problems in Children Exposed to Jet Noise (May 19, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that opponents of the proposed El Toro Airport in Orange County, California are citing a new study from Germany that shows children's health is negatively affected by noise. How applicable the study is to the El Toro situation remains to be seen.

Researcher Tells California School Board Trustees That Noise Can Create Problems for Schoolchildren (May 19, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that Gary Evans, a professor at Cornell University, spoke to the Capistrano Unified School District board of trustees and the Orange County Acoustical Society in Orange County, California on Monday night on the topic of whether an international airport at the El Toro Air Station would create problems for kids exposed to jet noise. Evans said that chronic exposure to noise can lead to lower reading scores and hypertension among schoolchildren, but he added that there's no evidence yet that an El Toro airport would force kids to endure chronic noise exposure. The article notes that the school district opposes an airport.

Village Board Reprimands Inn for Noise (May 19, 1998). The Buffalo News reports the Lewiston, New York, Village Board Monday publicly admonished the general manager of a local inn for its noise levels and failure to be a good neighbor.

Florida Airboat Owners Demonstrate on River Hoping to Prevent Ban (May 18, 1998). The Press Journal reports the owners of airboats took guests on a "trail ride" to protest a proposed ban being considered by Florida's Indian River and Brevard counties. Airboat owners hoped to prove noise complaints were unfounded.

Nelson Airport Upgrades Noise Committee (May 18, 1998). The Nelson Mail reports the Nelson, New Zealand, airport authority will form a committee to deal with noise issues arising from the airport.

Noisy Post Office Disturbs Rhode Island Residents Night and Day (May 18, 1998). Providence Journal-Bulletin reports residents of Westerly, Rhode Island, complained to the Town Council that their post office is a noisy neighbor.

Return of Trains Bring Noise and Safety Worries to Some Conn. Residents (May 18, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports that while the revival of the Hartford-to-Cromwell rail line is being hailed as a boon for local businesses, some Wethersfield, Connecticut, residents say they are concerned about safety and noise.

Calif. Residents Write Letters in Protest of El Toro Airport (May 17, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following letters to the editor about an op-ed article the paper published by former mayor of Newport Beach, Clarence Turner, and his opinions on the controversial El Toro Airport. The first letter is from Larry Agran of Irvine, California:

Editorial Advocates for Balance of Noise and Needs of Residents Surrounding Van Nuys Airport (May 17, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed an editorial that debates the question of how to consider both residents' need for quiet and the economy's need for airport capacity around California's Van Nuys Airport.

Noise, Crime, and Traffic Will Rise while Property Values Fall say Neighbors of Florida Naval Center Slated for Redevelopment (May 17, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports Florida residents who live near a naval center slated for redevelopment are worried about noise, along with declining property values and increased traffic and crime.

Van Nuys Airport Noisy and Unfriendly to Community (May 17, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following letter to the editor from Wayne Williams of Sherman Oaks, California:

Air Cargo Conference Held in Ottawa; Some Industry Members Say Ottawa Could Become Secondary Air Cargo Hub (May 16, 1998). The Ottawa Sun reports that the 7th annual International Air Cargo conference ended yesterday in Ottawa, Ontario. Some industry members said the Ottawa International Airport could be a location in the future for a secondary air cargo hub. But airport officials aren't sure that's a good idea, the article says.

Go-Cart Track Upsets Residents in Louisiana Subdivision (May 16, 1998). The Times-Picayune reports a proposed go-cart track at Mandeville, Louisiana, miniature golf course has residents worried about noise.

Go-Gart Plan in Louisiana Town Angers Residents and Councilman (May 16, 1998). The Times-Picayune reports a proposed go-cart track at Mandeville's Putt-Putt Golf & Games has residents in a nearby subdivision worried and at least one city councilman upset.

Letter from Dept. of Aviation Clarifies Methods of O'Hare Noise Data Collection (May 16, 1998). The Chicago Tribune published the following letter from Mary Rose Loney, Commissioner, Department of Aviation. In her letter, Ms. Loney seeks to clarify information reported in a previous Tribune article about the collection of noise data from O'Hare to establish noise contour maps:

Noise and Public Conduct Ordinance Proposed for Maine Town (May 16, 1998). The Bangor Daily News reports Pittsfield, Maine, town officials hope to curb unwanted behavior with a new noise and public conduct ordinance.

Three Years into Inquiry, Two Sides No Closer on Heathrow's Terminal Five (May 16, 1998). The Financial Times of London reports the inquiry into Heathrow's Terminal Five has been going on for three years now which makes it the longest inquiry in UK history. Opponents are still vocal, although some are experiencing fatigue and financial strain.

Virginia Residents Want Sound Barriers to Block Noise from I-95; Residents' Say Barriers in Original Plans (May 16, 1998). The Washington Post reports the noise level from traffic on nearby Interstate 95 is so bad for residents of Prince William Estates in Dumfries, Virginia, that they're asking the Virginia Department of Transportation to erect sound barriers along their back yards.

Hartford Residents Meet to Solve Noise Problems in Capitol Neighborhoods (May 15, 1998). The Hartford Courant of Hartford, Connecticut, reports Capitol area neighbors Thursday met and formed committees in hopes of solving parking problems and noise and other nuisances connected with a corner bar.

Neighbors of Orlando Sanford Airport Say their Ideas to Curb Jet Noise are Ignored (May 15, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports a group of Florida residents has suggested ways to curb jet noise from Orlando Sanford Airport, but the group feels their ideas have been ignored by the Noise Abatement Committee.

Proponents of Florida Airboat Ban Expect "Battle;" Boaters Plan Demonstration (May 15, 1998). The Press Journal of Vero Beach, Florida, reports airboaters are organizing a demonstration on Sunday to protest a possible ordinance prohibiting airboats from operating in the Sebastian and Indian Rivers.

Sante Fe, NM, Lounge Agrees to Noise Restrictions (May 15, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reports Santa Fe, New Mexico, city councilors on Wednesday adopted an agreement between the city and El Farol Restaurant & Lounge, ending a lengthy noise dispute with the nightclub.

Sea-Tac Negotiates with Schools to Pay for Jet Noise Study and Noise Reduction Improvements (May 15, 1998). The News Tribune of Tacoma, Washington, reports school district officials and representatives of the Port of Seattle, which runs the Sea-Tac Airport, say they're trying to negotiate a solution to the long-running dispute over jet noise in Highline classrooms. Both sides say they could have an agreement within the week over how to pay for a noise study.

Some Say Police Firing Range Incompatible with Quiet Use Redevelopment Plans for WA Army Post (May 15, 1998). The Columbian of Vancouver, Washington, reports Clark County commissioners decided Thursday that a redevelopment plan for a former Army post should include police firing ranges, much to the dismay of nearby residents.

Vancouver Residents Say Portland Airport Noise Abatement Test Moves Noise from One Neighborhood to the Next (May 15, 1998). The Columbian of Vancouver, Washington, reports complaint calls to the Port of Portland's noise abatement office are rising along with tests of new routes for jets departing Portland International Airport. The tests are being done to in an attempt to shift noise from areas that get a lot to areas whose residents might not notice. Next week, an airport noise committee holds a special meeting, and could cancel the test.

Anti-Noise Group Asks Government to Fund Fair Fight Against Heathrow's Terminal 5 (May 14, 1998). Press Association Newsfile reports the Heathrow Association for the Control of Aircraft Noise (HACAN) asked the government today for financial assistance in its fight to stop a fifth terminal from being built at Heathrow airport.

Calif. Town Says No to Preschool Permit Citing Health, Safety and Noise Concerns (May 14, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that in Thousand Oaks, California, a developer that wanted to build a preschool had its proposal rejected by planners who worried about noise, safety, and health problems. The developer will appeal the ruling in City Council.

Conn. Recreation Area Temporarily Closed Due to Uncontrolled Noise, Litter, and Parking (May 14, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports Southington, Connecticut, officials have temporarily closed a newly opened recreation area while they work out a plan to control parking, noise and litter.

Fearing Ground Noise Impact, Residents Ask Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport for Redevelopment Money for Mitigation (May 14, 1998). The Star Tribune reports Richfield residents and officials pleaded with airport officials Wednesday to protect their city from the negative effects of the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport expansion.

Illinois Town Seeks to Clear Up Vagueness in Noise & Entertainment Zoning Rules (May 14, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports in an effort to clarify rules that govern licensed entertainment establishments, officials in Schaumburg, Illinois, proposed changes to sections of the village's zoning code that regulates entertainment and noise.

Increase in Activity and Noise at Conn. Speedway Leads to Resident Petition of Protest (May 14, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports noise from a speedway during the daytime has led residents of Stafford, Connecticut, to submit a petition to the board of selectmen Monday asking that something be done about the problem.

Leaf Blower Ban in Calif. City May Go to Public Vote in November (May 14, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports opponents of Menlo Park, California's, leaf blower ban said they will turn in a petition to City Hall today to force a public referendum on the issue in November.

Ohio City Limits Noise from Ice Cream Trucks (May 14, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports there's a new law in Medina, Ohio, that restricts ice cream trucks from playing loud music.

Port of Seattle Agrees to Fund Noise and Soundproofing Study for Highline Schools (May 14, 1998). The Seattle Times reports the Port of Seattle and school officials say they're close to reaching a deal that would begin the process of outfitting schools near Sea-Tac Airport with insulation to muffle the noise of jets.

Sante Fe Business Can Keep Live Music; Must Follow City's Noise Ordinance (May 14, 1998). The Santa Fe New Mexican reports an agreement between the Santa Fe City Council and a local business means the lounge will continue to offer live amplified music, but hours for live performances will be limited.

Second Hearing Scheduled for Controversial Maine Motocross Track (May 13, 1998). The Central Maine Morning Sentinel reports a new date for a hearing has been set to decide on a controversial proposal to build a motocross track in Benton, Maine.

West Chicago Debates Railport Proposal: Lists Noise and Traffic Concerns (May 13, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports West Chicago city officials say they need more information and more convincing before they can agree to the "railport" being proposed by Union Pacific Railroad.

Calgary Bylaws Prevent New Noisy Businesses (May 12, 1998). The Calgary Herald in Alberta, Canada, reports the city's council approved new bylaws to regulate noise from bars and restaurants near residential areas. The article goes on to point out that the new bylaws don't govern existing facilities.

Editorial Laments Ottawa's Noisy Spring (May 12, 1998). The Ottawa Citizen published an editorial lamenting spring's double-edged sword: warmer weather and more daylight bring more noise.

Florida Pig Farmer Says Noise Laws will Harm Business (May 12, 1998). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports Martin County officials will hold a public hearing on a noise ordinance for the county. A Stuart pig farmer says the proposed noise law is aimed specifically at him and will alter his agricultural business.

Van Nuys' Noise Variance to be Reviewed after Residents Complain (May 12, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that a review of Van Nuys Airport noise concerns will be undertaken by the California Department of Transportation. At stake will be the renewal of a variance that allows Van Nuys Airport to operate above state noise limits.

Residents in Annapolis Area Concerned about Increasing Noise Sources (May 11, 1998). The Capital of Annapolis, Maryland, reports Anne Arundel County residents are exposed to ever increasing sources of noise. While many believe their world is too noisy, experts say it's all in how people perceive noise. The article provides an overview of noise standards, methods by which noise is measured, and some methods of noise mitigation.

Residents Optimistic, Officials Cautious about Airport's Noise Diversion Study (May 9, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports residents who live in an apartment complex near the Palwaukee Municipal Airport welcome the news that airport officials plan to study a possible shift of the airfield's main runway to direct planes over an industrial area instead of the apartments. However, airport officials say it may be too late to make such changes.

Toronto Columnist Relates Fight Against Leaf-Blowers (May 9, 1998). The Toronto Sun printed an editorial by Robin Ward, a resident of the Rosedale neighborhood in Toronto, Ontario, describing a personal fight against leaf blowers. The editorial details how the writer moved into the neighborhood and fixed up a deteriorating house, only to find that the area is assaulted by leaf blowers in the summer.

Hartford Residents Push for Speedier Police Action and Penalties for Noisy Neighbors (May 8, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports police officers' response time to noise complaints were the topics of a meeting of the Southend Neighbors Action Project Wednesday night in Hartford, Connecticut.

Residents Discover Local Regulations Hold No Clout at the Pittsburgh Airport (May 8, 1998). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports Moon, Pennsylvania, has recently discovered that FAA regulations pre-empt local and state regulations as far as noise from Pittsburgh International Airport is concerned.

New Aberdeen Industrial Park in Suburb Looks for Quiet Businesses (May 8, 1998). The Aberdeen Evening Express reports noise is absent from Aberdeen's latest industrial park that is located in the middle of a suburb.

Charleston City Council to Write More Enforceable Noise Ordinance (May 8, 1998). The Charleston Daily Mail reports Charleston's City Council's public safety committee will look into adopting a noise ordinance that is more objective and therefore, more enforceable than their current ordinance.

Noise Abatement Group Attempts to Quiet Portland Airport (May 8, 1998). The Columbian reports since total elimination of noise from the Portland International Airport is impossible, PDX and the airport's Noise Abatement Advisory Committee are making attempts to mitigate the noise. The article goes on to list some of the mitigation measures and their challenges.

Moon Residents Discover Local Regulations Hold No Clout at the Pittsburgh Airport (May 8, 1998). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports Moon, Pennsylvania, has recently discovered that FAA regulations pre-empt local and state regulations as far as noise from Pittsburgh International Airport is concerned.

NJ Residents Win Tax Cuts in Fight to Reduce Rail Noise (May 7, 1998). The Record reports New Jersey residents are fighting train noise by making tax appeals. With one resident's victory setting a precedent, others are following suit, seeking compensation for the noise they endure. Meanwhile Congress is considering a ban on whistle-blowing at crossings while seeking alternative safety measures.

Aberdeen Say New Takeout Business Will Increase Noise, Litter, and Traffic (May 7, 1998). The Aberdeen Evening Express reports local residents are irate over food takeaway plans, which they claim will make their lives miserable by adding to existing noise and traffic problems.

City in British Columbia Proposes "Anti-Nuisance Zones;" Includes Noise as Uncivil and Illegal Behavior (May 7, 1998). The Vancouver Sun reports the New Westminster, British Columbia, city council has given a first reading to a new bylaw that would create "anti-nuisance zones" where civility would be required. Making noise that disturbs residents is one of the uncivil behaviors addressed in the new bylaw.

City of Charleston Considers Updating Noise Ordinance (May 6, 1998). The Charleston Daily Mail reports city council committees are meeting this week to discuss recycling issues and strengthening the Charleston's noise laws.

Boca Resident Wants to Know Who Controls Noisy Trains (May 6, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel published an editorial by Boca Raton resident, Louis N. Gordon. In his letter to the editor, Mr. Gordon asks who has jurisdiction over noise from nearby railroad tracks. Mr. Gordon wrote:

Conn. Seeks Federal Money for Comprehensive Noise Study of Bradley Airport (May 6, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports state transportation officials are seeking federal aid to expand their planned study of noise from Bradley International Airport.

NJ Residents Want Alternatives to Concrete for Highway Noise Barriers (May 5, 1998). The Record reports New Jersey's Assembly Transportation Committee approved a bill Monday that would allow counties to choose the form of their highway noise barriers.

Revitalization Plans Bring Noise Worries to Residents of Fort Worth Neighborhood (May 5, 1998). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports while officials and business owners celebrate the steps being made toward commercial progress in a one area of Fort Worth, Texas, some nearby residents worry about traffic and noise. the opening of a Mexican market on North Main Street,

Airport Advisory Committee Holds Limited Power to Reduce Noise in Boca Raton (May 5, 1998). The Palm Beach Post reports Boca Raton, Florida, residents heard from members of an advisory committee on airport noise Monday. The committee listed its accomplishments but acknowledged their limited power to decrease airport noise.

City Council Member Pushes for Noise Study at Boca Raton Airport (May 5, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports a public forum, sponsored by Florida's Boca Raton Airport Noise Compatibility Advisory Committee, was held Monday to update residents about changes made by the airport to reduce noise and give residents an opportunity to speak about the noise problem.

Board Orders RI Gun Club to Conduct More Sound Tests (May 5, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the West Greenwich, Rhode Island Planning Board last night rejected noise tests performed by a gun club seeking a special-use permit to relocate. The Planning Board requested further noise tests as well as a second traffic study.

New Noise Ordinance Has Teeth, Says Eagle City, Idaho (May 4, 1998). The Idaho Statesman reports a new noise ordinance approved by Eagle City, Idaho, is now in effect. The City Council is confident the new ordinance is enforceable.

Calif. Congressman's Letter Addresses Criticism of Airport Noise Questionnaire (May 3, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following letter to the editor from Brad Sherman, Congressman, 24th District. In his letter, Sherman responds to criticism lodged at a questionnaire he sent out about airport noise. Sherman wrote:

Kentucky Residents Request Noise Barrier along New Interchange (May 3, 1998). The Courier-Journal reports St. Matthews residents whose homes border a planned interchange along Kentucky's Interstate 264 have requested the state erect a concrete noise barrier.

Noise Ordinance Going Too Far in Charleston? (May 2, 1998). The Charleston Daily Mail published an editorial questioning the proposal for Charleston police to use decibel meters to enforce noise ordinances.

British County Planners Recommend Approval of Recycling Facility, Despite Residents' Objections (May 1, 1998). The Western Morning News reports that British county planners have recommended that plans for a recycling facility in East Devon, England be approved, despite objections by local residents and the parish council. The article notes that the project will be considered by the county's development control committee on Wednesday.

Editorial - Van Nuys Residents Want Equity in Airport Noise Decisions (May 1, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles published the following editorial by Ellen Bagelman, president of the Lake Balboa Neighborhood Association. It's Bagelman's opinion that noise complaints from residents who live near the Van Nuys Airport are ignored. Bagelman wrote:

English Town Expands Noise Control Team as Noise Complaints Rise (May 1, 1998). The Sentinel of Stoke, England reports an extra officer is being added to the Stafford Borough Council's noise control team to help cope with the expected rise in complaints. The council faces its busiest period in the summer months.

New Zealand Advisor Advises Against Highway Upgrade, Citing Noise and Its Health Effects (May 1, 1998). The Evening Post reports a New Zealand senior advisor said widening a State Highway would add to already unacceptably high noise levels for residents and most likely result in serious health effects.

New Zealand Expert Advises Against Highway Upgrade, Citing Noise and Its Health Effects (May 1, 1998). The Evening Post reports a New Zealand senior advisor said widening a State Highway would add to already unacceptably high noise levels for residents and most likely result in serious health effects.

Palm Beach Airport's Noise-Afflicted Neighbors Will Continue to Fight Expansion Despite FAA Approval for Longer Runway (May 1, 1998). The Palm Beach Post reports Palm Beach International Airport received approval from the Federal Aviation Administration this week to lengthen its main runway. Airport expansion and noise continue to be a source of conflict among residents, city officials, and county commissioners.

Anti-Noise Group Gets Drowned Out by Noise from O'Hare (Apr. 30, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that while a conference on noise reduction and education was held Wednesday at Park Ridge in Chicago, every few minutes or so, a plane would roar by and drown out the leader of the event.

China's Labor Department Outlines Its Efforts to Protect Workers from Hearing Damage (Apr. 30, 1998). The South China Morning Post published the following letter to the editor from Wong Ching Kwok for the Commissioner of Labor about efforts made by the Labor Department to protect workers from hearing damage. Wong Ching Kwok wrote:

City Council Calls for Curfew at Boca Raton Airport in Effort to Put Officials on Notice (Apr. 30, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports the Boca Raton, Florida, City Council this week approved a resolution mandating airport officials impose a voluntary night curfew, notify all pilots who violate it, and pursue federal approval for a mandatory ban on night flights.

NYC Steps Up Anti-Noise Effort with Restrictions for Cabbies (Apr. 30, 1998). The Daily News reports New York City is increasing its efforts to limit noise by restricting cab drivers from honking their horns unnecessarily.

Noise Impact Study May Result in Airport Buying Homes Affected by FedEx Hub (Apr. 30, 1998). The News & Record of Greensboro, North Carolina, reports that because the new FedEx hub and a third runway are expected to alter the high- noise areas around the Piedmont Triad International Airport, the Airport Authority may purchase a number of homes.

Residents Near UK's Teesside Airport Object to Proposed Freight Terminal (Apr. 30, 1998). The Northern Echo of the United Kingdom reports complaints about noise from light aircraft using Teesside International Airport have risen since plans were announced to build one of the UK's biggest freight terminals.

Illinois Residents Say Wal-Mart is a Noisy Neighbor (Apr. 29, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports Lake Zurich, Illinois village officials rejected a proposed 4,000-square-foot expansion to Wal-Mart, citing overdevelopment of the area in general and charging the company specifically with being a noisy neighbor.

NY Residents Say Noise and Fumes Accompany Go-Cart Track (Apr. 29, 1998). The Times Union of Albany, New York, reports an angry crowd of Turf Community Park residents Tuesday night protested a proposed go-cart tract and urged the Town Board to side with them.

Noise Sharing Scheme at Sydney Airport Criticized (Apr. 29, 1998). Flight International of Cairns, Australia, reports airline officials, controllers and pilots are against noise sharing at Sydney's airport, citing safety and economic issues as well as mounting chaos.

North Carolina Residents Concerned about Night-Time Noise from Fedex Hub (Apr. 29, 1998). The News & Record reports leaders in the Greensboro, North Carolina, area are asking for more details about noise from the proposed FedEx cargo hub at the Piedmont Triad Airport.

PA Township Considers Ordinance to Control Noisy Pets (Apr. 29, 1998). The Morning Call of Allentown, Pennsylvania, reports East Rockhill Township supervisors are considering an proposed ordinance that prohibits the possession of animals that cause a public nuisance by making noise.

EU Will Strive for Consistent but Flexible Nighttime Aircraft Standards (Apr. 28, 1998). Airports(R) reports the European Union plans to define a common approach to nighttime movements of aircraft and created a new policy, particularly for cargo shipments, at Europe's airports.

More Flights at O'Hare or a Third Airport? No Agreement. (Apr. 28, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports O'Hare critics are angered by a plan to add 53 daily commuter flights at O'Hare Airport. Their protests are fueling arguments for a third airport at Peotone.

Crackdown on Smaller Crimes in Greenwich Village Works, but Leaves Some Residents Annoyed (Apr. 27, 1998). The New York Times reports that New York City police have been undertaking a crackdown on minor crimes every weekend in Greenwich Village as part of Mayor Rudolph Giuliani's increased focus on quality-of-life crimes. The crackdown, called Operation Civil Village, involves radar traps, sound traps, drunken-driving checkpoints, stolen-vehicle checkpoints, motorcycle checkpoints, and license, registration, and insurance-card checkpoints. The article notes that while police and some residents say the project has been a huge success, other residents complain about being stopped by police when they've done nothing wrong, about police officers harassing people, and about long waits in traffic when police are checking IDs.

Activists in Newport Beach, California Wield Power in El Toro Airport Fight (Apr. 26, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Newport Beach residents -- who fought the expansion of John Wayne Airport in the 1970s -- are worried that if the proposed El Toro Airport isn't built, increases in air traffic will occur at John Wayne since expansion limits are scheduled to end in 2005. As a result, residents there have become fierce proponents for the El Toro Airport, often opposing residents in the south of Orange County who worry they will be negatively impacted by El Toro. In addition to past experience, Newport Beach residents tend to have more money and political clout than south county residents.

Chicago Suburb Will Continue to Work with Two O'Hare Noise Groups Despite Vote (Apr. 26, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports the Des Plaines City Council opted against joining the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission. But a vote for one group doesn't necessarily mean disapproval of the other group, according to city officials.

Parkland, Florida, Drafts Noise Ordinance (Apr. 26, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports Parkland, Florida, city administrators are drafting a law aimed at reducing "loud and raucous" noise.

Quieter Aircraft Planned for Grand Canyon (Apr. 26, 1998). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that the National Park Service is working to control noise from helicopter and plane flights in Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. A ten-year phase-out of the noisiest aircraft that was enacted last year is the most recent noise regulation, the article says.

Canadian Resident Considers Launching Petition Opposing Second Runway at Calgary Airport (Apr. 25, 1998). The Calgary Herald reports that the Calgary (Canada) Airport Authority voted Wednesday that a study be conducted to look at the feasibility of building a second north-south runway at Calgary International Airport to deal with increasing air traffic. In response, Fred Waterman, a Castleridge resident, said he may launch a petition drive opposing construction of the runway.

Two Chicago Area Schools Get $6 Million in Soundproofing Against Airport Noise (Apr. 25, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports U.S. Transportation Secretary Rodney Slater announced that two Chicago area schools will get $6 million in grants for soundproofing against noise from O'Hare and Midway airports. In addition, Slater announced grants of $6.9 million to other Chicago airport projects, and $14.3 million for other Illinois airport projects.

European Commission to Hold Conference on European Union's Noise Pollution Policy (Apr. 24, 1998). Agence France Presse reports that the European Commission, in cooperation with the Danish government, will hold a conference on May 4-5 in Copenhagen, Denmark, to discuss the European Union's noise pollution policy. The conference will focus on bringing noise pollution regulations of member states up to a standard and creating European Union legislation on noise pollution.

Oregon Airport Experiments With Flying Planes at Lower Altitutes Over a Washington County (Apr. 24, 1998). The Columbian printed an editorial that explains that the Portland International Airport in Portland, Oregon will allow some passenger jets to make their big turns at lower than usual altitudes over Clark County in Washington for 60 to 90 days, beginning Monday. The experiment is a test to determine how sensitive residents are to jet noise in the area. The editorial writer says that airport officials should prepare to get lots of complaints.

Federal Aviation Administration Rejects Florida City's Plan to Quiet Aircraft Noise (Apr. 23, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Wednesday rejected a resolution proposed by City Councilor Bill Glass in Boca Raton, Florida to impose curfews on noisy jets at the Boca Raton Airport. The article says that Dean Stringer, an FAA official, told members of the Boca Raton Airport Authority that if the resolution passes, the airport could lose funding from the FAA and Florida Department of Transportation, and could open itself up to lawsuits.

Nevada County Commission Faces Residents Angry Over Proposal to Let Prospective Property Buyers Know About Jet Noise (Apr. 23, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that hundreds of residents packed a Clark County (Nevada) Commission meeting Wednesday, complaining that a proposal to let prospective property buyers know about jet noise from the McCarran International Airport will lower their property values. Commissioners promised the residents that a compromise would be developed during the next month, and would be considered at the May 20 meeting. The article notes that the proposal also would apply to land around Nellis Air Force Base, but none of the residents living in the proposed zone around the base complained at the meeting.

Orange County, California is Split Over New Airport at El Toro (Apr. 23, 1998). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that a proposed new regional airport at the site of the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station near Irvine, California has divided the county. Supporters of the proposed airport, including the Orange County Board of Supervisors, say it would allow the county to become a major economic player in the region. Opponents say the airport will just bring more noise and pollution. They want to transform the base into a mixed-use urban center for the county. Many view the controversy as one of the most divisive and most important issues the county has faced.

Toronto Area Residents Attack Government and Politicians for Allowing Increase in Jet Noise (Apr. 23, 1998). The Toronto Star reports that about 200 residents of the Rockwood neighborhood of Mississauga, Ontario attended a public meeting last night at which they said the new runway at Pearson International Airport is making their life hell. The residents also criticized the federal government and the local Liberal Members of Parliament for allowing the new runway, which opened late last year, to be built.

Arlington Heights Noise Group Says Third Airport Won't Reduce Noise (Apr. 22, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that in February, the Arlington Heights Village Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise voted against joining a coalition that supports building a third regional airport. However, committee discussions on the topic continue.

Chicago Airport Construction is Likely to Send More Jet Noise Over Some Neighborhoods (Apr. 22, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois has started its annual maintenance project to repair roadways, taxiways, and runways. The project, which will cost at least $25 million, is likely to bring more noise to some suburbs and less noise to other suburbs.

Chicago Suburb Committee Set to Make Final Decision on Supporting a Third Area Airport (Apr. 22, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that Village Board in Arlington Heights, Illinois has asked the Arlington Heights Village Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise to make a final decision on whether the village should support a third regional airport in the Chicago area. The article notes that the committee voted against joining a coalition that supports building a third airport in the Peotone area in February, saying a third airport would not reduce jet noise in Arlington Heights. The committee will take up the issue again at its May 19 meeting.

Maryland County Removes Obstacle to Building Motor Speedway; Residents Angry That They Had Little Voice in Decision (Apr. 22, 1998). The Baltimore Sun reports that the Anne Arundel County (Maryland) Council voted 5-2 Monday to allow "sports racing complexes" as one of the allowed activities at a site in Pasadena that has been proposed for a motor speedway. The article says the decision removes a major obstacle to the proposed project. Meanwhile, residents are angry that the decision to bring the track to their area occurred in slightly more than a month, and that their concerns have not been considered.

New York Politicians Warn FAA Not to Reroute New Jersey Planes Over New York (Apr. 22, 1998). Newsday reports that a New York congressional delegation yesterday warned the Federal Aviation Administration not to direct air traffic from New Jersey's Newark Airport over Long Island in New York as the agency begins to redraw the nation's air traffic routes.

New York's LaGuardia Airport Will Get More Air Traffic Despite Pending Lawsuit Challenging Increasing Flights (Apr. 22, 1998). Newsday reports that the U.S. Department of Transportation yesterday approved nine additional daily flights at New York City's LaGuardia Airport. The decision came in spite of a pending lawsuit in federal appeals court filed four months ago by Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and Queens Borough President Claire Shulman, seeking to reverse an earlier Department of Transportation decision to allow 21 flights at the airport.

Canadian Columnist Writes Fairy Tale About Amplified Concerts in Calgary (Apr. 21, 1998). The Calgary Herald printed an editorial regarding a recent city council decision in Calgary, Alberta to allow festival promoters to apply for exemptions from the noise bylaw to hold performances past 10 pm at Prince's Island Park. The editorial writer tells a fairy tale about the situation, with two possible outcomes: one in which the merchants encourage the loud concerts and the residents shun their businesses, and another in which large concerts are banned from the park, while several smaller concerts are allowed, and everyone is happy.

Colorado Residents Opposed to Proposed Rock Quarry (Apr. 21, 1998). The Denver Post reports that residents in Jefferson County, Colorado are opposed to a proposed quarry at a site in Coal Creek Canyon that would mine up to 70 rail cars of rock a day. Residents from Crescent Park, a subdivision to the west of the quarry site, and Plainview, a rural community to the east, say their homes will be filled with noise and dust, and their wells will dry up if the quarry is built. Residents will meet tonight representatives of the quarry company to discuss the proposal.

Minnesota City Near Airport Proposes Redevelopment Plan to Mitigate Noise from New Runway (Apr. 21, 1998). The Star Tribune reports that city officials in Richfield, Minnesota are proposing a $200 million redevelopment plan to mitigate ground noise that is expected from a new north-south runway at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. The redevelopment plan would destroy 1,000 homes and apartments near Cedar Avenue South and replace them with bigger buildings that would insulate against jet noise. The article notes that city officials are trying to convince the Metropolitan Airports Commission (MAC) to pay for the plan. Meanwhile, the article says, about 50 residents attended a MAC meeting Monday hoping to discuss the matter with commissioners. But they left the meeting in anger, the article reports, after only one resident was allowed to address the Commission.

Oregon Airport Experiments With Flying Jets Over New Area in Washington State (Apr. 21, 1998). The Columbian reports that jets leaving the Portland (Oregon) International Airport will be flying over Clark County in Washington for two or three months starting Monday as part of an experiment to consider permanent flight path changes. The article notes that jets have not flown above this area before. Airport officials are trying the experimental flight path to find out if noise can be reduced over areas with growing populations, and to learn whether residents in Clark County will notice the jet traffic and will complain about the noise.

Washington Cities Deserve Explanation on FAA's Refusal to Adjust Flight Paths for Noise Reduction (Apr. 20, 1998). The News Tribune printed an editorial which argues that residents living in the flight path of Sea-Tac Airport in the Tacoma, Washington area deserve a good explanation for the Federal Aviation Administration's recent decision not to adjust flight routes in order to mitigate jet noise.

California Residents Oppose Sports Park Plan for Their Neighborhood, Saying They Will Sue to Keep Space Open (Apr. 17, 1998). The Ventura County Star reports that residents of Westlake Canyon Oaks in Westlake Village, California don't want a sports park built on 41 undeveloped acres near their homes. The article says village officials are considering a proposal to build a $4 million sports park on 28 acres of land that is currently zoned as open space. Residents say they are prepared to bring a lawsuit over the issue.

Editorial Approves Attempts to Quiet Planes at Florida Airport (Apr. 17, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel printed an editorial that argues that city officials in Boca Raton, Florida should continue their attempts to quiet jets at the Boca Raton Municipal Airport. In addition, the editorial says that progress toward effective noise-abatement procedures will ultimately depend mostly on the voluntary compliance of pilots and airlines, and they should help preserve Boca Raton's high quality of life.

Government Panel in Japan Will Propose Raising the Noise Level Allowed Along Major Roads (Apr. 17, 1998). The Mainichi Daily News reports that a subcommittee of the Central Environment Council in Japan will propose raising the level of noise allowed along major roads at an April 21 meeting of the Council. The subcommittee will recommend that the maximum acceptable noise level near arterial roads should be 70 decibels during the day. The new proposal exceeds the current noise limit of 65 decibels recognized by the Supreme Court in 1995 in connection with a noise pollution lawsuit brought by residents in Kobe.

Options for Converting California Air Base Into Commercial Airport Unveiled; All Options Call for Smaller Operations Than Originally Envisioned (Apr. 17, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that the master plan for the proposed El Toro Airport in Orange County, California -- which includes four scaled down options for airport configuration -- was presented today. The airport, in any of its incarnations, would handle three to five times more passengers than nearby John Wayne Airport.

Scottish Residents Try to Block Comedy Club Festival Near Their Homes (Apr. 17, 1998). The Evening News reports that residents in Edinburgh, Scotland are angry about noise from a comedy club, the Gilded Balloon II Festival Fringe venue, near their homes. The residents accuse comedy club workers of bullying residents to ensure that residents don't oppose them. Now, residents are lodging complaints with the Edinburgh City Council in an attempt to block the club from holding a festival venue at Fishmarket Close from 11 am to 1 am between August 7 and 29. The comedy club has applied for a temporary theatre license to operate festival venue, and the City Council's licensing committee will discuss the issue at a meeting today.

California City Council Bans Gas-Powered Leaf Blowers (Apr. 16, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle printed an editorial in which the columnist humorously discusses the decision Tuesday by the Menlo Park (California) City Council to ban gas-powered leaf blowers. The editorial writer pokes fun at the City Councilors for not listening to hundreds of people who said a ban was overkill.

Connecticut Residents Object to Skeet Shooting Proposal (Apr. 16, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports that about 15 angry residents in Durham, Connecticut turned out for a planning and zoning commission hearing Wednesday night to oppose a proposal by the Durham Rod and Gun Club to allow skeet shooting in a farm residential zone. The commission decided to continue the public hearing at its May 6 meeting.

