Aircraft Noise


Chicago Area Communities To Receive Soundproofing (Apr. 20, 2000). The Chicago Sun-Times reported that homes in communities near O'Hare Airport will receive soundproofing as part of a $30 million city-suburb program.

Chicago's O'Hare Airport Expansion Subject of Heated Controversy Because of Increase in Jet Noise (Apr. 20, 2000). The Chicago Tribune printed an editorial about the expansion of O'Hare International Airport, its supporters and opponents. The editorial supports the expansion of the airport by adding a third runway.

Chicago's O'Hare Expansion Plans Fuel Debate Between Wealthy Corporations and Concerned Citizens (Apr. 20, 2000). The Chicago Daily Herald reported that a proposed new runway at O'Hare International Airport received support from wealthy corporations known for supporting political campaigns, but not from residents who live nearby.

Illinois Towns Neighboring O'Hare International Angry Over United Airlines Recommendation for O'Hare Expansion (Apr. 20, 2000). According to the Chicago Tribune, United Airlines (the world's largest airlines) dropped a bombshell when it recently recommended construction of a new runway at O'Hare International Airport. According to the article, United has long stated that the airport could meet the demands of increased air traffic without expansion.

Increase in Flights at New York's LaGuardia Unauthorized and Neighbors are Angry (Apr. 20, 2000). The New York Daily News reported that air and noise pollution in Queens are about to become worse unless officials act now. Within a year, an increase of 400 flights into and out of LaGuardia is expected, and residents are outraged.

Overexposure to Noise Damages Hearing (Apr. 20, 2000). The Indianapolis Star reported that aging is not the only reason for hearing loss, and that overexposure to loud noise such as continual loud music and jet noise or sudden loud noises such as explosions and firecrackers can led to hearing loss as well.

Reno Military Watchdog Group Appeals Navy Warfare Sites on Public Land (Apr. 20, 2000). An article by the Associated Press reported that an activist group in Reno plans to appeal a decision by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Fallon Naval Station to place three electronic warfare sites and 22 mobile truck-mounted sites on public land in central Nevada.

English Pioneer of Aeroacoustics and Noise Control in Aircraft Dies (Apr. 19, 2000). The London Times printed a feature article about the death of a distinguished mathematician, Aeroacoustics specialist and expert in aircraft engine noise, Sir David Crighton.

Florida Residents Say Private Planes Not Commercial Are Too Noisy (Apr. 19, 2000). The Press Journal reported on complaints against jet noise at Vero Beach Municipal airport, but this time the complaints are against private aircraft rather than commercial.

Floridians Say Trains Noisier Than Airplanes (Apr. 19, 2000). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News printed this letter to the editor responding to complaints from complaints about airport noise. The letters are printed in their entirety.

Jet Noise at NYC's LaGuardia Airport Approaching Unbearable and Borough Officials Say No to Additional Air Traffic (Apr. 19, 2000). According to the Daily News, Queens Borough President Claire Shulman said that an increase in air traffic will make life unbearable for residents in boroughs near LaGuardia Airport if the projected flight increase in the hundreds is approved. LaGuardia air traffic is currently at 1,200 flights a day.

LA City Council Compromises on Jet Noise Restriction (Apr. 19, 2000). The Los Angeles Times reported that the LA City Council's move to impose a stricter limit on new air traffic at Van Nuys Airport [the busiest airport in the country] is significantly short of the original proposed ban requested by the airport's neighbors.

Los Angeles Buys Homes Near LA International Airport (Apr. 19, 2000). An article from Copley News Service reported that the LA City Council approved a $7 million voluntary buyout of 15 single-family houses and two duplexes Manchester Square, which neighbors the airport. The vote was unanimous.

Moving Florida Airport Topic of Debate (Apr. 19, 2000). The Jupiter Courier reported that a real estate broker who lives under the flight path of 760-acre Witham Field airport has proposed moving the airport to a site in western Martin County and use the current site to build a major business complex. His plan is now the subject of an invigorating debate.

North Carolina Residents Suspicious of FedEx Hub Business at Triad Airport (Apr. 19, 2000). The High Point Enterprise reported that a state representative visited the Indianapolis International Airport resulted in his having serious concerns regarding the impact of a FedEx cargo hub might have on the Piedmont Triad International airport and its neighbors.

Ohioans Ready to Take Legal Action Against Jet Noise from Cleveland International Airport (Apr. 19, 2000). According to the Plain Dealer, noise complaints from residents near Cleveland Hopkins International airport are on the rise, and a local city councilwoman called for legal action.

Seattle Area Neighbors Pitted Against Each Other Because of Seattle-Tacoma Airport Flight Paths (Apr. 19, 2000). According to a report by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, over 300 angry residents attended a public hearing at a community center last night ordering city officials to kill the proposal that would put a flight path directly over their neighborhoods. The problem is, their neighbors in Beacon Hill, Madrona, Leschi and the Central Area already endure jet noise, and want support the proposal, which would channel some air traffic south.

Small St. Louis Airport Too Busy to Grow (Apr. 19, 2000). According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Spirit of St. Louis airport is the source of residents' complaints of noise and safety. The article said that the airport, once a small, recreational airport is now the third-busiest in the four-state area.

Burbank Airport Officials Delay Airport Expansion for Two Years: Noise Study to Come First (Apr. 18, 2000). According to the Los Angeles Times, Burbank Airport officials voted to conduct an in-depth noise study that may delay the construction of a $300 million airport complex for a minimum of three years. The article said extraordinary opposition to the expansion prompted the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority to give up on beginning construction.

California City Council Limits Older, Noisier Aircraft: Aviation Group Files Suit (Apr. 18, 2000). City News Service reported that the Los Angeles City Council voted in one body to limit the number of the older, noisier Stage 2 aircraft at Van Nuys Airport, and will phase out the older planes (made before 1984) by 2010.

New Jersey Town Council Approves Flight Path Shift (Apr. 18, 2000). The Asbury Park Press printed a number of special interest articles about Middletown, including this article about the Middletown Township Committee's adoption of a resolution proposed by the anti-noise group New Jersey Coalition Against Aircraft Noise. According to the article, the group wants to shift air traffic at Newark International Airport over the Shore area rather than over the North Jersey metropolitan area.

North Carolina Man Asks for Clarity on Airport Contour Map (Apr. 18, 2000). The News & Record printed this letter to the editor calling for clarification of the paper's reporting on the contour map of airport noise as printed in the April 7, 2000 edition. The letter is printed in its entirety.

Boeing 727 to Get Performance Upgrade (Apr. 17, 2000). Aviation Week & Space Technology printed an article about a modification kit for Boeing 727 aircraft that is compliant with Stage 3 "noise-attenuation system for increased and heavy-gross-weight 727s." The article is technical in nature, explaining that the kit allows shorter takeoffs and increased "payloads at 'hot and high' airports."

Florida Flight School Too Noisy for Vero Beach Residents (Apr. 17, 2000). The Press Journal printed this op ed regarding aircraft noise from FlightSafety Academy in Vero Beach, Florida. The editorial is written in its entirety.

France Close to Developing New Age Super Concorde: Noise Under Consideration (Apr. 17, 2000). According to the Aviation Week & Space Technology, the French are examining whether a successor to the Concorde would be feasible and competitive in the near future. Besides considering the financial feasibility, a task force overseeing five groups will focus on noise and emissions.

LaGuardia to Get 300 More Daily Flights (Apr. 17, 2000). According to Newsday, a new federal law may lead to the most significant increase in air traffic at LaGuardia Airport in decades--as many as 300 more flights a day. Safety and noise problems are of concern.

Some Residents in High Point, N.C. Like the FedEx Cargo Hub (Apr. 17, 2000). An article in the High Point Enterprise reported on some residents who support the proposed FedEx cargo hub project at Piedmont Triad International Airport, saying that personal imposition of noise should be weighed against a positive economic impact and job creation.

Chicago is a Noisy City and Residents Suffer (Apr. 16, 2000). The Chicago-Times printed an editorial in the Sunday edition about the impact of noise from many different sources has on residents in the Chicago-area.

Florida Airport Relocation Debate Gets Noisy (Apr. 16, 2000). an article in the Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reported that politics money and the proposed expansion of Witham Airport have accelerated greatly, and residents are calling for a vote on the issue in November and are organizing.

Sacramento Airport Construction Delay Because of Noise and Safety Issues (Apr. 16, 2000). The Sacramento Bee reported that the increase of noise complaints and the crash of a cargo jet have resulted in an 18-month construction delay at Mather Airport. The article said county officials the opportunity to study the future of the up and coming air-freight hub.

EU Must Respond to Ban on American Hush Kits (Apr. 15, 2000). An article by the Associated Press reported that the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has given the European Commission (EU) until the end of June respond to the United States' complaints over its ban on hush kits--noise reducing technology for noisy jets.

Florida Resident Likes Aircraft Noise: Disclosure a Must (Apr. 15, 2000). The Press Journal printed a letter from an aircraft engineer regarding jet noise complaints. The letter is printed in its entirety.

Arizona Cities Challenge Zoning Changes and Developers Threaten to Sue (Apr. 15, 2000). The Associated Press printed an article from the Arizona Republic about developers who have threatened to sue several cities around Luke Air Force Base. The developers want zoning changes in order to develop the land within a 1988 noise contour. The cities want to keep the noise contour zoning because of safety hazards and noise, and to do otherwise would leave them vulnerable to potential lawsuits they could not afford.

US Files Complaint With ICAO Over EU Ban on Hushkitted Aircraft (Apr. 14, 2000). The Associated Press reports that the United States government filed a complaint last month with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) over a proposed European Union (EU) ban on aircraft outfitted with "hushkits," which are mufflers that reduce noise on older planes. The ban is to take effect May 4. The ICAO has given the European Commission a deadline of June 30 to respond to the complaint.

Has Newington, New Hampshire Golf Course Expansion Contributed to Airport Noise? (Apr. 14, 2000). The Union Leader in Manchester, New Hampshire reports that some Newington, New Hampshire residents are concerned that the expansion of a local golf course has led to an increase in airport noise. When the Pease Golf Course expanded, twenty-six acres of trees were removed, and the residents claim that the lack of trees has increased the noise. A meeting was held recently with the Pease Development Authority (PDA) to allow the residents to air their grievances.

Residents of Southeast Seattle Upset by Airport Proposal To Divert Flight Paths (Apr. 14, 2000). The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports that residents of southeast Seattle are at loggerheads with their neighbors in northern Seattle over a proposal by Seattle-Tacoma International Airport to change the take-off flight path of some planes from a northerly path to an easterly path. The path change is commonly referred to as the "split east turn." Southeast Seattle residents will hold a public meeting on Tuesday to voice their complaints with city, county, and port officials.

Virginia Beach Reader Concerned About Noise From Navy Jets (Apr. 14, 2000). The Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk, Virginia published a batch of letters to the editor. One of them is from a reader in Virginia Beach who complains about the noise from navy jets. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Airport Board Agrees to Monitor for Noise Near Cincinnati Area Airport (Apr. 14, 2000). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that Kenton (Kentucky) County Airport, serving parts of Kentucky as well as the greater Cincinnati, Ohio area, hopes to build a new runway beginning in 2003. The airport board plans to use portable jet noise monitors to measure neighborhood noise levels to determine which areas near the airport will be eligible for the airport's noise abatement program. Areas in both Kentucky and Ohio will be monitored. The board will meet on Monday to decide whether to accept the proposed noise monitoring program.

United Kingdom Noise Association Asks Government to Enact Stricter Aviation Noise Regulations (Apr. 14, 2000). The Evening Standard in London, England reports that the United Kingdom Noise Association used International Noise Awareness Day to publicly ask the Government to make noise pollution a priority when drafting a new aviation strategy report that will be published next year. The Association based its request partially on a report by Friends of the Earth that states that hundreds of thousands of people living near airports are adversely affected by noise.

London Property Owner Loses Lawsuit Over Surveyor's Failure to Advise About Aircraft Noise (Apr. 14, 2000). The Times of London reports on a Court of Appeals case concerning a contract between a chartered surveyor and a prospective purchaser. The court's task was to determine whether the purchaser could receive damages for "non-physical distress and annoyance" resulting from the high level of aircraft noise that he was subjected to on the property. The contract stipulated that the surveyor was to advise "whether the property might be affected by aircraft noise." The court decided that the property owner was not entitled to a monetary award because the noise was an annoyance, rather than something that caused physical damage or distress. The judges explained that a surveyor's contract does not cover "non-physical stress and annoyance."

Stuart, Florida Resident Concerned About Noisy Aircraft and Touch-and-Go Landings (Apr. 14, 2000). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News in Stuart, Florida published a letter to the editor from a reader named Robert Gavin who is concerned about noisy aircraft at Witham Field. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Tulsa, Oklahoma Airport Officials Hire Local Firm to Manage Noise Mitigation Program (Apr. 14, 2000). The Tulsa World reports that the Tulsa, Oklahoma firm of Cinnabar Service Co. has been chosen by the Tulsa Airport Authority to receive a one-year, $2 million contract to manage the noise mitigation program to be undertaken by Tulsa International Airport. Approximately 1,200 homes near the airport will qualify for the $33 million program.

Warwick, Rhode Island Airport to Redirect Flights to Reduce Neighborhood Noise (Apr. 13, 2000). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island plans to change its flight paths in order to reduce noise in certain neighborhoods. Under the new plan, the FAA would need to soundproof 800 to 900 fewer homes than they would have needed to had the flight paths remained the same. Airport officials recently presented the plans to the public and, pending FAA approval, would like to start using the new paths in December.

Hazelwood, Missouri City Council Discusses Joining National Noise Organization (Apr. 13, 2000). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Lambert Field in Hazelwood, Missouri plans to expand. At a recent City Council meeting, members discussed noise levels in the neighborhoods they represent.

Reader Wants Stuart, Florida Community Airport Moved to Rural Area (Apr. 13, 2000). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News recently published a letter to the editor from Stuart, Florida resident Betty Becker, who is concerned about aircraft noise at Witham Field. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Residents Near U.S. Naval Air Facility in Atsugi, Japan Complain About Military Jet Noise (Apr. 13, 2000). The Asahi News Service in Japan reports that residents near the U.S. Naval Air Facility in Atsugi are asking the U.S. government to address the noise pollution problems at the base. The residents believe that Japan should not listen to the American government's demand that Japan deal with the dioxin problem in the area until the noise problems at the base are solved.

Officials Must Complete Federal Noise Studies Before Airport Noise Can be Tackled at Witham Field in Stuart, Florida (Apr. 13, 2000). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports that the controversy about whether or not to allow large, noisy planes to use Witham Field in Stuart, Florida continues. The County Commission would like to institute a weight ban on planes; airport officials believe that noise levels should be the criterion for a ban instead.

Stuart, Florida Attorney Wants to Land Private 737 at County Airport Despite Opposition (Apr. 13, 2000). The Palm Beach Post reports that a wealthy attorney in Stuart, Florida who has been fighting to be able to land his private Boeing 737 at Witham Field has come up against resistance from residents and from the Martin County Commission. The Commission decided at a recent meeting to back plans that would block larger aircraft from using the airport. The businessman, Willie Gary, said that he might file suit against the county.

Sarasota-Bradenton Airport (Florida) Awaits FAA Approval of Proposed Takeoff Path Change (Apr. 12, 2000). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has still not decided whether to approve a takeoff path at Sarasota-Bradenton Airport that it had previously approved. The agency has said it needs to continue to review neighborhood noise data, and could possibly demand a new environmental impact statement that could delay the path's approval for more than another year.

Alaska Airlines to Use Air Force Base for Employee Military Training (Apr. 12, 2000). The News Tribune reports that Lakewood, Alaska officials are worried that Alaska Airlines' plan to use nearby McChord Air Force Base for employee military mission training might mean an increase in noise and air pollution, as well as a higher risk of accidents taking place. The Air Force is reviewing the plan, and does not believe that the operations would increase pollution levels or accident risk, even though there would be more flights into and out of McChord.

Reader Complains About Jet Noise in Virginia Beach (Apr. 11, 2000). The Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk, Virginia published a letter to the editor from a reader who is complaining about jet noise in Virginia Beach. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Virginia Beach Residents Contemplate Lawsuit Against Government for Jet Noise at Navy Base (Apr. 10, 2000). The Daily Press in Virginia Beach, Virginia reports that over 300 residents of Virginia Beach and Chesapeake attended a meeting recently to discuss the jet noise problem from the nearby Navy base. The meeting was organized by Citizens Concerned About Jet Noise (CCAJN), a local citizens' group whose members currently number more than 1,500. City and Navy officials also attended the meeting.

FAA Releases Draft Environmental Impact Study for Proposed FedEx Cargo Hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport in North Carolina (Apr. 9, 2000). The High Point Enterprise in North Carolina reports on the recently released Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) draft environmental impact study of the proposed Federal Express cargo hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport. The study is summarized on the following Web site: www.gsoair.org. The study is also available at five locations in Guilford and Forsyth Counties, including the airport and the public library in High Point.

Readers Sound Off About Proposed Expansion at Burbank Airport in California (Apr. 9, 2000). The Los Angeles Times printed letters to the editor from readers who responded to an editorial that the newspaper published about a proposed expansion at Burbank Airport in California. The letters are reprinted here in their entirety:

Virginia Beach, Virginia Residents Discuss Solutions to Jet Noise from Oceana Naval Air Station (Apr. 9, 2000). The Associated Press reports that a meeting was held recently in Virginia Beach, Virginia to ask for help from the city and from Navy officials in reducing jet noise from the nearby Oceana Naval Air Station. The meeting was called by Citizens Concerned About Jet Noise (CCAJN), a group that was formed two years ago and has 1,500 members.

Interview with Major General William G. Bowdon, Commander Marine Corps Air Bases Western Area Concerning Military Air Routes and Noise Mitigation (Apr. 9, 2000). The San Diego Union-Tribune printed an interview with Major General William G. Bowdon, Commander of the Marine Corps Air Bases Western Area. Bowdon spoke about flight routes and the use of the Miramar air facility. He addressed military aircraft noise at the base. The interview is reprinted here in its entirety:

North High Point, North Carolina Residents Continue to Fight Proposed FedEx Cargo Hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport (Apr. 9, 2000). The High Point Enterprise in North Carolina reports that many residents in north High Point are concerned about a proposed Federal Express Corporation (FedEx) cargo hub that is set to be built at Piedmont Triad International Airport (PTIA). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has recently released its preliminary environmental impact study on the project, which is estimated to cost $300 million.

O'Hare International Airport in Chicago May Be First Airport to Use Computer Program to Keep Planes on Quiet Paths (Apr. 8, 2000). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that a new computerized system that will help keep planes on a quiet takeoff path may be implemented by the end of the summer at O'Hare International Airport.

Federal Aviation Administration Releases Environmental Study on Proposed Cargo Hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport in North Carolina (Apr. 8, 2000). The News and Record in Greensboro, North Carolina reports on the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) recent study of the proposed Federal Express cargo hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport (PTIA). The study contains twenty environmental and sociological issues concerning the project.

Greensboro, North Carolina Residents and Officials Comment on FAA Draft Environmental Study of Piedmont Triad International Airport Cargo Hub Expansion (Apr. 8, 2000). The News and Record in Greensboro, North Carolina reports (in more detail than a smaller article printed in this same newspaper on the same day) on the Federal Aviation's Administration draft environmental study of the proposed Federal Express cargo hub project at Piedmont Triad International Airport (PTIA).

Readers in Virginia Beach Voice Concern Over Oceana Naval Air Station Noise (Apr. 7, 2000). The Virginian-Pilot in Virginia Beach printed a selection of letters to the editor from readers who are concerned over jet noise at the nearby Oceana Naval Air Station. The letters are reprinted here in their entirety:

New F-22 Raptor Jet May Be Brought to Langley Air Force Base in Virginia; Studies Show it is Quieter than the F-15 (Apr. 7, 2000). The Daily Press reports that the Air Force has announced that its newest jet fighter, the F-22 Raptor, tests quieter than the F-15, which is the jet currently flown by the First Fighter Wing stationed at Langley Air Force Base in Virginia. Noise measurements were based on ground testing of a pre-production model of the F-22 Raptor, and as such, do not necessarily indicate the noise levels of a jet in flight.

Chicago Reader Questions City Aviation Commissioner's Contention That Noise From Midway Airport Does Not Affect Property Values (Apr. 7, 2000). The Chicago Sun-Times printed a selection of letters to the editor. One of them was from a resident who lives near Midway Airport and is concerned about noise pollution. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Virginia City, Nevada Says No to Noisy Helicopter Tours (Apr. 7, 2000). The Associated Press reports that residents of Virginia City, Nevada and other parts of Storey County are opposed to Sierra Gulf Helicopters and Virginia City Venture bringing helicopter tours to the area. The planning commission held a meeting last week, attended by 100 opponents. The planning commission decided to recommend that the County Commission turn down the request at its upcoming meeting next month.

Kenner, Louisiana Aviation Board Representative Resigns (Apr. 6, 2000). The Times-Picayune in New Orleans, Louisiana reports that the New Orleans Aviation Board is losing one of its members of six years, former Kenner City Councilman Forrest "Bucky" Lanning. He waited to leave the board until its recent vote to approve a home-insulation program for residents near New Orleans International Airport.

Column Writer in Sarasota, Florida Compares Local Grievances Against Airport with European Court Case (Apr. 6, 2000). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune in Florida published an editorial column from Waldo Proffitt concerning a recent court case involving Heathrow Airport in England. Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport is struggling with noise problems as well.

Contract Awarded to Begin Second Phase of Residential Airport Noise-Mitigation Program at New Orleans International Airport (Apr. 6, 2000). The Times-Picayune in New Orleans, Louisiana reports that the Aviation Board at New Orleans International Airport recently awarded a contract to begin sound-insulation work on some homes in the city of Kenner. The insulation program is the second phase of an airport noise-mitigation program that was launched as a result of a 1982 class-action residential lawsuit against the airport.

Forums on Airport Noise to be Held in San Francisco Bay Area (Apr. 6, 2000). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the San Francisco area Regional Airport Planning Committee is hosting a series of public forums on airport noise. For the first time, the committee will be dealing with public complaints about all three of the major airports in the Bay Area.

South Glastonbury, Connecticut Resident Seeks Permission to Build Home Heliport (Apr. 6, 2000). The Hartford Courant reports that South Glastonbury resident Robert Maltempo would like to build a heliport behind his home. He recently presented his plan to the town's zoning and planning commission, from whom he would need to receive a special exception permit in order to build the heliport.

Expansion Plans at Hanscom Field in Concord, Massachusetts Anger Local Politicians and Historic Preservation Groups (Apr. 6, 2000). The Boston Globe reports that Shuttle America, a low-cost airline, would like to expand at Hanscom Field in Concord, Massachusetts. The plan has met with strong opposition. The airline has requested approval from the FAA to schedule twelve flights a day between Hanscom and LaGuardia Airport in New York.

Dayton International Airport in Ohio Undertakes Noise Study to Placate Residents (Apr. 5, 2000). The Dayton Daily News in Ohio reports that an informational meeting was held in Dayton so that opponents of a planned expansion of Dayton International Airport could hear the results of an airport noise study conducted by an independent consulting firm. The airport has formed the Community Advisory Committee so that residents can have some input during the airport's expansion process.

Virginia Beach Mayor and Citizens' Group Debate Best Way to Request Noise Mitigation from Oceana Naval Air Station (Apr. 5, 2000). The Virginian-Pilot reports that Virginia Beach mayor Meyera E. Oberndorf has come under fire from the local Chamber of Commerce and from a citizens' group for failing to take a comprehensive approach to securing relief for the community from jet noise at the nearby Oceana Naval Air Station.

FAA Will Allow Miami International Airport in Florida to Redirect Nighttime Flights Away from Residential Areas (Apr. 4, 2000). Florida's Miami Herald reports that Miami-Dade County's Aviation Department and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have reached an agreement that will allow nighttime flights out of Miami International Airport to use a different flight path that will lessen noise over residential areas such as Brickell and Key Biscayne. The agreement was announced in March at a meeting of the county's Noise Abatement Task Force, of which Brickell resident Tory Jacobs is a member.

California State Senator Editorializes on Disputes between Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport and Local Communities (Apr. 4, 2000). The Metropolitan News-Enterprise of Burbank, California printed an editorial by Adam Schiff, representative of California's 21st State Senate District, including Burbank, Glendale, Pasadena and the surrounding communities. The editorial discusses continuing noise disputes between Burbank area communities and the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport and is reprinted here in its entirety:

Sarasota-Bradenton, Florida Airport Requests FAA Approval to Expand Homeowner Noise Mitigation Program (Apr. 4, 2000). The Bradenton Herald in Florida reports that the Airport Authority commissioners of the Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport have voted to ask the FAA to approve the airport's plan to enlarge its Noise Compatibility Plan to allow 600 more homes to be eligible. The airport's executive director, Fred Piccolo, expects that the FAA will approve the plan within six months. Adding the additional homes to the program will cost $7.5 million dollars, which will be funded by federal and state grants.

Reader in Plymouth, England Disagrees With Those Who Complain About Airport Noise (Apr. 3, 2000). The Evening Herald in Plymouth, England printed a letter to the editor from a reader who does not feel that residents should complain about noise from nearby Plymouth Airport. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Legal Notice of Public Hearing in Warwick, Rhode Island Concerning Noise Abatement Programs at T. F. Green Airport (Apr. 3, 2000). The Providence Journal-Bulletin published several legal notices, one of which is an announcement for a public hearing and workshop for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on proposed air traffic noise abatement actions at T. F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island.

Enfield, Connecticut Residents Complain About Jet Noise From Inbound Traffic to Bradley International Airport (Apr. 3, 2000). The Hartford Courant reports that the town of Enfield, Connecticut is concerned by the noise from jets inbound to Bradley International Airport

Editorial Writer in Orange County, California Does Not Want El Toro to be Converted to Commercial Airport Because of Safety Issues (Apr. 2, 2000). The Los Angeles Times printed an editorial about the future of the El Toro military air facility in California and possible plans to convert it to a modern, commercial airport. The writer, Donald Segner, a former FAA official, questions whether it can be done safely, and would rather see John Wayne Airport upgraded, with El Toro used as an overflow and small aircraft airport.

Reader Responds to Editorial About Noise at Burbank Airport in California (Apr. 2, 2000). The Los Angeles Times printed a letter to the editor about noise at Burbank Airport. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Reader in North Carolina Dismayed That Airport Authority Did Not Adequately Inform Her About Noise (Apr. 2, 2000). The News and Record in Greensboro, North Carolina printed a letter to the editor by a reader in the town of Colfax who feels that that the local Airport Authority did not inform her about the amount of noise to which she and her family would be subjected when they purchased their new home. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Kenner, Louisiana Residents Near Airport Urged to Accept Airport Offer to Soundproof Homes (Apr. 2, 2000). The Times-Picayune in New Orleans, Louisiana reports that 351 homeowners who live near the New Orleans International Airport in the town of Kenner have qualified for FAA funding to have their homes soundproofed. Only 107 have accepted the offer thus far.

Hill Air Force Base in Utah to Redirect Flight Paths Away From Hospital, but Over Residential Areas (Apr. 2, 2000). The Associated Press reports that Hill Air Force Base in Utah has agreed to change its flight paths so that jets are not flying over nearby Davis Hospital and Medical Center. Instead, the Air Force jets will be flying over the communities of Clearfield, Clinton, and Layton.

Burbank Airport Hopes FAA Will Agree to Nighttime Curfews and Allow New Airport Terminal to be Built (Apr. 2, 2000). The Los Angeles Times published an editorial reporting that the city of Burbank reached a framework agreement with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) last summer to build a new terminal at Burbank Airport. Since then, it has been waiting to hear from the FAA as to whether the agreement meets federal guidelines. The FAA informed the city last week that the agreement does not meet federal guidelines.

A Primer on Hushkit History and Worldwide Stage 3 and Stage 4 Air Emissions and Noise Standards (Apr. 1, 2000). Air Transport World reports on the two-year continuing battle between the United States and the European Union over emissions and noise standards in the airline industry. In particular, the article covers the controversy over hushkits and their restricted useage in clear, chronological terms.

Dutch Firm Receives Noise Abatement Contracts for British and Dutch Airports (Apr. 1, 2000). Jane's Airport Review in England reports that HITT Special Products BV, a Dutch firm, has received a contract to supply a LogIT noise and track monitoring system to East Midlands Airport in the UK. The company has supplied similar systems to Leeds-Bradford Airport in the UK and to Valkenburg Military Airfield in the Netherlands. Eindhoven Airport in the Netherlands has ordered a flight route monitoring system that will aid its noise mitigation efforts.

Humorous Solution to San Bernardino, California's Need for Local Airport and Airline (Apr. 1, 2000). The Press-Enterprise in Riverside, California published a tongue-in-cheek article about the need for an air carrier to fly out of the defunct Norton Air Force Base in San Bernardino, California. The article writer recommends that residents start their own airline: Berdoo Air.

Mixed Opinions on New Gulfstream IV Business Jet (Apr. 1, 2000). Business and Commercial Aviation reports that the Gulfstream IV business jet, which was announced by Gulfstream Aerospace in the early 1980s, has not lived up to expectations. One positive result, however, is "unmatched low noise levels" inside the jet's cabin. The rest of the article discusses other performance features of the Gulfstream IV.

Reader Blasts Witham Field (Stuart, Florida) Airport Watch Committee (Apr. 1, 2000). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News in Stuart, Florida published a letter to the editor about continuing controversies at Witham Airfield. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

San Jose International Airport Will Not Expand; San Francisco Airport Plans to Add More Runways Instead (Apr. 1, 2000). The San Jose Mercury News in California reports that plans to possibly expand San Jose International Airport and/or to add commercial flights to Moffett Field have been cancelled. These plans had become possible alternatives to San Francisco International Airport's plan to fill in part of San Francisco bay for additional runway space.

Tampa International Airport in Florida Attempts to Crack Down on Pilots Who Insist on Creating More Jet Noise by Using Convenient Runway (Apr. 1, 2000). The Tampa Tribune reports that residents in Beach Park, Florida have complained about noise from aircraft approaching Tampa International Airport. Pilots are not supposed to fly over Beach Park because of repeated noise complaints. But some pilots still take the route over Beach Park nonetheless, in order to save time.

UK Tests "Scimitar" Aircraft Propellers; Finds Substantial Noise Reduction (Apr. 1, 2000). Business and Commercial Aviation reports that, in the United Kingdom, "scimitar" propellers have been installed and tested on a Britten-Norman BN2B Islander, reducing noise by up to 7 dBA. The propellers could have other important applications. Testing the new propellers is part of a United Kingdom Department of Trade and Industry effort to reduce noise from piston-powered light aircraft.

Worldwide Cooperation Needed in Adopting More Stringent Air Noise Controls (Apr. 1, 2000). Air Transport World published an article about the history during the past 23 years of the airline industry in adhering to Chapter 3/Stage 3 noise rules, both in North American and in Europe. The writer believes it is time to begin discussing more seriously defining and adopting Chapter 4/Stage 4 noise rules.

Burbank, California Airport Loses Request to Close Terminal Overnight (Mar. 31, 2000). The Los Angeles Times reports that FAA administrator Jane Garvey has recently declared that Burbank Airport will not be allowed to close its terminal overnight until it completes a noise study that could take up to two years to complete. The city of Burbank was hoping that closing the old terminal would help speed along their plans to build a new terminal at the airport. The project will now have to be put on hold.

Port of Seattle Nearing Completion of Soundproofing Work on Homes Near Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (Mar. 31, 2000). The Seattle Times reports that the Port of Seattle, which operates Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Washington state, has been diligent in using federal funds to help soundproof approximately 8,000 homes near the airport (which is also known as Sea-Tac). Work began on the homes in 1985, and has cost $163 million. More than 1,000 flights land at Sea-Tac each day.

Reader in Arizona Doesn't Mind Noise from Luke Air Force Base (Mar. 31, 2000). The Arizona Republic printed a letter from a reader who thinks that people should not complain about jet noise from Luke Air Force Base. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) Resident Says Stop Complaining About Airport Noise (Mar. 31, 2000). The Ottawa Citizen printed an indignant letter from a reader who believes people should stop complaining about airport noise. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Attempts to Revitalize Beleaguered Phoenix, Arizona Neighborhood Meet With Opposition From Some City Officials (Mar. 30, 2000). The Phoenix New Times in Arizona reports that some city officials and residents wish to revitalize the neighborhood of Central City South. Residents there are faced with many obstacles, including noise pollution. The plan is getting little support from the city, however.

Flight Limits Placed on Grand Canyon National Park Tours Do Not Meet Goals of 1987 Law (Mar. 30, 2000). The Arizona Republic printed an editorial that discusses the recent limits placed on the number of flights in Grand Canyon National Park. However, the goals of a 1987 law that established flight-free zones over the park and called for "substantial restoration of natural quiet" still have not been attained.

Navy Jets Use New Orleans International Airport For Special Mission Due to Inadequate Size of Navy Air Station's Runways (Mar. 30, 2000). The Times-Picayune in Louisiana reports that residents in Kenner and St. Charles Parish have been warned that they will hear louder than usual takeoff noise from New Orleans International Airport today. The military is using the airport for the departure of two of the Navy's giant airborne tankers and a squadron of F/A-18 fighters for training exercises in Guam.

New Federal Legislation Will Increase Air Traffic at Kennedy and Laguardia Airports in New York (Mar. 30, 2000). Newsday reports that US President Bill Clinton is due to sign legislation this week that would allow more regional jet traffic at Kennedy and LaGuardia Airports in New York. The legislation will also allow the "high-density rule," which has set strict flight number limits at the two airports for the past thirty years, to expire in less than seven years. The bill was approved by Congress on March 15.

Noise Complaints Prompt Consideration of Rules Against "Touch-and-Go" Training Exercises at Witham Field in Stuart, Florida (Mar. 30, 2000). The Palm Beach Post reports that Martin County officials are trying to respond to community complaints about noise at Witham Field in Stuart, Florida by drafting a law that would restrict "touch-and-go" takeoffs and landings there. They will closely study a similar law enacted by the city of Pompano Beach five years ago as they draft the Witham Field law.

United States and European Union Attempt to Reach Hushkit Compromise (Mar. 30, 2000). The Journal of Commerce in London, England reports on another effort between the European Union (EU) and the United States to settle the controversy over hushkits. The EU law banning hushkitted aircraft takes place on May 4. This would affect more than 700 US aircraft.

Aircraft Noise in River Forest and River Grove, Illinois Within Acceptable Limits, O'Hare Commission Says (Mar. 29, 2000). The Chicago Sun-Times reports on several newsworthy events in Chicago's suburbs. One item concerns recent monitoring of O'Hare International Airport noise levels in the towns of River Forest and River Grove.

Belton, Missouri Candidates for Aldermen Discuss Opinions on Airport Expansion and Highway Widening (Mar. 29, 2000). The Kansas City Star reports that upcoming elections for aldermen in Belton, Missouri hinge on issues that include developing an "intermodal hub" at Richards-Gebaur Memorial Airport, and widening a highway, both of which could bring increased noise to nearby neighborhoods.

City of Surprise, Arizona Discusses Developing Land Near Luke Air Force Base (Mar. 29, 2000). The Arizona Republic reports that the City Council in Surprise, Arizona has voted to support Luke Air Force Base and will encourage property owners to voluntarily follow a law that says that cities should build sound-insulated homes and should encourage low-density residential building within a noise contour around Luke Air Force Base that was established in 1988. The law does not require that cities follow these building protocols. Surprise, however, requires that any new homes built within the city limits be insulated against the noise of jets from the base.

O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission Discusses "Fly Quiet" Program (Mar. 29, 2000). The Chicago Tribune reports that the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission is creating a recognition awards program that will give airline companies an incentive to comply with its "Fly Quiet" program. Commission Chairwoman Arlene Mulder, who is also mayor of Arlington Heights, made the announcement at a public meeting recently in Arlington Heights. Airlines would be rated according to their compliance with Fly Quiet.

Planning Officer from Hong Kong's Civil Aviation Department Responds to Complaints About Airport Noise (Mar. 29, 2000). The South China Morning Post printed a letter to the editor from a reader about excessive noise from a new airport in Hong Kong. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Reader Protests Federal Express Hub in Greensboro, North Carolina (Mar. 29, 2000). The News and Record in Greensboro, North Carolina printed a letter to the editor protesting the Federal Express air hub. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Reader Worried About Noise Increase at Witham Field in Stuart, Florida (Mar. 29, 2000). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News printed a letter to the editor about opening Witham Field to larger jet aircraft. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

US Department of Defense Launches Program to Develop Low-Noise, Supersonic Aircraft (Mar. 29, 2000). Jane's Defense Weekly, a British publication, reports on recent US Department of Defense discussions concerning research and development of a new low-noise supersonic aircraft that could conduct long-range reconnaissance missions without being detected.

US Government Announces Limits on Flights Over Grand Canyon (Mar. 29, 2000). The Arizona Republic in Phoenix reports that President Clinton announced on Tuesday that the number of flights that tour airplanes and helicopters may make over Grand Canyon National Park will be limited. The limits were established by the National Parks Service in conjunction with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Flights will be limited to 90,000 per year.

EU and US Negotiate Hushkits and Ban on Older Aircraft (Mar. 28, 2000). According to London's Financial Times, talks between the US and the European Union may lead to a compromise over "hushkits" because EU officials may delay the registration date for non-EU airplanes equipped with the engine mufflers to fly I into the 15-nation bloc.

Neighbors of US Air Base in Okinawa File Lawsuit Against Japanese Government Over Noise (Mar. 28, 2000). The Daily Yomiuri reported that almost 6,000 neighbors of the U.S. Kadena Air Base in Okinawa filed a lawsuit against the government because of jet noise from night and early morning flights, twenty-one of whom are demanding that the Japanese government order the U.S. to stop the flights. According to the article, the residents seek 6.2 million zen.

US Base Too Noisy for Okinawans: Court Action Taken (Mar. 28, 2000). The Mainichi News reported a story about jet noise from the US Kadena Air that has prompted over 5,500 residents near the base to sue the Japanese government and are asking for 6.2 billion zen in damages and calling for a ban on night flights after 7pm.

California Airport Prompts Noise Discussion (Mar. 26, 2000). The Los Angeles Times printed a letter to the editor regarding jet noise from Burbank Airport. The letter is printed in its entirety.

Dallas Historic Airport To Develop Master Plan for Growth and Expansion (Mar. 26, 2000). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported that, Love Field in Dallas is facing increased commercial air traffic and city officials must develop a long-term plan for the airport since it is already overcrowded and cannot accommodate more traffic.

Letters to the Editor About California Airport Facility (Mar. 25, 2000). The San Diego Union Tribune printed letters to the editor regarding Miramar military base as a choice for an international airport. The letters are printed in their entirety.

London's Heathrow Airport Faces Legal Challenge of Night Flights (Mar. 25, 2000). The Daily Telegraph reported that flying into Heathrow airport at night could be a violation of one's right to undisturbed sleep, and a test case on "unacceptable night noise" affecting a million people will heard in the European Court of Human Rights in April of 2000. Plaintiffs are asking the court to cut back night flights to before 1993 levels.

New Mexico Noise Activists Hire National Noise Experts (Mar. 25, 2000). The Albuquerque Journal reported that Airport Neighbors Alliance, a grassroots campaign against jet noise, received the help of two national noise experts to help them challenge jet noise from the Albuquerque International Sunport.

Pilot Training at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida Includes Dropping Live Bombs (Mar. 25, 2000). An article from the Associated Press reported on a live bombing exercise on Eglin Air Force Base in the Florida Panhandle--that was moved from Puerto Rico because of complaints against the Navy's use of the island for the bombing.

St. Louis City Officials Criticized for Dismissing Residents' Airport Noise Concerns (Mar. 25, 2000). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported on a news conference where regional officials, clergy and neighbors of Lambert Field sharply criticized St. Louis city officials for dismissing their noise concerns regarding the construction of a new runway and other improvements.

UK Promises Residents in Scotland to Help Soundproof Homes Against Military Jet Noise (Mar. 25, 2000). The Glasgow Herald reported that the British government promised to review soundproofing "arrangements" for residences around the UK's most northerly fighter base, Leuchars in Fife.

Alaska Airport Releases Biased Studies on Airport Expansion (Mar. 24, 2000). According to the Anchorage City News, four studies by Anchorage's international airport state that expanding the airport won't have much noise, air and traffic impact. {Editor's Note: One might conclude that a study sponsored by an airport might vastly differ from a study sponsored by advocates for noise abatement.]

Albuquerque City Council To Hire Noise Enforcement Officer (Mar. 24, 2000). The Albuquerque Tribune reported that Jay Czar, head of the Albuquerque International Sunport is scheduled to interview four people for the newly created position of Noise Abatement Officer.

Search for Loch Ness Monster Means No Royal Airforce Training (Mar. 24, 2000). According to the Herald, a scientist studying Loch Ness in search of the lake's famous monster, Nessie, complained that jet noise was adversely affecting sensors beneath the water's surface and pilots were requested to avoid the lake while "the hunt is on."

Canada Should Pay More Attention to Noise Pollution (Mar. 23, 2000). The Ottawa Citizen printed this letter to the editor regarding jet noise over residential areas. The letter is printed in its entirety.

Local City Council in UK Calls for Public Forum on Airport Noise (Mar. 23, 2000). The Birmingham Evening Mail reported that a Midland city councilor asked for a public forum for residents to discuss Birmingham International Airport.

Seattle-Tacoma Airport's Change in Flight Plan Gets Support From City Officials (Mar. 23, 2000). According to the News Tribune reported that town officials in Washington state support a plan to reroute dozens of flights from Sea-Tac (Seattle-Tacoma) Airport, a plan which other cities do not support. flight paths.

Nevada Airport Officials Face Vocal Residents Over Review of Aircraft Weight Limits (Mar. 22, 2000). An article by the Associated Press reported that when the Minden-Tahoe Airport Advisory Board called for a review of the airport's weight limit for aircraft, the airport's neighbors became suspicious that the board planned to expand the airport and increase air traffic.

San Jose Officials Delay Ban on Night Flights Rather Than Lose Federal Funds (Mar. 22, 2000). The San Jose Mercury News reported that San Mateo County officials delayed a ban on night flights at San Carlos Airport because they could lose federal funding and anger pilots, but did ask pilots for voluntary compliance until November.

English Businessman Files Appeal with the English Government Against a Local Government Ban Prohibiting Him From Constructing and Using a Personal Helicopter Landing Near his Home (Mar. 20, 2000). The Birmingham Evening Mail reports that Mr. Simon Farmer, a local resident and businessman, is concerned by the refusal of his local town councilors to allow him to build a helicopter pad on his property and use it to take off in and land his privately-owned helicopter. He has filed an appeal with Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott, who is Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions. The government's Planning Inspectorate will handle the appeal.

Residents Bothered by O'Hare Airport Noise Want Village of Mount Prospect, Illinois to Address Their Concerns (Mar. 20, 2000). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the Concerned Citizens of Mount Prospect met recently to discuss airport noise with the Village of Mount Prospect. The group believes that the village should take the same measures to study and act upon airport noise as it has taken in dealing with train noise in the town.

U.S. State Department Files Petition with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Concerning Possible International Law Violation by European Union for Banning Hushkitted Transports (Mar. 20, 2000). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports that the United States is concerned that the European Union's ban of hushkitted transports is illegal. The U.S. hopes that the petition it filed with the ICAO on March 14 will help settle the dispute. Hushkits are devices that were developed to help powerplants and aviation companies comply with the ICAO's Chapter 3 noise-emissions standards. Most hushkitted aircraft have been built in the United States. The United States claims that by banning hushkitted aircraft, the EU is unfairly penalizing U.S. aircraft companies, while simultaneously favoring European manufacturers who do not install hushkits, particularly Airbus Industrie.

Burbank, California Rejects Petition Barring New Airline Terminal Construction at Burbank Airport (Mar. 19, 2000). The Los Angeles Times reports that the Burbank City Council recently rejected a petition filed by Restore Our Airport Rights (ROAR) asking the city to deny Burbank Airport the right to construct a new terminal. The FAA agreed that the petition should not stop the airport from adding the terminal.

Dayton International Airport (Ohio) Expansion Plans Cause Controversy in Surrounding Communities (Mar. 19, 2000). The Dayton Daily News reports that Dayton International Airport's new expansion plan has caused much controversy in surrounding communities such as Tipp City, Butler Township, Monroe Township, Vandalia, and others. Officials maintain that community growth was planned based on previous plans presented to them by the airport, and now the airport has changed those plans. Many homes will now be affected by the noise from new runways that will be built close by.

Navy Moves Live Bombing Test Site from Puerto Rico to Eglin Air Force Base in Florida (Mar. 19, 2000). AP Worldstream reports that many residents who live near Eglin Air Force Base are not opposed to the Navy's recent decision to move its live bombing test site from Puerto Rico to Eglin. Most are used to the noise and realize that the military is important to the Florida Panhandle area.

San Fernando Valley Residents Unfairly Burdened with Burbank Airport Noise (Mar. 19, 2000). Los Angeles Times reports that Tom Lucente, President of the Studio City Residents Association, believes that southeast San Fernando Valley residents are unfairly burdened with noise from Burbank Airport. He wants other surrounding cities to share the noise burden. He opposes adoption of the settlement agreement offered last fall.

San Fernando Valley Residents Unfairly Burdened with Burbank Airport Noise (Mar. 19, 2000). Los Angeles Times reports that Tom Lucente, President of the Studio City Residents Association, believes that southeast San Fernando Valley residents are unfairly burdened with noise from Burbank Airport. He wants other surrounding cities to share the noise burden. He opposes adoption of the settlement agreement offered last fall.

Witham Field in Stuart, Florida Opens New Control Tower; Citizen Group Concerned About Increased Noise as a Result (Mar. 19, 2000). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports that Witham Field is holding ceremonies on Monday to celebrate the opening of a new control tower. The Witham Field/Martin County Airport Watch Committee has objections to the new tower because it will increase noise levels in the area.

Oracle Corporation Jet Temporarily Prevented From Nighttime Landings at San Jose International Airport (Mar. 18, 2000). The Associated Press State and Local Wire reports that Larry Ellison, head of Oracle Corporation, has been issued a temporary restraining order preventing his jet from landing at San Jose International Airport between the airport's curfew hours of 11:30 P.M. and 6:30 A.M. The city has warned Ellison more than once during the past eighteen months that he has allegedly violated the curfew. The city's attorneys allege that Ellison has violated "the city's noise ordinance, breached the terms of his airport lease, and engaged in unfair business practices by breaking the rules." City Attorney Rick Doyle said that the issue will now be resolved in the courts.

Beaufort, Georgia Air Station to Generate More Jet Noise as Navy and Marines Begin to Share Base (Mar. 17, 2000). The Savannah Morning News reports that the U.S. Navy is going to begin sharing space with the Marines at the Marine Corps Air Station in Beaufort, Georgia. Twenty-two Navy jets will mean that more than 100 planes will be at Beaufort, and the base's active-duty population will be increased by 500 people.