Report Finds Six Million People in France Suffer From Excess Noise Pollution (Apr. 16, 1998). The Independent reports that the Economic and Social Council (CES) in France, a consultative body representing industrial, business and social groups, issued a report that finds six million French people suffer from excess noise, mainly from cars, railways, and planes.

Columnist Argues British Government Should Survey People About Noise Around Heathrow Airport Instead of Relying on Computer-Generated Noise Averages (Apr. 15, 1998). The Guardian printed an editorial that argues the British government should survey residents living near London's Heathrow Airport about the aircraft noise they are experiencing, rather than relying on computer-generated noise averages. The editorial argues that only by doing such a survey can the government make the noise consultation currently in progress over Heathrow's expansion worthwhile.

Des Plaines to Hear Groups' Views on Noise from O'Hare (Apr. 15, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports two groups, seen as rivals by some, will present their approaches to dealing with noise from O'Hare International Airport to the Des Plaines City Council starting Wednesday night.

Few Noise Complaints in North Lincolnshire Require Formal Action (Apr. 15, 1998). The Scunthorpe Evening Telegraph of England reports more than 900 complaints about excessive noise were made to North Lincolnshire council last year, but few resulted in formal action.

Greensboro Residents Object to Airport's Third Runway for FedEx (Apr. 15, 1998). The News & Record of Greensboro, North Carolina reports noise -wary airport neighbors still vow to fight FedEx and the airport's planned third runway.

Residents Near McCarran Airport Object to Their Homes on New Noise Contour Map (Apr. 15, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports some Spring Valley residents are angry their homes could be included in the updated McCarran International Airport Environs Overlay District Maps, possibly classifying their homes as being in a high aircraft noise area.

Study Says Noise Acceptable from Georgia Firing Range; Neighbors Disagree (Apr. 15, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports a study of noise from a Georgia police firing range shows that noise levels acceptable.

Will New Flight Patterns across the U.S. Mitigate Noise? (Apr. 15, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports the national network of air traffic routes will be redrawn to reduce flight delays and noise on the ground, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Boca Council Member Pushes to Fine Violators of Nighttime Flight Curfews (Apr. 14, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports a Boca Raton City Council member is proposing a resolution that would fine violators of nighttime flight curfews at Boca Raton Airport.

North Carolina Residents Vow to Fight FedEx at Piedmont Airport (Apr. 14, 1998). The News & Record of Greensboro, North Carolina, reports that residents living northeast of the Piedmont Triad International Airport say they want FedEx to choose a different site.

Residents Along Florida's Tri-Rail Expansion Demand Protection from More Noise (Apr. 14, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports residents at a mobile-home community for seniors in Deerfield Beach, Florida, fear current noise and vibrations from trains and rail tracks are about to increase.

Appeals Board in Massachusetts Town Rejects Request for 30 Outside Dog Kennel Runs (Apr. 13, 1998). The Patriot Ledger reports that the appeals board in Cohasset, Massachusetts unanimously rejected a request Friday by John and Christine Millar of Cedar Street to build 30 dog runs on the outside of their kennel. The board rejected the request because of the noise factor, and because it would bring the building 10 feet closer to the lot line, a violation of the zoning bylaw.

Chicago's Noise Law Impounds Cars Blasting Music (Apr. 13, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that in the last year thousands of Chicagoans have had their cars impounded, some for violating the city code governing Noise and Vibration Control.

Enforce Santa Fe's Noise Ordinance (Apr. 13, 1998). The Santa Fe New Mexican published an editorial about on-going noise issues in Santa Fe, prompted most recently by residents' complaints about a local bar. It's the editor's opinion that a sound-level meter and an enforceable ordinance would solve the city's noise problems.

Burbank Fights Airport Expansion; Country Watches Outcome (Apr. 12, 1998). Copley News Service reports plans to expand the Burbank Airport are vehemently opposed by the city of Burbank. The rest of the country is closely watching this debate and how if will affect the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court landmark decision that limited local control of airports.

Louisiana Residents Living Near Interstate May Get Noise Walls (Apr. 12, 1998). The Times-Picayune reports that a new study commissioned by Louisiana state officials recommends that 10- to 24-foot noise walls be built along 11 miles of Interstate 10 near Metairie, between the St. Charles Parish/Kenner line and Tulane Avenue in New Orleans. The article notes that building the noise walls would be part of a project to widen Interstate 10. Before a final decision is made, the state will hold public input meetings to gather comments from residents.

Myths, Facts & Proposals about Noise and Regulation at Van Nuys Airport (Apr. 12, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published an editorial by Gerald A. Silver, president of Homeowners of Encino, California, and writer, Myrna L. Silver, about jet and helicopter noise from Van Nuys Airport. What follows is their article as published:

New Orleans Residents Welcome Noise Barrier Walls along I-10 (Apr. 12, 1998). The Times-Picayune reports many residents who live along the Interstate 10 Service Road are supportive of building sound barriers along the highway.

With Expansion, Santa Paula Considers Noise, Safety and Open Space (Apr. 12, 1998). The Ventura County Star reports the Santa Paula City Council will consider whether to expand as it considers final approval for a general plan update on Monday. Besides setting policy for land use, the general plan covers noise, conservation, safety, and open space.

Road Noise from New Bypass Drives Family From Home; Residents Ask for Road Resurfacing (Apr. 11, 1998). The Gloucestershire Echo of England reports a resident says excessive road noise is forcing him out of his home near the new Cirencester bypass.

Britain Fights EU's Tough Anti-Noise Proposals (Apr. 11, 1998). The Independent reports that Britain is preparing to fight new anti- noise laws proposed by the European Commission.

Detractors of Maryland Race Track Cite Noise and Traffic Concerns (Apr. 10, 1998). The Capital reports developers of a 54,800-seat race track in Pasadena met with the public again last night, hoping to amass support for the proposal.

Gloucestershire Protesters Block Road for Peace and Quiet (Apr. 10, 1998). The Gloucestershire Echo of England reports protesters brought traffic to a halt as they staged a march against noise pollution from the new Cirencester bypass.

Noise Expert Says Wall Won't Block Noise from Ohio Amphitheater (Apr. 10, 1998). The Columbus Dispatch reports Westerville, Ohio's noise consultant said yesterday the higher wall planned for the Polaris Amphitheater this summer won't solve the noise problem in the neighborhood. Instead, he advocates for stricter enforcement of existing noise standards and stronger penalties for violators.

Colden Lake Neighbors Wary of Noise from Motorcycle Races (Apr. 10, 1998). The Buffalo News reports the Colden , New York, Town Board Thursday night approved a special-use permit for an "off-road grand prix" to be held at the Colden Lakes Resort despite the objections of a few residents.

Staffordshire Relaxes Steel Company's Restrictions, Ignores Residents' Noise Concerns (Apr. 10, 1998). The Sentinel of Stoke, England, reports a Staffordshire steel company has been given approval to store stock closer to its boundary despite residents' fears of noise and late night working.

Study to Assess Impact of Sea-Tac Noise on Washington Schools (Apr. 10, 1998). The News Tribune of Tacoma, Washington, reports that the Highline School District has hired sound experts to measure acoustic conditions in classrooms affected by the noise from nearby Sea-Tac Airport.

Wales' Residents Voice Noise Concerns Over Pub's Request for Music License (Apr. 9, 1998). The South Wales Evening Post reports a Swansea community council is fighting a pub's application for a music license, citing noise concerns.

Beijing Takes Measures to Reduce Noise Pollution from Car Alarms (Apr. 9, 1998). The China Daily reports Beijing yesterday announced new regulations designed to curb noise pollution from car alarms.

Menlo Park Gardeners Try to Avoid Ban with Quieter Leaf Blowers (Apr. 9, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports local gardeners yesterday at Menlo Park City Hall traded in their leaf blowers for new, quieter models, hoping to prevent a ban on the machines.

Albany, New York Considers Zoning Change to Allow Controversial Go-cart Track (Apr. 9, 1998). The Times Union reports the town board will hold a public hearing later this month to consider a zoning change that would allow a controversial go-cart track at a local driving range.

S.C. Residents Object to Noise from Aviation Club (Apr. 8, 1998). The Augusta reports members of The Southern Model Aviation Club and nearby residents who don't like the noise coming from their airport reached no compromise at Tuesday's Aiken County Council meeting.

NJ Town Seeks to Include Music from Ice Cream Trucks in Ordinance, Preferring Regulation over a Ban (Apr. 8, 1998). The Asbury Park Press reports Mayor Carl Block and the Stafford Township attorney will meet tomorrow with a representative of the state Department of Environmental Protection to determine if there is a way to regulate ice cream truck music without banning it.

Maine Senate Enacts Watercraft-use Legislation that Bans Use of Personalwatercraft and Boat Moters on Specific Water Surfaces and Sets Decibel Noise Restrictions Where Watercraft Use is Permitted. (Apr. 8, 1998). The Bangdor Daily News reports that legislation enacted by Maine's Senate bans the use of personal watercraft (including Jet Skis) on 243 gem ponds and on specific lakes in Maine's Rangeley region.

California Senator Attempts to Blow Away Los Angeles' Ban on Noisy Leaf Blowers with State Legislation (Apr. 8, 1998). Los Angeles Times ran the following letter to the editor concerning state regulation of noisy leaf blowers in California.

Massport asked by Resident to Quiet Skies Surrounding Logan (Apr. 8, 1998). The Patriot Ledger reports residents are seeking relief from noise made by aircraft traffic noise near Logan.

Federal Aviation Administration Letter Supports Airport Expansion in Burbank, California (Apr. 8, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports the head of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sent a letter March 28 to U.S. Rep. Brad Sherman, D-Woodland Hills, saying neither the FAA nor the city can force flight curfews upon the Burbank Airport.

Community Development Committee in Overland Park, Kansas Approves Ordinance That Would Limit Hours for Home-based Auto Repairs (Apr. 8, 1998). The Kansas City Star reports that Overland Park's Community Development Committee has approved an ordinance to restrict outdoor auto work from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. in an effort to curb neighborhood noise and frustrations.

Routing Jets North Out of a Proposed El Toro Airport in Southern California Would Reduce Noise Over Some Neighborhoods, Noise Expert Says (Apr. 8, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that officials in Orange County have proposed routing more flights north on takeoff if the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station near Irvine, California is converted into a commercial airport. According to the county's noise expert, routing more planes north could reduce the number of takeoffs and jet noise over communities to the east.

Residents of Future Florida Community Notified about Noise from Bartow Airport (Apr. 7, 1998). The Ledger reports officials representing Florida's Bartow Municipal Airport and those from the nearby Old Florida Plantation said they've reached an agreement on informing residents at the prospective community about noise from overflying aircraft.

New York City Shuts Down Four East Side Bars in a Noise Crackdown (Apr. 7, 1998). The New York Times reports that neighbors' complaints about noise prompted the city to shut four Upper East Side bars over the weekend. City officials say the crackdown on rowdy Manhattan bars and clubs will last through the summer.

The City of Sante Fe Seeks to Put a Stop to NightClub Noise. (Apr. 7, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reports that city officials of Sante Fe, New Mexico have been attempting for over a year to put a stop to the noise from a local nightclub.

Emergency Water Aid to Marshall Islands Delayed by Hawaii's Noise Regulations (Apr. 7, 1998). The AAP Newsfeed reports that Hawaii has refused to allow a Russian-made aircraft - an Antonov 124 cargo plane - to land in Hawaii because it breeches Hawaiian noise standards. The aircraft was on an El Nino emergency aid mission in the Marshall Islands and was scheduled to arrive Tuesday, April 7, 1998. The prohibition against its landing forced it to extend the flight and refuel in Alaska, thus delaying emergency aid. Other aircraft were also due to begin arriving Tuesday, April 7, 1998 in the capital city of Majuro as a part of the first wave of the $US 6.5 million El Nino drought aid program.

An Increase of Noisy Jets at the Van Nuys Airport in California Fuels the Push to Ban the Noisy "Stage 2" Jets (Apr. 7, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the number of noisy Stage 2 jets based at Van Nuys Airport has increased 62 percent in the past four years.

The City Council in Mississauga, Canada Votes to Build Homes Below Existing Flight Paths; Greater Toronto Airports Authority Appeals their Decision to the Ontario Municipal Board in Canada (Apr. 6, 1998). The Toronto Star reports that the City Council for Mississauga, Canada has voted to rezone an industrial site below a Pearson airport flight path to clear the way for home development. The Greater Toronto Airports Authority opposed the decision and appealed to the Ontario Municipal Board, who will make the final decision on whether the project can go ahead.

Noise District Plan for Charlotte/Douglas Airport Discussed (Apr. 6, 1998). The Business Journal-Charlotte of North Carolina reports Charlotte/Douglas International Airport officials are asking city planners to create an airport noise district in their effort to manage the impact of noise on nearby neighborhoods.

California State Legislature to Consider Bill Preventing Cities in California from Banning or Regulating Leaf Blowers (Apr. 5, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports the long-running controversy over the noise-versus-utility of leaf blowers is now sweeping into California's state legislature, where a bill before the state Senate would prevent cities from banning or independently regulating the machines.

Loudspeaker Announcers for Competitive Swim Races Accused of Violating Noise Ordinance in Sarasota, Florida (Apr. 5, 1998). Sarasota Herald-Tribune published the following article in their Perspectives column after two loudspeaker announcers were cited for violating a noise ordinance in Arlington Park, Sarasota, Florida. The announcers were accused of violating an ordinance designed to let city residents sleep a little later on weekends by using a loudspeaker before 10 a.m. to start competitive swim races.

Bill Before California State Senate Would Prevent Cities From Banning or Regulating Leaf-Blowers (Apr. 4, 1998). The Sacramento Bee reports that a bill is before the California state Senate to prevent cities from banning or independently regulating leaf-blowers. The bill was introduced in an attempt to overturn Los Angeles' ban on gasoline-powered leaf-blowers, the article notes. If it passes, the measure would weaken Sacramento's restrictions on leaf-blowers, according to opponents.

Los Angeles City Council Changes Noise Ordinance to Allow Construction on City-observed Federal Holidays (Apr. 3, 1998). Los Angeles Times reports that Los Angeles has revised its noise ordinances to allow construction on federal holidays such as Martin Luther King Jr. day. One justification of the change was that City Hall is already open on those days.

Residents Frustrated with Absence of Funding for Noise Barrier in Annapolis, Maryland (Apr. 3, 1998). The Capitol reports that residents in Annapolis, Maryland are complaining of dangerous noise levels coming from Route 50 just east of the Severn River. The county rushed through zoning changes earlier this year to qualify for the money that would pay for walls, but the State Highway Administration is not planning to pay for the walls for another three to five years.

U.S. Representative from New Jersey Seeks Funds to Cut Airplane Noise (Apr. 3, 1998). The Record reports that Rep. Steve Rothman, D-Fair Lawn, New Jersey, is asking Congress to increase spending on airport noise-reduction by 20 percent by bolstering President Clinton's 1998 Airport Improvement Program funding from $200 to $239 million.

Wal-Mart Told to Keep Noise Down by Planning Commission in Lake Zurich, Illinois (Apr. 3, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the planning commission in Lake Zurich, Illinois wants Wal-Mart to reduce truck and other noise in return for their approved expansion of the store.

A Commissioner in Lake Mary, Florida Wants a Committee to Bring Remedies to Noise Problems Before Further Expansion at the Orlando Sanford Airport is Allowed (Apr. 2, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune in Florida reports that Lake Mary City Commissioner Thom Greene wants the city of Sanford and its airport authority to reduce noise generated by increased flights at Orlando Sanford Airport before more airport expansion occurs.

Publication of the New Noise Zone at Rickenbacker Airport, in Columbus, Ohio Will Trigger Ban on All Aid to Future Housing (Apr. 2, 1998). The Columbus Dispatch warns developers, land speculators and house hunters to be wary. Homes built after April 1998 that are within the noise impact zone for Rickenbacker Airport in Columbus, Ohio won't qualify for federal money to buy their property or pay for soundproofing if the roar of airplanes becomes a nuisance. The disqualification for payment is based on a new law that covers all airports in the United States.

Restrictions on Personal Watercraft Operators Will Go into Effect if Maine's House Joins the Senate and Approves the Bill (Apr. 2, 1998). The Portland Press Herald reports personal watercraft operators will face new usage restrictions in Maine if the House joins the Senate in passing the proposed legislation. The article, which was provided through the Associated press, says the bill banishes the machines from 245 lakes and ponds and requires a minimum of 16 years of age for operators of personal watercraft-better known by the trade name Jet Skis.

Kennels in Wales Approved Without Conditions Despite Residents' Noise Fears (Apr. 1, 1998). The South Wales Evening Post reports a Swansea farm has been given approval to build kennels despite fears about noise nuisance.

Los Angeles City Council Considers Giving Tax Break to Gardeners Who Say They're Strapped by Leaf-Blower Ban (Apr. 1, 1998). The Copley News Service reports that the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday took the first step toward giving a tax break to gardeners who say they're financially strapped by a ban on gas-powered leaf-blowers. The Council is looking at a plan that would reduce gardeners' business tax from about $106 a year to $23 a year, and would give gardeners who turn in their outlawed leaf blowers to the city a $100 rebate. The Council asked the tax equity committee, which is studying ways to better assess business fees, to review the plan. It is expected that the plan will return to the Council for consideration in September.

Missouri Quarry Wants to Expand, But Planning and Zoning Commission Recommends Rejection of Rezoning Request (Apr. 1, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Planning and Zoning Commission in St. Charles, Missouri has recommended that the City Council reject a re-zoning request by LaFarge Corporation for the St. Charles Quarry. The company wants to re-zone a 38-acre tract of land southwest of Friedens Road and west of its intersection with South River Road to expand its quarry operation. The land currently is zoned "limited industrial," and the company is asking that it be re-zoned to "general industrial." This would allow the quarry to expand closer to the residential areas that already surround it on three sides. But residents who live nearby objected to the proposed change, saying the quarry company already doesn't do enough to control dust, noise, vibrations, traffic, and debris.

New Restaurant in Irwin, Pennsylvania Worries Neighbors Who Anticipate Loud Noise and Traffic (Apr. 1, 1998). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports that persons living in the Penglyn section of Irwin, Pennsylvania are protesting the potential opening of Norwin's Ultimate Eatery fearing loud noise and increased traffic in their neighborhood. The proposed restaurant site is actually in North Huntingdon but many of the complaints are coming from residents across the street, which is in Irvin.

European Commission Proposal Would Prohibit Hushkits after April, 1999 (Apr.1 1998). The Airfinance Journal reports that a European Commission proposal for a directive on noise pollution would prohibit airlines from hushkitting aircraft after April 1, 1999. Originally, the deadline had been set for 2002.

British Neighbors Angry Over Construction Noise at Former Dairy (Mar. 31, 1998). The Northern Echo reports that residents in Middlesbrough, United Kingdom have complained to the Middlesbrough council that construction noise, dust, and vibration from the internal renovation of a nearby dairy are making their lives miserable. Councilor Ken Walker, the leader of the Middlesbrough council, is joining residents in their attack on the property owner, Shmshad Qurban. The council has told Qurban that he must restrict the hours of work to control noise.

Missouri City Officials Prepare to Spend $100,000 on Public Education Campaign Opposing Airport Expansion (Mar. 30, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that officials in St. Charles, Missouri are preparing to spend around $100,000 on a public awareness campaign submitted by St. Charles Citizens Against Airport Noise (CAAN) that would educate community members about the city's opposition to the W-1W expansion plan for Lambert Field, which is owned and operated by St. Louis.

Noise and Development Drives Away Turtles Laying Eggs on Beaches in Malaysia (Mar. 30, 1998). Emerging Markets Datafile reports the beaches of Rantau Abang, Malaysia became a popular eco-tourism site for tourists who wanted to see the majestic leatherback turtles lay their eggs. But extensive development and noise to accommodate more tourists has driven away the shy turtles. Now, as the Malacca Fisheries Department makes plans to designate Pulau Upeh as a turtle sanctuary, along with promoting it as an eco-tourism site, a better model of sensitive development is needed, the article says.

Noise from Engineering Workshop is the Source of a Bitter Neighborhood Dispute Before City Council in Upper Hutt, New Zealand (Mar. 30, 1998). The Evening Post of Upper Hutt, New Zealand reports that a neighborhood dispute regarding noise from an engineering workshop came before the City Council. According to the article, Sean Clancy, of Western Hutt Engineering, wants retrospective consent for a heavy industrial engineering workshop on his property at 229 Whitemans Valley Rd. But neighbor Tim O'Brien has complained to the council about the noise from industrial work being done at Clancy's workshop in their rural area.

Tokyo Airport Monitors Airplanes to Mitigate Noise (Mar. 30, 1998). Airline Industry Information reports that officials at the Tokyo Airport have started to display the flight path of every aircraft taking off or landing at the airport at an information center. Aircraft that don't follow their designated flight path will be controlled in order to mitigate noise to local residents, the article says.

Silencing of Ice Cream Truck Music by Stafford Township Leads to Filing of Federal Lawsuit (Mar. 28, 1998). The Asbury Park Press of New Jersey reports that Stafford Township's ban on ice cream truck music is being challenged in Federal Court based on constitutional grounds. Jeffery S. Cabaniss, a township resident and the owner of Jef-Freeze Treats, filed the suit against the township council on March 25. He has asked for a court injunction to restore the music in Stafford while the case is pending.

Arizona Airport Delays Defining Noise Boundary Area (Mar. 27, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that the Williams Gateway Authority, which governs the Williams Gateway Airport near Mesa, Arizona, tabled a proposal to define an "Airport Influence Area" that would warn prospective buyers about airport noise. Authority officials said they were uncertain whether the proposed area's boundary's were too large for the type of aircraft expected to operate at the airport, and decided to wait till at least the beginning of 1999 to define boundaries, when airport officials will have updated the airport's 5-year master plan.

California Officials Say Jets Departing From Proposed El Toro Airport Won't Fly Over Communities to the Northwest, Conflicting With FAA Report (Mar. 27, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Orange County, California officials -- pushing for an El Toro Airport -- are telling north-county towns that northbound flights from the proposed airport won't affect them because flights will go right over the Santa Ana Mountains. The Federal Aviation Administration and county consultants disagree.

Calif. Restaurant Served Restrictions after Noise Complaints from Residents (Mar. 26, 1998). The Orange County Register reports a new restaurant which practices "concept dining" has brought complaints from Lido Isle residents and others across the bay for its exuberant celebrations.

Developer Claims FedEx Distribution Center Won't Increase Air Traffic at Wisconsin Airport (Mar. 26, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that the Planning Commission in Waukesha, Wisconsin approved plans Wednesday for a 90,000-square-foot Federal Express distribution center near Crites Field. The facility will be the largest Federal Express facility in the Milwaukee area, the article says. According to the developer, the distribution center will not immediately increase air traffic at the county airport, but there is not telling what could happen in the future. Meanwhile, residents have complained to county officials recently that aircraft noise has increased around the airport.

Noise Boundaries to be Considered for Arizona Airport (Mar. 26, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that the Williams Gateway Airport Authority, which governs the Williams Gateway Airport near Mesa, Arizona, will consider a proposal this afternoon to place an Airport Influence Area around the airport to warn prospective buyers about airport noise. If the authority embraces the proposal, the airport will be the first in the state to create Airport Influence Area since the state Legislature granted the right in 1997, although some airports have created similar boundaries through zoning, the article says.

University Students in England Complain about Night Time Noise on Campus (Mar. 26, 1998). The Leicester Mail reports De Montfort University students who live near the student union have complained about late night noise coming from the union.

Meetings Set in Las Vegas Area to Show New Boundaries on Airport Noise Contour Maps (Mar. 25, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that the Clark County (Nevada) departments of aviation and comprehensive planning are holding a series of meetings to discuss the revised noise contour maps for the McCarran International Airport. The maps show how noise levels have affected neighborhoods around the airport during the last seven years. The Spring Valley Town Board will recommend the Clark County Commissioners approve or deny the noise contour map at a meeting Monday. Commissioners are expected to take up the matter on April 22.

New Jersey Township Looks at New York City Regulations on Ice Cream Truck Music (Mar. 25, 1998). The Asbury Park Press reports that the Township Council in Stafford Township, New Jersey recently banned music from ice cream trucks. But now, because ice cream vendors are saying the ban will hurt their business, the Township Council is looking at New York City's ordinance regulating amplified music from street vendor vehicles. That ordinance stipulates that a vendor cannot "emit a sound signal more frequently than once every 10 minutes in any city block" and the sound cannot last for more than 10 seconds.

Noise Grant to Chicago Suburbs Discussed in Illinois State Legislature (Mar. 24, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Illinois state transportation officials defended a $787,000 grant to suburbs around Chicago for equipment that monitors noise from O'Hare International Airport. State politicians loyal to Chicago's Mayor Daley objected to the grant during examination of the Transportation Department's budget in a Democrat-led House budget committee. In a related matter, Transportation Secretary Kirk Brown revealed that his agency has up to $8 million it could spend this year without legislative input to purchase land for a third Chicago area airport.

State Study in Connecticut Will Identify Noise Levels Around Airport (Mar. 24, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports that officials from the Connecticut Department of Transportation discussed plans for a study of aircraft takeoff patterns and possible ways to lower noise levels around Bradley International Airport near Windsor Locks, Connecticut with members of the selectboards in Suffield, Windsor Locks, East Granby, and Simsbury on Monday.

Chicago Looks for Consultant to Discourage Plans for a Third Chicago-Area Airport (Mar. 23, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that the Chicago mayor's administration is searching for a public relations expert who would help discourage the idea of a third Chicago-area airport at a cost of about $180,000 per year. The consultant hired will help develop a strategy to defeat the movement for a regional airport near rural Peotone, and to prevent any of the more than $100 million in passenger taxes that Chicago collects annually at O'Hare International and Midway Airports from being used to build or operate a competing facility, according to city documents. The money to pay for the consultant would come out of the $3 tax on airline passengers at O'Hare and Midway.

Transport Minister Criticizes NSW Government Opposition to 2nd Sydney Airport (Mar. 23, 1998). The Australian General News from the AAP Newsfeed reports federal Transport Minister Mark Vaile accused the New South Wales government of mounting a cheap fear campaign against a second Sydney Airport. Vaile said new flight paths will distribute noise more evenly over Sydney.

DOT Tree Removal Infuriates Condo Resident Who is Now Exposed to Interstate Noise (Mar. 22, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports that the removal of thick Florida holly trees from Interstate 95 is exposing condominium residents to interstate noise in Deerfield Beach, Florida.

BWI Airport Avoids New Environmental Restrictions (Mar. 21, 1998). The Capital of Annapolis, Maryland, reports that three bills that supporters say would have forced BWI Airport to be a better neighbor were voted down this week by two General Assembly committees.

Silence Doesn't Mean Agreement in Charlotte with FedEx Hub at Airport (Mar. 21, 1998). The News and Observer reports that while residents who live near Raleigh-Durham International Airport have voiced their opposition to the noise that a new Federal Express hub would create, residents around Charlotte/Douglas International Airport, one of the four contenders for the project, have not sounded any opposition.

Airport Officials Skip Open Forum at West Palm Beach Public Hearing (Mar. 20, 1998). The Palm Beach Post reports Thursday's public hearing on West Palm Beach Airport's proposed runway extension used a format that prevented a group of people from expressing their views the old-fashioned way: in one large forum. Reviews were mixed.

Congressional Bills Would Lift Flight Restrictions at Washington's National Airport (Mar. 20, 1998). The Washington Business Journal reports that two bills in Congress would lift flight restrictions at National Airport in Washington, DC and open the airport to new competitors. The bills propose to remove the airport's "perimeter rule," which limits flights to 1,250 miles in length. Local officials are opposing the bills, saying they would lead to a loss of jobs and growth at Dulles International Airport, would worsen congestion and noise problems at National, and could create pressure to permit more flights at National

FedEx Possibility at Raleigh Airport Puts Cary Town Council and Chamber of Commerce on Opposite Sides (Mar. 20, 1998). The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC) reports divisions are loud and clear in the town of Cary over the possible location of a Federal Express hub at Raleigh-Durham International Airport.

Resident Groups in Belgium Threaten Action if Noise at Two Airports Doesn't Decrease (Mar. 20, 1998). Aviation Daily reports that resident groups in Belgium are threatening action against two airports in the Brussels area to protest what they say are lax noise standards. Residents living near the Brussels South Charleroi Airport are demanding a halt to night flights and training flights, and residents and city officials in Woluwe-St.-Pierre, a Brussels borough near Brussels Airport International, say the airport is not monitoring or enforcing noise rules for older aircraft.

Allow FedEx Hub at RDU to Create Jobs and Prosperity (Mar. 19, 1998). The Herald-Sun of Durham, North Carolina, published an editorial pointing out the irony of opposition from elected officials in the towns of Morrisville and Cary to the proposed Federal Express hub at the Raleigh-Durham International Airport.

Florida Residents Prefer Peace and Quiet to Softball in their Neighborhood (Mar. 19, 1998). The Press Journal of Vero Beach, Florida, reports that residents strongly object to a proposed softball complex in their neighborhood. They predict the complex will bring noise and traffic to their quiet neighborhood.

Groups Disagree over Change in Kansas City Noise Ordinance (Mar. 19, 1998). The Kansas City Star reports neighborhood leaders and abortion opponents disagreed Wednesday about a proposal to give police more power to enforce the city' s noise ordinance. Abortion opponents promised to sue if the ordinance is revised.

Resident's Airport Complaints Will be Heard in Waukesha (Mar. 19, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports the Airport Commission Wednesday announced it will hold periodic public hearings to allow Crites Field's neighbors to voice their concerns about airplane noise.

Virginia Quarry gets Expanded Hours, Promises Noise Abatement Plan (Mar. 19, 1998). The Richmond Times Dispatch reports that quarry operator Martin Marietta Aggregates promised to be a good neighbor in return for expanded hours of operation.

Florida Residents Oppose CarMax; Cite Noise, Environment and Traffic Concerns (Mar. 18, 1998). The St. Petersburg Times reports residents who live near the site of a proposed used-car superstore in Pinellas told Largo city commissioners Tuesday that the store would increase traffic and noise in what once was a quiet neighborhood.

Glendale Buys Land as Noise Buffer between Airport and Residences (Mar. 18, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that Glendale officials will purchase a large tract of land south of Glendale Municipal Airport to prevent developers from building too close to the airport.

Raleigh Council Weighing Pro's and Con's of Proposed FedEx Hub at Airport; No Official Position Yet (Mar. 18, 1998). The News and Observer reports that the city of Raleigh has yet to take an official stand in the debate about the noise impact of the proposed Federal Express hub at Raleigh-Durham International Airport while the other three towns who would be most affected have made their positions known.

Tollway Noise May Get One Chicago Neighborhood Noise Barriers; No to the Other for Now (Mar. 18, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the Illinois State Toll Highway Authority is compiling noise-level readings along the North-South Tollway prompted by residents' complaints of tollway noise.

Florida Airport's New Noise Officer Makes Enforcement Priority (Mar. 17, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel of Fort Lauderdale reports the city's Airport Authority on Monday appointed a new noise abatement officer.

Maine Residents Cry "Extended Use"; Object to Concerts at Revival Site (Mar. 17, 1998). The Portland Press Herald reports a third meeting moderated by town officials failed to alleviate residents' noise and traffic concerns about a new outdoor amphitheater in Old Orchard Beach.

National Parks Noisy and Congested with Traffic, National Conservation Group Says (Mar. 17, 1998). Gannett News Service reports vacationers may be shocked at discovering smog, traffic congestion, and noise from jet skis and sightseeing planes in national parks this summer.

St. Louis Agrees to Address Airport Noise from Lambert Field (Mar. 17, 1998). The Louis Post-Dispatch reports efforts by St. Charles to convince St. Louis to reduce aircraft noise from Lambert Field Airport has reached an important point.

Cincinnati Airport Brings Jobs, But Not Without Noise and Land Costs in Boone County (Mar. 16, 1998). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports Boone County, Kentucky, residents know the price for the prosperity brought by the Cincinnati - Northern Kentucky International Airport. Among the prices paid: jet aircraft noise, loss of land and homes, and now, the airport wants to close a section of road. Residents have objected to this last request.

Jury Still Out on New Flight Pattern at Newark (Mar. 16, 1998). The New York Times reports an accurate assessment of the new flight pattern at Newark International Airport was thwarted by a northwest wind today.

LA Residents Write in About Leaf Blowers and Enforcing the Law (Mar. 16, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles published the following letters from residents in the Los Angeles area who cited their views on leaf blowers, the leaf blower ban and its enforcement:

Residents Oppose Turning Vacant RAF Airfield into International Airport (Mar. 16, 1998). The Press Association Newsfile reports that thousands of angry residents are fighting plans to turn an abandoned airfield in rural England into a 24 hour international airport.

Raleigh-Durham Airport Spells Out Noise Limits to Fed Ex (Mar. 14, 1998). The News and Observer of Raleigh, North Carolina reports that Raleigh-Durham International Airport director John Brantley informed the Airport Authority of discussions he's held with FedEx about noise issues.

Hayden and Riordan Disagree over LAX Expansion (Mar. 14, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles Saturday reports state Sen. Tom Hayden harshly criticized Mayor Richard Riordan's promotion of a proposal to expand Los Angeles International Airport.

Noise Violations All in the Family in Two Massachusetts Asphalt Plants (Mar. 14, 1998). The Telegram & Gazette of Worcester, Massachusetts, reports Building Inspector James J. Ford Sr. has informed the P.J. Keating Co., a blacktop plant, that it is in violation of town bylaws governing noise from blasting and truck traffic.

EU Freezes Number of Hush-Kitted Aircraft; They're Legal, but Not So Quiet (Mar. 13, 1998). AFX News reports the European Commission is proposing a directive so that "hush-kitted" aircraft - aircraft with older engines muffled to meet tighter modern noise pollution standards - cannot be added to the registers of the EU after April 1, 1999.

Go Kart Track Approved Near Office Building in Parkway Village, Ohio (Mar. 13, 1998). The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch reports a proposed outdoor Go Kart racing track in Parkway Village received approval despite opposition for a nearby building owner who voiced concerns about noise.

Foes Say Fight Against Expanded Terminal at Burbank Airport Far From Over (Mar. 13, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Burbank Airport won a federal court of appeals case which validated an environmental study from 1996 that was called into question. The ruling allows the airport authority to move forward with plans to build a larger terminal.

Noise Pollution is Many Americans' Biggest Pollution Problem (Mar. 13, 1998). E Magazine reports that our world is becoming dangerously noisy, with noise pollution and health problems from noise on the rise. The two largest sources of noise pollution, airport and vehicle traffic, are growing at a rate of three to five percent annually, and the most frequent complaint Americans make about their neighborhoods is noise. The article says activists working on noise pollution issues compare the movement today to the campaign against secondhand smoke a decade ago. Like secondhand smoke, they say, noise is both an annoying nuisance and the cause of serious health problems. The article goes on to give an overview of health problems related to noise and to interview several activists involved in the fight against noise.