Burbank Airport Begins Home Insulation Program That Extends Beyond Burbank City Limits (Mar. 17, 2000). The Los Angeles Times reports that the Federal Aviation Administration and the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority have undertaken an ambitious home soundproofing program that for the first time extends into the city limits of Los Angeles. The Salazar family have become the first homeowners outside the city of Burbank to receive soundproofing.

Fort Knox Expansion Creates Concern About Noise and Wildlife Habitat Destruction (Mar. 17, 2000). The Courier-Journal of Louisville, Kentucky reports that residents in the area of Fort Knox have noise and environmental concerns over an urban-warfare training facility that will be built by the Army. The project will involve much logging and disruption of wildlife habitat. The Army has agreed to conduct an environmental study. [Editor's Note: This story has already been addressed in another article. We are reporting here only on details that were not in the previous article.]

Petition Opposing Burbank Airport Terminal Construction Rejected by City; Issue May Be Brought to Public Vote Anyway (Mar. 17, 2000). The Los Angeles Times reports that a recent initiative concerning the construction of a $300 million terminal at Burbank Airport was disqualified from the ballot on Wednesday by City Clerk Judie Sarquiz. The petition was signed by 7,400 voters, but its two most important proponents, former City Councilman Ted McConkey and Howard Rothenbach, neglected to add their signatures to the petition, which legally disqualified the initiative.

Pratt & Whitney Rocket Testing Facility Causes Noise Pollution in Nearby Stuart, Florida (Mar. 17, 2000). The Palm Beach Post published a letter to the editor by Jeanne Waldrop of Stuart Florida, who has complaints about noise pollution from a nearby rocket-testing facility. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Russian Space Station Module Noise Levels Deemed Unhealthy and Dangerous to Astronauts (Mar. 17, 2000). The United Press International reports that the United States Government Accounting Office (GAO) recently testified before the U.S. House of Representatives that continuing to collaborate with Russia on the International Space Station program may be problematic due to Russian safety violations. Excessive noise inside the Russian modules is the most severe of the four violations mentioned. The other violations concern "protecting the modules from penetration by space debris, verifying that the windows are strong enough to withstand years of space exposure, and designing the equipment so it can function even in an emergency when air leaks out of the station."

U.S. Army Plans Urban Training Center at Fort Knox; Plans to Study Environmental Impact (Mar. 17, 2000). The Associated Press reports that a new military training ground planned for Fort Knox has many environmentalists concerned over the negative impact such a facility will have on the environment. The Army has stated that it will conduct an environmental impact study to assess the situation.

European Union Disappointed that United States Filed Complaint Over Upcoming EU Hushkit Ban (Mar. 16, 2000). The Xinhua News Agency reports that the European Union is disappointed that the United States filed an Article 84 complaint with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) concerning the EU's ban of older non-EU aircraft outfitted with hushkits (airplane engine noise reduction mufflers.) The EU said that the action will make it more difficult for the EU and the U.S. to arrive at any type of agreement on this issue.

Federal Airport Bill Will Allow Airports to Spend More on Noise Mitigation; Will Also Cause Airport Growth and Increase in Air Traffic (Mar. 16, 2000). USA Today reports that airports around the country are waiting for President Clinton to sign the aviation bill recently passed by the U.S. House of Representatives. If the president signs the bill, many U.S. airports are expected to begin building programs next year. Los Angeles International Airport will use some of its allotted money on noise mitigation programs.

McClellan-Palomar Airport in Carlsbad, California to Be Focus of Noise Study (Mar. 16, 2000). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that a noise study will be conducted at McClellan-Palomar Airport in Carlsbad, California. Residents have become increasingly bothered by noise from the planes using the airport.

Noise Mitigation Program at Tulsa International Airport to Begin As Soon As Federal Aviation Plan is Passed (Mar. 16, 2000). The Tulsa World reports that the U.S. House of Representatives passed a $40 billion aviation bill that will include $2 million to be allocated to a noise mitigation program at Tulsa International Airport. The program can begin as soon as President Clinton signs the bill.

O'Hare Noise Levels Monitored by City of Chicago and Suburban O'Hare Commission for Past Three Years Have Not Yet Been Properly Analyzed (Mar. 16, 2000). The Chicago Tribune reports that noise data accumulated by the Suburban O'Hare Commission over the last three years has not been properly analyzed, causing continuing disagreements between O'Hare International Airport and its surrounding communities over noise remedies and who qualifies for them.

Reader Expresses Concern Over Jet Noise at Upcoming Augusta, Georgia Skyfest 2000 (Mar. 16, 2000). The Augusta, Georgia Chronicle published reader comments on a variety of topics in its "Rants and Raves" column. One is from a reader who expresses concern about noise at Skyfest 2000. The comments are reprinted here in their entirety:

Sarasota County Commission Approves Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport Expansion Plan (Mar. 16, 2000). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that the Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport will probably begin implementing its expansion plan this spring. The plan will include building a longer runway and a larger passenger terminal, as well as adding a parking garage and as many as 144 airplane hangars.

South Shore Boston Town Representatives Meet to Discuss Forming Regional Task Force to Fight Logan Airport Noise (Mar. 16, 2000). The Patriot Ledger reports that twenty-five residents from towns on the south shore of Boston harbor met at the Hingham Town Hall to discuss forming a regional task force to fight against Logan Airport jet noise. Residents complain that the airport noise continues to increase, disturbing their sleep and other activities.

United States Government Officially Protests European Union Proposed Ban Against Hushkitted Aircraft (Mar. 16, 2000). The M2 Presswire reports that the United States government today filed a formal "Article 84" action with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) against the European Union (EU). The complaint concerns ongoing controversy surrounding the EU's proposed ban of aircraft that use American hushkit technology to make the planes quieter.

European Hushkit Ban Will Affect Tulsa-based Nordam and Other U.S. Hushkit Manufacturers (Mar. 15, 2000). The Tulsa World reports that recent disagreements between the United States and the European Union (EU) over the EU's proposed ban on hushkitted aircraft will severely impact the Nordam Group, a Tulsa-based hushkit manufacturer. Hushkits are engine mufflers installed on older airplanes to reduce noise and air pollution. Other U.S. hushkit manufacturers include United Technologies, Federal Express, and Northwest Airlines. The EU ban is scheduled to go into effect on May 4.

Residents of Richmond, California Disturbed By Nighttime Jet Flight Paths (Mar. 15, 2000). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that over 400 residents of Richmond, California, who have noticed an increase in nighttime flights and subsequent noise from Oakland and San Francisco International Airports, have signed a petition. They are asking that the Oakland Airport Community Noise Management Forum allow the city of Richmond to join the group so that they can be a part of discussions about noise issues and flight patterns at the airports.

Louisville, Kentucky Residents Encouraged to Attend Public Meetings About Airport's Future (Mar. 14, 2000). The Louisville, Kentucky Courier-Journal printed an editorial about Louisville International Airport, in which the editor encourages readers to get involved with helping to plan for the airport's future by attending a series of meetings that will address public concerns. The editor believes it is the reader's duty to get involved in the process before complaining about airport improvements.

FedEx Hub in Greensboro, North Carolina Could Be Noisier Than Environmental Impact Study May Indicate (Mar. 13, 2000). The Greensboro, North Carolina News & Record published an editorial by John Licata of Greensboro, who is concerned about the noise impact from the planned Federal Express hub in Greensboro.

Louisville, Kentucky International Airport to Expand; Regional Airport Authority to Sponsor Public Forums (Mar. 13, 2000). The Courier-Journal of Louisville, Kentucky, reports that Louisville International Airport will be undergoing major development in the coming years, and airport officials want the public to be involved in studying the airport's Master Plan and giving officials input on the plan.

Stuart, Florida Businessman Annoys Residents with Plan to Land Large Jet at Local Airfield (Mar. 13, 2000). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News in Florida published a letter to the editor from a member of Stuart's Airport Planning Advisory Team, who is annoyed with a local businessman who wants to land his Boeing 737 at a local airfield. The letter is reprinted here in its entirety:

Proposed El Toro Airport in Orange County, California Subject of Debate Over Effects on Property Values (Mar. 12, 2000). The Orange County Register in California published an editorial by Wallace Walrod, vice president for research and communications of the Orange County Business Council. Walrod presents reasons why property values of homes close to a proposed airport at El Toro might actually increase, rather than decrease as many opponents claim. A vote on the county-proposed airport could take place in November.

Residents Concerned About Safety and Expansion at Burbank Airport in California (Mar. 12, 2000). The Los Angeles Times published four letters to the editor about safety concerns and opposition to expansion at Burbank Airport after an incident in which a jet skidded off a runway after landing. The letters are reprinted here in their entirety:

Florida Airport Claims Noise Won't Disrupt Community College Campus (Feb. 22, 2000). The St. Petersburg Times printed a letter to the editor regarding a controversy over whether a community college should have a campus next to the Hernando County Airport. This letter, printed in its entirety, attacks a previous letter voicing concern over airport noise levels.

Rhode Island Schools Barely Outside Airport Noise Zone and FAA Refuses to Pay for Soundproofing (Feb. 22, 2000). The Providence Journal-Bulletin printed an article about two Rhode Island schools that are barely outside the high-noise zone around T. F. Green Airport, making them ineligible for funding from the Federal Aviation Administration for soundproofing. The schools are within 200 feet from the zone boundary, and both parents and teachers complain that the noise disrupts learning.

Alabama Airport Officials and Government Say No to Noise Limits: Residents Angry (Feb. 21, 2000). The Birmingham Post reported on a controversy among Birmingham International Airport, the Government and residents living near the airport. An advisory committee of the airport [Editor's Note: a committee with no power or binding vote] and the Government both claim that setting noise limits is impractical.

Madrid Airport Too Noisy and Dangerous Say Protesters (Feb. 21, 2000). The International Herald Tribune reported that 40 adults and three children arrived at Madrid Barajas at 10 pm in their pajamas and robes to protest airport noise.

Three Day Airport Noise Seminar in California Unveils New Technology to Reduce Noise (Feb. 20, 2000). According to the Chicago Daily Herald, a three-day conference, titled: "Year 2000 International Airport Noise Symposium," sponsored by the University of California at Berkeley included city officials from the Chicago area who sit on the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission.

British Airways Head of Environment Reports on Airline's Pollution Control Measures (Feb. 19, 2000). The London Daily Telegraph reports that British Airway's head of environment discussed the steps the airline takes to attempt to reduce the pollution it generates. He notes that the public will need to compromise in some areas in order to have a cleaner industry that also provides convenient flights.

North Carolina Airport Attempt to Change Flight Path to Reduce Noise Fails (Feb. 19, 2000). According to an editorial in the News & Record, an attempt by airport officials to redirect flight paths is a bad idea, bad politics and bad planning.

Oceana Naval Air Station, Virginia to Construct Soundproofing Facility for Testing Jet Engines (Feb. 19, 2000). The Virginian Pilot reports that the Oceana Naval Air Station will build a $9.9 million "hush house" for testing jet engines. The new soundproofing facility will significantly cut down on the noise generated by the testing of jet engines.

Virginia Naval Base Will Enclose Engine Noise (Feb. 19, 2000). According to the Virginian-Pilot, Oceana Naval Air base has finally acted on reducing noise from testing jet engines, a source of irritation for the base's neighbors for years.

Redirecting Flight Path at Seattle International Airport Is Not a Solution (Feb. 18, 2000). The Seattle Times printed this letter to the editor regarding a controversial proposal to switch jet flight paths from some neighborhoods to others. The letter is printed in its entirety.

UK Environmental Minister Maps City Noise (Feb. 18, 2000). According to an article in the Daily Telegraph, England's environmental minister Michael Meacher said that 12 million people in his country are victims of intolerable noise from traffic, railroads, airports or industry, and he has a way to target the problem and help politicians act to solve it.

US to Discuss Aircraft Noise With EU (Feb. 18, 2000). The London Financial Times reported on plans for the US to join in a discussion with the European Union on aircraft noise in order to settle the controversial issue on "hush kit" technology. [Editor's Note: "Hush Kits" are not so quiet as the newer Stage 3 aircraft, and they pollute more.]

Anonymous Protest Launched Against Businesses in Support of Virginia's Oceana Naval Base (Feb. 17, 2000). The Virginian-Pilot reports that an anonymous person or persons has circulated unsigned leaflets and a letter protesting six Beach businesses' support of the Oceana Naval base. The letter proposes a boycott of the businesses, which claim that the businesses "support jet noise at Oceana." Leaflets have been found attached to telephone poles and erected on stakes.

Five Resident Opinions Concerning Planned Alterations to Plymouth City, England Airport and Surrounding Roads (Feb. 17, 2000). The Evening Herald, Plymouth, England has printed letters from five residents of the Plymouth area who have varying opinions on proposed changes to Plymouth Airport and alterations to surrounding roads. The letters are printed below in their entirety:

Proposed Legislation Would Allow Local British Authorities More Power Over Noise Control at Provincial Airports (Feb. 17, 2000). The Coventry Evening Telegraph reports that Parliament will soon discuss possible legislation to control noise at provincial airports, including Baginton Airport in Coventry.

Chicago Area Airport Committee Promises More Pro-Active Position on Reducing Noise (Feb. 16, 2000). According to the Chicago Daily Herald, Arlington Heights' Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise

Coalition Protests Federal Express mid-Atlantic Cargo Hub Plans (Feb. 16, 2000). The High Point Enterprise reports that the Piedmont Quality of Life Coalition, headquartered near Greensboro, North Carolina, is spearheading opposition to Federal Express's plan to locate its mid-Atlantic cargo hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport. The group is sponsoring a speaker, and public input into the plan will be accepted in the coming months.

European Lobbying Group Supports EC Noise and ATC Initiatives (Feb. 16, 2000). According to the Air Transport Intelligence, European Commission (EC) spokesman Loyola de Palacio announced that a European airport lobbying group (ACI Europe)supports the EC's initiatives that address both jet noise and air traffic control (ATC) delays.

LAX Authorizes Soundproofing for Additional Homes in South Los Angeles (Feb. 16, 2000). The Los Angeles Times reports that soundproofing for more homes near the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) has been authorized by the Los Angeles Board of Airport Commissioners.

Readers Comment on Helicopter and Aircraft Noise at Hernando County Airport, Florida (Feb. 16, 2000). The Hernando Times published two letters to the editor by readers who are commenting about a recent article in the paper about excessive noise at Hernando County Airport, attributed to helicopter pilot training runs. The letters are printed here in their entirety:

UK Puts Noise on the Map (Feb. 16, 2000). According to an article from Hermes Database, 12 million people in England are victims of intolerable noise levels from transportation and industry, and the Environment Minister, Michael Meacher announced the nation's first noise map of one city.

Washington Man Claims Toy Airplanes Violate County Ordinance (Feb. 16, 2000). According to an article in The Columbian, a Clark County man complained about model airplane noise at a nearby fairground so vociferously that county commissioners ordered sound tests.

Congressmen Challenge NY Port Authority's Neglect to Fund Noise Abatement Measures (Feb. 15, 2000). According to the New York Times, two congressmen blasted Port Authority in a report on its lack of effort over the past five years to commit federal monies and airport revenue available for reducing airport noise. Instead, the article said, the authority has directed most of its passenger surcharges toward light rail. Kennedy International, Newark and La Guardia are under the Authority's jurisdiction.

Controversy Continues Over NY and NJ Port Authority's Use of Funds Earmarked for Airport Noise Reduction Projects (Feb. 15, 2000). The Record of Bergen County, New Jersey reports that the New York and New Jersey Port Authority denies claims recently published in a congressional report that it has not spent allotted money on airport noise reduction projects at Kennedy, LaGuardia, and Newark International Airports. The authority states that it has indeed spent millions on noise reduction efforts in the past five years.

Minnesota Twin Cities Officials Pass Compromise Plan for Jet Noise (Feb. 15, 2000). According to the Minnesota Star Tribune, officials from Minneapolis and St. Paul voted to identify an area near the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport as uninhabitable because of jet noise from a new runway expected to open in 2003.

More Homes in Vicinity of Los Angeles International Airport to be Soundproofed by the Airport (Feb. 15, 2000). The Business Wire reports that more homes near Los Angeles International Airport will be soundproofed due to a recent order by the Los Angeles Board of Airport Commissioners.

Port Authority in New York Neglecting to Spend Ticket Surcharges on Noise Reduction (Feb. 15, 2000). The Daily News reports that two area politicians have released a report that accuses The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey of not dealing adequately with noise problems near LaGuardia, Kennedy, and Newark International Airports.

Orange County Airports Topic of Heated Discussion (Feb. 6, 2000). The Los Angeles Times printed letters of complaint about John Wayne Airport and whether air traffic should be rerouted to nearby proposed El Toro airport, which is not yet constructed. The letters are printed in their entirety.

Nevada Activists Criticize Navy Training Plan (Feb. 5, 2000). According to an article from the Associated Press, a group of Nevada activists who monitor military activity has criticized officials of the Fallon Naval Air Station for planning to place two electronic warfare sites and 22 smaller mobile electronic sites on public land. The article said the Bureau of Land Management is collaborating with the Navy on the plan, which will be used for training.

California Residents Disturbed Over Continual Jet Noise (Feb. 4, 2000). The San Francisco Chronicle reported on Point Richmond residents who are subjected to jet noise every six minutes, and who've organized to get the number of overhead flights reduced.

North Carolina FedEx Airport Plans Subject of Noise Debate (Feb. 3, 2000). According to the Tribune Business News, FedEx officials may have to prove how noisy its aircraft will be by providing a sample landing and takeoff at Piedmont Triad International Airport (PTIA). Airport officials are amenable to the idea if FedEx executives are open to the idea.

Alternatives to Airport Noise in Australia Easy To Do (Feb. 2, 2000). The Canberra Times printed this letter to the newspaper regarding airport noise and possible alternative solutions. The letter is printed in its entirety.

City of Denver Appeals Fine Because of Airport Noise (Feb. 2, 2000). An article from the Associated Press reported that local cities around Denver won a $5.3 million fine against the city of Denver because of excessive noise from Denver International Airport (DIA). Denver is appealing the fine.

Los Angeles City Council Unsure About Phasing Out Stage 2 Jet Aircraft (Feb. 2, 2000). According to the Los Angeles Times, the city council wants to talk to the FAA about restricting the number of noisy aircraft at Van Nuys Airport. The article said that city council members are uncertain of their ability to limit the number of Stage 2 aircraft, which are older and noisier than newer planes, from landing or taking off.

New Airport Comes to Dallas: Residents in Flight Path Not Sure About Added Noise (Feb. 2, 2000). According to the Dallas Morning News, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals has given Legend Airlines approval to begin service to Love Field, which is outside Dallas, and some residents in nearby neighborhoods are concerned about more jet noise.

Seattle Towns in Flight Paths Should Share Jet Noise (Feb. 2, 2000). The Seattle Times printed this letter to the editor regarding Washington towns in flight paths. The letter is printed in its entirety.

Illinois Town Officials Receive Info on Airport Noise Study (Feb. 1, 2000). The Associated Press reported on an airport noise abatement study for Palwaukee Municipal Airport which will measure airport noise, identify exposure to it, and make a land use determination accordingly. The study will be completed in the spring of 2001.

South Korean Residents Sue Government Over Airplane Noise (Feb. 1, 2000). The Korea Herald reported on residents who sued the government and a government-run airport operator because of airplane noise from nearby Kimpo International Airport. Residents seek compensation for "physical and mental damage" because of airport noise.

Helicopter Convention Includes Retrofits to Reduce Noise Footprint, Inspired By Noise Problems Over Grand Canyon National Park (Jan. 31, 2000). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports on an international helicopter conference which included the introduction of a retrofitted sightseeing helicopter which is quieter than the original, creating an 80-decibel footprint.

T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island Plans to Buy 260 Homes to Mitigate Noise (Jan. 31, 2000). The Associated Press State and Local Wire reports that T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island plans to offer home buyouts to 260 homeowners to mitigate noise. Local officials are asking for creation of a federal law which would make airports reimburse municipalities for tax revenue lost in the process of noise mitigation.

Letters to the Editor Show Support for El Toro Airport (Jan. 30, 2000). The Los Angeles Times prints several letters to the editor, two of which deal with potential noise from the proposed El Toro International Airport in Orange County, California. The first argues that El Toro is needed because nearby John Wayne Airport is already overburdened and unsafe. The second says that residents near the proposed El Toro Airport knew about the noise from the former military base, and so should have no complaint about noise from a new airport.

Orange County, California Plans to Maintain Noise Rules at John Wayne Airport When Original Agreement Expires, Regardless Of Whether El Toro Airport Becomes a Reality (Jan. 30, 2000). The Los Angeles Times reports that Orange County, California officials plan to keep noise rules at John Wayne Airport in place even after 2005 when the original regulations expire. It remains unclear whether this plan will be feasible. Residents near John Wayne worry that if the proposed El Toro airport isn't built, John Wayne could grow dramatically.

Broomfield, Colorado's Jefferson County Airport Is Growing; Officials Are Pleased, But Some Residents Complain that Noise Is Getting Worse (Jan. 29, 2000). The Daily Camera reports that Broomfield, Colorado's Jefferson County Airport is growing, having increased by 10,000 operations during 1999. Residents feel that more and bigger planes have been using the airport, bringing with them more noise. Airport officials say this indicates a healthy economy, but have some voluntary noise rules in place to quiet the noise.

Eight Business Leaders Team Up with Virginia Beach's Chamber of Commerce to Form a Group that Promotes Oceana Naval Base, and Counter Attacks by Anti-Noise Activists (Jan. 28, 2000). The Virginian-Pilot reports that eight business leaders have formed a group with the help of the Chamber of Commerce to promote the benefits of Virginia Beach's Oceana Naval Base. They want to counter what they call 'misinformation' from an anti-noise activist group, and encourage the Navy to maintain its strong presence there.

Environmental Report from McGuire Air Force Base in New Hanover, New Jersey Says Base is Busier, and Also Quieter (Jan. 27, 2000). The Asbury Park Press reports that an environmental report on McGuire Air Force Base in New Hanover, New Jersey says that the base is busier but quieter.

Sunriver, Oregon Airport Plans to Add New Staff and Automatic Weather Advisory to Help Pilots Keep Quiet (Jan. 27, 2000). The Bulletin reports that Sunriver Airport in Sunriver, Oregon plans to add extra staff and an automatic weather system which could advise pilots of the quietest possible approach.

Letter to the Editor Criticizes Noise Abatement at Bradley Airport in Suffield, Connecticut (Jan. 26, 2000). The Hartford Courant prints a letter to the editor that criticizes noise abatement at Bradley Airport, and says until recently it has been lead by those who are ignorant of typical noise abatement strategy.

Schaumburg, Illinois Airport Noise Monitoring Program Reports Full Compliance Last Month (Jan. 26, 2000). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that a noise monitoring program at Schaumburg Regional Airport shows that all planes were in full compliance of noise rules since last month. Noise complaints have decreased to 30 percent of their levels since 1997 when the program was begun.

Sydney, Australia's Kingsford Smith International Airport Will Insulate More Houses After Updated Software Reveals Higher Noise Levels than Previously Thought (Jan. 26, 2000). Air Transport Intelligence reports that Sydney, Australia has promised to insulate more homes against noise from Kingsford Smith International Airport, after it was considered that the land around the airport slopes upward.

Airline Industry Organizations Applaud U.S. Decision to File a Complaint Against the European Union with the International Civil Aviation Organization Over It's Proposed Hushkit Ban (Jan. 25, 2000). M2 Presswire reports that several Airline industry groups applauded the U.S. decision to file a formal complaint with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) against the European Union's proposed ban on hushkitted aircraft. They emphasized that hushkitted aircraft meet international standards already set by the ICAO.