North London Church Fined for Noise Violations (Mar. 13, 1998). The Press Association Newsfile reports a North London church has been fined for violating noise regulations.

Loud Machinery Regulated by N. Charleston's Noise Ordinance (Mar. 13, 1998). The Post and Courier reports a new North Charleston, South Carolina, noise ordinance passed without comment from the public Thursday night.

Idaho Environmentalists Fight Air Force Training Range Expansion (Mar. 12, 1998). The Idaho Statesman reports environmentalists don't believe the Air Force will adequately protect Owyhee Desert wilds from a training range expansion, so they are in Washington, DC, trying to halt the project.

Memphis Go Kart Track Under Consideration; Noise Concerns (Mar. 12, 1998). The Commercial Appeal reports a Memphis amusement business has applied for a special use permit to operative an outdoor Go Kart track near Perkins. The request was put on hold last month for further study following concerns about how noise from the motors might affect nearby businesses and homes.

Michigan Residents Object to Concrete Crushing in Neighborhood (Mar. 12, 1998). The Grand Rapids Press reports Alpine Township residents will have to wait for a decision from the Planning Commission on a special use permit for an excavating company to crush concrete and process topsoil in their neighborhood.

Boise Commissioners Say New Road to Abate Truck Noise (Mar. 12, 1998). The Idaho Statesman of Boise reports Ada County Highway District commissioners approved a new road plan to reduce garbage trucks' noise.

European Commission Proposes Ban on Aircraft with Hush Kits (Mar. 12, 1998). The Journal of Commerce reports that the European Commission has moved to ban certain types of aircraft in a controversial move against noise pollution that has angered the Continent's express carriers and threatens trade relations with the United States.

PA Company Granted Variance for Earlier Operation Hours (Mar. 11, 1998). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports the Carnegie zoning hearing board has given approval to a drywall company to operate earlier than allowed by borough law, but the board says it will revoke the variance if delivery trucks disturb neighbors.

Texas Residents Oppose Concrete Plant (Mar. 11, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports the Sachse City Council, prompted by residents' opposition to a proposed concrete batch plant, will host public hearings on the issue before voting to revise a zoning decision made in January.

Citizens Work to Enforce Los Angeles Leaf Blower Ban (Mar. 11, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports ...

Another California Community Faces Leaf Blower Debate (Mar. 11, 1998). The San Francisco Examiner reports that the Menlo Park City Council in California has put off a vote on a controversial ordinance that would ban gas-powered leaf blowers.

Braintree Company Responds to Noise Complaints (Mar. 10, 1998). The Patriot Ledger reports King Hill Road residents in Braintree have asked selectman to take action on noisy delivery trucks at a nearby business.

Residents Seek Relief from Nightly Rail Noise (Mar. 9, 1998). The Grand Rapids Press reports Ada residents have organized to curb incessant night time train noise in their neighborhood. Their prospects for success appear dim.

OHare Noise Compatibility Commission Marks First Year (Mar. 7, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission marked its first anniversary Friday by noting its achievements.

Scotland's Environmental Health Department Should Enforce Noise Laws (Mar. 7, 1998). The Evening News of Edinburgh, Scotland, printed the following letter from a resident about which agency should enforce noise laws:

Kentucky Residents Worried About Noise From UPS Expansion at Airport (Mar. 7, 1998). The Courier-Journal reports that residents living near the Louisville (Kentucky) International Airport are worried that making the airport a mega-hub for United Parcel Service will increase the already disturbing noise produced by aircraft. As Regional Airport Authority and Jefferson County officials revise the airport's noise-reduction plan, residents are preparing to voice their concerns.

Motorsport Noise Issue Goes to Court (Mar. 7, 1998). The United Kingdom's Northern Echo reports a court hearing has been scheduled for June to address noise levels at a popular motorsport center in Sunderland.

LA Neighborhood Avoids Noisy Welding Facility (Mar. 6, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports MTA officials have abandoned plans to place a temporary welding facility and accompanying 16-foot-high sound walls in the Valley Village neighborhood.

Residents Wary of Study that Says Sixth Runway at Denver Airport will Reduce Noise (Mar. 6, 1998). The Denver Post reports Denver officials are hoping a study that says it is possible to reduce noise around Denver International Airport will persuade Congress to release funds for a sixth runway.

"Best Practice" Flying Trials by British Airways Verifies Noise Reduction (Mar. 6, 1998). M2 Presswire issued a press release that reports trials held with British Airways 747-400 aircraft leaving Heathrow confirm that "best-practice" flying procedures during take-off produce the least possible disturbance to local communities.

Court-Ordered Release Reveals El Toro Plans (Mar. 6, 1998). According to OC Weekly, a report written last year but only now released under court order contradicts statements from Newport Beach, California, county officials that runways at the proposed El Toro International Airport will go unchanged.

Opponents of FedEx Hub at Raleigh Airport Pressure Commissioners (Mar. 6, 1998). The News and Observer reports overnight delivery of packages is becoming a political issue in Wake County, North Carolina, as the controversy over the proposed Federal Express hub at Raleigh-Durham International Airport gains momentum.

Study Says More Planes Won't Mean More Noise at Denver's Airport (Mar. 6, 1998). The Rocky Mountain News reports changes in flight paths at Denver International Airport could ease noise problems for 90,000 people, according to a study released Wednesday. The study drew attention because it's the first time anyone has suggested so many people in the area are bothered by airport noise.

NJ Town Bans Amplified Music from Ice-Cream Vendors (Mar. 5, 1998). The Asbury Park Press published an editorial about the decision Tuesday night by the Stafford, New Jersey, Township Committee to ban amplified music from ice cream trucks.

CT Residents Object to Asphalt Plant, Circulate Petition (Mar. 5, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports that a group of vocal opponents circulated a petition Wednesday to voice their concerns about a proposed asphalt plant near Colchester, Connecticut. Meanwhile, a representative of the Department of Environmental Protection visited the site to make a recommendation about granting a permit to the company.

Sea-Tac and Schools Discuss Funding for Airport Noise Impact Studies (Mar. 5, 1998). The News Tribune reports the Highline School District of Seattle, Washington, whose schools encircle the airport, recently discussed the impact of airport noise on schools and funding for studies. At the meeting residents heard from Sea-Tac Airport director, Gina Marie Lindsey.

West Virginia Noise Bill May Not Get Through Senate (Mar. 5, 1998). The Charleston Gazette reports a bill that could help secure a little peace and quiet for a West Virginia resident was approved by a Senate Judiciary subcommittee Wednesday. However, the deadline is fast-approaching for the Senate to act on its own bills, and this bill may not make it through in time.

Live with PBI Airport Noise or Move: It's Your Choice, Says Resident (Mar. 5, 1998). The Palm Beach Post published the following letter in its Letters to the Editor section from West Palm Beach resident, Noelle Smith. Smith says dealing with noise from the Palm Beach International Airport is a choice she makes. Others, she says, need to take responsibility for their choice of residence. Ms Smith writes:

Albuquerque Residents Concerned about Noise, Pollution, Danger from News Helicopters (Mar. 5, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reports residents of an Albuquerque, New Mexico, neighborhood claim they've lost their peace and quiet to television-news helicopters that frequently fly over their homes.

Louisville Residents Fear Increased Noise with UPS Expansion at Airport (Mar. 5, 1998). The Courier-Journal reports Louisville, Kentucky, residents who live near the airport or under the flight path, worry that the UPS expansion announced yesterday will mean more noise and other harmful effects.

Florida Residents Ban All-Night Dance Festivals (Mar. 4, 1998). The Ledger of Lakeland, Florida, reports a new law placing restrictions on outdoor concerts in Polk County was approved recently after last year's all-night dance festival outraged neighbors.

Another NJ Town Bans Music from Ice-Cream Trucks (Mar. 4, 1998). BC Cycle reports Stafford Township, New Jersey, has become the latest community to ban ice cream trucks from playing music to attract their customers.

Coalition Questions New Housing in Potential Flight Paths of Luke AFB (Mar. 4, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that developers plans to build up to 2,200 residences in El Mirage, Arizona, have been put on hold because it's unclear whether the properties are in the flight path of planes from Luke Air Force Base.

More Traffic Causes Ohio Town to Consider Noise Barriers Along Interstate 75 (Mar. 4, 1998). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports Union Township leaders are considering erecting noise barriers in anticipation of increased traffic along Interstate 75 near West Chester.

BWI Airport Works to Get Pilots to Adhere to Higher Altitudes, Giving Residents More Quiet (Mar. 3, 1998). The Capital reports the Baltimore-Washington International Airport is taking steps to reduce low-flying, loud aircraft that disturb residents. BWI will begin employing a new technique to remind pilots to fly higher and, therefore, quieter.

Menlo Park Ban on Leaf Blowers to be Contested by Gardeners (Mar. 3, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle Tuesday reports gardeners in the Menlo Park area are planning a series of protests against the proposed ban on leaf blowers, alleging the ban is racially and economically motivated.

Missouri Residents Meet with Airport Authority about Noise Grievances (Mar. 3, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports of a meeting that took place last week between the St. Louis Airport Authority and area residents with noise grievances. The article details residents' concerns and an airport representative's responses.

NYC Can't Preempt Federal Government's Control of Airspace, Appeals Courts Rules (Mar. 2, 1998). The Weekly of Business Aviation reports an appeals court ruled that the city of New York may not restrict routes of sightseeing flights.

Wisconsin County Airport Commissioner Suggests Limiting Airport's Hours to Appease Neighbors Angry at Early-Morning Flights (Mar. 2, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that residents living near the Waukesha County Airport in Waukesha, Wisconsin are angry about early-morning takeoffs and landings at the airport. To respond to the problem, one airport commissioner has suggested that officials consider limiting the airport's hours.

Connecticut Politicians Meet with Local Officials to Reduce Noise from Bradley Airport and Preserve "Main Street" as Airport Expands (Mar. 2, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports state of Connecticut transportation officials are considering new efforts to reduce the noise over Suffield from planes leaving Bradley International Airport. One consideration in the noise mitigation effort is a new voluntary takeoff pattern. Other airport concerns were voice during a meeting last month at the governor's office with local elected officials.

Residential Suburban Growth in Maryland Pits Homeowners Against Gravel Mine Owners (Mar. 1, 1998). The Washington Post reports that residents in Charles County, Maryland are lobbying for restrictions on the entrenched gravel mining industry in the county. The article says that as homes increasingly spread across formerly rural land, homeowners' interests are at odds with the mining industry's practice of routinely strip mining for gravel.

European Union Proposes Restrictions on Noise From Outdoor Equipment (Mar. 1, 1998). The Automotive Environment Analyst reports that the European Commission proposed a new directive on noise from outdoor equipment on February 24. The directive specifies noise levels for a range of equipment used outdoors, the article notes.

Business Association in California Opposes Additions to Airport Noise Regulations (Mar. 1, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed an editorial by Bonnie Herman, president of the Valley Industry and Commerce Association. She says that further restrictions on Stage II jets at Van Nuys Airport will be an economic problem for the community, which will lose jobs and money.

Two Minnesota Neighborhoods Fight to Ensure Increased Train Traffic Isn't in Their Neighborhood (Mar. 1, 1998). The Star Tribune reports that two neighborhoods in the Minneapolis, Minnesota area are fighting to ensure that train traffic increases, not in their own, but in the other neighborhood. The Twin Cities & Western freight trains pass through both the working class Blackstone Avenue neighborhood in St. Louis Park and the exclusive Kenwood and Cedar-Isles-Dean neighborhoods in Minneapolis, but only one of the towns will be experiencing a permanent increase in rail traffic. The next vote on the issue will occur Monday in St. Louis Park, the article reports, when the City Council will consider an agreement in which the town gets funds to clean up a contaminated Superfund site in exchange for eventually having the trains pass through their city.

Letters to the Editor Regarding Burbank Airport in California (Feb. 28, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published two letters about the controversial expansion at the Burbank Airport. One letter is from Peter Kirsch, Special Counsel to Burbank on Airport Affairs. The other letter is from Thomas E. Greer, Executive Director of Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority.

New York City Mayor's Noise Pollution Prevention Program is Working (Feb. 28, 1998). The New York Post printed an editorial regarding the noise problem in New York City and progress on Mayor Giuliani's effort to target noise pollution as part of his quality-of-life initiative. The editorial argues that the mayor is right to target noise pollution, that the program has made considerable strides, and that a new initiative is giving car-alarm owners a way to quiet their car alarms before their car is towed.

Meeting Between Air Force and Community Members on Jet Noise Held in New Zealand (Feb. 27, 1998). The Evening Standard reports that a meeting was held Wednesday night between officials at New Zealand's Ohakea Air Force Base and the Sanson Community Committee in the Palmerston North, New Zealand area to discuss noise from jets and from base operations. Also attending the meeting were two Manawatu District Council members and, by invitation, members of the Collier family who live off the Ohakea main runway's east end.

New Hampshire Town Rejects Racetrack Proposal (Feb. 27, 1998). The Union Leader reports that the city zoning board in Franklin, New Hampshire unanimously turned down a developer's request for a special exception to build a race track. The board's decision last night was greeted by applause from the standing-room-only crowd at Franklin City Hall, the article notes.

Pennsylvania City Approves Concrete Recycling Plant Despite Neighbors Protests (Feb. 27, 1998). The Morning Call reports that the Bethlehem (Pennsylvania) Zoning Hearing Board granted a special exception Wednesday to permit a concrete recycling plant, despite neighbors' concerns about traffic, noise, and dust. The project must also be approved by the city Planning Commission, the article notes.

Review Period for Noise Limits at British Airports is Extended and Supplementary Paper is Published (Feb. 27, 1998). M2 Presswire released a press release saying that the consultation, or review period, has been extended on noise limits for jets departing from Britain's Heathrow, Gatwick, and Stansted airports. According to the press release, the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions has decided to publish a supplementary consultation paper, and has therefore extended the consultation period to eight weeks after the supplementary paper is issued. As a result of this action, the International Air Transport Association has withdrawn its application for leave to apply for judicial review of the paper.

Columnist Asks if New York Mayor Giuliani's "Quality-of-Life" Campaign is Really Addressing City Problems (Feb. 26, 1998). Newsday printed an editorial commenting on New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani's speech yesterday on quality-of-life issues. While Giuliani called his plan a "comprehensive new strategy" to foster a more civil city, the editorial says the plan actually echoed the major themes of the mayor's first term. The writer says the speech left some wondering if the mayor was simply trying to position himself for higher office as the "man who tamed New York," while others wondered if the mayor was to some extent trying to catch up in areas in which the city had fallen behind.

Committee Created in Newport Beach to Deal with Noise Issues from Bayfront Restaurants (Feb. 26, 1998). The Orange County Register reports the Newport Beach, California, City Council voted to create an ad hoc committee of council members, residents, and business representatives to take a closer look at how sound from bayfront restaurants affects residents. The new committee was created in the wake of the Council's handling of a recent noise controversy.

Los Angeles School District Agrees to Allow Major Developments to Proceed, Despite Concerns About Increased Noise (Feb. 26, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that officials from the city of Los Angeles and the Los Angeles Unified School District reached a partial agreement Wednesday that allows major developments to proceed while talks continue about how to protect the schools from the noise and traffic expected to result from the developments. Last year, the article notes, the school district won an appeals court ruling that invalidates the Warner Center specific plan, which could block construction of the projects. However, school district officials agreed to ask the court to keep the plan in effect while a long-term agreement is negotiated that would provide funds to mitigate noise and traffic impacts on nearby schools. According to City Councilor Laura Chick, school district officials also agreed not to challenge the construction of an 11-story, $30 million office building for Twentieth Century Insurance Company on Owensmouth Avenue.

Wisconsin Town Loses Lawsuit for Rejecting Shooting Range Due to Noise Complaints (Feb. 26, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that a judge ruled Wednesday that the Town of Eagle, Wisconsin did not follow proper procedure when it rejected a conditional use permit for a clay pigeon shooting range at the McMiller Sports Center. Noise complaints from neighbors resulted in town officials' decision.

Beijing Adopts Noise Standards (Feb. 25, 1998). The Xinhua News Agency reports that Beijing is enjoying greater quiet since the adoption of noise pollution standards in 1984.

European Commission Adopts New Measures To Reduce Noise (Feb. 25, 1998). The Herald reports that the European Commission is currently creating new noise limits for outdoor equipment and other incentives for noise reduction in the European Union

European Union Cracks Down On Noisy Garden Machinery (Feb. 25, 1998). The Daily Mail reports that noisy lawnmowers could soon be outlawed under a crackdown being considered by the EU. Garden machinery would have to be sold with a label showing how loud it is under plans being considered by the European Commission.

European Commission Issues Noise Pollution Control Measures (Feb. 24, 1998). The 1998 Rapid issued the following press release concerning regulation of noise pollution in the European Community:

Knoxville Delays Vote on Noise Ordinance to Explore How to Regulate Amplified Music (Feb. 24, 1998). The Knoxville News-Sentinel reports the Knoxville City Council is expected to delay action on at least two matters currently on its agenda for tonight. One of the items is proposed revisions to the city's noise ordinance. The other issue deals with revisions to the ordinance governing wrecker service operations.

Britain Regulates Offshore Noise (Feb. 23, 1998). M2 Presswire issued the following press release concerning new regulations for offshore noise:

California Legislature Threatens Local Leaf Blower Bans (Feb. 21, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that a state law is poised to overrule city-based laws on leaf blowers in the state of California. Los Angeles plans to rally other cities, and the state League of Cities, to maintain their gas-fueled leafblower bans and restrictions.

Los Angeles Leaf Blower Ban Supporters Prepare to Fight State Bill to Lift the City Ban (Feb. 21, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that a state law is poised to overrule city-based laws on leaf blowers in the state of California. Los Angeles plans to rally other cities, and the state League of Cities, to maintain their gas-fueled leafblower bans and restrictions.

Another California Community Restricts Leaf Blowers (Feb. 20, 1998). The Ventura County Star reports that Calabasas California has joined hosts of other California communities in restricting the use of gas powered leaf blowers.

California Senator Introduces Bill To Strengthen Controls On Airport Noise (Feb. 19, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that State Senator Quentin Kopp plans to introduce a new bill to help communities fight airport noise.

Judge Rules That California City Can't Block Airport Expansion Plan (Feb. 19, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that a Superior Court ruling that says Burbank, California can not block airport expansion has paved the way for Burbank Airport to work, unencumbered, toward a 19-gate terminal.

New York City Works To Decrease Noise Pollution (Feb. 19, 1998). The Boston Globe reports that noise pollution continues to grow in New York City. The City is trying stronger measures to lower noise levels.

Florida Legislation Concerning Gun Ranges Unfair (Feb. 18, 1998). The Tampa Tribune published an editorial concerning a Florida bill about gun ranges that is currently being introduced. The proposed bill may make it harder for neighbors of gun ranges to successfully complain about noise and other matters.

Oklahoma Planning Commission Rejects Dairy Parking Lot Project After Residents Object (Feb. 16, 1998). The Daily Oklahoman reports that the Planning Commission in Norman, Oklahoma voted 4-3 to recommend that a proposed parking lot at the Hiland Dairy be rejected. The vote came after residents near the dairy objected that the plan would increase the traffic, noise, and air pollution around the facility. The Norman City Council has the final say on the proposed project.

Indiana Planning Commission Approves Subdivision Near Airport's Flight Path (Feb. 13, 1998). The Indianapolis News reports the Hendricks County Area Plan Commission this week unanimously approved plans for a small subdivision in Danville, Indiana close to the flight path and noise of airplanes from the Indianapolis International Airport. The developer said he would build the homes with extra soundproofing and would warn buyers about the potential jet noise.

Expansion Plan at Los Angeles Universal Studios Drags On (Feb. 12, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that the first round of hearings regarding Universal Studios proposed expansion in Los Angeles, California are drawing to completion. The Regional Planning Commission delayed formal completion, and residents opposed to the expansion were pleased.

California City Fills Vacant Airport Authority Seat With Representative Who Supports Limited Airport Expansion (Feb. 11, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Burbank, California's City Council appointed a new member to the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority, saying he was on their wavelength when it comes to noise issues and expansion questions.

Dallas Church Vows to Fight D/FW Over Buyout (Feb. 11, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports The Church in Irving blames the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport for its demise as a missionary training and conference center. Now the church, involved in a bitter dispute with the airport, contends the airport is obliged to buy out the 50,000-square-foot church.

International Air Association Plans Legal Challenge to British Government's Plan to Cut Noise Levels at London Airports, While Airlines Predict London Airports Will Decline Under Rules (Feb. 11, 1998). The Travel Trade Gazette UK & Ireland reports that the International Air Transport Association (IATA) is preparing a legal challenge against the British government's proposal to cut noise levels at London's Heathrow, Gatwick, and Stansted airports. Meanwhile, airline executives are saying that Heathrow airport could lose its spot as Europe's most important airport if the government's noise rules are implemented.

Homeowners' Interests Regarding Aircraft Noise Left out of Noise Reduction Plan Sent by Indianapolis Airport Authority to FAA for Approval (Feb. 7, 1998). The Indianapolis Star reports that homeowners' issues regarding aircraft noise were not included in an aircraft noise reduction plan approved by the Indianapolis Airport Authority board on February 4, 1998. It could take as much as six months for the Federal Aviation Administration to rule on the plan.

European Union to Label Noise Levels on Outdoor Machinery (Jan. 26, 1998). The Financial Times Limited of London, England, reports that the European Commission, meeting in Brussels, Belgium, is expected to recommend noise levels be labeled on various outdoor machinery in an effort to limit noise that's dangerous to citizens of the European Union.

Boston's Big Dig Attempts to Keep Noise Down (Jan. 25, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that in Boston the biggest public works project since the building the Great Pyramids continues while officials attempt to maintain a quality of life for residents. Known as the Big Dig, the project will ultimately create a complex of highways that will run through and under Boston, hopefully eliminating the city's infamous traffic congestion.

Californai Residents React to El Toro Editorial (Jan. 25, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letters to the editor in response to a January 18, 1998, editorial titled, "Clarity for El Toro."

Upstate New York Resident Objects to Noise from Hail Guns in Apple Orchard (Jan. 25, 1998). The Buffalo News of Buffalo, New York, reports that an Orleans County resident has asked the county Legislature to do something about noise coming from hail guns at a nearby apple orchard.

Will Hovering Airliners be the Answer to Air Traffic and Noise Pollution? (Jan. 25, 1998). The Sunday Telegraph Limited of London, England, reports that a new kind of aircraft which can take off and land like a helicopter but fly as fast as an airliner could "revolutionize" air travel. According to its manufacturers, this new technology is quieter than conventional aircraft.

Police May Issue Permits for Live Acts after Noise Complaints (Jan. 24, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that a proposal in Cypress, California may leave the chief of police there in charge of issuing live entertainment licenses.

Cleveland Railroad Will Use Noise-Reduction Plan if Merger Approved (Jan. 23, 1998). The Plain Dealer of Cleveland, Ohio, reports that CSX Transportation's efforts to convince federal officials to approve a railroad merger, includes promises to enhance neighborhoods in Cleveland and East Cleveland, including re-routing some trains and implementing a noise-reduction plan.

Denver Developers Must Pay for Noise Wall (Jan. 23, 1998). The Rocky Mountain News of Denver, Colorado, reports that city officials refused to annually tax future residents of the Buell Mansion subdivision for a noise wall and other improvements. Instead, the developers, Perlmutter / Witkin Properties will have to foot the three million dollar bill.

Oil Rigs in Brentwood, CA Neighborhood Noisy and Unsightly (Jan. 23, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that residents in a section of southern Brentwood, California, are upset about the noise coming from oil drilling in their backyards.

Wetlands, Noise, Traffic Concerns Force Review of Proposed Amphitheater in Washington State (Jan. 23, 1998). The News Tribune of Tacoma, Washington, reports the Muckleshoot Tribe's amphitheater project must undergo a review of all possible environmental impacts, including traffic and noise as well as its effect on wetlands.

CSXT Unveils Noise Mitigation Plans for Cleveland (Jan. 22, 1998). PR Newswire reports CSX Transportation Inc. (CSXT) announced its plan today for noise berms and attractive landscaping adjacent to the sections of Conrail track it plans to obtain in the Greater Cleveland Metropolitan Area.

Chicago Department of Aviation Member Defends City and Airport's Noise Program (Jan. 22, 1998). The Chicago Tribune printed a letter from Dennis Culloton, member of the city's Department of Aviation. In the following letter, Culloton defends the noise reduction efforts of the city of Chicago and O'Hare Airport. Culloton writes:

Day Care Centers in California Neighborhoods Bring Noise Disputes (Jan. 22, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that some Dublin, California, residents are upset about noise from a nearby daycare center. In a counterattack, the daycare center has brought a suit against two neighbors. Apparently, the contentious battle mirrors other disputes over day care centers moving into residential areas.

Despite Noise Concerns, Freeholders Approve Carousel for NJ Park (Jan. 22, 1998). The Record of Bergen County, New Jersey, reports that despite noise concerns and other issues, the Board of Freeholders gave their support for a carousel in Van Saun Park.

Kansas City Residents Want Park, Not Noisy Industry (Jan. 22, 1998). The Kansas City Star reports that residents of Coleman Highlands in Kansas City, Missouri, oppose a developer's plans to build a business in their quiet neighborhood. Concern about heavy traffic, noise, pollution and decreasing property values have prompted the group to ask the city to condemn the developer's property and turn it into a park.

Noise Monitors available to Residents who Live Near NY & NJ Airports (Jan. 22, 1998). Newsday reports that residents who live around a major airport in the New York City area can request a mobile noise monitor from Port Authority. These monitors measure decibel levels of aircraft noise to determine if airlines are violating noise limits.

To Keep Noise Out, Walls to be Built in Annapolis Open Schools (Jan. 22, 1998). The Capital of Annapolis, Maryland, reports that the city's proposal to construct walls in 25 "open space" schools would cost $17 million and still may not eliminate noise.

Vancouver Resident Questions Closing of Rifle Ranges (Jan. 22, 1998). The Vancouver Sun printed an editorial by Peter Hiebert, a resident of Coquitlam, Vancouver, in which he expresses his displeasure at the closing of the rifle ranges on Barnet Highway. Mr. Hiebert writes:

WA Residents Say Mine Noise and Traffic Incompatible with Quality of Life (Jan. 22, 1998). The Spokesman-Review of Spokane, Washington, reports that a dozen Green Bluff residents argued Friday against a Spokane County Division of Engineering proposal to expand a gravel mine and crushing operation near their homes.

Barking Dog Not Music to Residents' Ears in Chicago Suburb (Jan. 21, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that residents in a Chicago suburb are willing to take dog owners to court to put a stop to incessant barking.

CA Residents Say Too Much Noise Coming from Fantasy Island Resort (Jan. 21, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports Triunfo Canyon, California, zoning laws are being reviewed after residents complained of late night noise from a banquet facility.

CA Van Nuys Airport Publishes New Noise Restrictions (Jan. 21, 1998). Press Release to News Editors/City Desks from Stacy Geere at Van Nuys Airport:

California Resident Says 199 Roosters Too Loud; Seeks New Ordinance Yet Willing to Compromise (Jan. 21, 1998). The Press-Enterprise of Riverside, California, reports that a Pedley resident who planned to petition the Riverside County Board of Supervisors Tuesday seeking restriction on crowing fowl kept by residents in the unincorporated communities decided to delay action.

English Court of Appeal Rules Against Noise Complaint (Jan. 21, 1998). Times Newspapers Limited of London reports on the outcome of a Court of Appeal: Murdoch and Another v Glacier Metal Co Ltd., in which the plaintiffs were overruled in a noise case.

Malaysian Residents Says Noisy Cement Plant Polluting Food, Water, and Air (Jan. 21, 1998). WorldSources Online reports residents of Kampung Satu in Malaysia want Kuala Lumpur City Hall to halt operations at a cement batching plant which they claim has caused noise pollution as well as the pollution of their food and drinking water.

Maryland Residents Oppose Race Track on Noise and Traffic Grounds (Jan. 21, 1998). The Capital of Annapolis, Maryland, reports Middle River Racing officials failed to convince West County residents opposed to a proposed speedway that it would be a good neighbor.

Minor CA Baseball Club Faces Lawsuit Over Noise and Traffic Concerns at College Field (Jan. 21, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that the Pacific Suns -- a minor league team that wants to play at Oxnard College -- will have to deal with lawsuits that say noise and traffic will be worsened by their presence. College trustees have already approved their request to play there.

NJ Township Debates Noise from Ice Cream Vendors (Jan. 21, 1998). The Asbury Park Press reports that the Stafford Township Council in New Jersey last night delayed a vote on whether to limit ice cream vendors' noise. Members want time to consider the hotly argued viewpoints expressed during last night's public session.

Neighbors Near NC Campus Ask City Council to Close Noisy Club (Jan. 21, 1998). The News & Record (Greensboro, NC) reports that residents have complained to Greensboro City Council about the noise and disorderly patrons at a local nightclub and an all-night convenience store. The residents asked the council to close down Jokers 3 and force the Crown station to close at midnight.

Who Will Pay for Quieter but More Expensive Helicopters in Grand Canyon? (Jan. 21, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Grand Canyon Park employees say it's noisier than ever at the top of rim in spite of aircraft and flight restrictions. Renewed hopes for natural quiet rest on a new helicopter.

199 Birds Per Acre Ruins Peace and Quiet of Rural Living in Pedley, CA (Jan. 20, 1998). The Press-Enterprise reports a Pedley resident will try for the third time to convince Riverside County officials to change the ordinance that allows property owners in unincorporated areas to keep up to 199 poultry.

Baltimore Area Residents Fight Auto Speedway Proposal (Jan. 20, 1998). The Washington Post reports that homeowners in Anne Arundel, Maryland are fighting a proposal to build a $100 million auto speedway in their area.

Citizens' Group Unhappy with Noise from San Francisco Airport (Jan. 20, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports a new citizens' organization opposed to noise from San Francisco International Airport is urging Peninsula mayors to exert more pressure on the airport to be a quieter neighbor.

East Hartford Mayor Backs Theme Park; Residents Concerned about Noise and Traffic (Jan. 20, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports that the mayor and city officials of East Hartford, Connecticut, will recommend a giant amusement park for their town.

Editorial: Stop Throwing Taxpayer Money Away. Burbank Airport and City of LA Need to Come to Terms of Agreement. (Jan. 20, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles published an editorial that urged officials of Los Angeles and of the Burbank Airport to settle their differences.

Mass. Residents Request Relief from Noise from 24-Hour Store (Jan. 20, 1998). The Telegram & Gazette of Worcester, Massachusetts, reports two residents in Ware, whose homes are close to a gas station, recently complained to selectmen of noise, bright lights and fumes that come from the 24-hour gas station and convenience store.

New Exit on Parkway Robs Lake Forest Residents of Sleep (Jan. 20, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that a truck route created by a new exit on Southern California's Interstate 5 has exposed residents in Foothill Ranch and Rancho Santa Margarita to high levels of noise that disrupts sleep.

Noise and Lead from Gun Clubs Incompatible with Urban Growth Decides Town in British Columbia (Jan. 20, 1998). The Vancouver Sun reports that the city council of Burnaby, British Columbia, ordered three Burnaby Mountain gun ranges to close by the end of September.

Wary Residents in Arundel Will Fight Speedway (Jan. 20, 1998). The Washington Post reports that citizens of Anne Arundel County, Maryland, are fighting a proposal to build a $100 million auto speedway near Laurel.

Wolfeboro Modifies Decision on Large Concert Tent Citing Noise and Traffic (Jan. 20, 1998). The Union Leader reports the Wolfeboro Massachusetts Planning Board recently limited the size of a an acoustic concert tent at Great Waters Music Festival citing noise, traffic, and parking concerns as well as the visual impact of the 810-person capacity tent and related equipment.

Detroit Senator Proposes Fund For Communities Effected By Airport (Jan. 19, 1998). The Detroit News reports that Michigan state Senator, Loren Bennett is proposing a bill that would give a portion of revenues from the Detroit Metropolitan Airport's parking tax to a fund for the surrounding communities effected by noise and other consequences of the airport.

Idaho Sprint Racers Request Permit for New Course after Noise Complaints (Jan. 19, 1998). The Lewiston Morning Tribune of Lewiston, Idaho, reports that Chapter One Racing is requesting a permit to build a new boat track after noise complaints from a few residents along the Snake River.

Noise from Oakland Airport Enough Already; Residents Oppose Expansion (Jan. 19, 1998). The San Francisco Examiner reports thousands of Alameda County residents, civic leaders and educators in the East Bay of California oppose the Metropolitan Oakland International Airport's plan to more than double the number of flights, passengers and cargo passing through Oakland over the next 10 years.

School May Relocate in Wake of New Runway at Dallas/Fort Worth Airport (Jan. 19, 1998). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that Grapevine Middle School officials are discussing relocation, saying that a new runway at Dallas/Fort Worth Airport will bring noisy planes over the building.

Some Mass. Towns Wary of New Logan Runway; They Fear Increase in Noise (Jan. 19, 1998). The Patriot Ledger of Quincy, Massachusetts reports that a 30-year-old Massport plan to build a new runway at Logan Airport, the nation's fourth-busiest airport, is still alive. While some state leaders say the runway will reduce air traffic over the South Shore, other local leaders are afraid it will have the opposite effect and want the plan killed.

New Orleans Resident Suggests Trees as Noise Barrier (Jan. 18, 1998). The Times-Picayune of New Orleans, Louisiana, published a letter by a resident from Metairie who has a suggestion for a noise barrier on Interstate 10. The letter reads as follows:

Political Push for Maryland Racetrack Unlikely in Election Year (Jan. 18, 1998). The Baltimore Sun recently published an editorial about the questionable future of a 54,000-seat auto racetrack in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Convincing officials in an election year that auto racing should be part of their county's future may be difficult.

Spokane Area Lakes in Critical Condition, Poisoned by Noise, Pollution, Crowds (Jan. 18, 1998). The Spokesman-Review reports several lakes in the Spokane, Washington, area are critically polluted with silt, weeds, noise and overcrowding.

Utah Lawmakers Consider Mass Transit (Jan. 18, 1998). The Salt Lake Tribune reports that Utah lawmakers are beginning to consider mass transit systems for the state, but road work still dominates transportation policies.

Virginia Residents Sue Marina to Stop Expansion Citing Noise, Danger, and Damage (Jan. 18, 1998). The Roanoke Times & World News reports that residents are opposed to a developer's plan to expand a marina along Becky's Creek in Virginia. Residents are concerned about dock damage and noise. A number of lawsuits on both sides have been filed.

Florida Airport Tower Put On Hold (Jan. 17, 1998). Saturday reports that a Federal Aviation Administration ruling concerning the Boca Raton Airport will freeze up funds that would allow for a new control tower. The tower is controversial because its completion would allow for heavier traffic at the Boca Raton airport. Area residents fear the noise that more traffic would bring, while city officials fear the current air traffic congestion as a safety hazard.