North Carolina Legislator Proposes Law to Stop FedEx from Building Hub with Overnight Flights at Greensboro's Piedmont Triad International Airport; Some Officials Say This Would Be Illegal (Jan. 25, 2000). The News and Record reports that a state representative has drafted a law that would prohibit night flights, discouraging a proposed FedEx hub at Greensboro's Piedmont Triad International Airport. Some say that such a law is illegal, and others say it's a bad idea anyway. Proponents of the airport say that noise problems would be overshadowed by benefits from new jobs.

Orange County, California Supervisors Change Maximum Noise Levels For Areas Surrounding John Wayne Airport While Questioning Why Airport Changed Maximums in Previous Years Without Consulting a Judge (Jan. 25, 2000). The Los Angeles Times reports that Orange County supervisors approved changes to maximum noise levels near John Wayne airport, and questioned why a district judge's permission for such changes had not been consistently sought in the past.

California Residents Protest Los Angeles International Airport Noise (Jan. 17, 2000). An article from City News Service reports that protestors will march at Inglewood City Hall on January 19, protesting an agreement that denies their right to sue Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) if the organization that operates the airport pays for sound-proofing their homes.

Virginia Naval Station Proves Costly for Schools (Jan. 16, 2000). The Virginia-Pilot reports jet noise from the Oceana Naval Air Station is so disruptive to education in Virginia Beach that 15 schools need better insulation that will cost $3.5 million.

Airport Officials Rethink Decision: California Man's Jet Can Stay (Jan. 15, 2000). According to the Ventura County Star, a Ventura County man can store his Czechoslovakian military jet at the Camarillo Airport because it passed the required noise test. This recent decision rescinds an earlier one requiring him to remove the jet.

Tax Break for Chicago Homeowners Near O'Hare Not on Town Ballots (Jan. 14, 2000). The Chicago Tribune reports that former state treasurer Pat Quinn's attempt to give property tax breaks to homeowners who live near O'Hare Airport failed to get support from local townships and municipalities. Only Stickney Township will put the question on the town's ballot.

Kentucky Group Upset Over Vague Airport Noise Reduction Recommendations (Jan. 14, 2000). The Courier-Journal reports that an airport consultant recommended existing and new technology be used to keep aircraft on track over less populated areas near Louisville International Airport. The article said the consultant upset and even angered some people at the public meeting because he rejected many of their recommendations.

Nevada Airport Authority's New Noise Study Seeks Public Input (Jan. 14, 2000). According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, the Washoe County Airport Authority board approved a new study reduce to noise around the Reno-Tahoe International Airport. In addition, the authority said it would aggressively seek public input.

New Jersey Lawmakers Design Strategy to Reduce Jet Noise at Teterboro (Jan. 14, 2000). The Bergen County Record reported that lawmakers recently met to design a strategy for reducing noise for North Jersey towns near Teterboro Airport, the nation's busiest non-commercial airport.

Connecticut Residents Increased Complaints Until Airport Officials Reduced Noise (Jan. 14, 2000). The Hartford Courant reports that in 1999, complaints against jet noise from Bradley International Airport quadrupled, adding airport traffic dramatically increased as well. But that's only part of the problem.

Belgian Express Mail Company Seeks Solution to Ban on Night Flights at Brussels Airport (Jan. 13, 2000). According to an article in AFX European Focus, the CEO of a Belgian express mail company pledged to find a solution to the Belgian government's proposed ban on night flights to Brussels National Airport.

Chicago Train Horn Noise Battle Returns (Jan. 13, 2000). The Chicago Daily Herald reported that Edison Park residents must renew their battle with train noise on the Wisconsin Central line at all hours of the night unless they pay for costly improvements at rail crossings, or so says the Federal Railroad Association.

Australian Airport Bans Airlines Because of Noise and Safety Concerns (Jan. 13, 2000). According to an AAP Newswire bulletin, the Victorian government banned Virgin Airlines from establishing its headquarter and barred it from temporarily using the city's Essendon Airport for an 18 month-interim until a new airport is built in Tullamarine. Governmental officials said the airline's 737 jets would create noise and safety risks in the suburban residential area.

UK Airport Fights Residential Developments: Local Officials Angry (Jan. 12, 2000). The Canberra Times reported on the opposition to residential housing by the owner of the Canberra International Airport. The article said that the airport owners want a cross-border agreement among local governments ensure that no houses are built under the airport's flight path

New York Environmental Group Links Helicopter Noise to Health Problems (Jan. 12, 2000). According to the Daily News, the Natural Resources Defense Council released findings from a recent study saying that helicopter noise can lead to health problems.

North Carolina FedEx Supporters Spout Propaganda and Mislead the Public (Jan. 12, 2000). The News & Record printed a scathing editorial that criticized pro-FedEx supporters for propagandizing about growth, noise and runways if FedEx comes to town. The editorial said that many of the supporters never been awakened a 3:00 am by a FedEx airplane, or never visited a visited a FedEx hub, of if they have, were given a VIP tour.

North Carolinians Fight FedEx Hub at Airport (Jan. 12, 2000). An article in the Greensboro reported that residents near Piedmont Triad International Airport are poised to launch a campaign to stop FedEx from building a cargo hub.

Kentucky Town Discusses Airport Noise Reduction Strategies (Jan. 11, 2000). The Courier-Journal printed a notice about the Regional Airport Authority's next Noise Compatibility Study Group meeting.

Minnesota Airport Noise Consultants Disagree On Noise Impact Area (Jan. 11, 2000). According to the Star Tribune, a dispute between noise consultants resulted in a failure to define noise zones affected by jets using a new runway at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.

Mayor of Arlington Heights, Near Chicago O'Hare Airport, Says Hushkitted Stage II Jets -- Which Are Still Louder than New Stage III Jets -- Will Need to Be Phased Out Before Real Noise Improvements Are Made (Jan. 10, 2000). The Chicago Tribune reports that despite new requirements that all Stage II jets have hushkits, noise is not expected to decrease much over the next year because hushkitted Stage II aircraft still make three times the noise that a new Stage III plane does. O'Hare Airport is urging the FAA to require a hushkit phase out.

Los Angeles Times Editorial Says Safety Should Override Both Sides of Debate Over Burbank Airport's New Terminal; Noise Should Not Be Introduced to New Neighborhoods Simply to "Share the Noise," and Ban on Eastward Flights Should Not Have Higher Priority than Safety Concerns (Jan. 9, 2000). The Los Angeles Times prints an editorial which says noise considerations should not be used to determine runway use at Burbank Airport, no matter what side of the debate you are on.

Numerous Letters to the Editor on Orange County, California's Proposed El Toro Airport Argue For and Against Airport, Criticize Commissioners for Secretive Activity, and Discuss Measure that Would Require Citizen Approval of Infrastructure Like Airports and Jails (Jan. 9, 2000). The Los Angeles Times prints several letters to the editor which argue for and against the validity of a noise report on the proposed El Toro Airport in Orange County, California, argue for and against Measure F that would require citizen approval of public infrastructure like airports and jails, and criticize airport commissioners for secretive activity.

Richfield, Minnesota Wants to Demolish Hundreds of Houses and Apartments and Build More Residences and Office Buildings Elsewhere; Report on Low-Frequency Noise from Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport Runway May Be a Barrier to Plans (Jan. 7, 2000). The Star Tribune reports that a plan to redevelop part of Richfield, Minnesota may face an obstacle in the form of a low-frequency-noise report on Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport's new runway. The 8,000 foot runway will open in 2003. New buildings will be " built with the latest sound-stopping techniques and materials to blunt low-frequency noise."

Boise, Idaho Airport Hopes Congress Will Reconsider Giving Local Authorities the Right to Restrict Noisy Aircraft (Jan. 7, 2000). The Associated Press State and Local Wire reports that federal representatives from Boise, Idaho met with residents this week to discuss noise problems from Stage-2 corporate jets at Friedman Memorial Airport in Hailey. A pending report may encourage Congress to allow cities to restrict noisy aircraft: a right that was taken away in 1990.

Private Jet Owner Sues San Jose International Airport Over Noise Rule He Says Is Illegal Because It Is Based on Weight and Not Noise Levels (Jan. 7, 2000). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that a CEO who owns a private jet has sued San Jose International Airport over a rule that says his plane can't land at night because it weighs more than 75,000 pounds. The CEO says that federal laws prohibit "arbitrary and discriminatory" regulation based on weight rather than noise. In 1990, Congress "established complex criteria for cities wishing to enforce noise restrictions on airline traffic," but the curfew may have been grandfathered in since it was established before the law was passed.

FAA Head Supports Removal of Eastern-Departure Ban from the Terminal Building Agreement at Burbank Airport; Burbank Officials Dismiss the Comment As a Mere Suggestion (Jan. 6, 2000). The Los Angeles Times reports that Jane Garvey of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has said that a proposed ban on eastern takeoffs from Burbank Airport should be removed from the draft agreement. Burbank city officials downplayed the comment as a suggestion, likely because they know that the ban will help win support from Burbank voters.

Seattle Resident Says Redistributing Noise is No Solution to Seattle-Tacoma Airport's Noise Problems (Jan. 6, 2000). The Seattle Times prints a letter to the editor that criticizes a recent letter that supported sharing aircraft noise by redistributing it. This letter says redistribution is no solution.

Resident of Virginia Beach Says Daily Noise Levels for Jet Noise Provided By Military Are Misleadingly-Low (Jan. 6, 2000). The Virginian-Pilot prints a letter to the editor which questions the military's presentation of Daily Noise Levels for Virginia Beach jet noise without presenting the more telling data on single noise events.

New Short-Term Leasing System to Encourage Airline Competition in Minnesota's Twin Cities Will Allow New Airlines to Opt Out of Paying for Some Noise Abatement Projects (Jan. 6, 2000). The Star Tribune reports that a committee of the Metropolitan Airports Commission for Minnesota's Twin Cities has approved a new leasing agreement which would designate up to seven gates as short-term. New airlines taking advantage of the new system can opt out of noise abatement fees for projects that are not included in the current plan.

Potential Low-Altitude Flight Path for Air Force Bombers in New Mexico Rejected In Favor of More Suitable Route Through West Texas (Jan. 6, 2000). The Associated Press State and Local Wire reports that the Air Force has announced that a flight path it had considered for low-altitude training flights through New Mexico is not its top choice. The flight path through New Mexico would have brought 2,600 flights each year within 200 feet of the ground, generating painful noise that could disrupt recreation, ranching, and wildlife.

Brussels' Night-Flight Ban Is Latest in European Trend of Noise Restrictions; Policies Hurt Cargo Companies the Most (Jan. 5, 2000). The Journal of Commerce reports that Belgium's proposed ban on flights between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m. at Brussels Airport is the latest in a European trend of noise restrictions. Other airports have lost or gained cargo customers based on their noise restrictions.

European Express Association Denounces Belgian Move to Ban Night Flights by 2003 (Jan. 5, 2000). Air Transport Intelligence reports that the European Express Association (EEA) has denounced a move by the Belgian Government to ban night flights starting in 2003. The EEA says that express companies need to fly at night to maintain their competitive edge, and to continue benefiting the European economy.

High Point, North Carolina Officials Delay Approval of Development Plans Near Piedmont Triad International Airport -- the Future Site of a Fedex Hub -- Until Noise Study Provides More Details (Jan. 4, 2000). The News and Record reports that High Point, North Carolina officials are delaying the approval of development plans near Piedmont Triad International Airport, fearing that a planned FedEx hub may cause more noise than expected. Approval will be delayed until an FAA-supervised noise study -- due later this month -- is released.

Neighbors Near Hampton, Virginia's Langley Air Force Base Say They Are Used to Jet Noise (Jan. 3, 2000). The Daily Press reports that many residents living in Hampton, Virginia near Langley Air Force Base are used to fighter-jet noise. The base does maintain no-flight hours on most days, but doesn't restrict afterburner use. Some say that residents aren't sufficiently aware of potential noise problems when they move in.

New York City Resident Criticizes FAA for Taking So Long to Rework Aircraft Flight Paths to Reduce Noise Burden (Jan. 3, 2000). The Daily News prints an editorial which criticizes the FAA for taking so long to provide noise relief for New Yorkers.

Brussels, Belgium Will Ban Night Flights After 2003 (Jan. 3, 2000). AFX European Focus reports that Brussels, Belgium will ban all nighttime flights starting in mid-2003, as well as restricting noisy flights after 11 p.m starting in 2001.

Union Beach, New Jersey Activist Says Noise Study of Flight Paths from New York City Area Airports -- Which Said Ocean Routing Would Increase Noise for Coastal Residents -- Was a "Big Lie" (Jan. 2, 2000). The Asbury Park Press prints a letter from a Union Beach, New Jersey resident who says a noise study which showed ocean routing of aircraft at New York City area airports was a big lie manufactured by the airlines. He says that contrary to the study, ocean routing would take the planes farther out to sea and coastal residents would not receive additional noise.

U.S. Threatens to File Complaint with the International Civil Aviation Organization to Pressure the European Union to Modify or Withdraw Its Hushkit Ban (Jan. 1, 2000). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports that the United States may file an official complaint with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) against the European Union's proposed hushkit ban, although a compromise may be reached before that. The U.S. says that when the ICAO eventually tries to work on Stage 4 standards, European companies won't want its equipment devalued any more than the U.S. does now.

Maine County Commissioners Want Public Advisory Committee on Airport Expansion (Dec. 16, 1999). According to the Bangor Daily News, county commissioners in Knox County, Maine have called for a public advisory committee to the master plan for the Knox County Regional Airport. Of particular interest are noise and air pollution.

Maine Town's Public Hearing on Noise Not Attended (Dec. 16, 1999). According to the Kennebec Journal, Hallowell city council members were surprised when nobody showed up for a public hearing on a proposed ordinance regarding noise.

California Airport Noise Deal Under Suspicion (Dec. 15, 1999). According to the Los Angeles times, Orange County officials may have permitted John Wayne Airport to have aircraft traffic exceed required levels over a period of six years--all without approval.

U.S. Noise Reduction for Aircraft Take Effect in 2000 (Dec. 14, 1999). The Journal of Commerce reports that beginning January 1,2000, new U.S. noise reduction rules take effect for aircraft. It's the deadline for cargo and passenger aircraft to comply with Stage 3 noise rules for take-offs and landings at U.S. airports, the article says.

Seattle Residents Express Anger Over Exclusion From Flight Plans (Dec. 13, 1999). The Seattle Times reports that residents of several suburbs have come together to protest what they feel as being railroaded by the Port of Seattle staff regarding modification study of jet flight paths over Lake Washington.

Virginia Residents Losing Sleep Because of Naval Air Station (Dec. 13, 1999). Letters to the editor of the Virginian-Pilot call for community leaders to implement an anti-noise plan because of jet overflights at Oceana Naval Air Station near Virginia Beach. The editorial asks community leaders to act immediately because jet over flights have reached a level where the noise adversely affects the quality of the residents' lives.

Alaska Legislators Hear Jet Noise Complaints (Dec. 12, 1999). The article report on citizens from a nearby town who asked the legislators to help alleviate the inordinate amount of air traffic and subsequent jet noise over many parts of the city.

Florida Golfers Object to Jet Noise (Dec. 12, 1999). The Stuart News printed a letter to the editor regarding golfers, noise and jet noise. The letter was written by an international captain flying with American Airlines in response to jet noise interfering with golf games.

Jet Noise in Virginia Prompts Letters to the Editor (Dec. 11, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot printed the following letters to the editor concerning flights from Oceana Naval Base.

New Jersey Airport More a Safety Hazard Than a Noise Concern (Dec. 11, 1999). The Bergen County Record reported that noise has become a secondary issue at Teterboro Airport because of a plane crash that killed four people in nearby Hasbrouch Heights.

US Claims European Union's Ban on Aircraft Noise Law Costs Billions: US Seeks Ban on EU Voting Rights (Dec. 10, 1999). The London Financial Times reported that the US may ask the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) to revoke the voting rights of European Union States if agreement is not reached next week at the US-EU summit in a dispute over aircraft noise.

Connecticut Plans to Reroute Bradley International Airport Flights Sets Towns Against Each Other (Dec. 10, 1999). The Hartford Courant reported that the state Department of Transportation will hold an informational meeting to discuss plans to reroute air traffic at Bradley International Airport. Any concerns townspeople have about noise pollution over their towns will not reverse the decision.

European Union Defers Hush Kit Legislation Until 2001 (Dec. 10, 1999). According to AFX European Focus, the European Commissioner for transport, Loyola de Palacio, said that EU passed legislation requiring certain aircraft to be equipped with "husk kits" to make them quieter may be delayed until after an international aircraft noise conference in Sept 2001.

European Union and US Battle Over Aircraft Noise Law (Dec. 10, 1999). The Journal of Commerce reported that the United States warned the European Union that it may retaliate against a controversial EU law that would limit aircraft noise.

Seattle Resident Questions Proposed Changes in Seattle-Tacoma Airport Flight Paths Designed to Spread Noise More Evenly (Dec. 8, 1999). The Seattle Times prints a letter to the editor relating to noise at the Seattle-Tacoma Airport. The letter acknowledges the fairness of spreading noise more evenly, but questions several aspects of the plan including: a turn that would be taken at lower altitude, and the absence of data regarding another nearby airport.

Several Community Committees in Louisville, Kentucky Reported Their Suggestions For Noise Abatement at Louisville International Airport (Dec. 8, 1999). The Courier-Journal reports that ten committees composed of airport administrators, customers residents near Kentucky's Louisville International Airport gave suggestions for noise-abatement alternatives at a recent hearing. The suggestions will be studied by a consultant over the next month. At that point, the consultant will present the practicality of the different suggestions. The ultimate goal is to send a final draft to the FAA in the fall.

Chartered Jet Companies At Van Nuys Airport Say Noise Controls Will Limit Their Growth (Dec. 7, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports on the booming business of chartered-jet companies at Van Nuys Airport. Residents around airports are opposed to airport growth at the expense of their neighborhood's noise levels. The Los Angeles City Council is considering limitations or an outright ban on noisy Stage-2 aircraft, but a charter company owner details how that would hurt his business.

Rise in Corporate Jet Traffic At Van Nuys Airport in Los Angeles Raises Expenses for Plane Operators and Forces Many General Aviation Propeller Planes to Cheaper Venues (Dec. 7, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that the rise in corporate jet traffic at Van Nuys Airport in Los Angeles, California has caused a rise in rents and insurance for plane operators who use the facility. As a result, many general aviation (non-commercial, non-military aviation) prop-plane operators are leaving the airport in search of cheaper venues. Although the rise in jets based at the airport contributes $1.2 billion and 10,000 jobs to the local economy, the increased noise from the louder jets is driving residences to even more bitterly oppose noise from the airport.

National Anti-Noise Organization Urges FAA to Study Noise Mitigation for Low-Frequency Aircraft Sound (Dec. 6, 1999). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports that the National Organization to Insure a Sound-controlled Environment (NOISE) is working with a congressional representative from Minnesota to push the FAA to study low-frequency noise from aircraft.

New Office to Handle Soundproofing at Los Angeles' Van Nuys Airport; Residents Say Soundproofing Doesn't Address the Larger Problem (Dec. 6, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that a new noise-abatement office will open at Van Nuys Airport in Los Angeles, California to coordinate the soundproofing of homes nearby. Residents say the soundproofing is just a quick fix, and does nothing to address the underlying noise problem or to help the rest of the community. A judge is set to rule on whether the airport deserves a variance from noise rules that could allow it to continue operating. The new noise office is partly an attempt to show that judge that the airport is making an attempt to reduce noise.

Mexico Plans to Reduce Noise from Aircraft (Dec. 6, 1999). The Journal of Commerce reports that Mexico plans to make improvements in its commercial fleet with regards to safety and noise.

Proposed Flight Path Change at Connecticut's Bradley International Airport Will Add a Sharper Turn; Residents in Granby, Connecticut Will Receive More Noise While Simsbury Will Be Spared Somewhat (Dec. 6, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports that residents of Granby, Connecticut are upset over a proposed flight path change at Bradley International Airport that would increase flyover noise in their community. The state Department of Transportation proposed the change because the new flight path would affect only 20-30 homes, instead of the 600-1000 homes currently affected. A public meeting has been called, but anti-noise activists say that "They'll do what they want to do, but people should have a right to know specifically what's being proposed and how it affects them."

Santa Monica, California Resident Says Noise from Van Nuys Airport is Primarily From Aircraft Not Based There (Dec. 5, 1999). The Los Angeles Times prints a letter to the editor that questions a recent editorial which praised the Fly Friendly program at Van Nuys Airport in Los Angeles, California. The writer asserts that an effective program needs to target aircraft not based at the airport, since 90% of the noise that is over the limits come from those planes.

Neighbors of Suffolk County, New York Gabreski Airport Want a Moratorium on New Airport Construction; Airport Officials Say Air Traffic Is Down and No Significant Expansion is Planned (Dec. 5, 1999). The New York Times reports that residents around Suffolk County, New York's Gabreski Airport are pushing for a moratorium on new airport construction. Officials at the airport say there is no significant expansion planned at the airport, but pressure from residents who say the noise from the airport is growing.

Several Virginia Beach Residents Write, Supporting Military and Opposing Anti-Noise "Whiners" (Dec. 5, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot prints three letters to the editor on the subject of jet noise from Virginia Beach's Oceana Naval Base. They all support the military jets, and criticize the paper for emphasizing opposition from anti-noise groups.

American Airlines Provides Active Noise Reduction Earphones for All Passengers on Some Flights (Dec. 5, 1999). The Sacramento Bee reports that as of November, certain American Airlines flights have included active-noise-reduction earphones for all passengers.

Operation of Supersonic Concorde Jet Creates Substantial Noise in New York City (Dec. 5, 1999). Newsday reports that noise from the supersonic Concorde jet, which uses JFK as its only American airport, has been irritating New Yorkers since 1979 when the European-based aircraft began operating in America. The plane causes significant noise, and some call it a "stretch fighter jet." It is specifically exempted from noise-reduction efforts because its engine design doesn't allow for standard noise-reduction technologies. Congressional representatives believe that the FAA should make the Concorde play by the noise rules that all other airlines have to follow.

Resident of Stuart, Florida Questions Whether Pilots Knew They Were Being Monitored for Noise During Thanksgiving Weekend Test (Dec. 4, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News prints a letter to the editor that questions the validity of a noise study at Witham Field near Stuart, Florida.

Chula Vista, California Mayor Responds to Criticism of Council's Cautious Position on Brown Field Expansion (Dec. 3, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune prints a statement by Chula Vista, California's Mayor in response to criticism of the city council's cautious position on expansion at Brown Field. Chula Vista is attempting to create a job-housing balanced community by adhering to a policy of business-friendly "smart growth," and is cautious about questionable data in the airport's environmental impact statement.

National Meeting of Airport Officials Served to Share Noise Problems and Solutions (Dec. 3, 1999). The Copley News Service reports that at the National League of Cities convention in Los Angeles, there was a seminar -- arranged by National Organization to Insure a Sound-Controlled Environment (NOISE) -- designed to help local officials from across the country share problems and ideas they've encountered when trying to reduce airport noise.

Public Workshop Scheduled in Westchester, New York is Designed to Gather Opinions from Residents Living With Noise from Westchester County Airport (Dec. 2, 1999). The Daily News reports that a public workshop is being held to hear comments from some of the 700 residents who lives closest to noise from the Westchester County Airport in Westchester, New York.

St. Paul, Minnesota Musician/Pilot Warns that Current Site for Amphitheater Will Be Too Noisy Since It Sits Near an Important Air-Navigation Beacon (Dec. 2, 1999). The Star Tribune prints a letter to the editor from a pilot/musician who believes the current site selected for the Minnesota Orchestra's amphitheater is too close to a crucial air-navigation landmark to avoid jet noise.