Noise Seminar in Bangkok Reveals Harmful Levels of Noise Throughout City (Jan. 17, 1998). The Bangkok Post reports that inner city residents, traffic police, bus drivers, steersmen and workers at certain factories are at risk of losing their hearing due to traffic and construction noise.

Burbank Airport and City Still at Odds over Key Expansion Issues such as Noise and Taxes (Jan. 16, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports Burbank Airport officials' proposed settlement with the city of Burbank contains several points still barring the way to air terminal expansion.

Maryland Community Zones Planned Employment Center (Jan. 16, 1998). The Baltimore Sun reports that the area Planning Board is developing a plan for a planned employment center. Area residents seek a development plan that will minimize noise and other environmental pollution.

National Park Service Prepares To Develop Winter Use Plan At Yellowstone Park (Jan. 16, 1998). The National Parks and Conservation Association issued the following press release concerning the study of winter uses by the public at Yellowstone Park and their effects on wildlife, air and water quality, and overall park tranquility:

A California Superior Court ruling requiring further analysis of El Toro Airport impacts won't stop planning by Orange county: an interview with El Toro Master Development Program manager Courtney Wiercioch. (Jan. 15, 1998). The Irvine Citizen interviewed Courtney Wiercioch, Orange County, California's program manager for the El Toro Airport Master Development Program. The Citizen talked with Wiercioch concerning San Diego Superior Court Judge Judith McConnell's ruling last week that major revisions must be made to the county's environmental analysis of El Toro airport noise, traffic and passenger demand. The article reports that the ruling requires the county to make additional comparisons based on existing or known conditions, such as road improvements now funded or in place. Wiercioch said that the ruling is not viewed as a major setback and will not stop base-reuse planning.

Atlanta Area Airport Found Beneficial In Recent Study (Jan. 15, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports that a recent study shows that the benefits of the DeKalb-Peachtree airport proposal outweigh the costs to area residents whose property will lose value due to the project.

City Council Approval Clears Way for New Highway 1 Interchange in Oxnard, California Despite Concerns About Drainage, Noise, and Traffic Problems (Jan. 15, 1998). The Ventura County Star reports that despite lingering concerns about construction noise, traffic snarls and other issues, the Oxnard City Council has approved measures that could clear the way for a new Highway 1 interchange at Pleasant Valley Road. The council voted 5-0 Tuesday to approve an environmental study and an agreement with the state Department of Transportation to build the new interchange and eventually reroute Pacific Coast Highway off Oxnard Boulevard to Rice Avenue.

Metropolitan Washington, D.C. Council of Governments Opposes Two Proposed Bills Designed To Allow More Planes to Land at Washington National Airport (Jan. 15, 1998). The Washington Times reports that the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (COG) unanimously opposed a federal bill that would allow more planes to land at Washington National Airport, fearing increased traffic would mean more noise. COG opposes the Aviation Competition Enhancement Bill, introduced by Sen. John McCain, Arizona Republican in October, which seeks exemptions to a "perimeter rule," which bans nonstop flights longer than 1,250 miles into or out of National. A companion House bill introduced by Rep. John J. Duncan Jr., Tennessee Republican, proposes to add up to six more flights a day at National. According to the report, opponents say this would increase noise.

Neighbors of Proposed In-Home Babysitting Service in Salem, Virginia Worried About Increased Noise and Traffic (Jan. 15, 1998). The Roanoke Times reports that a couple's request to open an in-home babysitting service on Bainbridge Street in Salem, Virginia has met with considerable opposition from their neighbors. Neighbors complained about increased noise, traffic, and decreased property values at a recent Salem Planning Commission hearing concerning the special use permit.

Complaints of Noisy Snowmobiles Have Increased in Wisconsin (Jan. 14, 1998). The Wisconsin State Journal reports that increased complaints about noisy snowmobiles have attracted the attention of the Governor's Snowmobile Council, the Association of Wisconsin Snowmobile Clubs and state recreation officials. Some of the complaints are related to an increasing number of snowmobile owners who are replacing their machines' factory-installed exhaust systems with ones that boost horsepower but are noisier, according to the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

Mining Company Incompatible with Tennessee Residential Area (Jan. 14, 1998). The Knoxville News-Sentinel reports that a surface-mining operation has been deemed incompatible with the Millertown Pike area. Planning commissioners were not wooed by company's offer to make road improvements.

Proposed Gravel Pit in Star, Idaho to be voted on by Ada County Commission (Jan. 14, 1998). The Idaho Statesman reports that the Ada County Commission will have the final say Thursday on an application for a gravel pit near Star, Idaho. According to the article, the proposed operation would be on about 30 acres of the 600-acre Phillips Bros. Cattle Co. ranch south of the Star city limits. It would remove close to 1 million cubic yards of gravel in the next 10 years. The Ada County Planning and Zoning Commission denied the application for the gravel pit in July 1997, largely because of a public outcry against the project.

Residents Demand Relief from Dover Landfill's Smells and Noise (Jan. 14, 1998). The Asbury Park Press of Neptune, New Jersey, reports member of the Dover Township Committee agreed to accompany a group of residents to the Ocean County Board of Health for answers to the loud noises and noxious odors emanating from the Ocean County Landfill.

Residents Oppose Proposed Speedway in Russett, Maryland (Jan. 14, 1998). The Capital reports that a proposed speedway just west of the Baltimore-Washington Parkway in Russett, Maryland has created a slew of concerns for neighbors. These concerns center around potential noise and decreased property values.

Bangkok, Thailand May Use Old Law to Fine Owners of Noisy Boats (Jan. 13, 1998). The World Times reports that Deputy City Clerk Wanchart Suphachaturas said that the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) is considering reviving a martial law imposing fines on owners of passenger boats that operate on canals and the river and generate excessive noise.

FAA Re-Publishes Rules for Interim Compliance Waivers for Stage 2 Aircraft (Jan. 13, 1998). The FAA yesterday published procedures and guidance in the Federal Register for operators of Stage 2 aircraft to submit a request for an interim compliance waiver, although the agency's policies for reviewing those requests have not changed. Under FAA noise regulations, an operator of Stage 2 aircraft by Dec. 31, 1998, must either reduce its number of Stage 2 aircraft by 75% from the November 1990 base level or achieve a fleet mix of airplanes that is 75% Stage 3 airplanes.

Leaf Blower Ban in Los Angeles, California Pits City's Homeowners Against Workers (Jan. 12, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that from the moment the City Council voted last week to ban leaf blowers from Los Angeles, California, the city's class and ethnic divisions split open like an earthquake fault. Before the vote Tuesday, actors Julie Newmar, Peter Graves and others from posh Westside neighborhoods sat on one side of the City Council chamber demanding a ban on leaf blowers that cause air and noise pollution. On the other side sat members of the Association of Latin American Gardeners, clad in green caps and jackets, who pleaded with council members to spare them the basic tool of their trade.

North Jersey Air Traffic Could Increase From Rerouting Plan (Jan. 12, 1998). According to a Wire Services article, the Port Authority plans to reroute air traffic from Newark International Airport to Teterboro Airport in Bergen County using economic incentives to entice air carrier companies. Already subject to the noise from the 4,200 planes that pass over North Jersey daily, the rerouting would increase the frequency and level of unwanted noise, the article stated.

The United States Federal Aviation Proposes Civil Penalty (Jan. 12, 1998). The Record reports that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has proposed that the Venezuelan air carrier, Servivensa, pay a civil penalty of $144,000 for conducting flights that violated FAA's aircraft noise regulations.

Jet Noise Problems Faced by Queens, New York Residents Look to Get Worse, Not Better (Jan. 11, 1998). The Daily News recently reported on the jet noise problem experienced by Queens, New York residents who live nearest to Kennedy International and LaGuardia airports. The article stated that their noise problem looks to get worse before it gets better as more and more airlines are being given the okay to land and take off at the borough's two airports. This, despite a federally enacted High Density Rule that places limits on the number of flights into and out of Kennedy, LaGuardia, Chicago's O'Hare and Washington National airports.

Letters to the Editor Express Differing Views on the Proposed El Toro (California) Airport. (Jan. 11, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following letters:

Sound Walls For Existing Illinois Roads Built at Community's Expense (Jan. 11, 1998). A Daily Herald article answered reader's questions about traffic problems and road construction, with one question referring to sound wall construction along current roads.

State Representative Jim Wayne Speaks at Airport Neighbor's Association meeting in Louisville, Kentucky (Jan. 11, 1998). An article in the Courier-Journal reported that Rep. Jim Wayne attended a recent meeting of the Airport Neighbors' Alliance in Louisville, Kentucky. The article reported that Wayne was one of about 50 people at the alliance's monthly meeting held at St. Rose School. At the meeting, people were urged to go to Frankfort, Kentucky this week to support a bill that would add a citizen advocate to the airport board. The meeting also included information about Kentucky's relocation plan for people who live close to Louisville International Airport. This plan has recently come under fire. The Quiet Communities Act was also discussed.

Cerritos, California Residents Concerned About Increased Noise, Traffic, and Lighting From Proposed Driving Range (Jan. 10, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reported that residents near Cerritos College in Cerritos, California are opposing a proposed golf driving range on the grounds that it will create noise, traffic, and lighting problems.

Noise Matters: Ban Leaf Blowers, Buy Rakes (Jan. 10, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports that noise matters. It points to the clash over leaf blowers in Los Angeles ---a battle that has drawn national attention and counts among its supporters actress Julie Newmar, a leaf-blower hater.

Sarasota, Florida's New Noise Ordinance Will Regulate Outdoor Amplified Music (Jan. 9, 1998). Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that Sarasota, Florida has adopted a new noise ordinance. The law, which was approved 4-1 by the City Commission, caps the allowable sound level at 75 decibels and requires outdoor music to stop at 10 p.m. during the week and at 11:59 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and holidays.

Residents Living Near Deltona, Florida Park Say Lights Would Mean More Noise (Jan. 9, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports that Deltona, Florida City Commissioner and some city residents are in a dispute with neighbors of Wes Crile Park over lighting the park to allow for more nighttime games.

Residents Living Near Ocean County (New Jersey) Landfill Upset Over Noise and Odors (Jan. 9, 1998). Asbury Park Press reports that about 300 residents of Dover and Manchester, New Jersey townships met Wednesday to voice concerns over unpleasant odors and noise from the Ocean County Landfill. The article reports that township residents who live along the Whitesville Road, Route 571 and Route 70 corridors have formed the all-volunteer Whitesville Action Committee (WAC) to handle what they say are problems caused by the Manchester Township landfill. The group held its first meeting Wednesday night at the Pleasant Plains First Aid building.

Noise Monitoring System at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (Texas) Designed to Settle Disputes Between Airport and Residents (Jan. 9, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports that Dallas/Fort Worth (Texas) International Airport officials have unveiled a noise-monitoring system that they say will be the final arbiter in noise disputes between nearby residents and airport officials. Residents of Texas cities around the airport have long complained about noise from planes that they say are too low and off their prescribed flight paths. And for just as long, many have been skeptical of official assurances that most of the planes were just where they were supposed to be.

Los Angeles Mayor Approves Leaf Blower Ban (Jan. 9, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that despite threats by Los Angeles, California gardeners to continue a hunger strike, Mayor Richard Riordan signed an ordinance Thursday that calls for fines of $270 against anyone using a gas-powered leaf blower in a residential area. However, the article reports that before he signed the law, Riordan met for nearly an hour with hunger-striking gardeners in wheelchairs to resolve the dispute, saying his hands are tied. The mayor said that this is because if he had not signed the ordinance setting the $270 fine, a previously approved measure allowing up to six months of jail time for violators would have taken effect.

Soundproofing of California Homes Begins as Part of Program by FAA and Los Angeles International (California) Airport (Jan. 9, 1998). The Copley News Service reports that the first of 25,000 California residences surrounding Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) have been "soundproofed" as part of a program funded by the Federal Aviation Administration and LAX. The soundproofing program is taking place in Los Angeles and three surrounding California cities, could cost $500 million and take five to seven years to complete. While residents say that the soundproofing, which includes installing airtight doors and double insulated windows, helps, it doesn't eliminate the noise from jets flying overhead.

Rowlett, Texas Seeks Solution To Noise Dispute with Industrial Park (Jan. 9, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports that city officials said they may soon have a solution to the ongoing dispute over noise between southwest Rowlett, Texas neighborhoods and nearby businesses. According to the article, residents of Dexham Estates and Ridgecrest have complained for several years about noise coming from Tolar Industrial Park near Dexham Road and State Highway 66. Although the City Council passed a noise ordinance in January 1997 in response to the complaints, homeowners have said that they have seen little decrease in the noise levels. Possible solutions being discussed include building a sound wall, buying sound measuring equipment, and soundproofing homes, and lowering the decibel levels allowed in the ordinance.

Man's Quiet Leaf Blower Impresses Gardeners Striking Over Ban in Los Angeles, California (Jan. 8, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that an auto mechanic who lives in Van Nuys, California put together a leaf blower that is ultra-quiet and easily built with standard auto parts. The blower may have an influence on the controversial ban on gas-fueled leaf blowers that is proposed.

Ocan Township, New Jersey Resident Complains About Noisy Trucks (Jan. 8, 1998). The Asbury Park Press reports that an Ocean Township, New Jersey resident is bothered by early morning noise from township trucks. Sandra Krug, of Holland Drive, told the Township Council that since an aging building was torn down in the road department yard on the corner of Beecroft Place and Larkin Place several years ago, the noise of trucks rumbling to life in the morning is amplified. The township maintains that construction of a new building has been held back by NJDEP regulations and testing.

Letter to the Editor in Raleigh, North Carolina Urges Residents to Complain About Boom Cars (Jan. 8, 1998). The following letter to the editor was printed in The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC):

Fewer Flights, More Passengers at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport Says Airport Official (Jan. 8, 1998). Chicago Daily Herald reports that newly released statistics show fewer planes are taking off and landing at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois where aircraft noise has angered many in nearby suburbs. Chicago aviation commissioner Mary Rose Loney said at a recent meeting with suburban business and elected leaders that the number of flights in 1997 dropped about 2 percent from the previous year, from 909,000 to an estimated 890,000. However, some airport noise activists claim that these numbers are too low.

Rezoning Dispute in Spokane, Washington (Jan. 8, 1998). The Spokesman-Review reports that developers and residents disagree over the appropriate use of a 40 acre piece of land in Spokane, Washington. Developers are asking the county hearing examiner to rezone the land in north Spokane to allow a large shopping center with Wal-Mart as its centerpiece. But residents, who will live next door to the 40 acres of shopping and parking, argue that a massive shopping center would make a bad neighbor.

City-Imposed Sound Limits May Limit Performances at Proposed Amphitheater (Jan. 8, 1998). The Florida Times-Union reports that Jacksonville, Florida officials have placed a 'non-negotiable' limit of 105 decibels on bands performing at a proposed amphitheater. According to The Cellar Door Cos., the promoter negotiating to run the facility, that wouldn't prevent putting topnotch acts on stage. This is despite the fact that one promoter has said acts like KISS, Boston, Alan Jackson or Sawyer Brown generally play at 110 to 130 decibels and country star Travis Tritt's show July 4 at the current pavilion at Metro Park registered highs of 117 decibels.

Flight Paths of Stage Two Planes May Change at Albuquerque, New Mexico Airport As a Result of Recent Noise Study (Jan. 8, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reports that Albuquerque International (New Mexico) Airport officials and a consultant conducting a noise study have been working with airlines and the FAA to change some flight patterns to reduce noise to nearby residents. As a result, some of the older, noisier planes that have plagued residents of Southeast Heights, Albuquerque may start turning south away from the city after taking off. The noisier, stage two airplanes, which include Boeing 727s, must be phased out or outfitted with "hush kits" by 2000.

Monks and Environmental Groups in Trabuco Canyon, California Sue Over Proposed Development (Jan. 8, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that the Norbertine monks of Trabuco Canyon, California have filed a lawsuit to stop the development of a shopping center that they say would threaten their sacred lifestyle. The monks fear that traffic noise generated by the proposed 12-acre Live Oak Plaza, which would include a gas station and restaurant, would interrupt their prayers and services. They also say the glare would make it difficult to sleep.

Los Angeles, California Gardeners Continue Hunger Strike Over Leaf Blower Ban (Jan. 8, 1998). An article in the Los Angeles Times reports that the steps of Los Angeles' city hall have been home to eight men from the Association of Latin American Gardeners for five days. The men are on a hunger strike which protests a proposed ban on gas-fueled leaf blowers. Their organization was formed last year to fight the ban, and has since produced a union of nearly 1,000 gardeners.

Both Sides of El Toro Airport Debate Claim Victory Over California Judge's Ruling (Jan. 8, 1998). Los Angeles Times reported that in a decision that made both sides of the debate happy, a Superior Court judge ruled that Orange County must fix its environmental review of its proposed commercial airport at El Toro Marine Base, but it doesn't have to redo the entire thing.

Progress Made in Two Year Dispute Over Waldwick, New Jersey Firing Range (Jan. 8, 1998). The Record reports that Waldwick, New Jersey officials are seeking architectural plans and cost estimates for enclosing an outdoor gun range that has been the target of a lawsuit by residents in neighboring Allendale, New Jersey. The article reports that Mayor Rick Vander Wende said the borough plans to hire an architect to look at several ways the Capt. George H. Bunning Police Training Facility could be enclosed, diminishing the gunfire noise Allendale residents have said disrupts their peace.

St. Charles, Illinois Officials Consider Ultimatum in Dispute Over Airport Expansion Noise (Jan. 8, 1998). St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the St. Charles, Illinois City Council is frustrated with the lack of noise abatement strategies in the proposed plan for airport expansion favored by St. Louis and Lambert Field Airport officials. If a noise abatement agreement cannot be reached, the City of St. Charles is considering filing a lawsuit against the city of St. Louis and Lambert Field Airport.

Mahoning Township, Pennsylvania Residents and Businesses Voice Opposition to Weeknight Races at Local Racetrack (Jan. 7, 1998). The Morning Call reports that residents and local businesses voiced their opposition at a Mahoning Township, Pennsylvania zoning board hearing where Mahoning Valley Speedway owners were asking permission to hold three weeknight races in July and future years.

Rerouting of Flights at New York's LaGuardia Airport Seen as Answer to Noise by Some, as Public Relations Ploy by Others (Jan. 7, 1998). Newsday reports that two New York, New York city councilmen have called on the Federal Aviation Administration to reduce ear-numbing airplane noise by rerouting flights at LaGuardia Airport. However, some residents are doubtful that this will have a real effect on noise in the communities surrounding the airport.

Dispute Between Neighbors and Auto Body Shop Goes Unresolved (Jan. 7, 1998). The Patriot Ledger reports that a year-long dispute between residents and an auto body shop in Stoughton, Massachusetts went unresolved after a recent town selectman's meeting. At the meeting, selectmen told neighbors, who are opposed to the repair shop based on noise, fumes and aesthetic grounds, that they must take their complaints to the zoning board of appeals.

Plymouth, Massachusetts Residents Against Expansion of Golf Club Operations (Jan. 7, 1998). The Patriot Ledger reports that a group of West Plymouth, Massachusetts residents is upset over a proposal to expand clubhouse operations and open a golf school at the Squirrel Run Country Club. The residents have asked the planning board to deny the permit unless steps are taken to improve their privacy and cut down on noise from the 18-hole golf course and clubhouse.

Boac Raton, Florida Airport Adopts Ban on Touch-And-Go Maneuvers In Effort to Reduce Noise (Jan. 7, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports that Boca Raton (Florida) Airport recently instituted a weekend and nighttime ban on touch-and-go maneuvers - repetitive takeoffs and landings by student pilots for training purposes. The ban was one of several recommendations from the Airport Noise Compatibility Committee, an advisory group created by the Airport Authority to boost communication and improve the relationship between pilots, airport officials and homeowners.

Los Angeles, California Leaf Blower Ban OK'd by City Council (Jan. 7, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Los Angeles, California City Council voted to begin enforcement of a ban on gas-powered leaf blowers, despite intense opposition from gardeners, including 200 who packed the chambers and 10 who vowed to continue a hunger strike to seek a veto by Mayor Richard Riordan. The council's 9-6 vote created the enforcement rules, setting a maximum $270 fine for people who operate leaf blowers within 500 feet of residences and for the homeowners who hire them.

Sports Center in Eagle, Wisconsin Seeks Permit for Clay Shooting Despite Noise Complaints by Residents (Jan. 7, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that Wern Valley Inc. plans another attempt to obtain a conditional use permit to allow sporting clay target shooting at the McMiller Sports Center, part of the Southern Unit of the Kettle Moraine State Forest in Wisconsin. Last year, Eagle, Wisconsin officials declined to renew Wern Valley's permit for sporting clay shooting for another year because of noise complaints from nearby residents.

Quieter Helicopters at the Grand Canyon May Help Meet Noise Restrictions (Jan. 7, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that National Park Service officials recently held a news conference to unveil what they hope will put an end to one of the most vexing environmental problems at the Grand Canyon in recent years. Officials are hopeful that the use of the Boeing MD-900 helicopter will enable them to maintain a viable air-tour industry while abiding by a federal law mandating the natural quiet of the Grand Canyon and other national parks. The Boeing MD-900 helicopter produces 73 decibels, compared with the average tour helicopter's 85.

Two NYC Councilmen Join Noise Protest at New York's LaGuardia and Kennedy Airports (Jan. 7, 1998). The Daily News reports that Two New York City Councilmen joined anti- noise activists at LaGuardia Airport yesterday to demand that the city and federal governments act to reduce air traffic noise in the areas around LaGuardia and Kennedy airports.

Recent Visitors to Santa Fe, New Mexico Discover There is No Law Against Noisy Trucks (Jan. 5, 1998). An article in the Santa Fe New Mexican recounted the experiences of two recent visitors to Santa Fe, New Mexico who were treated to the sound of diesel engines all night during their stay. The vacationing couple spent a long, sleepless night in their hotel room, discovering that Santa Fe does not have any laws concerning noisy trucks.

Neighbors Afraid Proposed Gas Station/Car Wash in Camarillo, California Will Bring More Traffic and Noise (Jan. 5, 1998). The Ventura County Star reports that American Oil Co. wants to build a gasoline station and car wash in Camarillo, California, but neighbors fear the project will increase traffic and create noise.

Noise Zone Reductions at Baltimore-Washington International Airport Not Enough (Jan. 5, 1998). The Capital reports that although noise levels near Baltimore-Washington International (BWI) Airport have been reduced through the use of newer, quieter aircraft, some nearby residents think the airport could do more. The Airport Coordinating Team, a watchdog group, at a recent hearing on BWI's 1998 proposed airport noise zone, told airport officials they need to regulate the use of older, louder aircraft.

Park Service Prepares Regulations For Jet Skis on Lake Powell (Jan. 4, 1998). The Salt Lake Tribune reports that federal managers of Lake Powell, one of the West's premier watersports playgrounds, are considering making portions of the Utah-Arizona lake "Jet Ski free."

Los Angeles Gardeners Begin Hunger Strike To Protest Ban On Leaf Blowers (Jan. 4, 1998). Los Angeles Times reports that protesters who oppose a pending ban in Los Angeles, California on gas-fueled leaf blowers have started a hunger strike. The protesters are gardeners.

Resident And Businesses In New Orleans' French Quarter Fight Over Noise (Jan. 2, 1998). The Times-Picayune reports that noise levels in New Orleans' French Quarter are sparking a sharply divided debate that may end up the subject of a federal lawsuit.

Resident Take City To Task On Noise Violations (Dec. 31, 1997). The Daily News reports that New York residents of Queens Blvd. are suing the city for violations of local noise pollution control laws.

Runway Expansion At Florida Airport Worries Neighbors (Dec. 31, 1997). The Palm Beach Post reports that Palm Beach residents are skeptical about a proposal to extend the runway at Palm Beach International Airport(PBIA). Officials say the extended runway will reduce noise. Residents disagree.

Across The Nation, Jet Skis Are Making Waves (Dec. 30, 1997). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the increase in boating accidents involving jet skis are yet another cause for their regulation. Noise and other environmental damage are causing some states to regulate the use of jet skis.

Noise Expert Cries Out For Stronger Noise Pollution Control In New York City (Dec. 30, 1997). The Daily News reports that a top environmental expert yesterday called for appointment of a city czar to coordinate a crackdown on the noise explosion tormenting New Yorkers.

After A Decade Of Debate, California Will Decide In 98 The Future Of El Toro Air Base (Dec. 29, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that in 1998, plans to use the former El Toro Marine Corps Air Station for non-military purposes will become clearer, and the debate over the details will likely intensify.

New Yorkers Number 1 Quality Of Life Complaint Is Noise (Dec. 29, 1997). The Daily News reports that New York City is doing little to reduce noise pollution even though noise is New Yorkers' No.1 quality of life issue.

Pennsylvania Speedway Seeks Zoning Variance (Dec. 29, 1997). The Morning Call reports that Mahoning Valley Speedway in Pennsylvania, which six years ago lost its battle to allow cars to run practice laps on weeknights, is hoping to get the checkered flag this time.

Virginia Plans Regulation Of Personal Watercrafts (Dec. 27, 1997). The Virginian-Pilot reports that Jet Skis, WaveRunners and SeaDoos could be limited to Broad Bay and 500 feet or farther off the Chesapeake Bay and ocean beaches, if the draft recommendations of an advisory group are followed.

California Community Establishes New Requirements For Noisy Bars And Restaurants (Dec. 23, 1997). Ventura County Star reports that the Simi Valley City Council in California approved an amendment requiring noisy bars and restaurants to obtain a special-use permit.

Federal Aviation Administration Completes Environmental Assessment of Airport Expansion In Missouri (Dec. 23, 1997). St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the expansion of the Missouri Airport at Lambert Field won a big endorsement from the Federal Aviation Administration on Monday.

Missouri Community Persists In Struggle Against Airport Noise (Dec. 23, 1997). St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that St. Charles officials and residents say they will continue to press their case for reducing aircraft noise over the county and protecting a historic commercial district as they respond to a federal agency's assessment of the environmental impact of Lambert Field.

National Parks Prepare New Transportation Plans For Visitors (Dec. 23, 1997). National Public Radio reports that Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt has announced a plan to reduce the use of cars in America's National Parks.

Senator McCain Advacates For Changing A Rule That May Reduce Noise At Washington National Airport (Dec. 23, 1997). Airports reports that Senator McCain of Arizona is proposing a bill to lift the perimeter rule at Washington National Airport. McCain suggests lifting the rule may reduce noise at the airport.

New York Police Impound ATVs In Response To Noise Complaints (Dec. 22, 1997). Newsday reports that reacting to noise complaints from residents and civic groups, police in Suffolk County New York took to the woods of Shoreham Saturday and impounded 10 all-terrain vehicles.

California Car Wash Under Construction Despite Angry Neighbors (Dec. 21, 1997). The Fresno Bee reports that a commercial project that ignited protests from Woodward Park area residents in Fresno, California last year and sparked two lawsuits is under construction.

Virginia Airport Expansion Approved Despite Findings Of Greater Potential Noise (Dec. 21, 1997). The Richmond Times Dispatch reports that the Federal Aviation Administration environmental impact study of the proposed Hanover airport expansion do not measure up to community requirements for low noise, though the plan has been approved based on the study.

Washington Metal Shredder Proposal Concerns Residents (Dec. 21, 1997). The Columbian reports that several neighborhood activists are airing concerns about a metal shredding plant proposed for the site of the former Fort Vancouver Plywood cooperative in Vancouver, Washington.

Los Angeles City Council Expands Curfew At Van Nuys Airport (Dec. 20, 1997). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that after years of debate about noise problems at Van Nuys Airport, the Los Angeles City Council voted Friday to extend the curfew at the airfield so that noisy jets will be barred from taking off after 10 p.m. instead of 11 p.m.

Maryland Speedway Project Woos County Officials (Dec. 20, 1997). The Washington Post reports that County Executive John G. Gary is behind a Speedway Project in Anne Arundel, Maryland.

Louisiana Community Council Adopts Zoning Regulations For Airport (Dec. 19, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that the Kenner City Council has adopted legislation to control airport growth.

Virginia Sawmill Expansion Opposed By Neighbors (Dec. 19, 1997). The Roanoke Times & World News reports that the proposed expansion of a Lumber Mill in Christiansburg Virginia has citizens alarmed. Neighbors worry about added noise and other environmental pollution.

California Communities Oppose Railroad Expansion (Dec. 18, 1997). The Orange County Register reports that trains are expected to rumble and roar through Placentia California in increasingly hefty numbers in the next 10 to 15 years. Their numbers may jump from about 40 trains a day to as many as 150 trains daily along the Orangethorpe Avenue corridor.

Chicago's "Fly Quiet" Program A Sham (Dec. 18, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that six months after Mayor Daley's "Fly Quiet" program at O'Hare Airport in Chicago, area residents are still complaining about aircraft noise. Some residents say noise is worse.

Louisiana Residents Oppose Grocery Store (Dec. 18, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that residents in Luling, Louisiana oppose a proposal for a new Winn-Dixie market. Residents say the secondary entrance to the market will cause noise pollution and safety hazards.

Louisisana City Council Plans For Local Airport Regulation (Dec. 18, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that Kenner City Council is expected to vote to give itself veto power over any project at the New Orleans International Airport that would hurt the safety and property values of Kenner residents.

Maryland Communities Struggle Over Proposed Racetrack (Dec. 18, 1997). The Washington Post reports that neighborhood activists in Anne Arundel County, Maryland find themselves staring at a $100 million, 100,000-seat auto racing track and entertainment center that would host National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing events.

New York City Sues U.S. Department of Transportation Over New Flights At La Guardia Airport (Dec. 18, 1997). The New York Times reports that the City's Corporation Counsel sued the Federal Government to stop it from adding 21 new flights a day at La Guardia Airport, arguing that the extra traffic at the already congested airport would compromise the safety of air travelers and Queens residents.

Norway Labor Laws Outlaw Church Bells (Dec. 18, 1997). AP Online reports that state noise regulations have made it illegal to ring steeple bells in Norway.

Orchard Owners Restricted On Methods To Frighten Birds (Dec. 18, 1997). The Indianapolis News reports that an apple orchard and farm market will be allowed to expand after the Zoning Board restricted the use of noise devices to frighten birds.

Penalties Reduced On Los Angeles Leaf Blower Ban (Dec. 18, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that Los Angeles' leaf blower ban lost its teeth when the City Council decided to reduce violations to an infraction from a misdemeanor. Consequently, the fine goes down. Enforcement will begin January 6.

Tennessee Kennel's Permit Revoked For Noise (Dec. 18, 1997). The Commercial Appeal reports that a neighborhood kennel in Tennessee recently had its permit revoked due to noise pollution.

Virginia Runway Extension Approved (Dec. 18, 1997). The Richmond Times Dispatch reports that Virginia County officials approved a controversial plan to extend the runway at the county's airport. Some residents oppose the project fearing a decrease in property values and greater noise.

Authorities In Oakland California Vote To Expand Airport (Dec. 17, 1997). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that Oakland port commissioners voted to move ahead with a $600 million airport expansion yesterday, saying the benefits of the project for the region outweigh the problems that added noise could cause for airport neighbors.

Florida City Prepares Zoning Ordinances For Outdoor Dining (Dec. 17, 1997). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that sidewalk dining has become very popular in Sarasota, Florida, particularly on St. Armands Circle, prompting calls for stricter controls from nearby residents because of concerns about noise.

Florida Residents Prepare For New YMCA (Dec. 17, 1997). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports that county commissioners in Orlando, Florida voted to sign a 50-year lease with the Central Florida YMCA and contribute $1.9 million toward the new fitness center in Blanchard Park. Area residents worry about noise and are concerned over the loss of their park.

Industrial Barge Fleet Frightens Louisiana Neighbors (Dec. 17, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that a proposed grain barge fleeting operation that would be moored on the Mississippi River just across the levee from Destrehan's Red Church subdivision in St. Charles, Louisiana is drawing heated opposition from neighborhood residents and St. Charles Parish Council members.

Virginia Community Struggles Over Runway Extension (Dec. 17, 1997). The Richmond Times Dispatch reports that a municipal airport in Hanover, Virginia recently received approval from a neighborhood association for a runway extension.

Florida Community Considers Auto Service Center Plans (Dec. 16, 1997). The St. Petersburg Times reports that Sun Toyota wants to build a larger parts and service center and an express lube service in New Port Richey, Florida. Some neighboring residents want to put a roadblock in those plans, saying it will bring more noise, traffic and runoff to their neighborhood.

Washington Community Negotiates With Native American Tribe On Ampitheater Proposal (Dec. 16, 1997). The News Tribune reports that King County is negotiating with the Muckleshoot Tribe over a 20,000-seat amphitheater the tribe is building on farmland near Auburn.

New Zealand Residents Propose Extra Fees For Noisy Planes (Dec. 10, 1997). The Evening Post reports that proposals to charge noisy Boeing 737 aircraft more for landing at Wellington Airport in New Zealand have been deferred until February.

California Officials Delay Rule Change At Van Nuys Airport (Dec. 9, 1997). Airports reports that changes in rules at the Van Nuys Airport in California are on hold.

Airlines Voice Opinions On Changes At Love Field Airport In Texas (Dec. 9, 1997). Airports reports that airlines are voicing their opinions about changes at the Love Field Airport in Texas.

New Orleans Takes Zoning Measures To Confront Noise Problems (Dec. 8, 1997). New Orleans City Business reports recent changes in permitting in New Orleans to protect residents from noise and to preserve the character of neighborhoods.

Florida Resident Shares Perspective on Commission's Denial of Bikini Contest (Dec. 7, 1997). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune printed the following letter to the editor concerning the Kissimmee (Florida) City Commission's decision to deny a bikini contest proposal.

Florida Community To Decide Whether To Outlaw Outdoor Concerts (Dec. 6, 1997). The Tampa Tribune reports that Pasco County (Florida) commissioners will decide Tuesday whether to grant a permit for an outdoor concert at Harmony Park.

Proposed Kennel Expansion in Britain May Be Rejected Due To Noise (Dec. 6, 1997). The Northern Echo reports that a proposal to expand a dog kennel in Copley, England may be rejected due to the concern for noise pollution that would be created by the additional animals.

Irish Employers Take Notice Of Growing Claims For Damaged Hearing From Work Related Noise (Dec. 5, 1997). The Irish Times reports that many businesses in Ireland are not aware of their vulnerability to claims for hearing loss.

Sacramento Residents Rally To Ban Leaf Blowers (Dec. 5, 1997). The Sacremento Bee printed the following letters to the editor concerning banning leaf blowers in Sacramento, California:

Residential Day Care Center Bothers Washington Neighbor (Dec. 4, 1997). The Spokesman-Review reports that a Spokane, Washington resident, weary of noise and traffic from a residential day care operation, is filing a lawsuit.