California State Legislators Hold Meeting to Discuss Ways to Curb Noise at Van Nuys Airport; Those Attending Agreed that City and County Officials Have Been Ineffectual (Dec. 1, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that several state legislators organized a meeting -- which included anti-noise activists and airport representatives -- to discuss ways to curb noise at Van Nuys Airport in California. State officials are considering better enforcement of state laws, research into other city's approaches to noise reduction, and tax incentives for quieter jets.

Laguna Woods, California Residents Say Air-Navigation Easements That Allowed Military Flights Over Their Properties Have Expired, Meaning the Proposed Commercial Airport Will Be Open to Lawsuits (Dec. 1, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that residents of Laguna Woods, California are pointing to easements that allowed military flights over their properties as a strike against the proposed airport at El Toro. If the former marines base becomes a commercial airport, the easements will expire and residents will be free to sue the airport for noise pollution and trespassing.

Residents Question Environmental Impact Report for Cleveland, Ohio's Hopkins International Airport (Dec. 1, 1999). The Plain Dealer reports that Olmsted Falls, Ohio residents and officials say that an FAA environmental impact report is faulty and needs revision, and say that the noise consulting firm for the airport has a conflict of interest because it already works for the airport. The airport "wants to build a 9,000-foot northeast-southwest runway at the northern end of the airport and lengthen an existing parallel runway." Olmsted Falls residents say they already get enough noise and pollution from jets, and don't want the expansion to make worse.

Rolls Royce Sets Up New Technology Center at University of South Hampton in the U.K. (Dec. 1, 1999). The Derby Evening Telegraph reports that Rolls Royce will invest 1.6 million pounds in a new technology center at the University of Southampton in the U.K. to reduce noise from aircraft engines.

United States Asks European Union for Another Delay --This Time Indefinite -- of Anti-Hushkit Legislation; EU Says Delay -- If Any -- Will Have a Time Limit (Dec. 1, 1999). The Tulsa World reports that the United States is demanding another delay -- this time indefinite -- of anti-hushkit legislation that would require American airlines to use aircraft that comply with Stage-3 noise standards without the assistance of hushkits when in Europe. Officials here say the EU's real motivation is increased revenue for European airlines and manufacturers, not the protection of residents from noise pollution. Postponing the legislation until after newer international standards are due may keep pressure on the U.S. to continue cooperation, although the EU has said that any delay will not be indefinite.

Association of Asia Pacific Airlines Recognizes Importance of Sticking to International Civil Aviation Organization Guidelines for Noise As it Continues to Grow (Nov. 30, 1999). The New Straits Times reports that the Association of Asia Pacific Airlines, which is made up of airline officials from Asia Pacific, agreed at a meeting in Malaysia that noise standards set out by the International Civil Aviation Organization must be adhered to as growth continues for aviation in the region.

Final Public Meeting Scheduled for Environmental Aspects of Flight Path Changes at Bradley International Airport in East Granby, Connecticut (Nov. 30, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports that a final public meeting will be held in East Granby, Connecticut to discuss flight path changes at Bradley International Airport. Instead of being examined under the current study, certain changes -- which have been identified as likely to increase noise impacts -- will be considered only as part of a larger, more comprehensive Part 150 study already begun.

Messingham, U.K. Resident Says New Flying Club Won't Cause Noise Problems (Nov. 30, 1999). The Scunthorpe Evening Telegraph prints a letter to the editor that supports a new flying club in Messingham, U.K. The writer notes that grass strips of this type rarely cause noise problems.

Workshops on Aircraft Noise in Minneapolis, Minnesota Will Teach Residents About Possible Noise-Abatement Changes, Including a Possible Lowering of the Qualifying Noise-Threshold for Home Insulation (Nov. 30, 1999). The Star Tribune reports that workshops in Minneapolis, Minnesota over the next three days will teach residents about possible changes to the insulation program that may allow more homes near Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport to be insulated from noise.

Residents Near Los Angeles International Airport Are Pushing for Proposed El Toro Airport (Nov. 29, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that residents and officials near Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) are pushing for the proposed new airport at El Toro in Orange County. They say that it is only fair for Orange County residents, who send about 12 million passengers a year to LAX, to shoulder some of the aircraft noise burden. Opponents say that LAX and nearby John Wayne Airport should be used to their potential before any new airport is built.

Seattle's Sea-Tac Airport Plans to Use New, "Two-Tiered Flight Path" For Departures; Noise Will Be Balanced More Evenly, But Residents Who Will Get More Noise Are Upset (Nov. 29, 1999). The Columbian reports that residents near Seattle, Washington's Sea-Tac Airport are split over a new plan to use a two-tiered flight path system for takeoffs that will increase noise for some residents.

Stuart, Florida Resident Criticizes Officials Who Prioritize Reduction of Industrial Noise Over Airport Noise (Nov. 29, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News prints a letter to the editor from a Stuart, Florida resident who says that reduction of airport noise should be given higher priority than reduction of noise from industrial sources.

New Yorkers Complain Increasingly of Noise from News Helicopters, Now That Tourist Flights Are Fewer (Nov. 28, 1999). The New York Times reports that local officials and residents are complaining more and more often about noise from news helicopters. Officials have proposed solutions such as news programs sharing air coverage, or putting "restrictions on altitude and limits of when and for how long news helicopters can hover over residential areas," but New York officials have limited power, since news helicopters usually originate in New Jersey.

Public Hearing in Cleveland, Ohio Scheduled Over FAA's Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (Nov. 28, 1999). The Plain Dealer reports that a public hearing is scheduled in Cleveland over the FAA's draft Environmental Impact Statement (dEIS) for Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. Officials from several neighboring communities don't want the expansion to take place. Communities are also upset that the city has reduced the number of homes it will pay to soundproof because planes are quieter; they want a commitment to soundproof homes that experience 60 decibels of noise instead of the current 65.

Residents Write to Oppose El Toro Airport, and a Dangerous Ploy By City Council to Build Schools Near the Site to Put the Potential Airport At Higher Risk for Noise Lawsuits (Nov. 28, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that seven residents wrote to the Los Angeles Times' editorial staff to oppose the proposed El Toro Airport. Among the issues mentioned, there are claims that more 'economic development' from the airport will be hollow, questions as to whether taxpayers should have to approve the airport with a 2/3 majority, and criticism of a dangerous ploy by city council to discourage the airport by approving noise-sensitive schools and residences near the site.

Residents of Norfolk, Virginia Hold Opposite Views About Airport Noise; One Says Some Jets at Oceana Are Being Excessively Loud, and Another Says that Anti-Noise "Whiners" Around Fentress Should Move Away (Nov. 28, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot prints several letters to the editor, two of which are on the subject of aircraft noise. One writer says that while some fighter jets at Oceana Naval Base land and takeoff without too much noise, others seem to be purposely louder with high-performance takeoffs and low-altitude approaches. Another writer says those who complain about noise from military aircraft should move away if they don't like it.

Mt. Cook, New Zealand Recreationists and Residents Complain Less About Aircraft Noise; Airline Industry Appears to Be Voluntarily Cooperating (Nov. 27, 1999). The Timaru Herald reports that the Department of Conservation in Aoraki/Mt Cook, New Zealand believes that airlines have been voluntarily cooperating to reduce noise, by trying to use alternative flight paths that keep planes "high and wide" of populated areas and recreational sites.

Protesters In Birmingham, U.K. Blast Birmingham Airport Manager's House With Noise To Express Concern Over Approved Doubling of Airport Capacity (Nov. 27, 1999). The Birmingham Evening Mail reports that about a dozen activists in Birmingham, U.K. trucked a large sound system to the house of the Birmingham Airport Manager and blasted the house with noise. Protesters hoped that the manager would take better note of widespread resident concern over noise.

Luton Airport Leads London Airport in Environmental Commitment (Nov. 26, 1999). The Times reports that Luton Airport in London, England has prioritized protection of the environment. The noise policy is strict: the toughest in London. A new rail line is scheduled to open, and should reduce automobile traffic to the airport. Other areas considered are air quality, waste, energy, water protection, and ecology.

Martin County Airport in Stuart, Florida Begins Part 150 Study that Is Required for FAA-Sanctioned Curfews (Nov. 26, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports that the Martin County Airport in Stuart, Florida is beginning a Part 150 study. The first piece of the study will cost $35,000, and will monitor jet noise over the Thanksgiving holiday with twelve noise monitors

Anaheim, California Says It Will Only Continue Support for El Toro Airport If County Promises to Mitigate Noise Impacts for Residents (Nov. 25, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that Anaheim, California has noted that it will continue support for the El Toro Airport proposal only if the County promises to adequately mitigate noise impacts for residents. One of those mitigations would be a night-time noise curfew.

Millennium Plan -- Irvine, California's Development Alternative to a New Airport -- Will Add Some Noise, though It's Unclear How the Noise Would Compare to Noise from an Airport (Nov. 25, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that the Millennium Plan -- a city-proposed development -- is poised to replace a county-proposed airport. An environmental impact report on the plan says noise would increase by 1.5 decibels on nearby roadways.

Seattle Activist Implores Seattle-Tacoma Airport to More Evenly Distribute Aircraft Noise, Claiming Support from Ten Communities (Nov. 25, 1999). The Seattle Times prints a letter to the editor from the chair of Citizens for Airplane Noise Equity Seattle. She suggests several measures that will help minimize and equitably share noise impacts from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.

Chicago's O'Hare Airport Will Give Oak Park Community Temporary Noise Monitor Next Year; Community Will Keep Monitor If Noise Levels Are Relatively High (Nov. 24, 1999). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Chicago's O'Hare Airport will be giving several communities -- including Oak Park -- a temporary noise monitor to keep track of aircraft noise in the area to see if noise levels warrant a permanent one.

London's Heathrow Airport Extends Runway Alternation Policy Into Nighttime Hours (Nov. 24, 1999). The M2 Presswire reports that London, England's Heathrow Airport will extend its policy of runway alternation into the night hours. Runway alternation -- which designates a particular runway each week to allow residents predictable periods of quiet -- has taken place at Heathrow since the 1970s, but night flights have not alternated to allow for night-maintenance on whichever runways were in need. The government is still trying to decide on details of the policy.

Van Nuys Airport Postpones Proposal to Phase Out Noisy Stage 2 Jets; Residents Say Proposal Doesn't Go Far Enough, and Airport Workers Say It Goes Too Far (Nov. 24, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that a Los Angeles City Council proposal to begin phasing out Stage 2 jets from Van Nuys Airport has been delayed for 90 days to get answers from the FAA about its legality. Residents near the airport say the proposal doesn't go far enough, while airport employees and operators say they will lose their livelihood.

Hearings Over Airport Noise Rules In Palmerston North, New Zealand Result In New Guidelines for Airport Operation and Development Nearby (Nov. 23, 1999). The Evening Standard reports that after a series of hearings regarding airport noise in Palmerston North, New Zealand, new guidelines have been established for noise abatement. Ground engine-testing rules, land uses, and noise limits were set.

Noise-Hearings Commissioner in Palmerston North, New Zealand Admits that Even After Noise Rules, Airport Noise May Still Exasperate Residents (Nov. 23, 1999). The Evening Standard reports that the commissioner of recent airport-noise hearings in Palmerston North, New Zealand admits that "adverse effects" from airport noise may still be present even after the recent establishment of noise rules. The commissioner refused to totally ban nighttime engine testing, saying that occasional, unavoidable nighttime testing was essential to the airport's operation.

US Airways Introduces Earlier Shuttle Between Washington and New York After Acquiring Quieter Planes; Addition Expected to Attract Business Travelers (Nov. 23, 1999). The Washington Post reports that US Airways is the first to introduce a 6 a.m. shuttle from Washington's Reagan National Airport to New York's LaGuardia Airport. New aircraft allow the airline to meet noise limits required of early takeoffs.

Vote on Los Angeles Van Nuys Airport Noise Proposal Delayed Due to Disagreement from Both Sides; Orange County Supervisors Pose Ballot Initiative that Could Require a Two-Thirds Majority Vote to Approve Airports, Which Would Affect the El Toro Airport Proposal (Nov. 23, 1999). The City News Service reports that the Los Angeles City Council has delayed a vote on a proposal that would limit noisy Stage 2 jets at the airport. Residents say they were there first, but business representatives say the limitations could cause a loss of $750 million and 2,400 jobs. Also, the Orange County Board of Supervisors have agreed to place an initiative on the ballot that could require a two-thirds majority vote to approve public projects such as airports. Residents hope that the initiative will stop the proposed El Toro Airport.

Airports Council International Favors Phase-Out of All "Marginally-Compliant" Stage 2 Aircraft, While Airline Organizations Want Those Aircraft to Live Out their Useful Lives First (Nov. 22, 1999). Traffic World reports that Airports Council International is pushing United States airlines to phase out hush-kitted Stage 2 aircraft within three years. Most prominent airline associations are saying that hush-kitted planes -- which meet Stage 3 standards only marginally -- must be allowed to live out their useful lives. The International Civic Airports Organization (ICAO) hopes to have Stage 4 standards defined by September of 2001. After December 31 no Stage 2 planes without hushkits will be allowed to fly.

Commissioners Will Vote In the Spring On a Proposed Two-Tiered Flight Path to Spread Noise More Evenly Over Communities North of Seattle-Tacoma Airport (Nov. 22, 1999). The Seattle Times reports that port commissioners will vote in the spring on a proposed two-tiered flight path that would spread noise more evenly over communities to the North of the Seattle-Tacoma Airport. The plan should reduce total noise impact in the North by 30 percent, as planes turn sooner and at a lower altitude.

French Officials Say Pollution-Reduction to Comply with Kyoto Conference Global Warming Protocol Should Be Coupled with Noise Reduction (Nov. 22, 1999). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports that French environmental officials believe that in working towards the carbon dioxide limits set by the U.N.'s global warming conference in Kyoto, researchers should also prioritize noise reduction. Turbines are 40% quieter than they were in the 1970s, and many further gains in noise reduction will result from work on non-engine components.

Oadby, U.K. Resident is Dismayed that Noise from the Local Aerodrome Seems to Be Under No One's Jurisdiction (Nov. 22, 1999). The Leicester Mercury prints a letter to the editor that expresses concern over noise from a local aerodrome. The writer is dismayed because no agency has any jurisdiction over the noise.

Okinawa Governor -- Wary of Residents' Noise Complaints and Upcoming Summit -- Proposes Less-Populated Site for U.S. Military Heliport (Nov. 22, 1999). The AP Worldstream reports that the governor of Okinawa, Japan has proposed a new site for the heliport currently located on a local U.S. Marines Base. Residents around the base complain currently, but some officials in Naga, the new location for the heliport, are upset that the public there wasn't consulted.

Residents Suggest Better Solutions for Airport Noise Ordinance at Los Angeles' Van Nuys Airport (Nov. 22, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that residents around Los Angeles, California's Van Nuys Airport oppose a proposed noise ordinance that they say would not effectively address noise concerns, and would in fact lock-in many current noise problems. They suggest better solutions for a modified ordinance.

Van Nuys Airport Business Association in Los Angeles, California Says Proposed Noise Ordinance Will Hurt Business and Actually Create More Noise (Nov. 22, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Van Nuys Airport Business Association in Los Angeles, California opposes the proposed noise ordinance which it says would actually increase noise. The ordinance would cost hundreds of jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars in lost, taxable revenue. Property values which residents say are hurt by the airport are actually rising. The city would also be open to lawsuits from airport operators.

Editorial Supports Passage of Noise Ordinance at Los Angeles, California Van Nuys Airport; The Ordinance Takes Some Small Steps Towards Noise Reduction (Nov. 21, 1999). The Los Angeles Times prints an editorial which says the Los Angeles City Council should approve the proposed Van Nuys Airport noise ordinance. It says that like the "Fly Friendly" program which is voluntary yet effective, the caps on Stage 2 planes based at the airport would be a step -- albeit it a small one -- towards noise reduction.

Los Angeles City Council Gets Pressure from Both Sides to Reject Proposed Noise Ordinance for Van Nuys Airport (Nov. 21, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that Los Angeles City Council members are getting pressure from anti-noise activists and airport supporters to reject the Airport Commission's proposed noise ordinance that will cap the number of Stage 2 planes that can be based at the airport. Anti-noise activists say noisy planes will still be flying in and out of the airport, while airport supporters point to lost revenue. This article is slightly more detailed than others about certain aspects of the plan.

Resident of Virginia Beach Questions Previous Letter that Says Oceana Noise Isn't That Bad (Nov. 21, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot prints several letters to the editor, one of which centers on airport noise at Oceana's Air Base. The writer questions several comments made in a recent letter by a retired military captain that suggested that noise from the base wasn't that bad.

Seattle-Tacoma Airport Noise Consultant Proposes More Equitable Flight Paths that Would Share Noise More Evenly; FAA to Be Consulted on Use of Industrial Corridor (Nov. 18, 1999). Business Wire reports that at a hearing, attended by at least 200 residents, the noise consultant for the Seattle-Tacoma Airport has proposed the use of split flight paths for north and south departures that would share noise more evenly between communities. CANE (full-name unspecified) was concerned that the proposal had fizzled out in 1990 when it was first proposed, but were optimistic that it would now be taken seriously by the Port Authority. The Community Advisory Committee (CAC) seemed interested in examining the consultant's proposal more closely.

Virginia Beach Resident Says Jet Noise is Price of American Freedom: Treasure It (Nov. 18, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot prints several letters to the editor, one of which asserts that jet noise around Virginia Beach's Oceana Naval Base is simply the price we pay for freedom.

Chicago Tax Lawyer Proposes Property Tax Break for Illinois Residents Impacted By 65 Decibels or More of Airport Noise (Nov. 17, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that a Chicago tax lawyer has proposed a property tax exemption for residents who deal with 65 decibels of noise from airports. Residents support the idea, which would be equal to the current general homestead exemption: about $300-$500.

Editorial Praises County for Freezing Development Around Airports Until Noise Study is Completed (Nov. 17, 1999). The Denver Post prints an editorial that praises Arapahoe County, Colorado Commissioners for placing a moratorium on development near airports until a two-year, $400,000 noise study is completed.

FAA E-mails Reveal Administration's Concerns About a Potential Airport at Orange County, California's El Toro (Nov. 17, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that after FAA e-mails were released in accordance with the Freedom of Information Act, it is clear that the FAA has serious concerns about safety and efficiency of any airport that was approved at Orange County's El Toro site. A largely ignored alternative plan, called the V-plan, was praised in the e-mails; the plan would use north and south runways to send planes over the least populated areas.

Oklahoma City Council Considers Buyout of Small Town Near Tinker Air Force Base to Remove Residents from Noise and Pollution Risks (Nov. 17, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that Oklahoma City Council is considering support of a buyout of a community near Tinker Air Force Base now that research has linked volatile organic compounds from years of aircraft refurbishing to average birth weights two-ounces lower than normal. At least one representative believes a buyout should occur on the basis of noise alone.

Palwaukee, Illinois Resident Proposes Noise Hot Line, But Officials Say One Exists and Isn't Very Useful (Nov. 17, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that at a recent meeting on an airport noise study, a Palwaukee resident suggested instituting a noise hot line for Palwaukee Municipal Airport. Officials noted that the current answering machine does take noise complaints, but it has been seldom used and ineffective since complainers rarely leave their names. Also, an alderman made it clear that noise-abatement funds should not be counted on as a definite result of the study.

University of Missouri: St. Louis Professor Says Proposed Campus Performing Arts Center Will Be Sub-Standard Due to Noise from Overhead Jet Flights (Nov. 17, 1999). The Riverfront Times reports that a physics professor at the University of Missouri -- St. Louis is saying that a planned campus performing arts center will be plagued with noise from jets flying overhead. The professor says the site should be moved to south campus and should be built with a thicker roof and walls that would block 10 additional decibels of outside noise.

Editorial Says FedEx Has Not Answered Key Questions About Proposed Greensboro, North Carolinai Hub (Nov. 16, 1999). The News and Record prints an editorial that says FedEx, who wants to build a new runway and hub at the local airport, have not answered some key questions in their public comments to date. Questions relate to property taxes, noise, and pollution.

Member of U.K. Parliament to Support More Powers for Local Councils for Regulating Aircraft Noise (Nov. 16, 1999). The Derby Evening Telegraph reports that a Member of Parliament (MP) from North West Leicestershire will be speaking on the need to give local councils the power to regulate aircraft noise; currently only the secretary of state has this power.

Stalled Federal Funding for FAA Will Jeopardize Many Airport Projects, Including Noise Mitigation at Tulsa Airport in Oklahoma (Nov. 16, 1999). The Tulsa World reports that a federal funding bill, planned to give the FAA $50-billion in funds between 2001 and 2004 has been abandoned for this year, meaning that among other projects, a noise mitigation program at Tulsa Airport in Oklahoma will be jeopardized. The $20-million program will reduce noise levels at 1,000 homes surrounding the airport using either $15,000 sound insulation per home, monetary flyover easements, or assistance in making up noise-related losses from home sales.

York County, South Carolina Tourism Councils Plan to Spend $4,000 on New Noise Study of Airport (Nov. 16, 1999). The Herald reports that York County, South Carolina's tourism councils want to merge, and spend up to $4,000 on a new noise study for the county airport.

Brisbane, Australia Group Tells Senate Inquiry that Proposed Parallel Runway at Brisbane Airport Would Make Learning Difficult for Children, Exacerbate Health Problems for All (Nov. 15, 1999). The Australian General News reports that a statement from Ban Aircraft over Residential Brisbane (BARB) was presented to a senate inquiry in Brisbane, Australia on problems associated with the proposed parallel runway at Brisbane Airport; potential problems include increased learning difficulties in schoolchildren and health problems.

Chicago, Illinois Proposal to Double Property Tax Break for Homes in Airport Noise Zone Draws Varied Reactions (Nov. 15, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that a proposal to double the property tax break given to those in 65-decibel-or-higher noise zones around Midway and O'Hare International Airports has drawn mixed reactions. Some say it's a good idea and will better protect residents, while others worry where the money would come from.

Former Resident Says Schaumburg, Illinois Airport Noise Complaints Are Motivated By Disgruntled Village Which Missed Its Chance to Buy the Airport (Nov. 15, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald prints several letters to the editor, one of which relates to aircraft noise. The writer says that noise complaints from Roselle residents about Schaumburg, Illinois' Airport are those who are upset that the village missed its chance in the 1970s to benefit economically from the airport by buying it.

Homeowners Near Chicago's Midway Airport Want Doubled Property Tax Relief for Noise Burden (Nov. 15, 1999). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that homeowners near Chicago's Midway Airport launched a campaign to double the property tax relief given to residents state-wide who live near airports.

Jamaica, New York City Reverent Supports Congressional Bill to Force Concorde to Comply with Noise Regulations (Nov. 15, 1999). Newsday reports that a reverend in Jamaica, New York City has asked an old friend -- now influential in the U.S. Congress -- to help reduce aircraft noise from Kennedy Airport by supporting a bill passed by the House and pending in the Senate. The bill would force the heretofore exempt Concorde supersonic jet to comply with noise regulations, and would also strengthen those regulations for all aircraft.

Proposed New FedEx Runway at Piedmont Triad International Airport Will Create Noise Corridor Directly Over Recently Approved Development; City Planners Admit They Should Have Never Approved the Development (Nov. 15, 1999). The News and Record reports that High Point, North Carolina planners admit that their 1997 approval of a housing development located north of Piedmont Triad International Airport was a mistake. They knew the airport would expand but did not know that the noise corridor from a soon-to-be-proposed runway would pass directly over the development. The FAA is conducting an environmental study that should be done early next year which should more specifically explore potential noise problems at the development.

Denver, Colorado Resident Begs to Differ After City Attorney Said Airport Noise Doesn't Harm Anyone (Nov. 14, 1999). The Denver Rocky Mountain News prints several letters to the editor, one of which has to do with airport noise. A Denver, Colorado resident writes to disagree with the city attorney who said that Denver International Airport's noise doesn't harm anyone.

Elementary School Students in Elk Grove, Illinois will Relocate for Four Months in 2000-2001 School Year While Their Old School Is Soundproofed (Nov. 14, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that students at Clearmont Elementary School in Elk Grove Village, Illinois will be relocated to a nearby school for four months in the 2000-2001 school year while their old school is soundproofed from noise at nearby O'Hare airport.

Fort Lauderdale, Florida Resident Notes Her Involvement in Anti-Noise Issues (Nov. 14, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel prints several personal statements from environmentalists in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. One statement is from a woman who works against noise pollution from Southern Florida airports.

Noise Consultant for Palwaukee Municipal Airport in Illinois Warns that Noise Study Does Not Guarantee Federal Noise-Abatement Funds (Nov. 14, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that a noise consultant conducting a study for Palwaukee Municipal Airport in Illinois warned that the study didn't guarantee noise-abatement funds.

Noise Study at Florida's Tampa International Airport Says Noise Still Annoys Residents, But Airport Officials Say Noise Problems Are Decreasing (Nov. 14, 1999). The St. Petersburg Times reports that noise is still a problem for residents in the area around Florida's Tampa International Airport, but airport officials say that noise has been decreasing and will decrease even further by 2003 thanks to noise-reduction policies.

Portland, Oregon Resident Questions PDX Airport's Claim that Airports Have "No Authority Over Aircraft In Flight" (Nov. 14, 1999). The Columbian prints several letters to the editor, one of which has to do with aircraft noise. The writer asks whether PDX really has "no authority over aircraft in flight" as it has claimed.

Realtor in Virginia Beach Says Realtors Must Inform Home Buyers of Noise and Crash Zones Around Airports (Nov. 14, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot prints several letters to the editor, including one from a realtor who says that home buyers must be informed about airport noise and crash zones before they buy.

Voluntary Fly Friendly Program at Van Nuys Airport in Los Angeles Draws Mixed Reviews from Noise Activists and Airport Officials (Nov. 14, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that the voluntary "fly-friendly" program -- which aims to reduce noise from Los Angeles' Van Nuys Airport -- causes a difference of opinion between anti-noise activists and airport officials. Airline officials and the airport worry about safety from low-noise take-offs, while noise activists say a handful of private jet owners with no consideration cause most of the problem.

San Diego Port Officials Will Offer Noise Reduction to Homeowners in Historic District; Debate Rages Over How to Reduce Noise While Preserving Historic Architecture (Nov. 13, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that San Diego port officials are offering to soundproof historic homes in Loma Portal, but have yet to decide how best to reduce noise while preserving historic architecture. Some residents don't care much about the historic value, but some do, and the port is currently studying noise-reduction at Minneapolis and Boston airports, as well as consulting with window manufacturers to explore their options.

Six Waterfront Homes Near Florida's Tampa International Airport Will Be Only Homes in the County to Receive Soundproofing (Nov. 13, 1999). The St. Petersburg Times reports that only six homes in Hillsborough County, Florida qualify for soundproofing that will reduce noise from Tampa International Airport. Last year 336 homes qualified, but now only the six appear to be in the 65 decibel impact area.

York County, South Carolina Official Wants $4000 Noise Study to Determine If Proposed Freeze on Residential Development Near Airport is Necessary (Nov. 13, 1999). The Herald reports that a York County, South Carolina council member wants the council to fund a $4,000 noise study to determine if a ban on future residential development near the Rock Hill airport is necessary. The council member thinks rezoning decisions should not be based on data from a 1994 study, which could be outdated. Residents of Rock Hill were opposed to the idea of industrial zones near their neighborhoods, but were somewhat satisfied when the planning commission agreed to provide green space buffers between residents and any industrial zones.

Editorial Says Los Angeles City Council Has Ignored Airport-Noise Concerns of Regional Residents for Years, and Hopes that Recent Statement Against an Inequitable Flight Path at Burbank Airport Is a Sign that It Will Take a Stronger Stance on Noise Issues (Nov. 12, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Los Angeles City Council finally seems to be taking a strong stance on airport-noise reduction and fairness. It has finally said that it will sue if the Airport blocks takeoffs over Glendale and Pasadena, which would force flights over Los Angeles communities. In the past, the council has largely ignored noise concerns from residents near Van Nuys Airport and Los Angeles International Airport.

Peace Group Protests Military Raid Rehearsals in Columbia, South Carolina, Citing Noise Complaints (Nov. 12, 1999). The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reports that a peace organization in Columbia, South Carolina are saying that practice military operations in downtown areas creates too much noise. he operations are designed to train Marines in urban warfare situations such as those that could arise in places like Kosovo.

Connecticut Department of Transportation Tests Noise from Takeoffs at Bradley International Airport in Suffield; Realtors Should Also Notify Prospective Buyers About Noise Impacts (Nov. 12, 1999). The Hartford Courant asserts that in addition to testing quieter alternative flight paths at Bradley International Airport in Suffield, realtors should be forced to tell home buyers about noise impacts.

San Francisco Resident Criticizes Airport Director for Using Euphemisms to Disguise Expansion Plans and Ignoring Noise Concerns (Nov. 11, 1999). The San Francisco Chronicle prints several letters to the editor, one of which criticizes a recent letter that discounted noise problems from San Francisco International Airport.

Denver County Commissioners Suspend Development Around Four Regional Airports Until Stricter Regulations Are Considered (Nov. 11, 1999). The Denver Post reports that County Commissioners in Arapahoe County, Colorado -- which includes Denver -- have suspended development on a total of 30.7 square miles surrounding four airports in the region. New rules could include sound insulation, and a larger minimum distance between houses and the airport. By February, results should be available from a noise study being conducted at Centennial Airport that can help make decision-making easier.

People Against Intrusive Noise (PAIN) Issue Demands to East Midlands Airport and North West Leicestershire Council (Nov. 11, 1999). The Derby Evening Telegraph reports that an anti-noise group in the U.K. called People Against Intrusive Noise (PAIN) has issued a list of demands to officials at East Midlands Airport and North West Leicestershire Council. Demands include installation of a noise monitoring system, restricted flying at night, and designated flight paths that disturb fewer residents. The airport plans to extend their runway soon, which has spurred the residents to action.

Resident of Greensboro, North Carolina Says Recent Article on Noise from FedEx's Planned Hub Ignored Imminent Federal Regulations Requiring Stage 3 Noise Levels (Nov. 11, 1999). The News and Record prints a letter to the editor from a Greensboro, North Carolina resident who questions why the switch from Stage 2 to Stage 3 noise levels -- required by the federal government after December 31, 1999 -- was given such cursory consideration in a recent article about FedEx's proposed hub.

Los Angeles Officials Pressure Burbank Airport to Consider Alternative Flight Paths that Don't Overburden their City (Nov. 11, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that Los Angeles officials are putting together a negotiating team that will pressure the Burbank Airport Authority to consider alternative flight paths. Burbank Airport says it will consider L.A.'s comments, but also say that several alternative flight paths have already been deemed ineffective at reducing noise.

Proposal to Increase Tax Exemption for Homeowners Impacted By Chicago Jet Noise Supported By Local Noise Activist Group; School and Municipal Officials Worry About Who Will Make Up the Difference (Nov. 11, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that a proposal to double the property tax exemption for homeowners affected by Chicago-area airports has gained support from the Alliance of Residents Concerning O'Hare. Officials worry that other tax districts would have to pick up the tab, but some say that "previous court decisions require airports to reimburse taxing districts for lost tax revenue."

Two Residents of San Diego Address Noise from Miramar Military Base; One Suggests Alternate Flight Path, Another Criticizes Anti-Noise Activists for Having Skewed Priorities Away from Safety (Nov. 11, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune prints several letters to the editor, two of which pertain to helicopter noise from Miramar military base. The first writer suggests consideration of an alternative flight path, while the second says there are bigger problems to complain about than noise.

Three Los Angeles Area Congressmen Asked the FAA to Lift Ban on Eastern Takeoffs at Burbank Airport, Saying the Lift Would More Equitably Share Noise (Nov. 10, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that three congressmen from the Los Angeles, California area asked the FAA to lift a twenty year ban on eastern takeoffs at Burbank Airport. Los Angeles officials say the ban is unfairly directing flights over Los Angeles, but Burbank officials say eastern takeoffs are more dangerous because of mountains and traffic from Los Angeles International Airport. Also, Burbank residents have come to expect quiet.

High Point, North Carolina Resident Praises Series of Articles on Planned FedEx Hub at Greensboro for Its Informative Nature (Nov. 10, 1999). The News and Record prints a letter to the editor that praises a recent series of articles on the planned FedEx airport hub in Greensboro, North Carolina. The letter also asks for clarification of a noise contour, including how it is determined.

Anti-Noise Group Criticizes Appointment of Northwest Airlines Official to Minneapolis, Minnesota's Planning Commission (Nov. 10, 1999). The Star Tribune reports that the anti-noise group Residents Opposed to Airport Racket (ROAR) have criticized a recent decision by Minneapolis' mayor to appoint a Northwest Airlines official to the city planning commission. The official, has background in "planning,... economic development and planning issues,", but noise activists say her "expertise [shouldn't] be turned against citizens affected by airport noise."

Coventry, England Parliament Member Backs Campaign to Allow More Local Regulation of Noise (Nov. 10, 1999). The Coventry Evening Telegraph reports that a Labour MP of Rugby and Kenilworth, U.K. is backing a campaign to give local authorities more power to regulate airport noise.

High Point, North Carolina Officials Support FedEx's Planned Hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport; They Claim Economic Benefits Will Be Present As At Indianapolis' FedEx Hub, but Noise Will Be Less of a Problem (Nov. 9, 1999). The News and Record reports that High Point, North Carolina officials support the planned FedEx hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport. They say that comparisons of noise with a similar hub in Indianapolis is unfair, although they say that economic benefits will be present as they are in Indianapolis.

Greensboro, North Carolina Residents Debate Potential Noise Problems from a Proposed FedEx Airport Hub; A Similar Hub In Indianapolis Broke Traditional Neighborhoods Apart, But Many Residents Aren't Worried (Nov. 9, 1999). The News and Record reports that some residents around Greensboro, North Carolina's Piedmont Triad International Airport are worried that a planned FedEx hub -- of the type that destroyed long-present neighborhoods in Indianapolis -- may threaten neighborhoods here. While some residents worry about noise, others worry a housing shortage could result from recent decisions that zone noisy land as incompatible with residences.

US Airways Introduces A320 Airbus on Boston to New York Route; With 75-Decibel Footprint, Aircraft Affects Ten Times Less Area than the 727s It Replaces (Nov. 8, 1999). PR Newswire reports that US Airways new Airbus A320s has a 75-decibel noise footprint, making it affect ten times less area with noise than the Boeing 727 it replaces.

Residences Around Greensboro, North Carolina's Piedmont Triad International Airport May Go the Way of Neighborhoods Near Indianapolis' International Airport; Some Neighborhoods May Be Soundproofed, Others May Be Demolished (Nov. 8, 1999). The News and Record reports that neighborhoods surrounding Piedmont Triad International Airport in Greensboro, North Carolina may share a fate that has befallen neighborhoods around Indianapolis International Airport: soundproofing or demolition. The Airport owner pays all of the expenses associated with these projects to comply with federal law.

Cities Near Proposed El Toro Airport in Orange County, California Rezone Land for Schools and Residences In Hopes that Those Properties Will Further Discourage Airport Plans (Nov. 8, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that cities near the proposed El Toro Airport in Orange County, California are encouraging residential and school development near the site. Officials hope that by allowing noise-sensitive developments to move near the airport, the airport project will be more likely to be abandoned due to concerns over noise. Some disagree, saying that building schools is "a tacit acknowledgment that the noise won't be that bad."

Plainfield, Indiana's Strategy for Replacing Taxes Lost When Airport Bought Land By Increasing Incentives for Businesses May Be Model for Greensboro, North Carolina, Where Airport Growth Is Similar to Plainfield (Nov. 8, 1999). The News and Record reports that when Plainfield, Indiana began losing property taxes because Indianapolis International Airport was buying land in the area, they began offering incentives to businesses. Greensboro, North Carolina is looking at Plainfield's model, since a proposed FedEx Hub at Greensboro's Piedmont Triad International Airport is similar to Indianapolis' airport growth.

Anti-Noise Groups in United Kingdom Question Validity of Aviation-Sponsored Study On Financial Benefits of Aviation (Nov. 8, 1999). The Birmingham Post reports that anti-noise groups in the U.K. are questioning the validity of an aviation-sponsored report on the financial aspects of the aviation industry to the U.K. economy. An anti-noise group says that "The airline sector only accounts for 0.8 per cent of UK gross domestic output."

Camas, Oregon Resident Criticizes Noise Complainants Who Knowingly Moved Near Portland International Airport (Nov. 7, 1999). The Columbian prints several letters to the editor, one of which criticized residents near Portland International Airport for moving near to noise and then complaining about it.

Bensenville, Illinois Settles Airport Noise Dispute with Chicago; Bensenville List of Homes to Soundproof Will Be Used, Despite Chicago's Original Opposition (Nov. 7, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that a U.S. District Court approved a settlement in an airport noise suit between Bensenville, Illinois and Chicago. Chicago originally rejected Bensenville's list of homes to be soundproofed, and replaced it with their own list. The settlement allows Bensenville to select the homes.

Residents Around Logan Airport and Hanscom Field Meet to Discuss Common Gripe With Massachusetts Port Authority Expansion Plans, Although the Two Neighborhoods Are Usually Enemies (Nov. 7, 1999). The Boston Globe reports that residents surrounding Hanscom Field and those surrounding Logan Airport met to discuss possible common ground against a common enemy: Massachusetts' Port Authority (Massport). Massport is proposing an additional runway at Logan, and has added commercial flights at Hanscom without much of a public input process.

Alternative Flight Paths Tested Last Year at Newark International Airport Deemed Ineffective at Reducing Noise by the Federal Aviation Administration (Nov. 7, 1999). The New York Times reports that alternative flight paths that were tested at Newark International Airport in New Jersey last year did not reduce noise.

Comparison of Indianapolis International Airport and Greensboro's Piedmont Triad International Airport; Greensboro May Soon Have FedEx Hub Just As Indianapolis Does, But the Airport's Smaller Size Will Mean Noise Problems May Not Be As Severe (Nov. 7, 1999). The News and Record notes that Greensboro's Piedmont Triad International Airport will soon be home to a FedEx cargo hub -- just as Indianapolis International is -- but differences in size of the airport and use of the hub mean that noise problems may be different. The article compares many aspects of the two airports directly.

Comparisons Between Indianapolis International Airport (Which Has A FedEx Hub) and Greensboro (Which Will Soon Have One) Show Similarities In Flight Patterns, But Differing Types of Neighborhoods May Overshadow Similarities (Nov. 7, 1999). The News and Record reports that the configuration of the impending FedEx hub at Greensboro, North Carolina's Piedmont Triad International Airport means that flight patterns will be similar to those at Indianapolis International Airport.

Greensboro, North Carolina Residents Living Near Piedmont Triad International Airport May See their Neighborhoods Dismantled Due to Excessive Noise from a Proposed FedEx Hub, As Has Happened In Similar Neighborhoods Near Indianapolis' International Airport (Nov. 7, 1999). The News and Record reports that neighborhoods south of Indianapolis International Airport are being slowly dismantled as the airport buys out houses impacted by jet noise. Greensboro, North Carolina residents fear that a FedEx hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport -- which would make Piedmont very similar to Indianapolis -- could cause similar problems to the south. Most flights would be routed south at Piedmont due to wind patterns, just as they are in Indianapolis, which would protect the most vocal opponents of the new hub: upscale suburban homeowners north of the airport.

Proposed FedEx Hub at Greensboro, North Carolina's Piedmont Triad International Airport May Cause Noise Well Beyond the Projected Three-Mile Estimate, If A Similar Hub at Indianapolis International Airport Is Any Indication (Nov. 7, 1999). The News and Record reports that the proposed FedEx Hub at Greensboro, North Carolina's Piedmont Triad International Airport may cause noise problems that extend further than is currently estimated. Noise problems at a similar hub in Indianapolis -- which have been growing over the last twelve years -- extend as far as five and one-half miles, while Piedmont has only estimated noise problems up to three miles away.

Bensenville, Illinois Wins Choice of Which Homes Will Be Soundproofed by Chicago O'Hare Airport Funds; Bensenville Wants to Soundproof By Community, and Accused Chicago's Alternative Home Selections as Discriminatory to Hispanic Neighborhoods (Nov. 6, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that Bensenville, Illinois has won the right to choose which homes will be soundproofed in its community by Chicago O'Hare Airport funds. This particular article differs by bringing up the issue of environmental justice in the choice of homes.

Seven Chicago Schools Will Receive Soundproofing, Since School Soundproofing Budget Doubled From Last Year (Nov. 6, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that seven schools in the Chicago area were chosen to receive soundproofing next year. The budget for school soundproofing was expanded to include three more schools this year than last year, and was raised from airline ticket fees.

Seven Chicago-Area Schools Will Receive Soundproofing Next Year (Nov. 6, 1999). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that seven schools in the Chicago area were chosen to receive soundproofing next year.

Chicago O'Hare Airport Officials Say Soundproofing Program Will Continue Throughout 2000, When Official FAA Noise Maps Are Released; Some Had Predicted that Program Would Stop As Stricter Federal Noise Laws Caused a Reduction of Noise Levels (Nov. 5, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that officials at Chicago's O'Hare Airport have said that their home soundproofing program will not end this year. It is possible that some homes will no longer be affected with enough noise -- 70 decibels -- to qualify for noise insulation, but the Airport can't be sure until at least 2001 when the FAA releases it's official 2000 noise contour map.

New Jersey, New York Legislators Argue Over Flight Paths from Newark Airport (Nov. 5, 1999). The Gannett News Service reports that New Jersey and New York legislators are arguing over proposed changes in flight paths from Newark Airport that would take a 'straight-out' path that passes over Elizabeth, New Jersey instead of turning to fly over Staten Island.

Noise Consultants for Suffield, Connecticut's Bradley International Airport Recommend Dropping Turn From Flight-Path; Environmental Impact Study Must Be Done First (Nov. 5, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports that noise consultants for Bradley International Airport in Connecticut have suggested that a fifteen-degree turn be dropped from a departing flight path. The new path would mean that by 2005, 249 people would be affected by an average of 65-decibel noise, while the older path would affect 359. A complete environmental impact study must be done first, because some areas will see an increase in noise despite the overall drop.

Former Navy Pilot Dispels Myths About Jet Noise Around Virginia Beach's Oceana Naval Base (Nov. 4, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot prints a letter to the editor from a former navy pilot who dispels some myths about jet noise from Virginia Beach's Oceana Naval Base.

Three San Diego, California Area Residents Voice Opinions Over Miramar Base Noise; One Says Safety Should Determine Flight Paths, Second Says Newer Helicopters Might Not Reduce Noise, Third Criticizes Letter that Blamed Military Pilot's Death in Kuwait on Noise Abatement Here (Nov. 4, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune prints three letters relating to aircraft noise at Miramar Base. The first letter says only safety and cost should determine helicopter flight paths; the second says that newer helicopters may not mean quieter skies; the third criticizes a couple's letter that blamed their son's death in Kuwait on "worrying about noise abatement" while he was training here.

Lacey, New Jersey Resident Opposes New Jersey Coalition Against Aircraft Noise's Support of Ocean Routing at Newark Airport; He Says the Route Reduces Safety, Efficiency, and Only Benefits the Affluent (Nov. 3, 1999). The Asbury Park Press prints a letter to the editor that criticizes the New Jersey Coalition Against Aircraft Noise for pushing for "ocean routing" at Newark Airport. The author says that the routing will increase delays, and will only help a few affluent communities with noise, while poorer communities still have it bad.

San Francisco International Airport Director Responds to Letter from Mayor that Minimized Noise-Reduction Efforts at the Airport (Nov. 3, 1999). The San Francisco Chronicle prints a letter to the editor from the Director of San Francisco International Airport who responds to a previous letter from the Mayor. The writer says that the Airport Community Roundtable, which was criticized as ineffectual by the Mayor, has resulted in several noise reduction improvements.

Approval of Proposed Hotel and Housing Development In Aberdeen, U.K. Is In Question Due to Potential Rail and Airport Noise (Nov. 2, 1999). The Aberdeen Evening Express reports that planners say a proposed hotel and housing development in Aberdeen, U.K. may be too near to a noisy railroad and airport, and worry that future complaints will be directed at airport noise, or noise from established area businesses.

Federal Aviation Administration Head Commits to Helping Burbank, California Sell Idea of Restricted Operating Hours to Airlines, and Burbank Promises to Verify Legality of Several Proposed Operating and Financial Issues (Nov. 2, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that the Federal Aviation Administration promised to help encourage airlines to continue using Burbank airport, while Burbank promised to check out the legality of financial issues. Airlines dislike a "backdoor-curfew" which would close the terminal at night. The FAA worries that a proposed payment to Burbank to replace lost property taxes is not legal. Burbank will put the plan to a referendum in the spring.

Pilot Writes Humorous Column Emphasizing Safety's Priority Over Noise Reduction (Nov.1 1999). Upside prints a humorous, irreverent column on why pilots emphasize safety over noise reduction.

Birdneck, Virginia Resident Upset Over Continued Noise from Oceana Naval Base Jets, and Lack of Concern from Government and Navy (Oct. 17, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot prints several letters to the editor, including one regarding jet noise. The author notes that although many say that residents knew how loud it would be to move near the base, residents should always be able to enjoy their home. She also notes that naval officials have ignored her concerns and the concerns of her community -- Birdneck, Virginia.

Orlando, Florida Resident Upset that Realtor Didn't Mention Future Growth at Leesburg Airport (Oct. 17, 1999). The Orlando Sentinel prints a letter to the editor from an Orlando, Florida resident. The author is upset that growth -- which will increase commuter and corporate jet overflights near his house -- at the Leesburg Airport wasn't mentioned when he bought his house three years ago.

Columnist in Columbia, South Carolina Discusses Noise Strategies in Our National Parks (Oct. 16, 1999). The Sacramento Bee prints a column that discusses noise pollution in our national parks. The column discusses air-tour noise, raft-motor noise, and other problems in our national parks. She mentions that the National Park Service is currently drafting a policy that will require all parks to monitor their noise and establish natural sound levels as well as sources of the most intrusive human-made sounds.

Montreal Resident Angry at Aeroports de Montreal for Ignoring Citizen Concerns about Pollution and Noise (Oct. 16, 1999). The Gazette prints a letter to the editor that questions why Aeroports de Montreal (ADM) consistently ignores resident concerns over noise and pollution from area airports. The author criticizes ADM for blaming aircraft manufacturers and keeping takeoff and landing information away from the public. His main concern is that Mirabel Airport, which has a larger buffer zone for crashes, noise, and pollution, is being ignored as an alternative to overusing Dorval Airport.

Public Meeting in Louisville, Kentucky to Share Strategies from Noise Committee; Report Will Go Next to Airport Authority, then to FAA (Oct. 16, 1999). The Courier-Journal reports that new noise-reduction strategies have been developed for Louisville International Airport in Kentucky, and will go to the FAA for approval next fall. The article notes that the strategies are in response to a report, which included computer-model data and actual noise measurements. 3,600 homes are now considered to be in high-noise areas.