California Judge Attempts to Resolve Dispute Between Wedding Retreat Center and Neighbors (Dec. 3, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that a hearing held by a state judge in California was intended to avoid a trail over legal arguments between a fancy retreat center in Triunfo Canyon and residents who say the resort causes noise and traffic problems.

California Officials Consider How To Limit Noise Of Rafting Groups On Kaweah River (Dec. 3, 1997). The Fresno Bee reports that Tulare County, California wants to impose limits on noise river rafters can make as they shoot the rapids on the rocky and challenging Kaweah River.

Polar Air Cargo Asks U.S. Government to Impose Restrictions on Certain Airlines to Compensate for Strict Noise Restrictions at Amsterdam Airport (Dec. 1, 1997). The Journal of Commerce reports that officials from Polar Air Cargo, a growing U.S. airline that has its European hub at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport, have asked the U.S. government to take steps to punish Dutch air carriers in retaliation for strict noise restrictions set at the airport. Polar Air officials say the airport's new regulations will drive them out of the air cargo market.

Rhode Island Town Considers Proposal for Auto Racetrack (Dec. 1, 1997). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that the final session of a public hearing regarding a zoning change that would bring an auto racetrack to Richmond, Rhode Island will take place tonight. The article notes that a noise expert has testified on behalf of the developers that noise from the racetrack will meet the town's noise limit.

Air Force and National Guard Want to Fly Combat Exercises Year-Round Over Coastal Georgia (Nov. 29, 1997). The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reports that the U.S. Air Force, Navy, and Georgia National Guard want to conduct combat exercises year-round with low-flying jet aircraft over coastal Georgia near Townsend. The proposal is being opposed by some civilian aviators and local government officials, who believe the military's plans would compromise air safety, cause noise pollution on the ground, and discourage business and vacation travelers from landing in the area. Public comments are being accepted by the Federal Aviation Administration on the proposal through Monday.

Florida Residents Protest Proposal for Industrial Zone Near Their Homes (Nov. 29, 1997). The Tampa Tribune reports that residents in Thonotosassa near Tampa, Florida are protesting that allowing a property on U.S. 301 to be rezoned to allow commercial intensive uses could cause inappropriate development in an area that has much residential development. County commissioners, meanwhile, have asked the owner of the property for a site plan for the warehouse distribution facility proposed for the site, along with a request to rezone the property.

Residents Opposed to Baseball Stadium in Neighborhood; Noise, Bright Lights and Quality of Life Issues (Nov. 29, 1997). The Ventura County Star reports residents near Oxnard College are disputing a report released this week that says minor league baseball at the college would not have a significant impact on nearby neighborhoods. Residents are concerned about noise, pollution, and bright lights.

Dutch Government Report Finds That Restraining Amsterdam Airport's Growth Will Seriously Affect Economy (Nov. 28, 1997). AP Worldstream reports that a Dutch government advisory body, the Central Plan Bureau, released a report Friday warning that limiting the growth of Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport to meet legal noise limits could cost the Dutch economy "tens of billions of guilders" by the year 2020. The report is being hailed by airlines and dismissed by environmental groups.

Ex-City-Councilor in Dallas Campaigns for Expanded Use of Love Field, While Residents Protest (Nov. 28, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that Jerry Bartos, a former Dallas City Councilor, is campaigning for expanded use of Love Field. Meanwhile, the article says, most citizens are opposed to increased use of the airport due to noise problems in many neighborhoods.

Southwest Airlines Enters Fight Over Expanded Service at Dallas's Love Field (Nov. 28, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that Southwest Airlines, which has long stayed out of the fight over expanded service at Love Field in Dallas, has entered the controversy after the city of Fort Worth filed a lawsuit to close or prevent expanded service at the airport. According to Southwest chair Herbert Kelleher, the company is "very much opposed to closing Love Field."

Florida Residents Fight Proposed Sand-Mining Operation (Nov. 27, 1997). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports that mining company Tarmac America has plans to move a sand-mining operation in Clermont, Florida to a 321-acre parcel of land in south Lake County off Hartwood Marsh Road. Residents near the proposed site are gearing up to fight the plan, which they say will drain or taint water supplies, cause excessive noise, and disrupt the calm atmosphere of the rural neighborhood.

Fort Worth Mayor to Launch New Media Offensive Against Expansion of Air Service at Love Field (Nov. 27, 1997). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that Kenneth Barr, Mayor of Fort Worth, Texas, said yesterday that he will launch a new media effort in the city's legal battle with Dallas over the expansion of air service at Love Field. Barr said he hopes the media effort will build more support in the city's legal efforts to protect the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport from additional competition at Love Field.

Judge Denies Bid for Bedrock Quarry in Maine, Upholding Town's Mining Ordinance (Nov. 27, 1997). The Portland Press Herald reports that a Maine Superior Court judge Tuesday denied a mining company's request to allow a bedrock mining operation in a rural neighborhood in Woolwich on Dana Mill Road. The decision upholds the town's mining ordinance, and comes after a decade-long battle to protect the 163-acre site.

Virginia Town Residents Say Noise Walls and Berms Near New Highway Aren't Enough (Nov. 27, 1997). The Washington Post reports that a four-lane divided bypass around Warrenton, Virginia opened on Monday after a ribbon-cutting ceremony. But some residents in the Ivy Hill neighborhood near the new highway say the noise walls and berms that have been built will not be enough to drown out the noise of passing traffic, the article reports. Residents attended the ceremony carrying signs saying "Finish Our Sound Wall" and "Spur Noise Ruins Lives."

California County Board Doesn't Revoke Resident's Kennel License, Despite Neighbors' Complaints About Barking (Nov. 26, 1997). The Press-Enterprise reports that the Riverside (California) County Board of Supervisors Tuesday granted a resident's appeal to keep her kennel license, despite complaints by neighbors that the barking dogs are a nuisance. But, the article says, the kennel owner must return to the board before the license can be renewed in March, and the board expects to monitor conditions at the kennel.

Florida City Considers Restricting Use of Boat Launches to Cut Down on Noise and Traffic for Neighbors (Nov. 26, 1997). The St. Petersburg Times printed an editorial that argues that residents living near Crisp Park in St. Petersburg, Florida deserve relief from the noise and traffic associated with a popular boat launch area in the park. The City Council is considering restricting the use of the boat ramps, and the editorial says councilors should vote in the restrictions.

Florida Town Meeting Focuses on Noise and River Pollution (Nov. 26, 1997). The Florida Times-Union reports that a town meeting in Arlington, Florida was held Thursday by City Councilor John Crescimbeni, and was attended by about 35 residents. The main topics of discussion were the health of the St. Johns River and noise pollution from concerts at Alltel Stadium.

New York City Councilors Propose Stopping Expansion of Trash Transfer Stations (Nov. 26, 1997). Newsday reports that two city councilors in New York City introduced legislation yesterday that would stop the expansion of trash transfer stations in the city due to increasing problems with odor, noise, and heavy traffic associated with the stations.

New Zealand District Council Rejects Appeal for Expanded Co-Generation Plant with Weaker Noise Standards (Nov. 26, 1997). The Daily News reports that the South Taranaki District Council in the New Plymouth, New Zealand area has rejected an appeal from Kiwi Co-operative Dairies to expand its co-generation plant. The council's judicial committee earlier approved the expansion, subject to special noise conditions, which then were appealed by the company.

British Government Proposes Lower Noise Limits at Three Airports (Nov. 25, 1997). M2 Presswire released the following press release regarding a consultation paper published today by Britain's Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions. The paper proposes more efficient noise monitoring and lower noise limits for aircraft at Heathrow, Gatwick, and Stansted airports.

California Residents and Aviation Operators Clash Over Proposal to Ban More Noisy Jets at Van Nuys Airport (Nov. 25, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that a public meeting attended by more than 250 people, residents and aviation-business owners argued over a proposed ban of the noisiest corporate jets from Van Nuys Airport. Also on the table was the issue of whether to include helicopters in the ban. Business owners said layoffs, economic instability, and financial ruin would result from the bans.

Complaints Over Noise and Litter at a California Recycling Center May Lead to its Closure (Nov. 25, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that noise from a 400 square-foot recycling center in Los Angeles has been causing increased complaints recently. The city council is considering revocation of the center's permit to operate, and will decide after a public meeting on December 2nd. Litter has also increased at the center.

Georgia County Considers Fining Owners of Barking Dogs (Nov. 25, 1997). The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reports that the Walton County (Georgia) Commission is proposing a new animal-control ordinance that would fine the owners of dogs that are a nuisance. The article says that specific penalties have not yet been proposed, but the commissioners are seeking to make dog-owners pay fines for dogs that bark excessively or stray too close to their neighbor's property.

Hanover, New York Residents Ask Town Board To Quiet Auto Parts Plant (Nov. 25, 1997). The Buffalo News reports that the Hanover (New York) Town Board heard from two residents Monday who complained about noise and vibrations from the Bailey Manufacturing plant on Bennett State Road, which makes auto parts. The article says that town officials visited the homes of the two residents and agree something must be done.

New Hampshire Racetrack Expansion Gets Preliminary Approval (Nov. 25, 1997). The Union Leader reports that a conceptual plan for a 9,000-seat expansion of the New Hampshire International Speedway in Loudon, New Hampshire received approval from the town planning board last week. However, according to Loudon Planning Board Chair Gary Tasker, the project must get through several more regulatory hurdles before it can go forward. Concerns about increased noise and traffic from the project are still to be addressed, the article says.

New Mexico Village Residents Oppose Expansion of Tortilla Factory, Citing Constant Noise from Coolers and Air Compressors (Nov. 25, 1997). The Albuquerque Journal reports that residents in the village of Los Ranchos, New Mexico are opposing the proposed expansion of the Albuquerque Tortilla Co., saying the constant noise from coolers and air compressors already is a nuisance. The tortilla factory is seeking a zone change from "commercial" to "special use" to operate a new warehouse.

Public Parks in India are Being Turned Into Noisy Celebration Venues, Columnist Complains (Nov. 24, 1997). Business Line printed an editorial in which the columnist argues that public parks in India are being converted into locations for one noisy personal celebration after another. The writer urges people to join the "quiet India" revolution in order to save the public parks for their intended use and protect human hearing.

Residents Complain About Traffic Noise in New York Town, But Get No Help From State Officials (Nov. 23, 1997). The Buffalo News reports that residents in Niagara Falls, New York are complaining about noise from the LaSalle Expressway, which runs from Williams Road in Wheatfield west to the I-190, through the heart of a Niagara Falls residential area. Despite residents' complaints, state officials say they cannot perform a noise study and don't have the funds to build a sound wall or plant trees as a buffer.

Judge's Ruling on Building Rules for Homes Near New Zealand Airport Ends a Decade-Long Noise Fight (Nov. 22, 1997). The Dominion reports that a judge's ruling Thursday regarding building rules for new homes near the Wellington (New Zealand) airport ends a decade-long battle between airline and airport officials and residents. The article describes the long fight, focusing on the leader who organized residents and led a successful battle, Maxine Harris.

Court Ruling in New Zealand Ends Ten-Year Battle Over Airport Noise (Nov. 21, 1997). The Dominion reports that a ten-year fight over acceptable noise levels around the Wellington, New Zealand Airport ended with a ruling yesterday by an Environment Court judge which stipulates where and what kind of housing developments can be built near the airport. The court case involved four parties: the Residents Airport Noise Action Group, the Wellington International Airport, the Board of Airline Representatives, and the Wellington City Council.

Maryland County Board Struggles With Whether to Allow Trucking and Manufacturing Uses in Certain Zones, While Residents Worry About More Noise and Traffic (Nov. 21, 1997). The Baltimore Sun reports that the Howard County (Maryland) Planning Board delayed a vote yesterday on whether to allow warehouses, truck terminals, and manufacturing centers in planned employment center zones. Members of the board said the proposal by the county administration to add the additional uses was too vague, and asked for clarification. Meanwhile, residents who attended the hearing opposed the changes, saying their neighborhoods would be hurt by the creation of more noise and traffic.

Developer in New Zealand Wants to Build Near Airport (Nov. 20, 1997). The Southland Times reports that at a hearing in Queenstown, New Zealand yesterday, officials from the development company Remarkables Park argued that their proposed subdivision zoning near the Queenstown Airport should be allowed, in conjunction with acoustic insulation in the homes. The developer's comments came after two days of Queenstown Lakes District Council district plan hearings in which opponents of the proposed zoning change -- developer Terrace Tower and airlines Air New Zealand and the Mount Cook Group -- spoke.

English Boy's Complaint About Noisy Neighbor Leads to Neighbor's Eviction (Nov. 20, 1997). The Daily Mail reports that Jeanette King and her two children of Bournemouth, England have been evicted from their home after a 13-year-old neighbor complained that King's non-stop playing of Frank Sinatra and Dire Straits records were preventing him from doing his homework.

Florida Airport Bans Nighttime and Weekend Touch-And-Go Training Maneuvers (Nov. 20, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel reports that the Airport Authority in Boca Raton, Florida on Wednesday voted unanimously to ban touch-and-go training maneuvers at night and on weekends from the Boca Raton Municipal Airport in an effort to reduce noise. Touch-and-go landings, which are repetitive landings and take-offs by student pilots for training purposes, will be limited to weekdays between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., to take effect on January 1. The ban was recommended by an airport noise committee created several months ago to suggest ways to curb noise at the growing airport. The Pompano Beach Air Park instituted a similar ban on touch-and-go maneuvers in the past year, and as a result, the maneuvers have increased at Boca Raton, the article explains.

Kentucky Airport Board Angers Town by Snubbing Engineer the Town Had Chosen to Help it Relocate Due to Jet Noise (Nov. 20, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that the Regional Airport Authority in Louisville, Kentucky has ignored the recommendation of leaders in Minor Lane Heights for an engineering firm to design a new site for residents to move to because of intolerable jet noise from the Louisville International Airport. Minor Lane Heights residents had worked with the firm the town recommended for two years to come up with an acceptable residential development design. In response to the airport authority's decision, leaders of Minor Lane Heights are threatening to move without the airport's assistance, or even to stay put. Leaders also said residents might consider selling their property directly to a private developer or commercial interest and selecting their own relocation site. Minor Lane Heights Mayor Fred Williams said he will get more input from his constituents, but he added, "It would tickle me to death for everybody to tell them to stick it."

Louisville Residents Rail Against Airport Authorities, Saying They're Fed Up with Noise (Nov. 20, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that about 50 residents attended a meeting sponsored by the Regional Airport Authority last night in Louisville, Kentucky to discuss noise from planes at the Louisville International Airport. The meeting was held to play a simulation of the jet noise level that residents can expect after the new West Runway opens December 1 at the airport. But the simulation provoked residents, who said the noise level is already much greater than the simulation, and they are fed up with it. Meanwhile, airport officials told residents that the areas many of them live in are not eligible for assistance from noise problems because they are outside the boundary considered to be too noisy for daily living.

New Zealand Judge Sets Noise Insulation Rules for Housing Near Airport (Nov. 20, 1997). The Evening Post reports that Environment Court Judge Kenderdine ruled yesterday that new housing developments on industrial or commercial land around the Wellington (New Zealand) Airport will have to meet new planning rules, including the use of noise insulation. The article says that the ruling is an attempt to end an 11-year battle over noise at Wellington Airport. Meanwhile, residents that have been fighting for stronger noise controls said that the ruling passes the problem back to the community instead of to the noise-makers.

Pittsburgh Residents Complain About Noise From 24-Hour Operation of Casting Plant (Nov. 20, 1997). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports that angry Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania) area residents complained to county supervisors last night about noise from the Harmony Casting plant on Perry Highway. Their complaints come in the face of a proposed expansion at the plant. Meanwhile, the board of supervisors is considering passing a noise ordinance which, among other things, would require the plant to be properly insulated and inspected by the township engineer.

Residents in Formerly Rural North Carolina Area Target Gun Ranges as Too Noisy and Unsafe (Nov. 20, 1997). The News and Observer reports that there is a growing battle in the Durham, North Carolina area between residents of new subdivisions and proponents of gun ranges. In one recent fight, Duncan Floyd, a property owner who wanted to expand his private shooting range, met with strong opposition from neighbors and dropped his request for a permit, the article says.

South Carolina State Officials Rule that Proposed Racetrack Near Old-Growth Forest Can Go Forward (Nov. 20, 1997). The Herald reports that the South Carolina state Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management issued a decision Tuesday that plans for a racetrack near the old-growth Francis Beidler Forest comply with the state's Coastal Zone Management Act. The agency had ruled earlier that the project complied with the state rules, but reviewed its decision after the state Department of Archives and History raised concerns that noise from the track could affect the forest. Meanwhile, opponents led by the National Audubon Society have challenged several permits for the proposed track near Four Holes Swamp, just two miles from the forest.

Univeral Studio's California Expansion Plan Moves Closer to Approval; Noise Consultant Testifies that Studio Should Provide More Data About Noise (Nov. 20, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that the county Regional Planning Commission in Los Angeles, California will being studying the feasibility of a proposed on-ramp at Universal Studios for the Hollywood Freeway. The ramp has been proposed by Universal Studios, which is undertaking a $1-billion expansion of their buildings. Residents say they haven't been involved in Universal's decisions, and a noise consultant admitted that Universal didn't give enough information about how noisy there facility can be.

Alabama City Council Warns Nightclub About Noise Complaints; Club Owners Insist They Aren't Noisy (Nov. 19, 1997). The Montgomery Advertiser reports that the Montgomery (Alabama) City Council on Tuesday warned owners of the Diamonds nightclub on Narrow Lane Road that there have been noise complaints about the establishment. However, nightclub owners insist they aren't causing the noise.

Development Around New Zealand Airport Would be Limited Under Proposed Plan (Nov. 19, 1997). The Southland Times reports that development surrounding the Invercargill Airport in Invercargill, New Zealand would be restricted to prevent noise complaints under the latest draft of the Invercargill District Plan released yesterday. The plan must be approved by the City Council, the article notes.

Grand Canyon Raft Outfitters Agree to Quieter Boat Motors (Nov. 19, 1997). The Orange County Register reports that commercial river-rafting outfitters in Arizona's Grand Canyon National Park have agreed to convert their fleets of rafts to low-noise, low-emission outboards by 2001. The outfitters' announcement came in response to a growing call to quiet the noisy boats by the Park Service in response to the federal government's directive to restore "natural quiet" to the park. Meanwhile, conservation group members said the outfitters recognized they have little choice but to abandon the noisier outboard motors.

Louisiana City Schedules New Forum on Airport Expansion, Criticizing Forum Held by the Airport (Nov. 19, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that officials in Kenner, Louisiana have scheduled a public hearing on plans by the New Orleans International Airport to turn a taxiway into a runway for private planes. Local officials were critical of the way airport officials handled their own public forum on Monday on the same topic, the article says.

New Zealand Judge Hints that Rifle Range Use Might Have to be Restricted (Nov. 19, 1997). The Evening Standard reports that an Environment Court judge in New Zealand hinted yesterday that the use of the Turitea rifle range might have to be severely restricted in order to comply with the Resource Management Act. Judge John Treadwell made the comments at the conclusion of a hearing initiated by the Palmerston North City Council, which argues that the judge should grant a declaration stating that land owned by the rifle club is being used for activities contrary to the Act. The decision in the case was reserved, the article says. However, in closing, the judge said that any such declaration could be over-ridden by a section of the Act that stipulates that occupiers of such land must ensure that noise emissions don't exceed a reasonable level.

Airport Information Booths Anger Kenner Residents; They Still Say No New Runway (Nov. 18, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that a number of Kenner residents expressed their disapproval on Monday of New Orleans International Airport's plans to turn its east-west taxiway into a runway for private aircraft. Residents also were not pleased with the forum designed to receive their input.

County Commissioners Approve Firing Range Near North Carolina Town, Angering Residents (Nov. 18, 1997). The News and Observer reports that county commissioners in Wake County, North Carolina voted Monday to approve a firing range near Holly Springs. The decision angered residents and officials in Holly Springs, who said their town is becoming a dumping ground for facilities no one else wants.

Fast Food Restaurant Proposal Near Residential Area is Rejected in Texas (Nov. 18, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that planning and zoning commissioners in Plano, Texas on Monday rejected a request for a new Sonic drive-in restaurant on Coit Road due to the proximity of a residential neighborhood, and complaints from residents about the noise, traffic, and trash the restaurant would bring.

New Orleans Airport Officials Draw Criticism for Unusual Public Hearing on Proposed Taxiway Conversion (Nov. 18, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that officials of the New Orleans International Airport held a public hearing Monday to gather input on plans to turn an east-west taxiway into a runway for private aircraft. At the hearing, airport officials staffed five booths addressing different issues, such as noise and land acquisition, and invited questions from the 200 residents who attended. But many residents from Kenner were angry both at the proposed taxiway conversion and at the way the forum was set up to handle their input.

New Orleans Resident Complains About Noise and Trash in Historic Quarter (Nov. 18, 1997). The Times-Picayune printed the following letter-to-the-editor from William Gershuny, a New Orleans resident, regarding the noise and trash problems in the city's historic Quarter:

Conservation Group Says National Park Service Should Regulate Air Tours Over National Parks (Nov. 17, 1997). U.S. Newswire reports that an official from the National Parks and Conservation Association today testified at a congressional field hearing that the National Park Service should be given the power to regulate air tours over national parks in order to curb noise. The official said that legislation is needed to manage the operations of scenic air tours, because the tours have grown explosively at the Grand Canyon and have expanded to other parks. Currently, neither the Park Service nor the Federal Aviation Administration has a process in place for regulating or managing flight tour operations over parks, the article notes.

California Resident Urges Others to Oppose Universal Studio's Proposed Expansion Due to Increased Noise and Traffic (Nov. 16, 1997). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Joan Luchs, a Los Angeles resident, regarding the proposed expansion of Universal Studios:

Florida City Wants to Close Airport, But FAA Says it Must Stay Open (Nov. 16, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel reports that city officials in Pompano Beach, Florida have been exploring the possibility of closing the Pompano Beach Air Park since September. But the Federal Aviation Administration, which must grant permission to close the airport, recently told city officials the airport is too important to the future aviation needs of South Florida to be shut down.

Florida County Hearing Officer Denies Appeal of Neighbors Living Near Dirt Pit (Nov. 16, 1997). The Tampa Tribune reports that a Florida county hearing officer denied an appeal by residents living near a borrow pit in eastern Hillsborough County, where dirt is excavated by the Hardaway Co. Residents are sick of the dust and noise from the pit, and filed the appeal to revoke the company's permit. But the hearing officer ruled that the operating permit that allows Hardaway to dig a half-million yards of dirt from the pit is valid. The hearing officer did include an amendment to the permit requiring Hardaway to water the pit daily to reduce dust.

Florida Residents Living Near Proposed Lakeshore Park Are Worried About Noise (Nov. 15, 1997). The Florida Times-Union reports that residents in Eagle Harbor, in the Jacksonville, Florida area, are worried about the county's plans to build a 3-acre recreational park on Doctors Lake off Lakeshore Drive North, because of the potential noise from loud, late-night music. The county planning commission will hold a public hearing on the matter on December 2, and will decide the matter on December 23.

California Aviation Commission Wants Potential Homebuyers Warned About Airport Noise (Nov. 14, 1997). The Ventura County Star reports that on Nov. 6, the Ventura County (California) Aviation Advisory Commission voted 4-3 against a proposed residential development near the Camarillo Airport. The commissioners said they wanted to ensure that all potential homebuyers are warned about the noise from planes flying over their neighborhood.

Residents Near Dallas's Love Field Air Frustrations Over More Flights at Local Meeting (Nov. 14, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that about 150 residents living near Love Field in Dallas, Texas attended a meeting Friday to discuss the prospect of more flights at the airport. The residents believe that the new flights authorized recently by Congress could mean more noise, lower property values, and the eventual elimination of all flight restrictions at the 80-year-old facility. The article reports that the two-hour meeting was co-sponsored by Dallas City Council member Veletta Forsythe Lill and state Senator Royce West (D-Dallas).

Indiana Town Officials Present Suggestions for Reducing Jet Noise from Indianapolis Airport (Nov. 14, 1997). The Indianapolis News reports that officials from Plainfield and Mooresville, Indiana offered suggestions for diverting most of the planes from Indianapolis International Airport away from Metro West area towns at a public hearing Wednesday night. The article says that about 30 residents and several of their attorneys from areas in Hendricks, Morgan, and Marion counties also offered suggestions. The Indianapolis Airport Authority held the public hearing to gather comments about the airport's latest planned changes in flight patterns and other steps to mitigate or compensate neighbors for the harmful noise. The public's comments will be reviewed before the airport board votes in January on a new noise mitigation plan, according to airport spokesperson Dennis Rosebrough, after which the plan will be sent to the Federal Aviation Administration for approval.

Local New York City Official Considers Challenging Decision Allowing Additional Jet Flights (Nov. 14, 1997). The Daily News reports that Claire Shulman, the Queens Borough President in New York City, is considering challenging a recent federal decision allowing additional takeoffs and landings at LaGuardia Airport, saying the skies already are noisy and congested enough. Last month, the article notes, the U.S. Department of Transportation granted Frontier Airlines, ValuJet Airlines, and AirTran Airways exemptions to the High Density Rule for new services where slots are limited. The rule limits the number of hourly takeoffs and landings allowed at LaGuardia and Kennedy airports in New York, O'Hare Airport in Chicago, and Washington National Airport.

Workshop Scheduled in Connecticut to Address Airport Noise Issues (Nov. 14, 1997). The Hartford Courant reports that the Federal Aviation Administration, the Connecticut Department of Transportation's bureau of aviation and ports, and the Bradley International Airport Commission will sponsor a November 24 workshop to address noise issues at the Bradley International Airport near Windsor Locks and Suffield.

North Carolina County and School Board Officials Fight Over Proposed Location of New School Near Airport (Nov. 14, 1997). The News & Record reports that members of the Guilford County (North Carolina) school board told Guilford residents Thursday that some of the county commissioners have lied to them and virtually eliminated a property from consideration as a site for a new northwest middle school. County commissioners have twice in the past few weeks rejected the school board's request to approve money to purchase a site on Horsepen Creek Road, citing the high price of the site, and safety and noise concerns because of the site's proximity to the Piedmont Triad International Airport. In response, the school board is now considering the possibility of building elsewhere, including on land that is now part of county-owned Bur-Mil Park and a site owned by the Piedmont Triad International Airport.

California Wedding Retreat Site and Neighbors Continue Five-Year Feud Over Noise and Traffic (Nov. 13, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that a retreat center called Fantasy Island, located in Agoura, California, has had a long history of noise and traffic complaints. The article discusses the history of the problems at the center, owned by a sometimes-inflammatory Israeli immigrant. The article notes that problems have often stemmed from lame zoning enforcement and lack of action by local officials.

New Zealand Car Club's Noise Levels From Loudspeaker Are Under Review (Nov. 13, 1997). The Timaru Herald reports that officials are reviewing the resource consent (permit) for the loudspeaker system of the South Canterbury Car Club's Falvey Road site near Timaru, New Zealand. The car club had sought to raise the permitted noise level from 45 decibels to 50 decibels, but the council intends to review two conditions of that proposal.

Fines for Helicopter Noise Made by Rich Maryland Executive Thrown Out of Court on a Technicality (Nov. 13, 1997). The Baltimore Sun reports that officials in Baltimore County, Maryland have been attempting to collect $800 in zoning citations from a rich executive who lands his helicopter in Green Spring Valley, an exclusive residential neighborhood in the Lutherville area. But yesterday a hearing officer threw out the fines because county zoning inspectors listed the wrong address on the citation. Zoning officials, however, are vowing to file new complaints against Martin Grass, the Chair and Chief Executive Officer of Rite Aid Corp., who uses the helicopter for his 20-minute commute to the company's headquarters in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Noise from New Jersey Parkway Angers Residents; Highway Officials Consider Ways to Appease Them (Nov. 13, 1997). The Asbury Park Press reports that residents in the Pine Ridge development in Barnegat Township, New Jersey expressed anger and frustration at a meeting last night about the way the New Jersey Highway Authority has handled a project to add three new toll booths to the 11 toll booths already at the Garden State Parkay toll plaza near their homes. Residents were angry about noise and safety issues of the project. In an attempt to satisfy the residents, officials with the highway authority said they would consider building an earthen berm between the parkway and the residents' homes.

More Noise Barriers Probably Won't be Built on Southern New Hampshire Interstate (Nov. 13, 1997). The Union Leader reports that an information meeting was held last night by the New Hampshire Department of Transportation on the bridge reconstruction project on Interstate 93 in Manchester, New Hampshire. Most of the 50 residents who attended the meeting wanted more noise barriers as part of the project, but according to the article, it's not likely that more barriers will be built.

South Carolina State Officials Say Proposed Racetrack Won't Hurt Forest (Nov. 13, 1997). The Post and Courier reports that the South Carolina Department of Archives and History has decided that the predicted noise level of a proposed racetrack in Berkeley County will not prevent Francis Beidler Forest from being placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The state agency's decision eliminates a possible roadblock for the proposed Interstate Speedway. Opponents, who are worried about the racetrack's effect on the wildlife sanctuary two miles away, had hoped the noise level issue would halt the project, the article notes.

New Zealand City Councilor Proposes Extra Fees for Noisy Air New Zealand Jets (Nov. 12, 1997). The Evening Post reports that officers of the Wellington (New Zealand) City Council are preparing a proposal that Air New Zealand be forced to pay extra charges every time its noisy Boeing 737 jets land at Wellington Airport. The extra costs paid by the airline would be used to insulate homes around the airport against noise. The proposal is being championed by Councilor Sue Kedgley, who said that if the idea was accepted by the City Council, it would ask Wellington International Airport Limited -- 34% of which is owned by the Council -- to impose the extra charges.

Airline Officials Complain About Noise Limits at Amsterdam's Airport (Nov. 12, 1997). Aviation Daily reports that officials from the airline Polar Air Cargo are complaining about the consequences of strong noise limits imposed by the Dutch government at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport. The noise limits will lead to airport-wide frequency reductions next spring, the article notes. Polar Air officials also are asking the U.S. Department of Transportation not to approve an application by KLM airlines (a subsidiary of Northwest Airlines) to place Northwest's "NW" code on KLM flights between Amsterdam and Calcutta. Meanwhile, KLM officials also oppose the Dutch regulations, but say they should be granted the code approval.

Amsterdam Airport's Noise Regulations Will Limit Flights and Runway Usage (Nov. 12, 1997). Aviation Daily reports that officials at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport have submitted operational guidelines for the new noise regulations at the airport to the Dutch transport ministry. According to airport officials, the noise limits will require "far-reaching limitations on flights and runway usage" during 1998. Dutch carriers will have to reduce frequencies after April 1, airport officials said.

Freight Yard Approved Near Commercial and Residential Buildings in a Massachusetts Town; Business Owners Vow to Appeal (Nov. 12, 1997). The Telegram & Gazette reports that the Zoning Board in Sterling, Massachusetts, near Worcester, has granted a special permit to Colnon & Co. to develop a freight yard behind the Barbers Crossing North Restaurant on Route 12. Residents and business owners are angry at the decision, and some are planning to appeal.

Proposed Arizona Subdivision Would Place Homes Near Future Freeway, Raising Town Officials' Concern (Nov. 12, 1997). The Arizona Republic reports that a proposed 300-house subdivision near Gilbert, Arizona is being opposed by town officials because the development would threaten town land use plans for development around the Williams Gateway Airport, and because it would place homes next to the future San Tan Freeway, exposing future residents to traffic noise and fumes. However, town officials lack jurisdiction over the 75-acre land parcel, because it is an un-incorporated county "island" surrounded by the town. The proposal for the Hudson Ranches housing subdivision is expected to come before the Maricopa County Planning and Zoning Commission on November 20.

Residents Continue to Debate Los Angeles Leaf-Blower Ban (Nov. 11, 1997). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letters-to-the-editor regarding the leaf-blower ban in Los Angeles:

Noise Consultant Recommends Stronger Noise Restrictions for Universal Studio's Proposed Expansion in California (Nov. 11, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that according to a noise consultant, the construction that Universal Studios has proposed should follow county standards rather than the more lenient city standards. He also said that noise measurements should be taken at the studios at unannounced times.

Houses Still Sell in Noise Zones Around Ohio Airport (Nov. 11, 1997). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that jet noise around the Cincinnati - Northern Kentucky International Airport in Hebron, Ohio hasn't dissuaded people from purchasing homes in noise corridors around the airport. The article says that since April 1996, when the Kenton County Airport Board began a purchase assurance program as part of a federally mandated noise mitigation effort, 105 houses have been sold and an additional six sales are pending. According to figures released by the board's noise mitigation committee, the properties sold for an average of 94 percent of their appraised value and 95 percent of their list price.

Orlando Homeowners Reject Hotel Proposal from Universal Studios on Grounds of Traffic and Noise (Nov. 2, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that a group of Orlando, Florida, homeowners challenged Universal Studios Florida and won. Using increased traffic and noise pollution as issues, the residents persuaded the city's planning board to deny the theme park's application to build a hotel and golf course near their homes.

California Superior Court Rules Local Power Supersedes Federal in Airport Expansion (Nov. 1, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that Burbank won a court decision that gives it the right to control land use at Burbank Airport. The airport had claimed that federal law didn't allow localities to do this. The judge said "The question is whether you can take away from a local community the right to review an expansion in that community. I don't think federal authority goes that far." Legal representatives for Burbank noted "We have been victorious, not just legally, but in the ability to protect the noise environment around the airport."

Noise Regulation is Part of Indiana Town's Comprehensive Plan (Nov. 1, 1997). A much longer article from The Indianapolis News reports Westfield, Indiana's vision for their comprehensive plan for growth and management that came from two recent planning sessions. Among the priorities of the 140 residents who participated were desires to preserve the rural charm of their area while fostering mixed growth, and subdivisions with houses that aren't mirror images of each other. Among their concerns was the regulation of noise pollution from a nearby airport.

Lake Tahoe Jet Ski Ban Challenged by Manufacturers (Oct. 31, 1997). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the nation's jet ski industry filed suit in federal court in Sacramento, California, against Lake Tahoe's ban on personal watercraft. Watercraft manufacturers challenged the suit by arguing that the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency exceeded its authority when it adopted the ban, to take effect in June 1999. According to this article, the Lake Tahoe case is of particular importance because as "one of the nation's natural jewels," Lake Tahoe gives this fight "great visibility and importance."

Florida Residents Object to Dog Kennel, Fearing Noise and Stench (Oct. 30, 1997). The St. Petersburg Times reports that residents of Stonehedge on the Hill in Tarpon Springs, Florida, are upset about the possibility of a dog kennel opening in a building north of their mobile park. Previously, this building housed a fish-packing plant that that caused residents to complain of a foul odor. Next the building housed a nightclub that residents say blared music until all hours of the night.