Forest Park, Georgia Residents Upset at Hartsfield International Airport's Failure to Include the City in Negotiations over Approval of a Fifth Runway (Oct. 15, 1999). The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reports that residents of Forest Park, Georgia are upset that Hartsfield International Airport hasn't been including the city in negotiations over a fifth runway. County authorities negotiated several conditions for approval of the runway, including compensation for lost tax revenue and the promise of attracting new commerce to the area. The County Commissioner promised that their noise abatement program would be the "best in the world", but residents who already endure aircraft noise from the existing runways don't believe it

Noise Consultants from Windsor, Connecticut's Bradley International Airport Will Hold Next Information Session in Less than a Month (Oct. 15, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports that noise consultants for Windsor, Connecticut's Bradley International Airport will hold their next public information session on November 4th. The consultants hope to determine ways to reduce aircraft noise disturbances. The article notes that one method to do this would be to spread flight paths more evenly, but tests this summer prompted a huge increase in noise complaints.

Frankfurt, Germany's Airport Takes Proactive Stance on Noise as Part of Its Expansion Plan to Stay Number One Cargo Hub In Europe (Sep. 21, 1999). The Journal of Commerce reports that the Airport in Frankfurt Germany, which is currently the number one cargo-hub in Europe, is trying to insure that it will stay at the top. Future expansion plans may add a fourth runway, new aircraft parking, and a new terminal. Noise measures that were undertaken to stem noise-related objections to expansion have resulted in 98% of the airports aircraft being in the quieter category. The Airport's location, and the fact that the second-largest air-cargo company in the world is based there, helps to keep Frankfurt competitive.

Richfield, Minnesota Home, Located Near Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, Sells Today After the Reversal of a Decision By the U.S. Department of Housing to Deny the New Buyers' Request for Mortgage Insurance (Sep. 21, 1999). The Star Tribune reports that the sale of a home in Richfield, Minnesota went through today after the reversal of a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Originally, mortgage insurance was denied to the buyers since the house's proximity to a Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport runway made it likely that the "mortgage would outlast the house." A call from the local congressman, who was contacted by the sellers and by city officials, prompted the reversal of the decision. Some officials are worried about the implications of the original denial on future real estate deals, while others are not and say that the reversal will be the precedent.

Shadowlawn, Virginia Civic League Acknowledges Oceana Naval Base's Cooperation and Says It Has Reduced Aircraft Noise (Sep. 21, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot prints several letters to the editor, one of which relates to noise in Virginia's Shadowlawn community from Oceana Naval Base aircraft. The author notes that after meeting with a commanding officer at the base, during which the Shadowlawn Civic League asked for a standard flight pattern to be used on a particular runway, noise has been significantly reduced. He supports the base while striving to reduce noise, and commends the officer and the base for their cooperative spirit.

Airports Across the Country, Including Dallas/Fort Worth in Texas, Are Almost Ready For the January 1st Federal Noise Standards to Come Into Effect (Sep. 20, 1999). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that Airports across the country, including Dallas/Fort Worth Airport (D/FW), are preparing to meet the January 1st deadline for new federally-mandated noise standards. The standards require the phasing out of all heavy "Stage 2" aircraft; Stage 2 aircraft with "hushkits" are quiet enough to be allowed under the standards. The airlines have known of the standards for 8 years, and 93 percent of the planes at D/FW meet the standards already. Some residents have noticed the difference, and some are still disrupted. The article also notes that D/FW has imposed their noise on fewer people as years have gone by even though traffic has increased, using several methods.

Columnist Asserts that Many St. Louis Area Politicians Are Losing Support from St. Charles Residents Because of Their Denial of the Aircraft Noise Problem (Sep. 20, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch prints a column that mentions a long list of politicians in the St. Louis area who are either championing the fight against aircraft noise pollution, or are ignoring it. The issue of noise is getting attention because of a proposed $2.6 billion expansion at Lambert Field.

Representative in Canberra, Australia Proposes Independent "Aviation Noise Ombudsman" to Investigate Noise and Pollution Complaints, Instead of the Current System of Complaining to Biased Airline Representatives (Sep. 20, 1999). AAP Newsfeed reports that an Australian legislator has proposed an independent "aviation noise ombudsman" as an alternative to the current system that sends complaints to biased airline officials.

US Urges EU to Reconsider Noise Law that Will Forbid Additional Stage 2 Aircrafts -- Even When Muffled with 'Husk-Kits' -- from Operating in Europe; US Says Companies Have Already Lost $2.1 Billion in Aircraft Resale Value and Hush-Kit Sales (Sep. 20, 1999). The Business Times reports that the US is urging the European Union (EU) to reconsider noise laws that would ban additional Stage 2 aircraft from operating in Europe. The US says that the laws discriminate against older US Stage 2 planes with hush-kits which meet noise standards. The EU has already postponed implementation of the law. Now the US wants withdrawal of the legislation, and the EU seems willing to consider it if the US makes commitments to developing new Stage 4 international noise standards in the near future; talks on the new standards are currently at a stand still.

US and EU Nearing a Resolution to Tension Over EU's Aircraft Noise Regulations that US Says Would Unfairly Hurt Resale Market for Noisier Planes (Sep. 20, 1999). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports that the US and the European Union (EU) are closer to an agreement that would resolve tension over proposed airport noise regulations in Europe. The regulations would forbid noisier Stage 2 aircraft from being used, which the US says would unfairly hurt the resale market for their aircraft. The EU may agree to withdraw or modify the regulations if the US commits in writing to a definitive timeline for development of the next phase of noise standards: Stage 4. The US is already working with the European Commission to outline principles and "an appropriate level of economic protection for the existing Stage 3 fleet," although the EU wants more assurances that the US will remain committed.

After Years of Shifting Flight Paths From One Disturbed Community to Another, New York City Area Airports May Computer-Test Ocean Routes that Could Keep Noise Away From Residents (Sep. 19, 1999). The Asbury Park Press reports that after years of shifting flight paths from one disturbed community to another, the New York/New Jersey Port Authority may computer-test ocean routes. Parties involved are now considering the computer-modeling of ocean routes that would largely limit noise from climbing aircraft to areas over the ocean. Since the 1978 deregulation of the airline industry, increasing traffic and noise have caused the FAA to try -- unsuccessfully -- to mitigate noise by shifting flight paths. New Jersey Coalition Against Aircraft Noise's ocean route proposal may offer a better solution.

Main Runway Repaving at Providence, Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport Temporarily Changes Noise Patterns (Sep. 19, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that during a two-week paving job of the main runway at Providence, Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport, aircraft will be using a shorter secondary runway. Some communities may experience increased noise. Also, airlines have sold fewer tickets to lighten their load and allow the use of the shorter runway.

Proposed Ban on Eastern Takeoffs at Burbank, California's Airport May Have Been Politically Motivated, but Safety Suggests It Is Still the Right Decision (Sep. 19, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that although Burbank and Glendale may have been politically motivated when they suggested a ban on eastern takeoffs at Burbank Airport, safety would dictate that most flights would avoid eastern takeoffs anyway. Eastern takeoffs are dangerous because the runway is shorter than the other runways, tilts uphill, requires aircraft to climb rapidly, and passes through air space used by Los Angeles International Airport: among the busiest in the world. The article suggests that Congressmen who recently opposed the ban, claiming that it distributed noise unfairly, should acknowledge the agreements positive aspects such as construction of a new terminal at safe distance from runways, phasing out noisy jets, and closing the terminal at night to reduce night-noise from aircraft.

Recap of the Summer Events Surrounding a Proposed Commercial Airport at the Former El Toro Marines Base in Orange County, California (Sep. 19, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports on the events of the summer that have surrounded a proposal to establish a commercial airport at the former El Toro Marines base in Orange County, California. The definition of community to be affected by the outcome is defined as the County populace instead of the commmunities immediately surrounding the base; this places distant communities in control of airport approval. After months of debate, the Board of Supervisors decided to vote on the proposal in May after the planning process is further along. Shortly after, a citizen petition qualified a ballot initiative that would require a two-thirds approval for expansion of airports. The initiative will be voted on in March, and so the Supervisors' vote may end up being subject to citizen approval.

Texas' San Antonio International Airport Far Behind Other Airports in Noise Abatement (Sep. 19, 1999). The San Antonio Express-News prints an editorial that criticizes noise abatement efforts at Texas' San Antonio International Airport. The article notes that two recent public hearings and noise studies have promised no relief for residents. While acknowledging that soundproofing is not practical for every affected home, the editorial pushes for a dialogue between all impacted parties.

U.S. Representative in San Fernando Valley Claims the Airport Authority's Deal with the City of Burbank Blatantly Ignores Noise Impacts South and West of the Airport (Sep. 19, 1999). The Los Angeles Times prints a column written by a U.S Representative in the San Fernando Valley who claims that Burbank's Airport Authority and the city of Burbank have cut a deal that blatantly ignores the impacts of noise on residents South and West of the airport. A new terminal is needed at the airport, and a ban on eastern departures from the east-west runway was suggested as a condition for the city's approval of the terminal. This ban will reduce noise over eastern communities while burdening others who have continually suffered since the FAA ruled that the old terminal is positioned in such a way to make eastern departures unsafe. He debunks the claim that the 6,032 foot runway is too short for commercial flights, pointing out that Orange County's John Wayne Airport handles commercial flights while being 300 feet shorter.

Gloucestershire, U.K. Woman Irritate by Noise from Airport Says Noise Is A Form of Pollution (Sep. 18, 1999). The Gloucestershire Echo prints a letter to the editor from a Cheltenham, U.K. resident which criticizes the tendency of many to ignore noise as a real form of pollution. She says that noise pollution is just as bad as any other kind of pollution. She responds to a recent letter to the editor which said that noise from Staverton Airport is not annoying.

Public Workshop in Tampa, Florida Outlines Final Proposal for 20-Year Expansion Plan at Tampa International Airport (Sep. 18, 1999). The Tampa Tribune reports that Tampa, Florida's International Airport held a public workshop and discussed "a new runway, a larger terminal, more parking, light rail, and noise abatement programs." Those projects are part of the long-term plan to accommodate 25 million passengers by 2020, nearly doubling the current number. Community and Airport Authority members created the plan together, and hope for FAA approval within 1.5 years. A separate noise abatement plan, which will include an engine-testing structure and soundproofing of area homes, will be considered by separately by the FAA after an additional public hearing later this year.

Continental Replaces All Older Jets with Newer, Quieter Ones at Cleveland, Ohio's Hopkins International Airport (Sep. 17, 1999). The Plain Dealer reports that Continental Airlines has replaced all of its older, noisier jets at Cleveland, Ohio's Hopkins International Airport with newer, quieter ones. The article notes that the airline decided to replace its older jets because of new noise regulations, but also because they expect to save $100 million each year in maintenance costs on the 103 aircraft they expect to replace nationwide. Local politicians are pleased with the step, although they worry that increased traffic after the 2002 completion of a new runway will keep the noise problem from getting better

DuPage County, Near Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, Debating Whether to Expand O'Hare or Build a Third Regional Airport; Concerns Over Expanding O'Hare Shifting from Noise to Safety (Sep. 17, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that residents and politicians in DuPage county, Illinois near Chicago's O'Hare International Airport are debating the question of how to handle a doubling of air traffic at O'Hare in the next twenty years: expand the airport, or build a third regional airport. Viewpoints of regional politicians center on issues from local safety concerns, to regional air-capacity concerns, to national infrastructure concerns. Those who want a new airport are less concerned with noise -- which was the central concern for many years -- and more worried about dangerously-crowded skies and runways.

Nevada Senators Add Rider to Spending Bill That Would Delay Noise Restrictions Planned for Grand Canyon National Park (Sep. 17, 1999). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that Nevada senators added a rider to an Interior spending bill that would delay implementation of new noise limits in Grand Canyon National Park. The senators say that air tour operators only want time to refute the methods used by the Park Service: methods they say are flawed. Environmentalists consider the rider a simple delay tactic, to be used to find other ways to reject the limits. In developing the limits, the Park Service is trying to comply with a 1987 congressional mandate to restore natural quiet to the park.

Delta Announces Quieter Fleet Will Be Used Between Washington DC, Boston, and New York City Airports (Sep. 16, 1999). The Daily News reports that Delta Air Lines will use new planes in their shuttle service between Boston, New York, and Washington. The new planes are twelve times quieter than the old planes, and should reduce noise for Queens residents.

Los Angeles' Van Nuys Airport Applies for Permit to Allow Continued Operation Above State Noise Limits; Anti-Noise Activists Ask for Permit Stipulations Requiring Stronger Commitments to Reducing Noise (Sep. 16, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that Los Angeles' Van Nuys Airport is applying for a permit that would allow it to continue operating above state-mandated noise levels. Noise critics want conditions to be imposed on the permit such as flight path restrictions for helicopters and a commitment to phasing out -- not just restricting -- noisy Stage 2 jets. Airport officials claim that they have already taken steps to reducing noise, and will continue to without "state-imposed conditions".

Several Letters to the Editor Label Past Letters that Complained About Jet Noise from Virginia Beach's Oceana Naval Base as Whiny (Sep. 16, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot prints several letters to the editor that label past writers -- who complained about jet noise from Virginia Beach's Oceana Naval Base -- as whiny. They discuss the fact that the base was here before developments, and question whether the tourists could ever be considered as important as the Navy.

Activists in San Antonio, Texas Hope Noise Compatibility Study Will Bring Airport Up to Speed on Noise Reduction Initiatives (Sep. 15, 1999). The San Antonio Express-News reports that a current noise compatibility study around San Antonio International Airport in Texas has residents hoping for relief from aircraft noise. Local organizations believe that alternating takeoff patterns and faster climbing are among the cheapest, easiest, ways to reduce noise immediately. A 5-house pilot soundproofing project will help determine whether the federal government will fund up to 80% of a soundproofing initiative at the airport.

Delta and USAir Announce Phasing-In of Quieter Phase 3 Jets to Reduce Maintenance Costs, Fuel Needs, and Noise at New York City's LaGuardia Airport (Sep. 15, 1999). Newsday reports that Delta Air Lines plans to add 18 Stage 3 jets to its shuttle service from LaGuardia Airport to Washington D.C. and Boston. The new jets will help reduce noise levels, will reduce fuel needs by one-third, and reduce required maintenance. 86% of all aircraft subject to the federal law are already quiet enough: due to mufflering equipment or a quieter design. The FAA says that more than twice the number of passengers that flew in 1975 will fly this year, but the number of residents who will be affected by similar noise levels will drop by over ten times.

Navy Pilot Objects to Sarcastic Tone of Letters Complaining About Noise From Navy Jets at Oceana Naval Base in Virginia Beach (Sep. 15, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot prints a letter from a Navy pilot who objects to recent letters that complained about jet noise from Virginia Beach's Oceana Naval Base. He says that the "cavalier attitude and sarcasm" of the letters was shocking. He suggests that her admitted desire to "discuss the merits of The Poisonwood Bible while eating quiche" in a comfortable, upper-income home is trivial next to the importance of the military's role in Kosovo and in protecting our country.

Opinion From Anchorage Resident Says that a Local Group -- Backed By State and National Environmental Organizations -- Is Wrong to Fight Expansion at Anchorage International Airport (Sep. 15, 1999). They aren't aware, apparently, that this noise issue was one of the loud and whiny complaints years ago when the north-south runway was first proposed. Residents of a little subdivision at the south end of the new runway raised holy hoopla and tried to block the construction of what has become, obviously, a vital part of Anchorage's commercial life.

Residents of Studio City, California Criticize Burbank's Airport Deal -- Which Bans Eastern Takeoffs -- and Ask Congressional Representatives to Help Kill the Deal and Spread Noise More Evenly (Sep. 15, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that residents of Studio City, California are upset over a deal that the city of Burbank cut with the Burbank Airport. The deal approves the airport's expansion plan in exchange for a ban on takeoffs over Burbank. Studio City officials say that a ban that was previously instituted on eastern takeoffs was due to the proximity of the terminal to the runway; expansion and renovation would eliminate that reason as justification for the ban. In addition, the deal would allow the Airport to forego a night-flight curfew and would also allow the addition of two gates to the existing fourteen in phase two of construction.

Study Says that Growth at Los Angeles' Van Nuys Airport Has Stimulated Local Economy; Residents Say the Study Didn't Include Negative Impacts on Property Values (Sep. 15, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that a new study shows that growth at Los Angeles' Van Nuys Airport has stimulated the local economy. Residents say the study did not take noise-induced property value reduction. The airport is asking for the renewal of variances which allow it to exceed noise standards, and already has plans to spend $15 million to soundproof 150 homes and 900 apartments that are affected by aircraft noise.

Union, New Jersey Politician Urges Unity Among Residents in Supporting a Live Test of Ocean Routing for Aircraft, Saying It Will Reduce Noise (Sep. 15, 1999). The Asbury Park Press prints several letters to the editor, including one from a Union, New Jersey politician who asks for support of a live test of ocean routing for aircraft. Ocean routing is intended to reduce noise over communities, and the writer says that New Jersey residents should unite in supporting a policy that could benefit them all.

Anchorage, Alaska Resident Worries that Permit to Fill Wetlands at Airport Will Destroy Environment and Neighborhoods (Sep. 14, 1999). The Anchorage Daily News prints an article written by a resident who is worried about a requested 10-year permit that would allow the Anchorage International Airport to fill most of the wetlands remaining on its land. Officials say competition requires growth, and critics worry about negative impacts to the environment and the community. The author urges the withdrawal of the permit request, and the drafting of an Environmental Impact Statement, which is not currently planned.

FAA Asks Congress to Hold Off on Filing Complaints Against EU's Anti-Hushkit Legislation, Saying that Productive Negotiations for Next Generation of Noise Standards May Encourage EU to Withdraw Legislation Themselves (Sep. 14, 1999). Air Transport Intelligence reports that the FAA has asked Congress to hold off on filing an official complaint against the European Union (EU) and its recent legislation that bans new planes from using hushkits to meet noise limits after May 2000. The EU is eager for U.S. participation in the development of new noise standards, and may be willing to withdraw their legislation if a proposed standard is being developed to otherwise address their concerns about noise. The anti-hushkit legislation -- as it now stands -- would prevent the addition of noisy, hush-kitted planes to European fleets after May 2000.

Legislators West of Burbank, California's Airport Ask FAA to Kill Expansion Plan That Would Ban Eastern Takeoffs; Some Support It Saying Eastern Takeoffs are Unsafe, Others Say the Ban Protects Upper-Class Burbank and Glendale Residents to the East (Sep. 14, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that a deal reached between Burbank, California and its resident airport is being challenged by legislators to the West. Los Angeles legislators say their constituents would get an unfair share of aircraft noise under a ban on eastern takeoffs, but proponents say mountains, runway length, and air-traffic patterns make eastern takeoffs unsafe.

Some Say Burbank, California's Expansion Deal With Airport is Ruined By Unfair Ban on Eastern Takeoffs; Others Say Safety Concerns Makes Ban Necessary (Sep. 14, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that three Los Angeles congressmen have written the FAA, asking them to kill a deal between Burbank and its airport. The congressmen claim that a ban on eastern takeoffs -- presented as part of the deal -- is unfair since the ban would direct most air traffic over Western communities and almost none over Burbank and Glendale.

SANE Organization in Tipp City, Ohio Holds First Public Meeting; the Group Opposes Runway Expansion at Dayton International Airport (Sep. 10, 1999). The Dayton Daily News reports that Tipp City, Ohio's Stop Airport Noise and Expansion (SANE) group held its first public meeting this week. The group was formed in June to oppose Dayton International Airport's expansion plan, which the group thinks will worsen noise and fuel-dumping problems. The group, which includes people with aviation and environmental engineering expertise, has proposed efficiency measures that would make the expansion plan unnecessary.

Letters to the Editor, Including a Virginia Beach Resident Who Believes Navy Pilots Training at Oceana Naval Base Have the Right to Make Noise in Preparation for Putting Their Lives on the Line (Sep. 10, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot prints several letters to the editor, including one from a Virginia Beach resident in support of Oceana Naval Base training flights. The author admits that he does not live in the affected area, and if he did he acknowledges he would be 'on edge.' However, he asserts that military personnel who put their lives on the line should be allowed to make noise if it is necessary for their training.

Gloucestershire, U.K Resident Writes Letter to the Editor Noting that Noise from Gloucestershire Airport Is Increasing Not From Passenger Flights But Because of Training and Recreational Flights (Sep. 10, 1999). The Gloucestershire Echo prints a letter to the editor from a Springbank, U.K resident. The author is responding to a prior letter, and says that although residents that live near airports must expects some noise, recent increases are in excess of what one should expect from an airport of its size. She believes that recreational and training flights -- not passenger flights -- are largely responsible for the increases, and thinks they should be taken elsewhere.

Rolling Meadows Community Near Chicago O'Hare Airport Gains Full Membership to Noise Commission, Hopes Money for Soundproofing Will Follow (Sep. 10, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that Rolling Meadows, Illinois has been granted full-member status on the Chicago O'Hare Airport Noise Compatibility Commission. The decision was made after data showed the community to be in O'Hare's 'affected area' by FAA standards, and means that Rolling Meadows may have more access to soundproofing money. The commission makes recommendations to the Chicago's Department of Aviation about which homes and other buildings may need soundproofing.

Rolling Meadows Community Near Chicago's O'Hare Airport Is Now a Member of the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission (Sep. 10, 1999). Chicago Daily Herald reports that Rolling Meadows, a community near Chicago's O'Hare Airport, has been admitted to the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission: the body that decides how and where soundproofing dollars will be spent. Based on 1997 noise-contour maps, many other communities have also been invited to become members. Locals are pleased, although they know that most money will still go to communities closer to the airport. One resident said he hoped the community would use their new status to oppose runway expansion

Hong Kong Government Proposal Designed to Evenly Distribute Noise by Limiting Night-Time Flight Activity to the Southern Runway Is Blocked by Southern Suburb (Sep. 10, 1999). The Hong Kong Standard reports that one southern suburb near Hong Kon's Airport blocked a government plan to limit all night-time air traffic to the use of the South runway. The measure was intended to limit the noise in northern suburbs -- where the noise is generally louder -- by shunting it to the quieter suburbs in the south. The southern suburb disagreed, saying that "Residents in both [communities] can at least share the noise burden when both runways are used."

Trade Officials Urge European Union to Revisit Regulation that Discriminates Against U.S. Planes with Hushkits (Sep. 10, 1999). The Financial Times reports that the U.S. undersecretary of commerce asked the European Union (EU) to withdraw a regulation that restricts some U.S. aircraft -- outfitted with noise-dampening hushkits -- from flying in the EU. The U.S. could lose $1.5 billion if the measure -- which would prevent hushkitted aircraft from flying to the EU by May of 2002 if they hadn't operated in the EU prior to May 1999 -- is put in place. The regulation was intended to phase out noisier aircraft over the densely populated EU, but the U.S. claims that the agreement doesn't meet international standards, since U.S. aircraft would be discriminated against while other noisier aircraft still operated.

Austin Approves $14.8 Million for Noise Abatement at City's New Airport (Sep. 10, 1999). The Austin American-Statesman reports that Austin, Texas' city council has approved $14.8 million for noise abatement at the new Austin-Bergstrom International Airport. Residents will have the option of having the city buy their house, soundproof it, or do nothing. Many people who have lived there for years have mixed feelings because they don't want to move. Nevertheless they will be escaping the "cracked walls, broken windows" and pollution that were mentioned in their complaints. The city is acting even though federal noise limits that require action have not been reached in most of the neighborhoods. The plan is part of their "Fly Quiet" program, which has already designated southern takeoffs during the day and moved four schools further from the airport.