Alternate Truck Route Makes for Quieter North Carolina Town (Oct. 29, 1997). The Chapel Hill Herald of Durham, North Carolina, reports that after years of complaints about noise and exhaust of huge trucks rumbling through downtown, Hillsborough merchants and residents now hope to reclaim their streets. State planners have said that as many as 600 trucks may pass through Hillsborough in a day's time. In six weeks, the N.C. Department of Transportation will give Hillsborough the authority to restrict large trucks from traveling on Churton Street -- N.C. 86 -- through downtown. Since 1991, town officials have been asking the state to find a way to route truck traffic away from Churton Street. But until now, the state said there were no alternate routes.

Expansion of New Zealand Airport Raises Noise Issues (Oct. 29, 1997). The Southland Times reports that a hearing into controversial air noise and runway issues at Queenstown Airport in New Zealand was delayed when the Queenstown Airport Corporation asked for more time to put its case together. The corporation had been scheduled to present technical evidence in relation to air noise boundaries and flight paths.

In a Twist, Texas Neighbors and Activists Support Noisy Business (Oct. 29, 1997). The Austin-American Statesman of Austin, Texas, reports that neighborhood residents in East Austin gathered to demand that the city award its 30-year curbside recycling contract to their old nemesis, BFI's Bolm Road recycling plant. In the past, the recycling plant has left wind-blown trash onto their lawns, annoyed them with crashing trash containers and sent trucks past their houses as many as 100 times a day. But residents and East Austin environmental activists urged the city to choose BFI, because the company has promised the neighborhood that it will move out if it gets the contract. BFI holds the current city contract, but it says the city's increasing recycling load would force it to move to a bigger facility if the contract is renewed.

Not a Good Idea to Overturn the Los Angeles Warner Center Plan (Oct. 29, 1997). The California Daily News of Los Angeles (Valley Edition) recently printed an editorial expressing its views on a decision by a state court of appeal to overturn the Warner Center Specific Plan. Noise pollution at the schools is an issue. Herein follows the editorial:

Virginia Politicians Oppose McCain's Airport Legislation (Oct. 29, 1997). The Washington Post reports that at a Capitol Hill hearing yesterday, Virginia Sens. John W. Warner (R) and Charles S. Robb (D), along with Rep.James P. Moran Jr. (D), bitterly renounced a proposal to relax federal flight controls at National Airport. They said this bill would mean more noise and congestion at the busy airport.

Virginia Residents Say More Navy Jets Incompatible with Human Life (Oct. 29, 1997). The Virginian-Pilot of Norfolk, Virginia, reports that at least 150 Chesapeake residents turned out for the Navy's final hearing on its plan to transfer up to 180 F/A-18 Hornets to Oceana Naval Air Station. The majority of the 15 people who spoke made it clear that more jets would not be welcome. The Navy's jets fly so close you can tell how recently the pilot shaved, one resident here complained. Others said the noise gets so bad they plug their ears when they go outside. And some residents worried that more jets would mean a greater danger of a crash in their neighborhoods.

Noise and Safety are Issues for Virginia Residents in Navy's Relocation of Jets (Oct. 28, 1997). The Virginia-Pilot of Norfolk, Virginia, reports that a large group of residents at a public hearing in Virginia Beach opposed the Navy's plan to bring 180 jets to Oceana. While city and state officials Monday night made a strong case for the Hornets, citizens asked the Navy for: peace, quiet and safety.

Residents Near Dallas's Love Field Say Their Noise and Safety Issues Ignored as Wright Amendment Debated (Oct. 28, 1997). The Dallas Morning News of Dallas, Texas, reports that a number of residents who live near Love Field Airport say their noise and safety concerns are being disregarded while a congressional debate about changing the Wright Amendment which would allow expansion at Love Field proceeds.

Senator McCain Sponsors Bill to Further Competition in Aviation (Oct. 28, 1997). The following press release was published in Washington, DC, by Senator John McCain who is sponsoring a bill to enhance aviation competition.

Factions will Speak for and against Relocation of Navy Jets to Virginia Beach; Noise is one Issue (Oct. 27, 1997). The Virginian-Pilot of Norfork, Virginia, reports that the Navy will holds the first of two public hearings in Hampton Roads to ask residents if they want the Hornets as their new neighbors. For Virginia Beach, the proposed relocation of 180 Hornets to Oceana, raises a number of issues. For Virginia Beach, a lot is at stake: economics, noise, safety, traffic congestion and water supply.

Love Airfield in Dallas Looks to Chicago's Midway Airport for Growth Strategies (Oct. 26, 1997). The Chicago Tribune printed an article in which an in-depth comparison is made between the Love Airfield in Dallas, Texas and the Midway Airport in Chicago, Illinois. Both airports are located in inner-city neighborhoods, and both play second fiddle to two of the world's largest airports. While Midway has experienced a small, but promising revitalization in recent years, Love Field's re-development is in an earlier stage. However, Congress currently is debating whether to make changes to the Wright amendment, a federal law that restricts flights from Love Field to destinations within Texas and its four neighboring states. Changes to the Wright amendment could improve the revitalization prospects for Love Field. Meanwhile, some Dallas residents oppose any increase in flights to and from Love Field because of increases in noise, pollution, and congestion.

California Schools Win Court Case Against Development Plan Due to Noise and Air Pollution Impacts (Oct. 25, 1997). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that California's Second District Court of Appeal invalidated a plan Friday that would allow the Warner Center in Woodland Hills, California to double its commercial and office space. The court found that the city failed to adequately address noise and air pollution impacts on nearby schools.

Environmental Group Joins Appeal of Homestead Air Force Base Permit in Florida (Oct. 24, 1997). The following wire report was released by US Newswire of Washington, DC, about the National Parks and Conversation Association's recent action regarding a permit for the re-development of Homestead Air Force Base in southern Florida.

New Jersey Residents Living Near Quarries Demand Stricter State Regulations (Oct. 24, 1997). The Record reports that residents living near quarries gathered in Haledon, New Jersey Thursday night to tell elected officials and quarry owners that they are fed up with the noise, dust, and blasting shocks they experience, and that they want stricter state quarry regulations and enforcement.

SunJet Airlines Suspends Flights From California Airport While Searching for Planes that Meet the City's Noise Regulations (Oct. 24, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that SunJet International, which offers chartered jets from Long Beach, California's airport has temporarily stopped operating at the airport in an attempt to find aircraft quiet enough for local noise regulations. The company has 118 noise violations since July of 1995, and had 28 just in September.

California Residents Are Up in Arms Over Proposed Truck Storage Area in Their Neighborhood (Oct. 23, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that residents in the Virginia Colony neighborhood of Moorpark, California say that a proposed truck storage lot near their homes is intolerable because of existing noisy industries and highways already nearby.

Re-routing Highway through Park Divides Minnesota Candidates; Noise an Issue (Oct. 23, 1997). The Star Tribune of Minneapolis, Minnesota, reports that in the renewed debate over the impact of routing Highway 55 at Minnehaha Park, the potential casualties are many, city politicians as well as alleged quality of life issues including noise

New York City Resident Wants New Noise Ordinance to Include Fines for Helicopters (Oct. 22, 1997). The New York Times printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Arun Malhotra, a New York City resident, asking the City Council to add fines for noisy helicopters to the city's recently passed noise ordinance:

Noise Restrictions at California Airport Approved by Airport Commission (Oct. 22, 1997). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Los Angeles Airport Commission Tuesday approved a plan to impose restrictions on jets at Van Nuys Airport to cut down on aircraft noise. The restrictions would ban flights by noisy jets starting at 10 p.m., instead of the current 11 p.m. curfew, and prohibit any more of the older, noisier, Stage 2 jets from joining the Van Nuys fleet. The article notes that the proposal still needs approval from the Los Angeles City Council, but that approval seems likely.

Texas Town Opposes Changes to the Wright Amendment That Would Bring Increased Air Traffic (Oct. 22, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that officials in Highland Park, Texas are opposed to possible changes in the Wright Amendment, which they say would increase air traffic at Dallas Love Field. Congress recently approved changes to the Wright Amendment, and the changes are awaiting presidential approval. Meanwhile, Highland Park has been acting as an information clearinghouse, providing information to residents about the proposed changes.

Universal Studios Loses Bid to Build Hotel and Golf Course in Orlando After Neighbors Complain About Increased Noise and Traffic (Oct. 22, 1997). The Orlando Sentinel reports that a group of residents in south Orlando, Florida opposed a project by Universal studies to build a hotel and golf course near their homes and won Tuesday when the city's planning board denied the request. The residents opposed the project based on the increased traffic and noise they believed would result.

Colorado City Councilor Challenges Proposed Annexation Plan Due to Jet Noise Under Parcel (Oct. 21, 1997). The Rocky Mountain News reports that a City Councilor in Greenwood Village, Colorado challenged a proposed 80-acre annexation Monday, saying it makes no sense to build 499 homes beneath a flight path for Centennial Airport. The issue was raised during a public hearing on the proposed annexation, which would annex South Peoria Street, Cherry Creek Drive, and parts of Peoria Street and East Belleview Avenue. The developer, Cherry Creek Holdings Partnership, sought annexation to Greenwood Village after the Arapahoe County commissioners rejected the housing plan, based largely on concerns about aircraft noise. Meanwhile, the article reports, three studies have reached different conclusions about the impact of aircraft noise on the site.

Idaho Residents' Concerns About Proposed Party Facility Causes Entrepreneur to Withdraw Idea (Oct. 21, 1997). The Idaho Statesman reports that the Boise City Planning and Zoning Commission approved a request for a conditional-use permit for a commercial reception center in a residential neighborhood in Northwest Boise. But the prospective buyer who requested the permit said she will not go forward with plans for the facility because nearby residents are opposed to it. Residents have said they are worried that the center would create noise, congested traffic, and parking problems.

Neighbors of Sex Club in Hollywood Try to Shut it Down Due to Noise and Parking Problems (Oct. 21, 1997). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that residents in a Hollywood, California neighborhood are seeking to shut down a gay sex club that is operating without a permit because of problems with noise and parking. However, the article reports, Los Angeles Councilor Jackie Goldberg is working to keep the club open. The operators of the club are seeking a conditional use permit that would allow the club to stay open, even though it is next to a residential neighborhood and near an elementary school. The City Council's Planning and Land Use Management Committee is to consider the proposal today, the article says.

Neighbors of California's Universal Studios Mount Increasing Opposition to Noise and Expansion Plans (Oct. 19, 1997). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that neighbors of Universal Studios in the Los Angeles, California area are mounting an opposition over the studio's plans for a multi-billion-dollar expansion. Residents already have been disturbed for years by the lights, noise, and continuous action from the studios, and now they say the expansion plans are too much.

New Plans for Mall in Northern Virginia Upset Residents; County Board Postpones Decision (Oct. 19, 1997). The Washington Post reports that 950 residents in Countryside, Virginia have signed petitions opposing a proposed 1.2 million-square-foot mall at the intersection of Routes 7 and 28. Residents say they are not opposed to a mall in principle, but are alarmed at the proposed changes in the mall's plans that would cause it to be more intrusive in their rural area, bringing noise, pollution, and glaring lights. Due to resident opposition, the County Board of Supervisors has postponed a decision on the requested changes and have agreed to hold a town hall meeting on the issue early next month.

Florida Theatre is too Disruptive for the Neighbors (Oct. 18, 1997). The Orlando Sentinel reports that residents in Lake Helen, Florida are speaking out about the nuisance of a theatre in their neighborhood. They told City Commissioners at a meeting Thursday that the theatre generates too much noise and traffic for a residential neighborhood. In response to residents and the theatre manager's comments, Commissioners decided to review about seven years' worth of records to determine whether the theater's existence is in violation of any city codes.

Auto Speedway Approved with Contingencies in Maryland as a Result of Citizen Input (Oct. 17, 1997). The Baltimore Sun reports that officials in Baltimore County, Maryland said yesterday that they would support a proposed auto speedway in Middle River only if the developer helps build wide roads to handle traffic. In response, the developer warned that such restrictions might make the project impossible. Meanwhile, residents who have strongly opposed the track worked with county officials to get many of their concerns reflected in the county's offer to the developer.

British Government Drops Commitment to Cut Noise Levels at Heathrow Airport (Oct. 17, 1997). The Evening Standard reports that the British government has dropped its commitment to cut noise levels at London's Heathrow Airport, on the grounds that an improvement in noise levels cannot be guaranteed. The news came through civil service evidence in the public inquiry into the proposed fifth terminal at Heathrow. The news shocked residents opposed to the expansion, the article says

British Government is Accused of Caving on Aircraft Noise (Oct. 17, 1997). The Daily Telegraph reports that the British government was accused of caving in to pressure from British Airways yesterday after dropping a 12-year-old commitment to seek continual noise reductions at London's Heathrow Airport. The inspector leading the public inquiry into the planned fifth terminal at Heathrow and residents opposed to the development both criticized the Labor government for its action.

Flight Restrictions to Address Noise at Amsterdam Airport Will Cost the Airlines (Oct. 17, 1997). The ANP English News Bulletin reports that according to the airline KLM, the flight restrictions imposed at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport to reduce noise pollution could cost the airline as much as 1.2 billion guilders in eliminated flights under a worse-case scenario. The restrictions are scheduled to take effect January 1. Meanwhile, the article says, the officials from the National Aviation and Astronautics Laboratory said they have found a way to reduce noise by 50% with a combination of technical adaptations and new methods of taking off and landing.

Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport Wins Noise Lawsuits (Oct. 16, 1997). Aviation Daily reports that Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport and the Dutch government were the victors in lawsuits brought against the airport for not following noise regulations.

Amphitheater Manager in Virginia Continues with Noise Reduction Measures; Residents Still Unhappy (Oct. 15, 1997). The Virginian-Pilot reports that noise complaints have plagued GTE Amphitheater in Virginia Beach, Virginia since it opened two years ago. At a meeting of the City Council on Tuesday, representatives of Cellar Door, which manages the amphitheater, said they plan to plant trees to cut down on noise, adjust lawn speakers, and consider purchasing better speakers. But City Councilors and residents continued to by skeptical and angry about the problem, the article says.

Editorial Writer Says Aviation Industry Should Promote its Current Commitment to Improving Air and Noise Pollution (Oct. 15, 1997). Flight International printed an editorial in which the columnist says that the aviation industry should do more to show how it is already making strides against air and noise pollution unless it wants to be faced with "increasingly irrational, and occasionally impossible," regulation. The writer goes on to discuss the new air emissions surcharge at the Zurich Airport and the new flight restrictions due to noise problems at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport as cases in point.

Netherlands Government Allows Amsterdam Airport to Violate Noise Standards Till End of 1997 (Oct. 15, 1997). Flight International reports that the Netherlands Government agreed October 3 to allow Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport to violate its noise standards till the end of the year, but has said the airport will have to meet those standards in 1998.

Congress Approves $1.7 Billion for Airport Improvements and Modifies Wright Amendment (Oct. 14, 1997). The publication Airports reports that the U.S. House and Senate sent President Clinton a fiscal 1998 Department of Transportation funding bill (H.R.2169) last week. The bill includes $1.7 billion for the Airport Improvement Program, which is $240 million over the fiscal 1997 level and $700 million over the administration request. A provision in the bill limited funds for both noise planning and mitigation and the Military Airport Program (MAP). In addition, House and Senate negotiators agreed last week to modify the Wright Amendment, which placed statutory restrictions on commercial service at Dallas Love Field. The House and Senate conferees allowed three additional states to be served without restriction from Love Field.

Federal Aviation Administration Tentatively Approves Funding for California Airport Improvement Program Projects (Oct. 14, 1997). The publication Airports printed the following list of Airport Improvement Program projects tentatively approved for California by the Federal Aviation Administration:

>Federal Aviation Administration Tentatively Approves Funding for Missouri Airport Improvement Program Projects (Oct. 14, 1997). The publication Airports printed the following list of Airport Improvement Program projects tentatively approved for Missouri by the Federal Aviation Administration:

Dallas Residents Say Noise Will Increase as Love Field Restrictions Eased (Oct. 9, 1997). The Dallas Morning News of Dallas, Texas, reports that residents who neighbor Love Field believe the noise they've learned to live with will increase as restrictions put in place by the Wright amendment are relaxed in other states.

Lawsuit Over Burbank Airport Expansion Will Clarify Laws on Local Control of Jet Noise (Oct. 6, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports the the outcome of a pending lawsuit between Burbank, California and Burbank Airport's airport authority will make it clearer for all airports as to when a local government can regulate aircraft noise at an airport. The first court appearance for the lawsuit will be on the last day in October in county court, although because of its implications the case may end up in the Supreme Court. The article discusses the background behind the fight, and how it will affect other cities authority to curb jet noise and designate land use for airports.

Nighttime Curfew Proposed for Australian Airport Meets With Opposition (Oct. 6, 1997). AAP Newsfeed reports that the Australian Democrat Senator Andrew Murray has proposed federal legislation that would place a midnight-to-6 am curfew at Perth Airport, similar to the curfews at the Sydney, Adelaide, and Melbourne Airports. While members of the public support the legislation, others are attacking it, including officials from Westralia Airports Corporation, the airport's new private-sector owner; Perth MHR Stephen Smith; and John D'Orazio, mayor of the noise-affected Bayswater.

Rhode Island Airport Officials Apply for Federal Noise Study Grant (Oct. 5, 1997). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that officials from the Rhode Island Airport Corporation, which manages the T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, have announced they will apply for a federal grant to study whether the airport should adopt mandatory flight rules that would reduce jet noise. The noise study also would re-draw the noise contours around the airport, the areas in which jet noise is a problem, in order to determine which areas need soundproofing. The Airport Corporation has scheduled three public meetings this month to hear comments on the proposed study, the article says.

Proposal for Nighttime Curfew at Australian Airport Raises Controversy (Oct. 5, 1997). AAP Newsfeed reports that Australian Democrats Senator Andrew Murray has introduced federal legislation that would impose a midnight-to-6 am curfew at the Perth Airport and a cap on the number of flights using the airport each hour. But Stephen Smith, MHR for Perth and a Labor Member of Parliament, today opposed the plan, saying it will have a negative impact on Western Australia, without improving the lives of residents near the airport.

Amsterdam Airport to Exceed Noise Limits (Oct. 4, 1997). The Star Tribune of Minneapolis, Minnesota reports that Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport - one of Europe's busiest - won a waiver from the government Friday allowing it to exceed noise limits.

California County May Privatize Two Airports Under a Federal Pilot Program (Oct. 4, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that Oxnard and Camarillo airports in Ventura, California may be sold or leased to private companies by local officials. The Federal Aviation Administration is allowing the plan under a pilot program that is trying to determine if private ownership of airports could be a way to deal with decreases in federal funding. The FAA will accept five airports nationwide for the pilot program,

Noise Wall Delay Makes Florida Residents Angry (Oct. 3, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel reports that residents in Sunrise, Florida who along Flamingo Road and Northwest 136th Avenue attended a City Commission meeting last week to complain about the lack of action in getting an 8-foot noise barrier built to protect their homes from traffic noise and dust. The project has been in the works for more than a year, the article says, and it could be another eight months before the wall is built.

Residents Near Montreal Area Airport Say Noise is Unbearable, While Officials Show No Sympathy (Oct. 2, 1997). The Gazette reports that residents living near the Dorval Airport outside Montreal, Quebec are complaining about an increase in jet noise after international flights were transferred from Mirabel Airport to Dorval on September 15. Residents of Dorval, Pointe Claire, and St. Laurent are especially affected by the changes, although communities around Montreal also are experiencing more noise. Last week, more than 80 Pointe Claire residents took over a city council meeting to vent their anger and demand action, the article reports, and the residents expect to do the same at the next meeting. Meanwhile, airport and local officials say the noise is not a problem and so far have refused to take action.

Dutch Airline Rejects Runways in North Sea for Schiphol (Oct. 1, 1997). Jane's Airport Review talks about the growth at Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and the White Paper that sets down clear limits to the airport's future growth, specifying day- and night-time ' noise zones'; a maximum annual throughput of passengers; freight; and enhanced safety and emissions. The growth of the airport has already outgrown the projections on which the 1990 study was completed.

U.S. Airlines Are Ahead of Regulatory Schedule for Quieter Aircraft (Oct. 1, 1997). M2 Presswire released a press release that says U.S. Secretary of Transportation Rodney Slater announced today that U.S. airlines are ahead of the federal regulatory schedule for a fifth consecutive year in making their fleets quieter. All airplanes must meet the quieter, Stage 3 noise levels by the year 2000 under the Airport Noise and Capacity Act of 1990, the press release notes.

France Plans to Add Two Runways at Paris Airport and Enact New Anti-Noise Standards (Sep. 30, 1997). International Market Insight Trade Inquiries reports that the French Ministry of Transport announced on September 23 that it plans to proceed with the addition of two new runways at Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris. Anti-noise standards will accompany the project, the article says.

Wright Amendment Foes in Texas See Repeal as Economic Boost; Proponents Cry Foul and Cite Noise and Safety Concerns (Sep. 30, 1997). The Dallas Morning News of Dallas, Texas, reports that while some favor the repeal of the Wright Amendment as a way to revitalize the economy of areas surrounding Love Field, others oppose the repeal of the Wright Amendment based on noise and safety concerns. Proponents use the recent revitalization of Midway Airport in Chicago as an example of what Dallas Love Field could be. Opponents say the Wright Amendment has little to do with area's economy.

Decision by Pennsylvania Airport Officials to Re-Locate 52 Homes Angers Residents (Sep. 29, 1997). The Morning Call reports that airport officials at the Lehigh Valley International Airport recently received a $3 million federal grant to re-locate the residents of 52 homes in the Williamson Mobile Home Court in Schoenersville, Pennsylvania. But homeowners are upset by the decision, the article says -- some because they learned about the airport's plans in the newspaper, and others because they don't want to move.

Australia Introduces Bill to Limit Flights at Sydney Airport (Sep. 26, 1997). AAP Newsfeed reports that Australia's federal government introduced the Sydney Airport Demand Management Bill 1997 yesterday that would limit the number of planes landing and taking off at Sydney Airport to 80 an hour and would limit the number of movements within five-minute periods. The bill was introduced by parliamentary transport secretary Michael Ronaldson, the article says. However, the bill has met with widespread criticism, both from a tourism lobbying group and from local officials whose towns are affected by jet noise.

Dutch Transport Minister Expresses Concerns About Future of Amsterdam Airport (Sep. 26, 1997). The ANP English News Bulletin reports that Dutch Transport Minister Annemarie Jorritsma Thursday told Members of Parlaiment that the economic development of Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport could be in danger as a result of recently imposed measures to curb noise pollution.

Hearing on Soundproofing and Purchase Program for Homes Near Indianapolis Airport is Postponed (Sep. 26, 1997). The Indianapolis Star reports that a public hearing on the Indianapolis (Indiana) Airport Authority's plans to alleviate noise problems for surrounding homeowners has been postponed until November after a request from the Plainfield Town Council for a 15-day extension. The hearing was supposed to be held Monday, but now will be held on November 12, the article says.

St. Paul Planning Commission Continues Suspension of New Metal Shredders (Sep. 25, 1997). The Star Tribune of Minneapolis, Minnesota, reports that members of the St. Paul City Council voted on Wednesday to extend a temporary moratorium on new metal shredders in St. Paul as the city neared a decision on whether to make the ban permanent. Those in favor of the ban object not to recycling but to the noise and other types of pollution caused by operation. They say the industry should find a more appropriate site.

Aircraft Noise Becomes an Issue in South Australian Election Campaign (Sep. 23, 1997). The AAP Newsfeed reports that aircraft noise became an issue in the South Australian election campaign today, when the ALP (Labor party) called for the nighttime curfew at Adelaide Airport to become federal law.

Massachusetts Airport Noise Opponents Are Disappointed at Officials' Response to Their Noise Recommendations (Sep. 23, 1997). The Patriot Ledger reports that residents and local officials in the Boston, Massachusetts area who are seeking a reduction of aircraft noise from Boston's Logan International Airport are disappointed at state and federal officials' response to noise mitigation recommendations they made earlier this year. Residents of Milton, Braintree, and Dorchester presented a list of recommendations to Massport and Federal Aviation Administration officials in July, and the agencies issued a five-page response to the recommendations this month.

New Noise Regulations at Amsterdam Airport Would Restrict Growth, Officials Say (Sep. 23, 1997). The publication Airports reports that new noise regulations proposed by officials at the Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, Netherlands would permit only limited air traffic growth in 1998, according to an airport official. The article says that according to the Dutch business daily Financieele Dagblad, Schiphol Manager Hans Smits said demand will increase by 8% to 10% next year, but capacity will increase by only 1% until 2003, when the airport's fifth runway becomes operational.

Rhode Island Airport Officials Consider Voluntary Noise Reduction Controls (Sep. 21, 1997). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that officials at the R.I. Airport Corporation are considering establishing voluntary flight rules at T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island, in order to address the recent backlash against increased noise after the airport's new terminal that opened one year ago. Flight rules being considered involve the amount of power pilots should apply on takeoff, how quickly they should climb, and whether they should turn once they gain sufficient altitude. The article notes that officials are considering these measures after they have already spent $35 million on other noise control schemes, including buying out neighbors, soundproofing houses, and building noise barriers on the airfield. The article goes on to detail the long history of the jet noise fight in Warwick, and the success of other airports around the country in establishing voluntary flight rules to mitigate noise.

Denver City Officials Agree to Discuss Airport Noise with County Under Threat of Lawsuit (Sep. 20, 1997). The Rocky Mountain News reports that Denver officials agreed Monday to negotiate with Adams County officials over noise from the Denver International Airport. Under a schedule set in a 1988 agreement, Adams County gave Denver until Monday to agree to talks on solving the noise problem, or else it would sue to collect $3.5 million in noise violation fines. While noise pollution still is the primary dispute, the negotiations are expanding to include other airport-related grievances, including water pollution caused by the airport and Adams County's opposition to a sixth runway.

Proposal to Reroute Corporate Jets to Different New Jersey Airport Worries Residents (Sep. 20, 1997). The Record reports that a plan to relieve congestion and delays at New Jersey's Newark International Airport could add 14,000 takeoffs and landings per year to the Teterboro Airport in Bergen County. But residents and local officials near Teterboro who are already fighting jet noise from the airport are unhappy with the idea and are preparing for a new battle, the article says.

Dutch Prime Minister Says Legal Noise Limits Must be Met at Amsterdam Airport (Sep. 19, 1997). The ANP English News Bulletin reports that the Netherlands' Prime Minister Wim Kok said on Thursday that the legal noise limits that apply to Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport must be observed, but that the cabinet will look into any leeway possible within the law. He added that no decision has been made yet on the new daytime flight restrictions proposed for the airport, but that no solution was possible within the law, there will be little the government can do besides approve the restrictions. The prime minister also said that eventual changes to legislation have not been ruled out.

German Cabinet Approves New Plan to Reduce Noise and Air Pollution from Jets (Sep. 19, 1997). The Journal of Commerce reports that the German Cabinet this week approved a new air-traffic environmental plan that calls for taxation of aircraft fuel and stricter requirements for aircraft to minimize harmful noise and air emissions. The plan was jointly proposed by the government ministries of Transportation and the Environment, the article notes.

Canadian Airline Fleets Start to Install Hush Kits to Meet New International Noise Regulations (Sep. 18, 1997). The Financial Post reports that Canadian airline fleets have started to install hush kits in their older, noisier planes in order to meet new international noise restrictions. The article goes on to describe the noise regulations and hush kits, and to discuss which Canadian airlines are installing the kits.

Chicago Suburb Seeks Voting Rights on Airport Noise Commission (Sep. 18, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports the Rolling Meadows (Illinois) City Council has agreed to seek voting rights on the Chicago O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission, a group formed by the mayor to make noise mitigation recommendations. Currently, the city is represented on the commission, but cannot vote on issues because it is not considered an "affected area." But residents convinced city councillors that the noise they experience warrants a vote on the commission, the article says.

FAA Committee Holds Meeting on Noise Certification Issues (Sep. 18, 1997). FNS Daybook reports that the Federal Aviation Administration's Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee will meet today to discuss noise certification issues.

Long Island Town Rejects Expansion Plan for Shopping Center Due to Citizen Protests (Sep. 18, 1997). Newsday reports that the North Hempstead (New York) Town Board voted unanimously Tuesday to reject plans for expanding a shopping center on Port Washington Boulevard, near a residential area. The board voted after a public hearing that attracted more than 100 residents who opposed the expansion. Residents believed the project would increase traffic, congestion, and noise.

Temporary Ban Set on Personal Watercraft in National Parks (Sep. 18, 1997). The Star Tribune reports that federal officials announced Wednesday that a moratorium will be imposed on the use of personal watercraft in the National Park System, starting in October. The moratorium could lead to a permanent ban on the machines in many areas of the National Park System, the article says.

Boston's Big Dig Highway Project Spends Millions on Noise and Other Mitigation Costs (Sep. 17, 1997). The Washington Post reports that officials managing Boston's "Big Dig," a massive highway project to build an eight-lane highway under the downtown at a cost of nearly $11 billion, are spending about a quarter of the project money on mitigating the negative impacts of the project. Critics say Big Dig bosses give money to anyone who's smart enough to threaten a lawsuit. But the bosses say their approach simply illustrates the reality of undertaking a large public infrastructure project in the late 1990s. Their approach, the article says, is a combination of engineering, traffic management, eco-sensitivity, social work, and ward-heeling that could indicate how the U.S. will approach other road and bridge projects, which across the country need hundreds of billions of dollars worth of repair.

German Government Approves Aircraft Emissions and Noise Proposals (Sep. 17, 1997). AFX News reports Germany's federal cabinet has approved a collection of proposals from the transportation and environment ministries that aim to reduce aircraft emissions and noise, according to a joint statement from the ministries. The statement also said that aircraft noise and emissions reduction would be encouraged through financial incentives -- for example, the tax break for the use of jet fuel could be eliminated, and taxes on aircraft take-offs and landings could be restructured.

Los Angeles City Council Moves to Place Restrictions on Noisy Jets at Van Nuys Airport (Sep. 17, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that the Los Angeles City Council will develop an ordinance to limit noisy jets at Van Nuys Airport, and to extend a nighttime curfew, now that the Federal Aviation Administration has authorized the plan.

Love Airfield in Dallas May Not be Able to Handle More Flights if Restrictive Law Ends (Sep. 17, 1997). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that a dispute is raging over whether the Wright Amendment, a law that restricts flights at the Love Airfield in Dallas, Texas, should be abolished. Many have speculated that abolishing the amendment would bring new air traffic growth and lower fares. But according to a Dallas official, there probably is not enough capacity at the airport to handle much growth. The article goes on to detail the limitations of the airport and of expanding flights there.

Air Freight Organization Opposes Noise Restrictions at Amsterdam Airport (Sep. 16, 1997). The ANP English News Bulletin reports that an organization of air freight companies, Barin, is opposing the restrictions on flights at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport, scheduled to take effect October 1. The organization sent an angry letter to Dutch Transport Minister Annemarie Jorritsma, claiming the restrictions designed to keep the airport within legal noise limits will compromise the safety and environmental standards.

Florida City Airport Officials Request New Federally Funded Noise Study (Sep. 16, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel reports that airport officials in Boca Raton, Florida will request Wednesday that the Airport Authority seek federal funding for a new noise study for the city airport called a Part 150 study. The action comes in the midst of continued criticism over airport officials' response to resident concerns about aircraft noise.

Freeway Noise Study in California Finds Noise Levels Don't Exceed Mandated Federal Levels (Sep. 16, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that the San Juan Capistrano City Council will review a noise study along Interstate 5. Residents had complained about noise after highway changes were made, but the study shows that noise levels do not exceed federal limits. Since the levels are not exceeded, it is likely that no noise mitigation will be undertaken.

Noise Limits for Amsterdam Airport May Be Reviewed and Relaxed by Government (Sep. 16, 1997). The Financial Times reports that the Dutch government may consider relaxing legal controls on noise pollution at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport, after airlines mounted a strong protest against recently announced flight restrictions. Transport Minister Annemarie Jorritsma favors a review of the noise legislation, the article says, and may gain the backing of a parliamentary majority in a debate expected this week.

Amsterdam Airport Proposes Daytime Flight Restrictions to Curb Noise (Sep. 15, 1997). The ANP English News Bulletin reports that officials at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport announced last week they would place daytime restrictions on flights, if approved by Transport Minister Annemarie Jorritsma, in order to stay within the country's noise limits. The restrictions would result in only two of the airport's four runways being available at some peak times, starting on October 1.

Experts with British Government Say Residents Don't Lose Sleep From Heathrow Aircraft Noise (Sep. 15, 1997). The Independent reports that at the long-running public inquiry into a proposed fifth terminal at London's Heathrow Airport, government experts are submitting testimony that nighttime flights do not affect people's sleep.

Ohio Residents Oppose Railroad Expansion That Would Triple the Number of Trains (Sep. 15, 1997). The Plain Dealer reports that the Norfolk Southern Railroad and its competitor, CSX, have submitted a joint application to the federal Surface Transportation Board to purchase rail tracks from Conrail in the Lorain County, Ohio. If the purchase is approved, the article says, Norfolk Southern will increase the number of freight trains it runs through Lorain County en route between New York and Chicago from 13 per day to 24. Residents who live near the tracks in Avon Lake and local government officials are opposed to the idea of increasing train traffic for a variety of reasons, including increased noise and safety issues.

New Noise Regulations Drafted in Malaysia (Sep. 13, 1997). The New Straits Times reports that three sets of new noise regulations and a set of guidelines have been proposed by the Malaysian government to control the country's worsening noise pollution. The regulations and guidelines address a wide range of noises and vibrations, and currently are being reviewed by the government's DOE.

Canada City Adopts Resolution Opposing Night Flights at Toronto Airport (Sep. 11, 1997). Canada NewsWire Ltd reports that the Mississauga, Ontario Council adopted a resolution today that opposes night flights at the Toronto area Lester B. Pearson International Airport (LBPIA). The article goes on to print the resolution the Council adopted.

Miami Residents Lobby Against Airport Noise, While Airport Officials Struggle to Reduce it (Sep. 11, 1997). The Miami New Times reports that Maimi, Florida resident Patrick McCoy has been leading a fight against the jet noise from the Miami International Airport. McCoy wants the airport to instigate a mandatory noise-abatement policy, like other large U.S. cities. Meanwhile, Jeffrey Bunting, environmental planner for the aviation department, is trying to implement new procedures and policies that would mitigate noise rather than pursuing a noise-abatement policy.

Airlines Complain About New Noise Regulations at Amsterdam Airport (Sep. 11, 1997). AFX News reports that three airlines said in a combined statement that the new regulations to mitigate noise levels at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport will have far-reaching, damaging consequences for them, and could severely damage the reputation of Schiphol as a high-quality European airport. The airlines that released the statement were KLM Royal Dutch Airlines NV, Transavia, and Martinair.

Amsterdam Airport Director Steps Down; Meanwhile, Residents Group Calls on Government to Reduce Noise Levels at Airport (Sep. 11, 1997). ANP English News Bulletin reports that Hans Smits, director of Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport, announced Wednesday that he will step down from his position to become vice chair of the Rabobank. During much of Smits' five-year tenure at the airport, Schipol has been surrounded by cotroversy regarding expansion plans. In a separate move on Wednesday, the residents' group GEUS (Vereniging Geen Uitbreiding Schiphol) called on Transport Minister Annemarie Jorritsma to reduce noise from the airport by 20%, alleging that Jorritsma is not keeping the airport within the legal noise limits.

Transportation Plan for Northeastern Illinois Draws Criticism from Airport Opponents and Others (Sep. 11, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that a public hearing was held in Des Plaines, Illinois Wednesday on the Chicago Area Planning Study, northeastern Illinois' transportation plan for 2020 recently released by CATS, the transportation authority. The hearing was dominated by calls for more data on the effects of a projected doubling of flights at O'Hare International Airport and for quieter trains, the article says.

Los Angeles City Councillors Act to Implement FAA-Approved Noise Mitigation Measures for Van Nuys Airport (Sep. 10, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that a Los Angeles City Councilman has proposed a motion to tell Van Nuys Airport officials to initiate specific noise mitigation measures just approved by the Federal Aviation Administration.

FAA Announces Approval and Review of Noise Programs in Arizona (Sep. 9, 1997). The publication Airports reports printed the following listings from the Federal Aviation Administration notices in the Federal Register:

Amsterdam Airport Officials Consider Closing One Runway at Peak Times to Abate Noise (Sep. 9, 1997). Airline Industry Information reports that officials from Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport have announced that they may close one of the airport's four runways during peak times in order to stay within legal noise limits.

United Airlines Reduces Noise Emissions Early (Sep. 8, 1997). M2 Presswire released a press release from United Airlines that says the airline will have reduced the aircraft noise emissions of its fleet by 25% more than federal standards require by the end of this year. The announcement came today during a meeting of the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission.

European Environmental Bureau Calls for Fuel Tax on Aircraft to Reduce Noise (Sep. 8, 1997). The Weekly of Business Aviation reports that the European Environmental Bureau (EEB) released a new policy statement to European Union members, saying that Europe's problem with increasing aircraft noise pollution is partly a result of the absence of a tax on aircraft fuels. The EEB called for noise mitigation measures to be funded by such a tax.

Rally Held in Missouri Town to Protest Airport Runway Plan (Sep. 7, 1997). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that a rally was held Saturday at the St. Charles (Missouri) City Hall to protest the proposed runway west of Lambert Air Field outside St. Louis. An estimated 500 people attended the two-hour rally organized by St. Charles Citizens Against Aircraft Noise. City, county, and state elected officials also attended and spoke at the rally.

Disputes over Noise at California's Van Nuys and Burbank Airports Take Different Turns, Columnist Says (Sep. 7, 1997). The Los Angeles Times printed an editorial which expresses the different results in two similar noise-related disputes at southern California airports. The Federal Aviation Administration allowed Van Nuys Airport to initiate an extended noise curfew and limits on the loudest jets. On the other hand, Burbank decided to stop talking with the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority, choosing instead to let pending lawsuits decide the noise disputes there: at taxpayers expense.

One Airline at New York County Airport Agrees to Comply with Voluntary Nighttime Noise Curfew (Sep. 7, 1997). The New York Times reports that in response to resident complaints about nighttime flights at the Westchester County Airport in Valhalla, New York, the County Transportation Commissioner wrote letters to the offending airlines asking them to cooperate with a voluntary nighttime curfew. But only one airline, Continental Express, agreed to delay its first flight of the day to comply with the curfew.

California City Officials Looking for Ways to Quiet Train Whistles (Sep. 6, 1997). The Press-Enterprise reports that city officials in Riverside, California are searching for ways to quiet loud train horns that are drawing more complaints from residents. Officials are considering making the city a "quiet zone" for trains, which would require approval from the federal government and funds to build new railroad crossings.

Chicago Suburb's Decision not to Join City Noise Group Draws Criticism (Sep. 6, 1997). The Chicago Tribune printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Laurie Stone, president and CEO of the Greater O'Hare Association of Industry and Commerce, regarding the decision by Elk Grove Village (Illinois) officials to not join the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission, a group formed by Chicago's mayor to address airport noise issues:

Chicago's Airport Noise Commission Wants Pilots to Use Full Length of Runway for Takeoffs to Reduce Noise (Sep. 6, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission, a city-suburban group working on noise issues at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, asked federal regulators Friday to require pilots taking off at night to use the full length of a runway in order to avoid flying at a low altitude over the northwest suburbs. The commission's action comes as noise complaints from residents are rising, the article says.

FAA Refuses to Re-Route California Jet Route Away from Indian Reservation (Sep. 6, 1997). The Press-Enterprise reports that the Federal Aviation Administration has published the final version of an environmental assessment for a flight route proposal that would send as many as 170 jets per day bound for Los Angeles International Airport over California's San Gorgonio Pass and western Riverside County. The FAA's environmental assessment rejects an alternate route proposed by the Morongo Band of Mission Indians that would have routed the planes around the Morongo Indian Reservation. City officials and residents in Norco also opposed the FAA-proposed route, but the environmental assessment report downplays their concerns, the article says.

Indiana Township Calls Public Meeting to Interpret Technical Aircraft Noise Report (Sep. 6, 1997). The Indianapolis Star reports that Charles Spears, Assessor for Wayne Township, Indiana, has called a public meeting to interpret a highly technical report on the impact of aircraft noise from Indianapolis International Airport. The report, which was released by the Indianapolis Airport Authority and prepared by a consultant, outlines the impact of noise on residents in Wayne and Decatur townships and Hendricks County. The meeting will be Monday at 7 p.m. in Ben Davis Junior High School, 1200 N. Girls School Road. The article notes that the airport authority has scheduled its own public hearing on the report for September 29 at 5 p.m. in the auditorium of Plainfield High School.

Collapse of Negotiations Over Airport Expansion in Burbank Leaves Rift Between City Officials (Sep. 5, 1997). The LA Weekly reports that late last week, negotiations collapsed between city officials in Burbank, California and the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority over expansion plans for the Burbank Airport, leaving decisions to be settled in court cases already filed. City and community leaders want strong restrictions on jet noise and air traffic, while authority members believe expansion is needed because the airport is already operating beyond capacity. But the failed attempt to negotiate a compromise has left a political rift within the city of Burbank, the article argues. Early this year, elected city officials and their appointees appeared to form a united front to oppose substantial airport expansion, but now the officials are divided into factions, with each side accusing the other of cynical politics, the article says.

Chicago Suburb Votes to Support Federal Bill to Fund Noise Office at EPA (Sep. 4, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that village trustees in Arlington Heights, Illinois voted unanimously Tuesday to support a federal bill that would fund a noise abatement office in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The legislation is known as the Quiet Communities Act of 1997, and is currently being reviewed by committees in the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate. Arlington Heights has long been involved in a fight against O'Hare International Airport over aircraft noise.

City Officials Say Proposed Noise Control Agreement Between Toronto Airport and Airlines Isn't Tough Enough (Sep. 4, 1997). The Toronto Star reports that officials in Mississauga, Ontario believe a proposed noise control agreement between the Greater Toronto Airports Authority and the airlines using Pearson International Airport isn't tough enough. City officials insist that restrictions on runway use should be more stringent than outlined in the proposed agreement.

Connecticut Citizen Airport Commission Adopts Written Policy on Noise Pollution (Sep. 4, 1997). The Hartford Courant reports that the Bradley International Airport Commission, a citizen commission in Windsor Locks, Connecticut that advises the state on the operation of Bradley International Airport, adopted a policy Wednesday that outlines recommended procedures for addressing noise pollution from jets. The policy stipulates that airport officials will "investigate each legitimate complaint and report its finding back to the caller," that officials of the state Department of Transportation, which runs the airport, will contact airlines and cargo carriers following complaints "to solicit their future cooperation with the airport's noise abatement program."

Aiport Officials Blame Burbank City Officials for Abandoning Talks Over Airport Expansion (Sep. 3, 1997). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that officials with the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority decried Burbank (California) city officials' decision Tuesday to end talks intended to resolve the dispute over the airport terminal expansion. Authority officials claimed that Burbank officials destroyed the mediation process by making demands that could not legally be met by the authority. But city officials maintain that the authority wasn't willing to make concessions on noise restrictions. According to airport officials, the fate of the terminal now will be decided in an on-going legal battle over the project.

County in Washington Makes it Easier to Punish Industrial Noise Polluters (Sep. 3, 1997). The Lewiston Morning Tribune reports that commissioners in Asotin County, Washington Monday passed a revision of an ordinance that will allow the county sheriff's employees, rather than state employees, to enforce industrial noise regulations. The action came partly as a result of complaints from residents living near Dutch's Welding in Clarkston, who said they couldn't get an uninterrupted night of sleep because of noise from the company. In addition, the state didn't have an employee stationed in Asotin County who could enforce industrial noise issues, the article says.

Ohio Airport Noise Task Force's Recommendations Sent to the FAA (Sep. 3, 1997). The Dayton Daily News reports that the Aircraft Noise Task Force, commissioned last January to recommend ways to alleviate early morning aircraft noise over Centerville and Washington Township, Ohio (outside Dayton), recently produced a list of 16 long-term and short-term recommendations. On Aug. 18, Washington Township trustees and Centerville City Councillors approved those recommendations, and sent them to Rep. Tony Hall (D-Dayton), who forwarded them last week to the Federal Aviation Administration. Hall has asked the FAA to respond to the task force's recommendations and help lessen the noise, the article says.

European Environmental Bureau Calls for Aircraft Fuels Tax to Fund Noise Abatement (Sep. 2, 1997). Aviation Daily reports that the European Environmental Bureau (EEB) released a policy statement to European Union members stating that noise abatement measures should be funded by a tax on aircraft fuels. The EEB report also called for strict rules against night flights at Europe's airports, the article says.

Connecticut Airport Considers Policy on Addressing Noise Complaints (Sep. 1, 1997). The Hartford Courant reports that the Airport Commission, an advisory board for Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks, Connecticut, will meet Wednesday to consider adopting a written policy to improve noise control and respond to residents' complaints about noise.

Local Authorities Are Granted More Power to Arrest Noisy Neighbors in England and Wales (Aug. 31, 1997). The Times Newspapers Limited reports that the government of the United Kingdom has given local authorities and housing associations in England and Wales the power to seek an injunction for the arrest of rowdy tenants. The new rules allow offenders to be arrested and charged with a breach of the peace or of their tenancy agreement, and prostitutes and drug-dealers will lose their tenancies, the article says. Neighbors who are arrested could spend a night in jail and appear in court the following morning.

Salvation Army in Boise Fights Order to Build Wall to Protect Neighbors From Noise (Aug. 31, 1997). The Idaho Statesman reports that the Salvation Army in Boise, Idaho is fighting a directive from the city's Planning and Zoning Commission to build a 10-foot masonry wall at its State Street store to shield nieghbors from noise. The Salvation Army plans to take its case to the Boise City Council on Sept. 9, the article says.

FAA Approves Increased Airport Noise Regulations at Van Nuys, California Airport (Aug. 30, 1997). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Federal Aviation Administration has approved changes at the Van Nuys (California) Airport to extend the nighttime curfew and to restrict the presence of noisier aircraft at the airport. The FAA's ruling is a reversal of its decision a year ago not to allow extending the curfew and limiting the jets, the article says.

Personal Watercraft in Florida Waters Cause Safety and Noise Problems (Aug. 29, 1997). The Tampa Tribune printed an article outlining the controversy over personal watercraft, known as Jet Skis, in St. Petersburg Beach and other areas in Florida. The article contains an in-depth look at the safety problems with the watercraft, but also outlines some of the noise issues surrounding the watercraft. According to the article, Labor Day weekend is likely to bring more attention to the battle between personal watercraft users and everyone else in the water trying to have a good time.

Maryland County Board Approves Private Airstrip Over Neighbors' Objections (Aug. 28, 1997). The Baltimore Sun reports that the Carroll County (Maryland) Board of Zoning Appeals yesterday approved an application for a private airstrip on a 208-acre property in Woodbine. The board approved construction of a 50-foot by 1,785-foot landing strip, but stipulated that the strip can only be used by the owner's two single-engine planes for 40 trips per year.

The Netherlands Government Approves Measures to Reduce Noise at Amsterdam Airport (Aug. 28, 1997). ANP English News Bulletin reports that a large majority of Members of Parlaiment in the Netherlands approved the cabinet's measures for reducing noise from Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport on Tuesday. Only the opposition parties of the Green Left and the Socialist Party believed the measures to be inadequate, the article reports.

Florida City Officials and Residents Question the Effectiveness of Airport Noise Committee (Aug. 27, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel reports that the City Council in Boca Raton, Florida has asked to meet with the Airport Authority for the second time in three months over allegations that the recently formed Noise Compatibility Advisory Committee is ineffective. The article says one member of the noise committee resigned last week, and other members complained at a City Council workshop on Monday that the committee is ineffective.

Voters in Colorado Community to Decide Development Fate of Land in Airport Noise Zone (Aug. 27, 1997). The Denver Post reports that the City Council in Greenwood Village, Colorado has decided to ask voters whether the city should annex a piece of land from Arapahoe County for a new housing development. The housing development recently was turned down by the Arapahoe County Commission because the land is inside a high noise zone of the Centennial Airport.

Ontario Airport Makes Forbidden Night Flights to Test Noise Levels, Angering Residents and Officials (Aug. 26, 1997). The Toronto Star reports that officials at the Pearson International Airport near Toronto, Ontario permitted secret flights during restricted night hours in order to test whether such flights would be tolerated by nearby residents on a regular basis. The flights have angered residents and local officials. Louis Turpen, president of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority, said the flights had to be kept secret to ensure valid results.

China Issues New Noise Pollution Regulations for Southern Province (Aug. 21, 1997). The China Business Information Network reports that new noise regulations expected to be approved next month will take effect later this year in Guangdong, an economically-developed province in south China. The Guangdong Provincial Regulations on the Prevention of Noise Pollution, which are expected to be passed by the Provincial People's Congress next month, will punish firms and vehicle-owners who create too much noise in residential areas, the article says.

Los Angeles Cuts Aircraft Landing Fees at Two Airports, Approves Passenger Charge to Pay for Noise Mitigation Programs (Aug. 21, 1997). Aviation Daily reports that the Los Angeles Board of Airport Commissioners has agreed to reduce aircraft landing fees at Los Angeles and Ontario airports, funds which have been used for noise mitigation programs. The board wants to raise the money for noise mitigation through a passenger facility charge instead, the article reports. The board's decisions must be approved by the Federal Aviation Administration, which is expected later this year.

British Police Will Enforce Noise Restrictions on Car Stereos (Aug. 20, 1997). According to The Northern Echo of England, government officials are preparing to award police with more powers to combat loud car stereos in England.

Debate Continues About Whether an Airport Control Tower Will Increase or Lower Noise in a Florida City (Aug. 20, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel reports that debate continues in Boca Raton, Florida over whether an airport control tower at Boca Raton Airport, scheduled for construction by the end of the year, will reduce or increase noise levels. On Tuesday, Philip Jones, an air controller for RVA Associates Inc., the company that would run the tower planned for the airport, told members of the airport's noise advisory committee that a tower can help improve noise problems by permitting air traffic controllers to tell pilots to use specific flight routes that avoid residential areas.

Groups Battling Over Noise Issues at New Zealand Airport Reach an Agreement (Aug. 20, 1997). The Dominion reports that the groups involved in an Environment Court hearing against provisions in the Wellington (New Zealand) City Council's district plan regarding acceptable noise controls for the Wellington Airport have signed a consent order, agreeing to settle their differences, after a week of court-ordered mediation. The Residents Airport Noise Action Group, Wellington International Airport Ltd, the Board of Airline Representatives, and Wellington City Council presented the consent order to Judge Shonagh Kenderdine, ending more than 10 years of dispute on the issue.

Illinois Town Joins an Effort to Oust the FAA as Airport Noise Monitor (Aug. 20, 1997). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Park Ridge, Illinois has become the first town to join a campaign by the Alliance of Residents Concerning O'Hare to remove the Federal Aviation Administration from airport noise monitoring and return the power to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Province in South China Expected to Pass New Noise Pollution Regulations (Aug. 20, 1997). The Xinhua News Agency reports that according to today's China Daily, new regulations limiting noise pollution will take effect later this year in Guangdong, a province in South China. The provincial regulations are expected to be passed by the Provincial People's Congress next month.

Chicago Suburb Rejects Proposal to Join Chicago Airport Noise Commission and Supports Federal Legislation to Restore Noise Regulation Power to EPA (Aug. 19, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that the Park Ridge (Illinois) City Council voted unanimously Monday night to reject a proposal to join the City of Chicago's O'Hare Airport Noise Commission. In addition, the council voted to endorse federal legislation that would restore the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's authority to regulate noise emissions, the article reports.

Dutch Government Agrees to Speed Up Plans for a Fifth Runway at Amsterdam Airport (Aug. 19, 1997). AP Worldstream reports that the Dutch government agreed Monday to accelerate work on a fifth runway at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport. The runway project is designed to decrease noise in neighborhoods near the airport by providing another landing strip for incoming jets.

Missouri Citizens Group Calls for Local Officials to Take a Stand on Pursuing Noise Agreement with Airport (Aug. 19, 1997). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that members of St. Charles (Missouri) Citizens Against Aircraft Noise (CAAN) are urging more aggressive action by local officials in pursuing a noise agreement with city officials in St. Louis over noise from Lambert Field. CAAN opposes an airport expansion plan favored by St. Louis officials that would extend a runway two miles closer to St. Charles. CAAN members have staged a rally for September 6 and are urging officials who support the group to attend and speak at the event.

More Noisy Streetcars to be Bought in San Francisco (Aug. 19, 1997). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the Board of Supervisors voted yesterday to allow San Francisco's Municipal Railway to buy 59 more Italian-built Breda streetcars, despite problems with the streetcars that include screeching noise and vibrations that shake houses.

Court Rules That Amsterdam Airport Doesn't Have Authority to Limit Nighttime Flights (Aug. 18, 1997). The ANP English News Bulletin reports that a court in Haarlem, Netherlands ruled Friday that the Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam did not have the authority to limit air traffic and control noise pollution levels by imposing a ban on night flights by wide-body planes. The suit was brought by a number of airlines, led by the charter airline Martinair.

Florida Airport Offers Money to Airlines That Fly Quiet Jets (Aug. 18, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel reports that officials from the Palm Beach (Florida) International Airport want to return some of the fees airlines have paid as a penalty for flying noisy airplanes after an airline flies 80% or more of its flights using quieter "Stage 3" jets. Airport officials plan to bring their proposal before county commissioners Tuesday.

Rhode Island Airport Grows and Noise Complaints Increase (Aug. 17, 1997). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that air traffic at the T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island is booming, due in part to a new air terminal that opened 11 months ago and by the introduction of Southwest Airlines to the airport. Meanwhile, residents living near the airport are complaining more and more about the noise from the growing airport. In recent developments, Air Ontario and Southwest announced plans Thursday to add service to Toronto, Iceland, and Luxembourg; the City Council Tuesday asked the state Department of Health to conduct an independent noise study; and a City Councillor has a resolution pending that would require a portion of the airport's landing fees be given to the city. The article details the history of attempts to measure noise impacts at the airport.

Landing Slots at Amsterdam Airport to be Apportioned by Independent Administrator (Aug. 16, 1997). The Financial Times (London) reports that Annemarie Jorritsma, the Netherlands Transport Minister, said she would seek clearance from Brussels to declare Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport a "co-ordinated airport," with landing slots apportioned by an independent administrator, in an attempt to address noise problems. If the regulation goes through, airlines would be forced to surrender some of their present scheduled times at the airport and would be allocated other times. The announcement comes the day after a ruling by a Haarlem court that the airport must rescind a ban on night flights by older, noisier jets in an attempt to not exceed legal noise limits.

Public Hearing on Noise Plan at Indianapolis Airport is Delayed (Aug. 16, 1997). The Indianapolis News reports that the Indianapolis Airport Authority voted Friday to delay a public hearing on a noise mitigation plan for the airport by 30 days. The hearing was set for August 25, but the Plainfield Town Council sent a letter to the authority asking for a 90-day delay. In a related development, the Town of Plainfield decided this week to hire a consultant to study the noise plan for the town.

California State Senator Lobbies to Strenghten State Law on Airport Noise (Aug. 15, 1997). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that Calfornia State Senator Quentin Kopp plans to introduce legislation that will give the state more power to minimize noise at airports. Kopp said at a public hearing in San Mateo yesterday that noise from increased air traffic at San Francisco International Airport is becoming a bigger problem for San Mateo County residents.

Colorado Airport Board Votes to Keep a Ban on Heavy Jets (Aug. 15, 1997). The Rocky Mountain News reports that the Centennial Airport Board in Arapahoe County, Colorado voted Thursday to refuse to open the airport's runways to large corporate jets, giving a victory to opponents of airport expansion and of increased noise pollution. However, the article says, the board hedged on whether it will permit so-called through-the-fence cargo operations, which opponents fear will encourage more noisy cargo flights into the airport. The board had postponed its decisions until Thursday after several hundred people packed a hearing room June 19 to oppose the measures, the article says.

New Rules at Washington Air Force Base Should Reduce Noise (Aug. 15, 1997). The News Tribune reports that aircraft landings at McChord Air Force Base near Tacoma, Washington should be quieter from now on, due to new minimum altitude requirements that go into effect today.

Restrictions on Air Tours at National Parks Receives Attention in Utah (Aug. 15, 1997). The Washington Post reports that one of the hottest controveries at Utah's Bryce Canyon National Park and other national parks is the pending federal regulations of air tours over the parks. Past and current attempts to limit air tours over the Grand Canyon will play a part in determining what regulations are formed for all national parks, the article says. The controversy has pitted backpackers, environmentalists, and some park superintendents against the air tour industry.

Aircraft Noise Debate Continues in Florida City (Aug. 10, 1997). The Palm Beach Post reports that complaints about aircraft noise have been increasing in variety, number, and ferocity in Boca Raton, Florida and surrounding communities. Recent debate has focused on the planned $1 million construction of an air-traffic control tower for the Boca Raton Airport next year, which opponents believe will attract more air traffic and noise. Meanwhile, a resident on a noise committee formed earlier this year said the committee has not been very effective so far.

Amsterdam Airport Institutes Ban on Night Flights to Reduce Noise (Aug. 6, 1997). The ANP English News Bulletin reports that the Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, the Netherlands Tuesday instituted a ban on night flights to avoid exceeding the country's noise pollution limits. The ban was approved late Monday by Transport Minister Annemarie Jorritsma, who described the plan as insufficient and called for a revised plan to be presented by September.

Debate Over Aircraft Noise at New Zealand Airport Begins in the Environment Court (Aug. 5, 1997). The Evening Post reports that the Environment Court in Wellington, New Zealand is being asked to decide how Wellington Airport and its neighbors can best live with each other. A three-week court hearing started yesterday to hear appeals against airport noise provisions in Wellington City Council's proposed District Plan. Judge Shonagh Kenderdine, assisted by three environment commissioners, is hearing the case.

Amsterdam Airport Accused of Negligence by Aviation Authority for Delay in Instituting Noise Mitigation Measures (Aug. 5, 1997). ANP English News Bulletin reports that civil aviation authorities in the Netherlands are accusing officials at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport of negligence because they delayed implementing noise mitigation measures that would prevent the airport from exceeding national noise limits. Civil aviation authority officials said the airport did not need to get approval from the government before implementing its latest plan to ban nighttime flights.

Editors Advise Giving Chicago's "Fly Quiet" Nighttime Aircraft Noise Reduction Plan Another Chance (Aug. 4, 1997). The Chicago Sun-Times printed an editorial which argues that Chicago's "Fly Quiet" voluntary nighttime noise reduction plan for O'Hare International Airport flights should be given a second chance. The program has only been underway for a month, the article points out, and deserves a longer chance to see if it will work.

Europe Continues to Limit Aircraft Noise (Aug. 4, 1997). Aircraft Value News reports that several recent actions in Europe have continued to place limitations on aircraft noise. As a result, the article says, residual values for a number of aircraft types may be called into question.

Aviation Industry Angry Over Move by European Body to Place Further Restrictions on Chapter 2 Aircraft (Aug. 4, 1997). Commuter/Regional Airline News International reports that the aviation industry is reacting in anger over moves by the European Civil Aviation Conference (ECAC) to prevent the influx of hushkitted Chapter 2 aircraft into its 36 member countries after April 1, 1999, three years ahead of the date set for all Chapter 2 aircraft to be banned from ECAC countries. The article reports that ECAC officials also have said they intend to recommend that Chapter 2 aircraft not be allowed to join the ECAC fleet after April 1999, even if they are fitted with hushkits to bring them into compliance with Chapter 3 noise level standards. It is believed that ECAC has proposed the earlier date in order to stop Chapter 2 aircraft from flooding their market if, as expected, the aircraft are banned in North America before 2000, the article says.

Resident Says if Florida Airport Allowed to Grow, Noise and Safety Problems Will Worsen (Aug. 3, 1997). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Robert Betts, a Lake Mary, Florida resident, regarding noise problems from the Orlando-Sanford Airport:

Chicago and Suburb of Bensenville Argue Over Who Can Talk at Public Meeting About Airport Soundproofing Plan (Aug. 3, 1997). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that officials in Bensenville, Illinois invited residents to a meeting Tuesday to learn about how and when soundproofing would be done in a program to dampen jet noise from O'Hare International Airport. The article says that Chicago aviation officials were furious when they weren't allowed to do the talking, but contractors were.

Dutch Government Will Decide Next Week Whether to Impose Nighttime Flight Restrictions at Amsterdam Airport, Delaying the Target Implementation Date (Jul. 30, 1997). The Business Times reports that officials at the Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, Netherlands will announce early next week if they will proceed with plans announced earlier to ban certain night flights and restrict others in order to meet the country's noise regulations. The airport's new rules were set to take effect August 1, but the government, which must approve the rules, currently is studying the issue. Meanwhile, airlines whose operations would be limited by the rules have raised strong protests and some reportedly have threatened to sue the airport, saying the restrictions would violate aviation treaties such as the open-skies agreements.

Charter Airlines Threaten Price Increase if Nighttime Flight Restrictions Imposed at Amsterdam Airport (Jul. 29, 1997). The ANP English News Bulletin reports that charter airline companies have said fares may rise 30%-40% if nighttime noise restrictions are imposed at the Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The airport has proposed to limit nighttime flights starting August 1 in order to avoid exceeding the country's noise pollution limits.

Grand Canyon Air Tour Operators Refuse to Pay Park Service Fees, Landing Them in Court (Jul. 28, 1997). The Arizona Republic printed an editorial about the refusal of some air tour operators in Grand Canyon National Park to pay Park Service fees. Now, the U.S. Attorney's Office in Arizona has filed the first of what may be several lawsuits against air tour operators to collect the fees. The editorial compares the situation to a tenant not paying rent, and says the air tour operators should be "evicted" if they don't pay.

What's the Quietest Lawn Mower? (Jul. 26, 1997). The Times printed an editorial that outlines which lawn mowers that can be purchased in Britain are the noisiest and the quietest. It also discusses the noise restrictions on lawn mower use in Germany, and talks about the fact that the European Community is considering new noise regulations for mowers. The writer concludes by giving a ranking of the types of mowers from noisiest to quietest.

Canadian City's Proposed Plan Faces Appeal from Airports Authority Because of Planned Land Uses (Jul. 24, 1997). The Toronto Star reports that the proposed new Official Plan in Mississauga, Ontario is being appealed by the Greater Toronto Airports Authority because it will allow development in high-noise areas near Pearson International Airport. The authority is afraid that such development will result in residents opposing future operations and expansion of the airport. The authority's appeal also is supported by the Air Transport Association of Canada, an umbrella group representing airlines and helicopter operators. The appeal will be heard by the Ontario Municipal Board, the article reports.

City in Washington May Lack Power to Control Noise from Rail Yard (Jul. 24, 1997). The Seattle Times reports that the Everett (Washington) City Council yesterday introduced an ordinance that would limit operations in the switching-yard of The Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad near Everett Marina due to resident complaints about noise. The ordinance would forbid excessive noise between 10 pm and 7 am. However, federal laws protect railroads from local regulations due to constitutional restrictions on interfering with interstate commerce, leading to speculation that the city may not have the power to enforce its ordinance.

Approval Sought for Long Flights from Dallas Airfield; City Council May Make the Final Decision (Jul. 23, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that Legend Airlines has proposed to offer long-haul passenger service from Love Field in Dallas, Texas, which would compete with airlines at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Legend Airlines officials recently convinced members of the U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee to approve legislation that would let them use Love Field in a way barred by the U.S. Transportation Department's interpretation of the Wright amendment. However, the committee also has adopted language that would give the Dallas City Council the final decision on the issue, in a concession to Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas), who opposes Legend's plan. Meanwhile, residents living near Love Field already have been fighting noise and traffic from the airfield.

New Noise Act in U.K. Gives Authorities More Power to Quiet Nighttime Noise Offenders (Jul. 23, 1997). M2 Presswire reports that the provisions of the United Kingdom's Noise Act 1996 come into effect today, National Noise Awareness Day, for those local authorities which adopt the provisions of the Act. The Act sets a permitted noise level for nighttime noise on domestic premises.

Noise Awareness Day Highlights Pervasive Noise Problems in Scotland (Jul. 23, 1997). The Herald reports that today is Scotland's National Noise Awareness Day, with the aim of increasing understanding of noise issues and considering the effects our lifestyles, transport, and businesses have on noise pollution. The article outlines some of the ways noise pollution is on the increase, and what Scotland is doing about it.

New Group Formed to Study Noise from Denver Airport (Jul. 22, 1997). The Denver Post reports that the Denver International Airport Study Coordinating Group has been formed to undertake a $200,000 independent study of noise from the Denver International Airport. The non-profit group will consist of representatives from up to nine counties and two citizen groups, the article says, with congressional monitoring by Sen. Wayne Allard and Rep. Joel Hefley (both Republicans). Denver's Mayor, Wellington Webb, joined the group Monday to launch the study, which is expected to be completed by the year's end.

Proposed Flight Path in Florida Still Opposed by Residents, Though Approved by Airport Authority (Jul. 22, 1997). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that a group of residents is still opposed to a new flight path for aircraft leaving the Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport that will route planes over Longboat Key, near Sarasota, Florida. The Sarasota-Manatee Airport Authority several months ago voted 6-2 to approve the new flight pattern, after extensive public hearings that pitted mid-Longboat Key residents against Manatee County residents who hoped to get some relief from aircraft noise. But now William Myers, an unsuccessful 1996 candidate for the authority, has brought the issue back, taxing the patience of the authority members, the article says.

Study in Scotland Finds Only a Small Percentage of Localities Likely to Adopt New Strict Noise Standards (Jul. 22, 1997). The Herald reports that a survey by the National Society for Clean Air in Scotland has found that only about 8% of local authorities are likely to adopt new curbs on noise between 11 pm and 7 am which come into force this week, enabling environmental health officers to seize noisy stereos, radios, and TVs. The survey was released yesterday to coincide with National Noise Awareness Day tomorrow, the article says.

Cleveland Airport Soundproofs Homes for Homeowners Who Agree Not to Sue (Jul. 21, 1997). The Plain Dealer reports that the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport in has soundproofed about 150 homes in Cleveland, Brook Park, Olmsted Falls, and Olmsted Township (Ohio), and is planning to make another 1,200 homes available for the soundproofing program. However, the article reports, some residents are not happy about the terms under which their homes can be soundproofed. The program requires that homeowners give up their right to sue the airport over aircraft noise.

European Commission Pushes for Legal Action Against Italy and Belgium for Failing to Adopt Noise Limits on Construction Machinery (Jul. 21, 1997). The Occupational Health & Safety Letter reports that the European Commission (EC) has applied to the European Court of Justice, seeking legal retribution against Italy and Belgium for failing to adopt limits on construction workers' exposure to noise from construction machinery.

Noise From Model Airplanes in Rural Maryland Doesn't Violate State Regulations (Jul. 21, 1997). The Baltimore Sun reports that the Maryland Department of the Environment checked the noise level of model planes flown by the Westminster Aero Modelers on a farm north of Westminster, Maryland in response to a complaint from a neighbor, and found that while the noise is "distinctively noticeable," it does not violate state regulations.

Noisy Stereos in Britain Seized by Local Authorities as a Result of Campaign (Jul. 20, 1997). The publication Mail on Sunday reports that more than a third of the local councils in Britain have seized noisy stereos from residents after a Mail on Sunday campaign. The article says that most local authorities have services to deal with nighttime noise, and nearly one-half plan to use the new confiscation powers they have been given by the government, according to a survey released today. However, the article goes on to say, less than a tenth of local authorities are likely to impose $100 on-the-spot fines, because they lack resources or believe existing measures are adequate.

Denver Officials Hope Airport Noise Study Will Help Lift Federal Funding Ban on New Runway (Jul. 19, 1997). The Denver Post reports that Denver officials have said they hope a new study of aircraft noise at Denver International Airport will help to eliminate a federal ban on funding imposed in 1994 because of aircraft noise. Eliminating the ban is the first step in paving the way for a controversial sixth runway at the airport, the article says.

36 Countries in Europe Agree to Limit Flights From Noisy Aircraft (Jul. 18, 1997). The publication Transport Europe reports that members of the European Civil Aviation Conference (ECAC), a group with 36 member countries, met in Strasbourg on July 2 and 3 and agreed to reduce the level of noise emissions from aircraft by the year 2002, and resolved to adopt a formal Recommendation on the matter by December 31. Meanwhile, express delivery airlines voiced concern about regulations limited to Europe and called for an international agreement.

Noise Abatement Flight Paths Ignored at Boston's Airport (Jul. 17, 1997). The Patriot Ledger reports that last fall, a new flight path was approved for Boston's Logan International Airport, designed to give residents in Milton and Quincy relief from airplane noise. However, local officials said this week that pilots consistently ignore the flight path during off-peak travel times, taking planes over Milton. The comments came at a meeting Tuesday between state and local officials from several South Shore towns, officials from Massport, and officials from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The meeting was called to discuss Massport's expansion plan for the airport, which includes the addition of a 5,000-foot runway, but local officials expressed frustration about continuing airplane noise and the lack of communication with Massport and the FAA.

Citizens Have a History of Fighting Washington's National Airport Over Noise (Jul. 16, 1997). The Washington Post reports that noise problems from Washington, D.C.'s National Airport have been plaguing neighbors since at least 1966, when jets were introduced at the airport. The article outlines what measures airport officials have taken to mitigate airport noise, and how citizens have responded.

Amsterdam Airport Announces Nighttime Restrictions to Reduce Noise (Jul. 15, 1997). The publication Airports reports that officials at the Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, Netherlands announced new restrictions on nighttime flights Friday. The new rules, which still must be approved by the government, call for a ban on flights of DC-10s and Boeing 747-100s, -200s, -300s, and SPs between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. starting August 1. Flights which are scheduled before 11 p.m., but are delayed, will also be prohibited, the article says. Airport officials said the ban is necessary to comply with the Netherlands' legally defined noise limits, but cargo airlines operating at the airport are furious about the proposed restrictions.

Airline Calls Amsterdam Airport's Noise Reduction Plan Discriminatory (Jul. 14, 1997). ANP English News Bulletin reports that officials at Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, Netherlands recently announced that in order to meet legal noise limits, they intend to ban nighttime flights of noisier planes starting August 1. Officials from the airline Martinair, which will see its three older Boeing planes banned from nighttime takeoffs as a result of the rule, have complained that the restriction is discriminatory and asked the airport to focus its ban on airlines that have recently increased night flights, thereby contributing to higher overall noise levels. Martinair officials maintain that tens of thousands of vacationers could be stranded in August as a result of the ban.

Wisconsin Town Rescinds Ban on Sporting Clay Shooting Due to a Legal Technicality (Jul. 14, 1997). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that officials in Eagle, Wisconsin have lifted a ban on sporting clay shooting at the McMiller Sports Center after they discovered they made a mistake earlier this week in establishing the prohibition. According to town chair Don Wilton, officials made the mistake Monday when they rejected a Department of Natural Resources request for a year extension on a conditional use permit to operate the range. Town officials later realized they could not legally initiate a ban before the current permit, which was agreed to last year by officials, expires July 27. Wilton said officials would ban the shooting clay range again, if necessary, once the current permit expires.

Chicago Suburbs Say Jet Traffic as Noisy as Ever After Mayor's "Fly Quiet" Plan Introduced (Jul. 13, 1997). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that the new "Fly Quiet" program at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport isn't working, according to officials from some suburbs. The voluntary program was launched June 17 in an attempt to get pilots and air traffic controllers to undertake routes and procedures that will help mitigate jet noise. The program included diverting nighttime flights to unpopulated areas and quieting engine tests on the runways.

Indianapolis Airport's Newest Noise Relief Proposal Offers Residents Soundproofing or Buyouts (Jul. 13, 1997). The Indianapolis Star reports that in response to residents' complaints about jet noise from the Indianapolis International Airport, the Indianapolis Airport Authority has proposed a plan to soundproof homes in certain areas or offer to buy the homes from residents and re-sell them. The airport's proposal is an attempt to preserve neighborhoods to a greater degree than has been done in the past, airport officials said.

Noise and Safety Issues of Powerboats Debated in Maryland (Jul. 13, 1997). The Capital reports that the South River, near Annapolis, Maryland, has become a battleground over restrictions on powerboats. Residents living in the area want a quieter life, and powerboaters want open waters for their fast boats. Last month, two events focused attention on the issues: a state hearing on boat noise regulations, and the death of a man thrown from a speeding high-performance boat. State officials are considering speed limits on the South River and two other rivers, the article says.

Residents Fear That New Terminal at Washington's National Aiport Will Mean More Flights and Noise (Jul. 13, 1997). The Washington Post reports that a new terminal at the National Airport in Washington, D.C. will open in two weeks, and many Washington, Maryland, and Virginia residents who live near the airport's flight path are worried that the new terminal will lead to an increase in flights that and will make the intolerable noise problem even worse. However, airport officials insist that the federal regulations in place that limit the number of flights from National will prohibit any increase. Meanwhile, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and other U.S. Congress members are considering legislation that could lead to more flights to and from National.

FAA Proposes to Divert L.A. Flight Paths Over California Indian Reservation and Other Communities (Jul. 11, 1997). The Press-Enterprise reports that to accomodate increasing air traffic at Los Angeles International Airport, the Federal Aviation Administration has proposed routing as many as 170 jets per day over the San Gorgonio Pass, which would put the aircraft over the Morongo Indian Reservation, Banning, Beaumont, Moreno Valley, Riverside, and Norco. At a public hearing Thursday at the Morongo Tribal Hall, about 40 residents of Banning and the Morongo Indian Reservation denounced the plans.

European Countries Agree to Prohibit Hushkitted Chapter 3 Aircraft After April 1999 (Jul. 8, 1997). Aviation Daily reports that the European Civil Aviation Conference's 36 member countries (ECAC) agreed last week in Strasbourg to "take all necessary steps" after April 1, 1999 to exclude aircraft from their carriers' fleets that have been hushkitted only to meet the minimum requirements of Chapter 3 noise standards. The decision sends a signal to current and future airlines not to increase their fleet's noise by using hushkitten airplanes, according to ECAC president-elect Andre Auer. The action comes as a result of a January 1996 environmental policy statement issued by ECAC calling for substantially lower noise levels at Europe's airports after Chapter 2 aircraft are phased out in 2002, the article reports.

Amsterdam Airport Considers Nighttime Ban on Takeoffs by Noisy Jets (Jul. 7, 1997). AFX News reports that the Amsterdam Airport Schiphol in the Netherlands is considering a ban on takeoffs by the noisiest, wide-body aircraft between the hours of 11:00 pm and 6:00 am starting Aug. 1.

European Commission Backs Recommendations to Improve Aircraft Noise Standards (Jul. 7, 1997). Aircraft Value News reports in an editorial that the European Commission is supporting two proposals that would ban or restrict aircraft equipped with Chapter 3 hushkits in an attempt to move along strong aircraft noise standards. The editorial argues that the first proposal, which would allow European authorities to ban aircraft equipped with Chapter 3 hushkits, would significantly hurt values for older, noisier Chapter 2 aircraft. The second proposal would bar operators in European Civil Aviation Conference member countries (ECAC) from adding hushkitted aircraft to their fleets after 1999, and this also would depress values for older aircraft, the editorial says.

Orange County, California Residents Continue to Debate Commercial Airport at Military Base (Jul. 6, 1997). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letters-to-the-editor from residents of Laguna Hills and Newport Beach, California, regarding the proposed conversion of the nearby El Toro Marine Corps Air Station to a commercial airport:

Debate Over Water Scooters on Maine Waters Grows (Jul. 5, 1997). The Patriot Ledger reports that the debate in Maine over what to do about water scooters is growing. Critics say the personal watercraft, known by brand names such as Jet Skis or Sea Doos, are noisy and a nuisance, while proponents say the scooters are a great way to draw families to Maine and make money. The state legislature had a chance to pass regulations governing the watercraft this year, but essentially did nothing, the article says.

Jet Skis Banned or More Heavily Policed on Two Idaho Mountain Lakes (Jul. 5, 1997). The Idaho Falls Post Register reports that officials in Custer County, Idaho have banned personal watercraft on Stanley Lake, and have decided to more heavily police them on Redfish Lake due to noise complaints from campers, anglers, and others.

Seattle's Airport Gets FAA Approval for Third Runway (Jul. 4, 1997). The Seattle Times reports that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) yesterday gave its final approval to a new, third runway at Seattle-Tacoma (Washington) International Airport, which is an important step in the airport's planned major expansion. Meanwhile, officials in the cities in South King County that have opposed the third runway said the decision was no surprise and just means the cities will add the FAA to the list of agencies they plan to sue.

Residents in Indiana Withdraw Lawsuit Against Airport After Purchase Assurance Program is Proposed (Jul. 2, 1997). The Indianapolis News reports that residents of Cottonwood Court in Plainfield, Indiana have dropped their lawsuit against Indianapolis International Airport operator BAA after receiving promises that the airport will a new program to mitigate the noise impact. The program will allow homeowners in certain areas to sell their homes to the airport or receive a free package of new windows, doors, and insulation to cut down on airplane noise.

California Appeals Court Upholds Vote on Commercial Airport at El Toro Air Base (Jul. 1, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that a district appeals court in San Diego, California rejected an attempt by opponents of the proposed El Toro Airport to invalidate a 1994 referendum that supported the airport. Other lawsuits from airport opponents are still to be decided.

Florida City May Back Out of Settlement Deal with Airport Over Runway Expansion (Jul. 1, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel reports that Dania (Florida) City Commissioners might back out of a settlement signed two years ago with Broward County about runway expansion at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport. The article says that the city dropped its legal fight in October 1995 in exchange for up to $1.6 million for city utility lines and possible buyouts of homes. Tonight, City Commissioners will discuss whether residents received enough protection under the settlement.

Legal Costs May Prevent New Zealand Residents Group from Going to Court Over Airport Noise Control (Jul. 1, 1997). The Evening Post reports that the Residents Airport Noise Action Group (RANAG), a group of residents in the eastern suburbs of Wellington, New Zealand, may have to abandon a fight over airport noise control because they cannot afford to go to the Environment Court for an appeal. The court hearing is estimated to cost the group $20,000, and is expected to last most of August.

Montgomery Mayor Places Curfew on Race Track Due to Resident Noise Complaints; Race Track Owner Mounts Sound Measuring Effort to Show the Noise Isn't That Bad (Jul. 1, 1997). The Montgomery Advertiser reports that Montgomery (Alabama) Mayor Emory Folmar has placed a curfew of 10:30 p.m. on the Montgomery Motorsports Park dragstrip facility, in response to complaints about noise from the racetrack from residents. Racetrack owner Jimmy Easterling, meanwhile, has been testing sound levels from the facility with a decibel meter and plans to hire an audiologist to take professional sound readings in order to convince the mayor to rethink the curfew. The mayor, meanwhile, said he doesn't care about the results of the sound tests.

Missouri City Studies Legal Options to Fight Airport Expansion (Jun. 30, 1997). The St. Louis Business Journal reports that the St. Charles (Missouri) City Council is considering its legal options in opposing expansion plans for Lambert St. Louis International Airport. Council members are worried that the W-1W expansion plan which has been submitted to the Federal Aviation Administration for approval will send more low-flying planes over St. Charles. Although the council appears to be preparing for a legal battle, council members said they also are keeping lines of communication open and trying to reach an agreement on noise abatement with airport authorities.

Maryland Considers Permanent State Regulations for Watercraft Decibel Levels on State Waterways (Jun. 29, 1997). The Washington Post reports that after a Maryland state law designed to quiet waterways passed last year, temporary regulations went into effect last summer that restricted noise levels on state waters and made it easier for the rules to be enforced. Now, the state Department of Natural Resources wants to make those regulations permanent, and residents and boaters are once again in conflict, the article reports. The issue is especially important for residents and boaters on South River, the article says.

Chicago's New "Fly Quiet" Program Designed to Get Pilots to Comply With Noise Abatement Procedures (Jun. 27, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports in an editorial that although Chicago has had noise abatement procedures in place for years for flights at O'Hare International and Midway Airports, some airline pilots and air-traffic controllers have not been following the procedures, having other priorities on their minds. The editorial says that now, due to the intervention of Mayor Richard Daley and his new commissioner of aviation and their "Fly Quiet" program, the airlines may actually come around and follow the procedures.

Florida County's Comprehensive Plan Sets Noise Contours Which Could be Federally Pre-Empted (Jun. 27, 1997). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that the Manatee County (Florida) government is in the process of updating its comprehensive plan, and it intends to include noise restrictions for the Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport that are based on current technology and economic conditions. However, the article reports that the airport's attorney said if those conditions change, the airport and county could find themselves in a legal entanglement about who has jurisdiction over aircraft noise.

U.S. House Subcommittee Approves Continuing Ban on Building Sixth Runway at Denver Airport (Jun. 26, 1997). The Rocky Mountain News reports that the transportation subcommittee of the U.S. House Appropriations Committee Wednesday approved a renewed ban on the federal funding for the proposed sixth runway at Denver International Airport. If approved by the full Congress, the ban would remain in place through September 1998, the article says. The vote was a victory for noise critics, who have maintained that the runway should not be built until the airport can control the noise pollution it already emits.

FAA Says New Runway at New Orleans Airport Could be Built at an Angle to Reduce Noise Pollution; Residents Remain Unconvinced (Jun. 25, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that a new study by the Federal Aviation Administration shows that New Orleans International Airport could angle its proposed north-south runway away from neighborhoods in Kenner to reduce the noise impact, yet still handle enough traffic to make the project feasible. The FAA is using the New Orleans study to develop national standards for near-parallel runway alignment, which could help planners throughout the U.S. deal with problems to airport expansions, such as land availability and noise issues. Meanwhile, residents living in Kenner seemed unimpressed with the FAA's new idea, and said they still oppose a new runway.

Queens Residents in an Uproar Over Proposal to Add 30 Daily Flights to LaGuardia Airport (Jun. 22, 1997). The Daily News reports that residents and public officials in New York City's Queens borough are alarmed and angry at requests by three low-fare airlines to add 30 daily flights in and out of the busy LaGuardia Airport. Opponents of the proposal have been writing letters to U.S. Transportation Secretary Rodney Slater, asking him to reject the requests from ValuJet, AirTran, and Frontier Airlines.

Indianapolis Airport Proposes New Noise Mitigation Programs (Jun. 21, 1997). The Indianapolis Star reports that the Indianapolis (Indiana) International Airport has proposed new noise programs designed to provide relief to residents. The proposals include soundproofing and buying homes southwest of the airport, and in areas less affected by noise, providing some compensation for homeowners unable to sell their homes at appraised values. In addition, the proposals include having departing planes change the times when they turn toward their destination, which could lessen noise impacts.

Airplane Interior Customizing Company at California Airport Considers Expansion; Residents Angry at Possibility of More Jet Noise (Jun. 20, 1997). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that UNC Corp.'s Jet Center is considering setting up a "completion center" to customize the interiors of new Boeing 737 business jets at the Van Nuys (California) Airport. Supporters of the idea say the new business would be a boon for the airport, but residents who are already upset about noise from existing jets are outraged. The issue comes at a time when a Federal Aviation Administration study of noise at Van Nuys and a city master development plan for the airport are bogged down in political fights between the interests in and around the airport, the article says.

Residents Oppose Expansion Plan at Colorado Airport (Jun. 20, 1997). The Rocky Mountain News reports that a hearing was held before the Arapahoe County (Colorado) Public Airport Authority board Thursday to consider changes in operation for Centennial Airport. In response to the proposed changes, which could lead to larger aircraft and expanded cargo and passenger service operations, a standing-room only crowd of residents said they opposed the changes.

Judge Rules Against City of Burbank in Airport Expansion Fight (Jun. 19, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that Los Angeles Superior Court Commissioner Emilie Elias Wednesday dismissed a request by the City of Burbank (California) for an injunction blocking Burbank Airport's proposed new terminal.

Pittsburgh Airport Runway Repairs Results in Angry Protests About Noise From Residents (Jun. 19, 1997). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports that as a result of new, temporary flight patterns due to runway repairs at the Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania) International Airport, hundreds of residents in Moon Township have complained about the jet noise. Officials in Moon Township said they have received nearly 200 phone complaints about noise, and nearly 100 residents turned up at last week's Moon supervisors meeting demanding that Allegheny County do something to stop the noise.

Residents and Officials Decry the Noisy Skies Over New York's Kennedy Airport (Jun. 19, 1997). Newsday reports that air traffic noise from New York City's Kennedy Airport is again becoming a public policy issue. Residents in Queens and Rockaway are once again pressuring the Federal Aviation Administration to do something about the noise.

Airlines Agree to Follow Flight Paths to Reduce Nighttime Jet Noise Over Chicago (Jun. 18, 1997). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that executives from United and American Airlines serving Chicago's O'Hare Airport agreed Tuesday to follow long-ignored flight paths designed to reduce nighttime jet noise that disturbs suburban residents. The flight paths call for pilots to fly over industrial parks, railroad tracks, forest preserves, and expressways at night. The flight paths are already in place, but according to Aviation Commissioner Mary Rose Loney, they have been "largely ignored due to unawareness." Loney maintains that compliance will increase now that airlines and the unions representing air traffic controllers and pilots have backed the plan.

Chicago Mayor's New Program to Address O'Hare Airport Noise Doesn't Satisfy Critics (Jun. 18, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that Chicago Mayor Richard Daley announced Tuesday a cooperative venture to quiet nighttime jet noise around O'Hare International and Midway Airports. The mayor was joined by Arlington Heights Mayor Arlene Mulder, who is also chair of the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission. But other suburbanites interpreted Daley's move as a precursor to airport expansion, and said the initiative is an old, unworkable plan with a new name.

Homeowners Shut Down Little League PA System in California City (Jun. 18, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that the Army Corps of Engineers -- which is responsible for enforcing noise rules in the Sepulveda Basin in Encino, California -- temporarily prohibited the use of a public address system that has neighbors complaining. The system exceeds the local 60-decibel limit for noise.

House near Los Angeles Airport to be Used as Model of Soundproofing (Jun. 18, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that the Los Angeles Board of Airport Commissioners plans to buy a house at the end of a Los Angeles International Airport runway to use as a demonstration for its soundproofing program.

California City Awarded $1.5 Million for Airport Noise Soundproofing Program (Jun. 17, 1997). Business Wire reports that the Los Angeles World Airports will award $1.5 million to the City of Ontario, California for implementing a sound insulation project.

California City Gets $9 Million for Airport Noise Mitigation Measures (Jun. 17, 1997). Business Wire reports that the Board of Airport Commissioners for the Los Angeles International Airport Tuesday awarded a $9.2 million grant to the City of Inglewood, California to insulate homes and acquire property in neighborhoods impacted by aircraft noise.

Chicago Anti-Airport Group Dismisses Mayor's New "Fly Quiet" Plan (Jun. 17, 1997). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Chicago Mayor Daley, along with airline executives, is scheduled to announce an anti-noise initiative today called the "Fly Quiet" plan. The plan reportedly calls for pilots to fly over non-residential areas during nighttime hours, including industrial parks, railroad tracks, forest preserves, and expressways. But according to the Suburban O'Hare Commission, a group fighting O'Hare Airport expansion, Daley's plan is a ploy to lay the groundwork for new runways.

Home Depot Store in Boise Takes Measures to Reduce Noise, While City Considers Revoking its Permit (Jun. 17, 1997). The Idaho Statesman reports that the Boise (Idaho) Planning and Zoning Commission discussed at its meeting Monday whether there was enough evidence to justify revoking the conditional-use permit of a Home Depot store at 1200 N. Milwaukee St., after residents complained about noise from the store. Boise Planning Director Wayne Gibbs said the store is making progress in reducing its noise levels, the article says. No decision was made on the permit, and according to Rinda Just, acting chair of the commission, no revocation would occur until the city attorney's office had studied the issue.

Japanese Lawyers to Lobby U.S. Over Noise from Yokota Air Base (Jun. 17, 1997). The Japan Economic Newswire reports that a group of Japanese lawyers representing residents near the U.S. Yokota Air Base in Tokyo's western suburbs will visit the United States on Saturday for a nine-day tour to ask U.S. officials to respond to their lawsuit against noise from the air base. A group of Japanese residents named the U.S. government in a lawsuit last year, but Japan's court dismissed the suit in March of this year, saying Japanese jurisdiction doesn't cover the U.S. The plaintiffs have appealed the ruling to the Tokyo High Court, which has continued with the case. U.S. officials told the court last fall that the government would not respond to a lawsuit, because it is not subject to Japanese law.

Maryland Governor Announces Bigger Budgets and Looser Rules for Highway Sound Barriers (Jun. 17, 1997). The Washington Post reports that Maryland Governor Parris Glendening announced yesterday that the state will provide bigger budgets and looser rules for building noise barriers along highways. The governor's action was prompted by complaints from residents in noisy neighborhoods near highways.

New Policy Requires Planes Flying Into San Francisco Airport to Maintain Higher Altitudes (Jun. 17, 1997). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that a new policy which took effect Sunday requires planes flying into San Francisco International Airport between 5 a.m. and 6 a.m. to fly at least 7,000 feet over Woodside, about 1,000 feet higher than required in the previous guideline. The policy comes in response to residents' complaints about early morning noise from aircraft. Meanwhile, the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors is scheduled to vote today on a resolution to allow cities in southern San Mateo County to appoint representatives to the Airport Community Roundtable, a Peninsula group concerned with airport noise and other issues.

Noise Levels at London's Heathrow Airport Are "Capped" (Jun. 17, 1997). The Times reports that BAA, the operator of the Heathrow Airport in London, has proposed that noise levels at the airport be capped at the levels that applied in 1994. The article says the proposal, which would require legislation, is an attempt by BAA to calm noise protests from residents and win approval for a fifth terminal.

Wyle Labs Gets $1 Million Contract for Airport-Related Soundproofing Work in Los Angeles (Jun. 17, 1997). Business Wire reports that the Los Angeles Board of Airport Commissioners Tuesday awarded a $1.17 million contract to Wyle Laboratories of El Segundo, California for services related to the Los Angeles International Airport's soundproofing program. Under the contract, Wyle Labs will provide acoustical and architectural design services for about 600 residences in the Los Angeles communities of Westchester and Playa del Rey.

Advisory Noise Committee to Hold its First Meeting in Boca Raton, Florida (Jun. 16, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel reports that the 17-member Noise Compatibility Advisory Committee in Boca Raton, Florida will meet for the first time on Tuesday. The committee, which consists of pilots, airport officials, city officials, and community representatives, will meet regularly to discuss noise and growth issues at the Boca Raton Airport.

Bangkok Residents Experience High Levels of Noise Pollution; Noise Barriers Reduce Some Traffic Noise (Jun. 16, 1997). The Bangkok Post reports that in Bangkok (Thailand), where traffic jams are part of daily life, it is hard to escape noise pollution. And for people living near the expressway, escape is impossible, the article says. The article goes on to discuss where noise barriers have been built in the city, and what types are most effective.

Heathrow Airport Officials Pledge Noise Cap and Night Flight Limit if New Terminal is Approved (Jun. 16, 1997). The Extel Examiner reports that officials of BAA PLC, operator of London's Heathrow Airport, said they will introduce a legally binding noise cap on noise levels around the airport and will not allow the number of night flights to increase if the airport's proposed Terminal 5 is approved. The article says that BAA said in a statement that if Terminal 5 is approved, their pledge "would limit noise levels at the airport to an area no greater than that within the most recent air noise contours published by the government," and that if "the noise level around Heathrow will not get any worse."

Decision is Due This Summer on St. Louis Airport Expansion (Jun. 15, 1997). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Federal Aviation Administration will rule this summer on whether the Lambert Airfield near St. Louis, Missouri can proceed with its expansion plan. By July, the FAA is expected to release a final study on the effects of expansion on the surrounding communities. As early as 30 days later, the agency will decide whether to approve or reject the expansion plan for a westward runway at the airport. The article goes on to report on all the details of the expansion plan, including the costs for the various parts of the project. A list of the country's busiest 20 airports is also given.

Florida City Mayor is Commended for Working to Solve Airport Noise Problem (Jun. 15, 1997). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reported in an editorial that after residents in Sanford, Florida complained about noise from large jets bringing tourists in from England, a committee formed to resolve the problem tested noise levels and found them to be no louder than a lawn mower, in general. At that point, Mayor Larry Dale got involved in the issue, saying that even though noise levels didn't test significantly high, people's quality of life had been lowered, and the problem must be dealt with. The editorial goes on to describe Mayor Dale's actions and commend him for his work.

Colorado Citizens Group Demands Noise Study for Centennial Airport (Jun. 14, 1997). The Denver Post reports that the president of a neighborhood organization in Arapahoe County, Colorado is fighting the expansion plans of the Centennial Airport. Joseph Ryan, president of United Citizens of Arapahoe Neighborhoods, said he has 5,000 signed petitions opposing expanding operations and expanding jet sizes at the airport. Ryan said, "We demand a noise study be done. We are mad as hell and we won't take it anymore. We want county commissioners to honor their campaign promises and stand by us."

Helicopter Noise Near Texas Race-Track Angers Residents; FAA Says Noise is Legal (Jun. 13, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that when the Texas Motor Speedway in Keller, Texas opened last April, some residents and city councillors were worried about potential noise from the racetrack. While noise from the track has not been a problem, residents and officials from Keller, Southlake, and Grapevine complained about excessive helicopter noise after inaugural races in April and again last weekend during the Indy Racing League events. Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration said they will look into the complaints, but maintain they have no legal authority over the helicopter routes.

Residents Angry About Aircraft Noise Over Ohio City (Jun. 13, 1997). The Plain Dealer reports that residents in northern Parma, Ohio are increasingly angry about noise from the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. Last night, about 70 residents brought their complaints before Cleveland officials and Federal Aviation Administration officials.

Los Angeles Agrees to Undertake Freeway Noise Study (Jun. 13, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that the Los Angeles City Council will study noise levels at the Capistrano Garden Homes housing complex in Las Brisas. The study will cost $15,000. Residents have complained for at least six months, after sound walls built as part of an Interstate 5 widening project did not help lower noise.

Burbank Mayor Initiates Talks with Airport Authority over Airport Expansion (Jun. 13, 1997). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that Burbank, California Mayor Bob Kramer will begin talks today with Burbank Airport in the hope of reaching a compromise in a long-running feud over airport expansion. But some critics, including one City Councillor, have accused the mayor of trying to compromise just when the city has a chance of winning its legal battle.

Citizens Group Pledges to Fight on After San Jose City Council Approves Airport Expansion (Jun. 12, 1997). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the San Jose (California) City Council voted 9-to-1 Tuesday to approve an ambitious expansion plan for the San Jose International Airport. Meanwhile, a citizens group opposed to the plan said they will continue the fight and may file a lawsuit.

San Jose City Council Approves Airport Expansion Plan Despite Residents' Protests (Jun. 11, 1997). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the San Jose (California) City Council voted 9-to-1 to approve an airport expansion plan last night that could more than double airline and cargo traffic by 2010, despite fierce opposition from downtown residents.

Florida County Considers Fees and Restrictions for Jet-Skiers (Jun. 11, 1997). The Florida Times-Union reports that St. Johns County (Florida) Commissioners are considering a new beach code that would charge jet-skiers a $125 annual fee. The first of two public hearings on the proposed beach code was held last night, with both jet-skiers and opponents vocal in their views.

European Parlaiment Debates Commission Response to Noise Reduction (Jun. 10, 1997). The Reuter European Community Report released a press release which states that some members of the European Parlaiment are critical that the Commission has not been sufficiently diligent in tackling the noise problem in Europe.

California Residents Fear that Ambitious Master Plan for Small Airport Will Bring More Noise and Development (Jun. 9, 1997). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that a draft of the Half Moon Bay Airport master plan in Half Moon Bay, California was made public in recent weeks, and proposes a long list of improvements, including the use of the entire length of the 5,000 foot runway, and the installation of equipment to enable planes to land in bad weather. The plan has raised the concern of some residents who believe the airport development could encourage more flights by bigger planes, opening the door to more noise, people, and development in the area. The San Mateo County Board of Supervisors will consider the master plan on July 22.

National Basketball Association Orders Utah Stadium to Turn Down the Volume (Jun. 9, 1997). The Des Moines Register reports that the National Basketball Association has ordered Utah to turn down the volume on the PA system at the Delta Center, but the basketball team the Utah Jazz are arguing against the restrictions, saying the players can't hear their introductions and the dancers can't hear their music.

Hearing Organizations Criticize Federal Mining Regulatory Agency's Proposed New Occupational Noise Standards (Jun. 9, 1997). The Occupational Health & Safety Letter reports that the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) has proposed new standards for occupational noise exposure in mines, but a coalition of prominent hearing-conservation organizations have said that the standards do not go far enough to protect miners' hearing.

Airport Study in Louisiana Recommends that Airport Development be Zoned (Jun. 7, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that the Kenner (Louisiana) City Council has sponsored a study which has recommended that the council could better control noise and protect the value of property near New Orleans International Airport by creating a strict zoning review process of airport development. The City Council's emergency land-use committee will discuss the draft study at a meeting Monday at 4 p.m.

U.K. Minister for Transport Supports Environmentally Friendly Aviation Policies (Jun. 6, 1997). Universal News Services printed a press release from the United Kingdom's Department of Transport regarding a speech in which the Minister for Transport, Dr. Gavin Strang, urged top European airline executives to "think green." The press release says Strang's speech is a signal of the new government's commitment to environmentally friendly aviation policies.

Colorado Airport Wants to Allow Heavier Planes; Residents Worried About Noise Increases (Jun. 5, 1997). The Denver Post reports that airport officials in Arapahoe County, Colorado are hoping to change standards at the Centennial Airport to allow heavier planes to land there. The proposal is an attempt to attract a new type of corporate jet that is popular with executives. Some residents who live near the airport, however, are afraid that changing the weight standards will open the door to air traffic from older, noisier jets as well.

Europe Moving to Impose Tougher Noise Restrictions on Airlines (Jun. 5, 1997). EIU ViewsWire printed a summary of a report in European Voice, a weekly newspaper of The Economist Group covering the European Union, which says that Europe is finalizing moves to impose tougher restrictions on noisy airplanes. The European Civil Aviation Conference (ECAC) is expected to adopt a non-binding recommendation in July committing its member countries not to add any new aircraft to their fleets after 2002 which do not meet the quieter "Chapter 3" noise standards. According to the Association of European Airlines (AEA), the recommendation will eventually form the basis of binding European Union legislation.

Charter Airplane Operators Complain About New Nighttime Noise Rules at Brussels Airport (Jun. 4, 1997). Aviation Daily reports that charter airlines and other operators using noisy aircraft are complaining about new nighttime regulations at Brussels Airport International.

Northwest Airlines Wants to Extend Runway in Minneapolis - St. Paul for Overseas Flights (Jun. 4, 1997). The Star Tribune reports that airport officials of the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport gave their initial support Tuesday to a plan to lengthen one runway temporarily and another permanently to allow Northwest Airlines to provide new non-stop flights between the Twin Cities and Hong Kong. A committee of the Metropolitan Airports Commission (MAC) said it would reserve a final decision on the issue until receiving input about the noise impacts of the decision from Minneapolis, Richfield, and Bloomington. However, the committee told Northwest Airlines it could have a decision by July.

FAA Issues Policy on Noise Funding Eligibility (Jun. 3, 1997). The publication Airports reports that the Federal Aviation Administration last week issued a "proposed final policy" on Part 150 approval and funding of noise mitigation measures. The policy says the FAA will not approve or fund noise mitigation measures for new noncompatible development after Jan. 1, 1998.

FAA Lists Notices in the Federal Register (Jun. 3, 1997). The publication Airports printed the following notices from the Federal Aviation Administration listed in the Federal Register:

Santa Monica Residents Protest Restaurant and Theater Development (Jun. 1, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports the Santa Monica (California) Planning Commission last week voted to recommend that the City Council allow a new theater, and the expansion of a popular restaurant, in the Ocean Park neighborhood. Commissioners promised some noise relief to upset residents, in the form of noise level measurements and noise insulation.

Aircraft Noise Policy Across the World Lacks Coherence (Jun.1 1997). Airline Business reports in an editorial that the failure of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) to agree on a transition to Chapter IV noise standards is leading to a patchwork of policy making around the world on aircraft noise. The diverse policies will force airlines to face operational restraints, the editorial concludes.

Leaf Blower Manufacturer Attempts to Make Gas-Powered Model Quieter (Jun.1 1997). The publication Appliance Manufacturer reports that Echo, Inc., a leaf blower manufacturer, has produced a new gas-powered leaf blower designed to reduce noise. The article notes that noise from leaf blowers is under attack across the country, and that hundreds of municipalities have enacted bylaws restricting or banning the blowers. The article goes on to describe the technology used in the new Echo blower.

Missouri Residents Group Against Airport Expansion Pushes County Council to Work Toward Noise Abatement Agreement (May 30, 1997). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that members of the St. Charles County Citizens Against Airport Noise (CAAN), a group opposed to westward expansion of Lambert Airfield near St. Louis, Missouri, has asked the St. Charles County Council to follow through on a resolution it passed in December to work toward a noise-abatement agreement with St. Louis, which owns the airport. At Tuesday's meeting of the County Council, CAAN members also told the council that although the group was formed to oppose the westward expansion of the airport, it was shifting its emphasis to focus on getting a noise-abatement agreement with Lambert officials.

Citizen Panel in Virginia Makes Airport Noise Recommendations (May 28, 1997). The Washington Post reports that a citizen panel created to address concerns about expansion of the Manassas (Virginia) Regional Airport will recommend a series of actions aimed at reducing airplane noise and requiring disclosure to potential buyers of nearby homes. However, the article reports, the panel is divided on the issue of how to compensate current residents, who fear that the new disclosure rules will make it difficult to sell their homes. The 16-member committee is scheduled to complete its work Wednesday, and will present its findings and recommendations to the Prince William Board of County Supervisors on June 10.

U.S. Congress Members Prepare Legislation to Stop Military Helicopters from Being Moved to California Air Base (May 28, 1997). Copley News Service reports that U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) and U.S. Representative Bob Filner (D-San Diego) announced Wednesday that they are preparing legislation to stop the Marine Corps from moving its helicopters to Miramar, a former naval air station in San Diego. Residents near Miramar have opposed the move and have urged that the helicopters be moved instead to March Air Force Base, in San Bernardino County, which has extra room due to the transfer of active Air Force units.

Angry Neighbors in Connecticut Take Farmer to Court Over Noise From "Corn Cannons" (May 27, 1997). The Hartford Courant reports that residents from the Bell Court subdivision of Portland, Connecticut have taken their farmer neighbor to court over noise from propane corn cannons that scare off blackbirds from his sweet corn crop. Judge Richard Stanley is considering the case in the Middlesex Superior Court.

New Zealand Airplane Noise Fight in Court Will Begin in August (May 26, 1997). The Evening Post reports that New Zealand's Environment Court has set aside the month of August to hear appeals against Wellington City Council's noise rules, contained in the proposed district plan, that would regulate airport noise. Appeals will be brought both by residents groups and by airline groups.

Florida City Mayor Ready to Fight FAA on Local Control Over Airport Noise Issues (May 24, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel reports that Boca Raton, Florida Mayor Carol Hanson on Friday called on the area's congressional delegation to either ease a federal law restricting flight curfews or give airports the power to fine or ban pilots who ignore noise reduction measures.

Florida City Struggles to Accept That It Can't Enforce Local Noise Restrictions (May 23, 1997). The Palm Beach Post reports that at a joint meeting Thursday between between the Boca Raton (Florida) City Council and the airport authority to discuss noise issues from the Boca Raton Municipal Airport, members were frustrated to learn that the airport has no power to enforce noise-reduction measures. At a meeting Wednesday, pilots and residents also addressed the issue at the airport authority's monthly meeting.

Florida Airport Responds To Residential Concerns (May 22, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel reports that the Airport Authority, the City Council, and federal and state aviation officials will be meeting to discuss future airport expansion at the Boca Raton (Florida) Airport. Expansion includes construction of a control tower and the push for a mandetory flight curfew at the airport. Mayor Carol Hanson made motions last month for a mandatory curfew. According to the article, because of a recent change in federal regulation, mandatory regulations are difficult to pass. The Federal Aviation Administration has not approved a mandatory curfew since 1990. The article says that local activist groups are joining forces to voice their say about the airport's expansion.

Housing Under Flight-Path in Vancouver Worries Airport Officials (May 22, 1997). The Vancouver Sun reports that the city of Richmond, British Columbia intends to develop a 14-hectare property it owns into a residential neighborhood, but officials at the Vancouver International Airport want to make sure the prospective buyers will be warned in advance that their homes are under a major flight path. They have proposed that an "air easement" be registered on the property's land title, which would prevent future owners from