Two Residents Take Opposing Views Of a New "Early Alert" System Proposed By Virginia Beach's Oceana Naval Base to Help Citizens Avoid Jet Noise (Sep. 10, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot prints letters to the editor from two Virginia Beach residents regarding jet noise from Oceana Naval Base. The first resident applauds the proposed plan, which would allow residents to take measures in preparation for expected jet noise. He still believes that the city council needs to establish a noise committee with disaffected residents, and be tougher on the Navy when they move louder jets into the area. The second resident applauds a plan to fly jets higher -- this lessening noise -- but says early warning for noise is irrelevant. He says "Noise is noise, and 108 decibels is just as loud when you know it's coming as it is when it surprises you."

Mayors of Four Cities in Flight Path of Helicopters From Miramar Marines Base in San Diego, California Meet to Discuss Ways to Reduce Noise (Sep. 9, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that the mayors of four cities in the flight path of helicopters from San Diego, California's Miramar Marines Base met to discuss ways to reduce the noise. They focused on alternate flight paths and quieter helicopters.

Letters to the Editor, Including a Sun Valley, Idaho Resident Who Suggests Easements as a Solution to Potential Noise Complaints After Airport Expansion (Sep. 9, 1999). The Idaho Statesman prints several letters to the editor, including one relating to noise. A Sun Valley, Idaho resident notes that easements -- signed by residents waiving their right to complain about jet noise -- could be the answer to quelling noise complaints near the expanding airport.

Letters to the Editor on the Issue of Helicopter Noise from Miramar Marines Base in San Diego, California (Sep. 9, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune prints several letters to the editor regarding helicopter noise from Miramar Marines Base in San Diego, California. The first writer protests past letters to the editor that painted North Count residents as people who had moved near noise to begin with; the author says that he neither "moved next to an airport [nor] moved next to Interstate 15." He believes North County residents should work with East County residents to have the helicopters moved out of San Diego entirely instead of trying to limit their impact to one part of the county or another. The second writer pushes for consideration of the quickest, most direct flight paths. He says they effect the fewest people even if they pass over the North County where the "squawk factor" (complaint intensity) is higher. The third writer says that in sixty years of living in the North County, she has never been bothered by helicopter noise as much as by other neighborhood noise such as lawnmowers. She believes that another non-noise-related agenda motivates the complainers. The fourth and final writer has problems with the facts that the Marines will consider pilot safety above all other factors and that they will have final say in determining flight paths. She believes that safety of pilots should be balanced with protection of civilians, and that unbiased professionals would be better to decide on the flight paths.

Three Residents Near San Diego, California's Miramar Marine Base Give Their Opinion on Proposed New Flight Paths for Noisy Helicopters (Sep. 9, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune prints three opinions from residents near San Diego, California's Miramar Marine Base about proposed new flight paths for noisy helicopters. The first opinion, from the second district supervisor, centers on the importance of maintaining safety despite any possible noise impacts. She also emphasizes the importance of working together with the military instead of creating a confrontational situation. She says that shoving noise from the North County to the East County is not the solution, and notes that the military will consider Eastern routes but will not guarantee that it will use them in the end. The second opinion focuses on the fact that most people who are complaining about noise knew they were moving near an airport. The third opinion renames MARCH (Move Against Relocating Copters Here) to WHINE (We Hope Itineraries are Nudged East) and says that the more urban North County treat East County residents as if they were hicks; the author says that copters would be far more disruptive in the rural East County than the more developed North County.

Milton, Massachusetts Supports New Runway at Boston's Logan Airport That Will More Evenly Spread Aircraft Noise Over Surrounding Communities (Sep. 9, 1999). The Patriot Ledger reports that the selectmen of Milton, Massachusetts have decided to support a new $22 million, 5,000-foot runway at Boston's Logan Airport. The runway is intended to reduce noise over certain communities including Milton. Other communities, which will experience increased noise levels -- though still under goals that were set by the communities in the 1980s -- oppose the runway. The new runway will reduce traffic on two other runway in particular, which are currently used heavily because they can handle more traffic in certain weather conditions -- thus reducing delays.

Tipp City, Ohio Letter to the Editor Opposing Expansion at Emery Worldwide Airport (Sep. 9, 1999). The Dayton Daily News prints several letters to the editor, including one on noise pollution from Tipp City, Ohio. The author says that expansion at Emery Worldwide Airport will increase a mild annoyance to an unbearable burden. He says that passenger volume had actually decreased in recent years, so the claim that residents should have 'expected' this expansion is wrong.

Albuquerque, New Mexico Mayor Wants Airport Takeoffs to Turn South Instead of North to Avoid Communities (Sep. 9, 1999). The Albuquerque Journal reports that the Mayor of Albuquerque, New Mexico wants flights to always avoid northern communities by turning to the South after takeoff instead of North. The FAA is resisting the change, saying that routing all takeoffs to the South may cause safety problems, since many landings arrive from the South. Older planes, whether outfitted with noise-reducing hush-kits or not, gain altitude less quickly and cause the worst noise impact; most of these planes already take off to the South. Also, the North-South Runway closed in 1997 and helped to reduce the noise impact on the Northern communities.

Neighbors of Los Angeles, California's Van Nuys Airport Say Soundproofing is Only Superficial; They Want "Elimination of Noise, Not Management" (Sep. 8, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that citizens at a meeting of Los Angeles, California's Van Nuys Airport Citizens Advisory Council said soundproofing plans are inadequate. They said that even the best soundproofing forces them to stay indoors, and only manages the noise problem; they want elimination of noise.Airport Commissioners recently banned additional noisy Stage 2 jets from coming to the Airport, but allowed the ones currently there to stay.

Chicago Aviation Department Publishes Booklet to Show Those Who Don't Qualify for Free Soundproofing How to Get it Done Themselves (Sep. 7, 1999). The Chicago Sun-Times reports on several happenings around the city of Chicago, including the release of a soundproofing booklet by the Chicago Aviation Department. The booklet discusses what needs to be done and who to contact about doing the work. While the information is intended for those who don't qualify for free soundproofing due to airplane noise, a local anti-noise group said the city should be paying for more soundproofing instead of giving advice.

Letter Writer Says Placement of Housing Developments Near DIA Airport in Aurora, Colorado Sets Stage for Future Litigation Over Noise (Sep. 6, 1999). The Denver Rocky Mountain News prints a letter to the editor by a realtor from Aurora, Colorado. The writer is concerned that after DIA Airport was built intentionally in an area away from residential neighborhoods, new development plans will place residences there and set the stage for future litigations that taxpayers will end up paying for.

Chicago, O'Hare Airport Neighbor Suggests a More Automated Noise Hotline (Sep. 5, 1999). The Chicago Sun-Times prints a series of letters to the editor, one of which is noise-related. A resident near Chicago's O'Hare Airport says that the old-fashioned noise-hotline should be upgraded so callers need not be "subjected to a series of ridiculous questions" after being awakened from sleep at night. He suggests a modified form of caller ID.

Writer Gets Military's Side of the Story Regarding Noisy, Low-Flying Planes (Sep. 4, 1999). The Daily Telegraph reports that there are two sides to the story about noisy, low-flying military jets. Despite 6,000 complaints each year relating to noise from low-flying planes, pilots say the skill requires practice and is invaluable. Though in the past designated flyways were used, pilots may now fly anywhere in the country as long as they avoid certain special areas such as hospitals or civil airports; they only fly low only thinly populated areas. Planes must be at least 250 feet above the ground in most areas, but some opposition groups say this is still too dangerous to civilians. Pilots may be monitored at any time by mobile radar that allows police to determine speed and altitude. Even at legal altitudes, complaints roll in and several public relations officers are employed to answer these complaints.

District Board Proposes Steeper Descent Into Hong Kong's Chek Lap Kok Airport (Sep. 3, 1999). The South China Morning Post reports that the Sha Tin Provisional District Board's Health and Environment Committee is considering a proposal for steeper aircraft descents -- already used in Britain -- at Hong Kong's Check Lap Kok airport. A committee member said that hills in the area would make it harder to correct flight path deviations inherent in steeper approaches. Since the airport opened a second runway and began round-the-clock operation, noise complaints have increased. Since then, the most disruptive northeast approach has seen less use but has not been eliminated as the committee has demanded.

Tampa International Airport Authority Include Several Steps to Reduce Noise In Their Long-Range Plans (Sep. 3, 1999). The Tampa Tribune reports that Tampa International Airport Authority held a public meeting to discuss its long-term plans: including a $4 million budget to reduce noise. The budget will go to building a three-walled jet-engine-testing structure, and a $100,000 landing-monitor system that will identify airlines who use inappropriate runways. Expansion plans -- which is estimated to increase passenger volume from 14 million to 25 million by 2020 -- include another runway, more parking lots, renovations to a terminal, the addition of cargo facilities and widening the road leading into the airport.

Taylorsville, Utah Residents Who Say Jets Have Flown Lower in Recent Months Want Noise Levels Monitored (Sep. 3, 1999). The Deseret News reports that 35 residents of Taylorsville, Utah attended a meeting with Salt Lake City International Airport officials to voice their concerns over increasing jet noise. They claim that jets are flying as low as 1750 feet over their neighborhoods. Airport officials say that jets are at least 2000 feet high.

Airline Industry Group Opposes Proposed Nighttime Terminal Closure At Burbank Airport, Which Is Designed As an Alternative To an Outright Curfew (Aug. 31, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that an airline industry group opposes a plan to close California's Burbank Airport terminal at night. The plan was designed to quell citizens' desire for a nighttime curfew without violating federal law that forbids localities from interfering with airport operations. Obtaining an outright, legal curfew would be a lengthy, costly, process involving FAA approval. The FAA has yet to comment on the legality of a terminal closure. Some residents oppose the plan because the city doesn't go far enough towards forcing a curfew, and those residents are seeking a voter initiative to curb airport growth.

Burbank, California Residents Upset Over Public Hearing Held By the Airport Authority that Wasn't Public Enough (Aug. 31, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that a public hearing held by Burbank Airport officials in Burbank, California was held in a strangely private manner, "where residents were each given three minutes in private to voice their opinions to an airport representative...." Residents were upset that they couldn't hear what others had to say. Airport officials explained the nature of the hearing by saying that they were trying to make residents more comfortable. Residents were expecting to air their concerns over a recent noise study which designates an official 'noise impact area', outside of which residents will get no financial assistance to be used toward insulating their homes against noise.

Chicago O'Hare Airport Built First "Hush-House" For Quieting Engine Tests in 1997 (Aug. 31, 1999). The Columbian reports that the first 'hush-house' -- a three-walled enclosure designed to reduce noise from engine testing at airports -- was built at Chicago O'Hare Airport in 1997. Noise is reduced by three-quarters, and complaints about engine-testing noise stopped. Maintenance crews love the structure, since it is in an area where no runway crossings are required, and since it is lit particularly well. Although using the $3.2-million structure is voluntary, over 80% used it last year.

Marine Corps Tests Noise From Helicopters Along Del Mar, California's Coastline As Part of 1997 Settlement With Anti-Noise Group (Aug. 31, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that a noise study was recently performed along the coastline of Del Mar, California to determine the impact of noise from military helicopters. The noise study will last four days, and is part of a 1997 agreement in which the Marine Corps settled with a local anti-noise group -- Move Against Relocating Choppers Here -- in part by promising a noise study. Much resident outcry has been from residents along the already noisy Interstate 15, but shoreline residents receive two-thirds of the noise impact.

Portland International Airport in Oregon Plans to Build "Hush House" For All But Largest Jets to Quiet Late-Night Engine Testing; Critics Say the Largest Jets -- Which Will Be Tested At the Airport's Corner Nearest Vancouver, Washington -- Will Create Noise Problems for Vancouver (Aug. 31, 1999). The Columbian reports that the Portland International Airport in Portland, Oregon plans to build a 'hush house' to quiet late-night engine testing, but jumbo jets that won't fit will be tested at the edge of the airport near Vancouver, Washington. Airport officials say a 'hush house' large enough for jumbo jets would have raised the price, which is not justified since less than 2% of the engine tests would involve jumbo jets. Others worry that Vancouver will be inundated with noise, and may see a drop in property values; they also note that the percentage of jumbo jets will rise as international traffic becomes more common A particularly vocal Portland resident is responsible for pressuring the airport -- with FAA assistance -- to build the hush-house. Before the hush-house is built, airlines may only test engines at night if departure times necessitate it.

Residents Near Proposed Airport at El Toro -- A Former Marines Base -- Want Nighttime Flight Curfews, Passenger-Count Caps, and Consideration of Noise Impact On Schools; Residents Closer to Nearby John Wayne Airport Say They Already Tolerate Noise, and Want El Toro to Share Some of That Noise Burden (Aug. 31, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that while residents near the proposed airport at El Toro in Orange County, California are worried that noise will irritate them, residents around the nearby John Wayne Airport say they don't want the noise they already deal with to get worse: a situation that could happen if El Toro isn't built. Critics of the airport have pushed for a referendum that could require two-thirds majority support for the construction of the airport. They also note that noise will likely be worse at El Toro since El toro will have two long runways to John Wayne's one short runway. One neighborhood, already within 1,500 feet of a runway at John Wayne, worries that the community would be "demolished" if John Wayne expanded.

Taylorsville, Utah Residents Organize Public Meeting to Air Concerns Over Noise from Salt Lake City International Airport (Aug. 31, 1999). The Deseret News reports that residents of Taylorsville, Utah want planes landing at Salt Lake City International Airport to use other flight paths. Since winds often come from the north -- and planes must fly into the wind when it is present -- landings often pass directly over Taylorsville residences. The group will hold a public meeting this week to air concerns; FAA and airport officials have been invited.

A Proposed Noise Mitigation Plan at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport Is Scheduled For Consideration in September; Plan Was Originally Scheduled For June Consideration, and Residents Are Upset At the Delay (Aug. 30, 1999). The Austin American-Statesman reports that a noise mitigation plan for Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA) in Texas will be considered in September by the city council after a delay of several months. The plan would call for buyouts, soundproofing, and money in exchange for overflight easements. Some residents are upset that the plan has been delayed, and say that a program that requires planes to turn over residential areas above a certain altitude is not being enforced. Officials say enforcement is strict.

Love Field in Dallas, Texas Embroiled In Court Hearings Brought By Neighborhood Organizations to Stop Proposed Increase In the Number of Flights At the Airport (Aug. 30, 1999). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that several neighborhood organizations have joined in a court battle to keep Love Field in Dallas, Texas from adding flights. Officials want to take advantage of the 1997 relaxation of federal restrictions to increase the number of flights at the airport. Neighborhood organizations are opposing the flight increases "mostly on environmental grounds, including noise, air pollution, air safety and traffic congestion," and expect the fight to go all the way to the Supreme Court.

Miami, Florida Residents Wait For FAA to Rule On Proposed Flight Paths At Miami International Airport; FAA Concerns Include Environmental Justice Issues (Aug. 30, 1999). The Miami Daily Business Review reports that residents and officials in Miami, Florida are still waiting on the FAA's opinion regarding proposed flight paths From Miami International Airport. A task force of "residents, American Airlines pilots and county officials" has developed flight path proposals, but the FAA has put off its judgement of the proposals for some time. The FAA originally postponed its decision until an environmental review of a proposed fourth runway at the airport was available. After that came through, the FAA said it wanted more information on potential environmental justice issues: notably, if steeper takeoffs would cause more noise for modest-income homes nearest the airport.

Anti-Noise Activist in Burbank, California Says City Council Has Sold Out By Permitting Airport Construction Without Immediate Noise Controls; Referendum Will Check the Public's Opinion (Aug. 29, 1999). The Los Angeles Times prints a piece alleging that Burbank, California's city council has given up the fight against noise by allowing the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority to construct a new terminal without immediate night-curfews and passenger-count caps. The council had the power to refuse the construction of a new terminal if the airport authority failed to implement noise control measures, but chose to require the curfew and caps only if the airport adds gates. The writer concludes, noting an upcoming "mandatory initiative" or referendum on the subject.

Since Scandal Forced Key Massachusetts Port Authority Official to Resign, Status of Fight Over New Runway at Boston's Logan Airport is Unclear (Aug. 29, 1999). The Boston Globe reports that since a scandal forced a key official to resign, the status of a fight over a new runway at Boston's Logan Airport is unclear. Runway opponents believe that the governor -- who supports the runway -- is now more likely to put politics aside and consider more regional solutions, including a new airport.

Letter to the Editor from Medical Helicopter Pilot Expressing Disdain for Those Who Accept Noise from Traffic and Fireworks but Complain About Medical Helicopters (Aug. 28, 1999). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette prints a letter to the editor that criticizes those who accept city noise and fireworks while complaining about medical helicopters.

Letters to the Editor Divided Over Recent Public Meeting in Escondido, California Where a Marine Corps Official Explained Reasons for Helicopter Noise Over the Community (Aug. 28, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune prints several letters to the editor regarding a recent Escondido, California meeting about helicopter noise from Miramar Marines Base. Some criticized complainers and said the military is necessary and quiet enough. Others criticized meeting-goers who booed military officials. Others criticized military officials for 'burning time' allotted for public questions and for 'smugly' sitting together while many elderly people stood throughout the meeting.

Craig Airport in Arlington, Florida Performing Noise Abatement and Cost/Benefit Studies to Evaluate Proposed New Runway Extension; Residents Wary of Possible Increase in Noise and Safety Issues (Aug. 27, 1999). The Business Journal-Jacksonville reports that Craig Airport in Arlington, Florida is performing a $50,000, three-month noise abatement study, along with a cost/benefit analysis, to determine if a runway extension would be possible. Airport officials say they want to allow the airport to relieve nearby Jacksonville International Airport of more non-commercial air traffic. Residents fear that larger, commercial aircraft would use the airport, but airport officials say that they would seek an airport ban on commercial passenger aircraft at the airport.

Judge Will Rule on Adams County's Suit Against "Noisy" Denver International Airport in About a Month (Aug. 27, 1999). The Denver Rocky Mountain News reports that testimony is over in a suit that claims Denver owes Adams County $6.5 million for 13 noise violations. A $500,000-per-violation penalty was set in an agreement between Denver and the County that allowed Denver to annex land for its airport. Denver claims no one was adversely affected, but the County says any violations were assumed to cause damages under the agreement even without proof of damages.

Letter to the Editor in Dorval, Canada -- Near Montreal -- Says Noise Pollution Since Runway Closure Is Intolerable (Aug. 27, 1999). The Gazette prints a letter to the editor from a resident of Dorval, Canada near Montreal. The author says that he was stonewalled when he tried to obtain information on the number of operations at Dorval Airport. After failing to obtain official data, he made assumptions and calculated intolerable numbers of flights that pass over Dorval now that a key runway has been closed.

Navy Flights at Oceana Air Force Base Near Virginia Beach to Increase in September; Base Commander Seems Attentive to Noise Concerns (Aug. 27, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot reports that flights at Oceana Air Base in Virginia Beach will be increasing from 40 operations per day to 60 during the first 2.5 weeks in September because seven squadrons of pilots need to become certified before being sent overseas. The new base commander seems attentive to noise concerns, and hopes to make use of steeper descents, different runway usage, and different turning patterns on takeoff to ensure that aircraft are as high as possible when they pass over residential communities.

Roselle, Illinois Residents Are Offered a Meeting with an FAA Representative by Schaumburg Regional Airport Officials Who are Tired of Responding to Repeated, Similar Complaints (Aug. 27, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that after repeated, similar complaints from residents the Schaumburg Regional Airport Advisory Commission has offered to invite an FAA official to a future meeting. One official said it would do no good, and that even the FAA would not change airport regulations. Residents, who maintain that the ten-year-old airport has gotten louder since 1995, were excited by the prospect

Trial Over; Judge to Rule Later on Denver International Airport's Responsibility to Pay Damages for Exceeding Its Own Noise Standards (Aug. 27, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that a four-day trial -- regarding the responsibility of Denver International Airport (DIA) to pay damages for exceeding its own noise standards in Adams County, Colorado -- is over. The lawsuit, brought by Adams County, is for $6.5-million and alleges that DIA broke its own noise standards 13 times. Denver says that "no one was harmed by the noise."

Debate in Anaheim Hills, California Over Proposed Commercial Airport at Former El Toro Military Base; Residents Know Noise Won't Affect Them, But Fear Problems with Housing and Economics (Aug. 26, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that at a recent debate over a proposed new airport at the former El Toro Military Base, many Anaheim Hills, California residents shared fears of "increased pollution, proliferation of 'slum' neighborhoods that commonly surround airports, and a more "transportation-business-oriented community." They didn't worry much about noise problems, which airport proponents say wouldn't effect the community in the first place.

Ireland's Minister for Public Enterprise Tells Legislators She Hopes European Union Aircraft Noise Rule Will Be Amended; Her Spokesperson Says Ireland Neither Supports Nor Opposes the Rule (Aug. 26, 1999). The Irish Times reports that Ireland's Minister of Enterprise told legislators that she hoped for " an alteration to the European Union (EU) aircraft noise directive." Her official position says Ireland neither "champions nor opposes" the rule. According to statements after the fact, she meant to say that she hoped talks between the U.S. and the E.U. are progressing well. She has met with other EU officials to emphasize the plight of Irish businessmen who may lose money under the rule which bans the use of hush-kits on louder airplanes.

Realtor in Hendersonville, North Carolina Will Settle with Two Couples Who Were Not Informed of Noise from Airport When They Bought Their Homes (Aug. 26, 1999). The Asheville Citizen-Times reports that a realtor in Hendersonville, North Carolina will lose her license for sixty days for failing to inform a couple that they were going to be living in the approach path of Asheville Regional Airport (ARA). The realtor claims she didn't know about "any significant air traffic over the Heatherwood subdivision." The state Real Estate commission judged that air traffic from ARA since it is "sufficiently important that an ordinary person would want to know" about it.

Flight Delays at Chicago's O'Hare Airport Cause More Nighttime Takeoffs that Disturb Residents (Aug. 25, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that a 98% increase in flight delays at Chicago's O'Hare Airport in recent months has pushed 22 more flights after 10 PM each night. The 98% increase in delays comes after less than 1% growth in air traffic, suggesting that the problems are not with strained capacity. Noise complaints are down, and noise monitors are reading lower, but activists still say that planes aren't using designated quieter nighttime runways enough.

Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport Can't Back Bonds for Noise Reduction Efforts with Airport Revenue Because Revenue May Only Be Used for "Actual Costs" (Aug. 25, 1999). The Bond Buyer reports on several issues related to bonds, including an issue with bonds sought by the Minnesota Metropolitan Airports Commission. They want to back bonds -- to be used for noise reduction efforts -- with airport revenue. The FAA said that they can't, since the efforts represent "projected impact" and not "actual costs."

Warwick, Rhode Island Residents Look for Ways to Sell Their Homes to Escape Increasing Noise from T.F. Green Airport (Aug. 25, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that residents of Warwick, Rhode Island want to leave behind the increasing noise from T.F. Green Airport. The opening of a new terminal in 1996 attracted larger, louder jets. One option, which in one recent case brought more than double the market value of houses to the sellers, is to have a realtor market an entire neighborhood for sale. Another is to hope that the airport gets a grant to buy individual houses. Those who have already soundproofed their houses with federal money may be lower priority for buyouts.

Letters to the Editor From Oxnard, California Say Expansion at Oxnard Airport Is a Bad Idea (Aug. 23, 1999). The Ventura County Star prints several letters to the editor on the subject of noise from Oxnard Airport near South Fremont, California. One letter worries about safety at the airport, and says that no expansion should be allowed for this reason. Another letter states that expansion is "in direct conflict with the joint powers agreement and at the expense of the homeowners and residents in the area of the airport." A third letter says that another regional airport -- Camarillo -- should be considered as an option for handling increasing air traffic.

86% of United States' Commercial Jets are Stage 3 Compliant Already; FAA Expects Full Compliance by January 1, 2000 Deadline (Aug. 20, 1999). Air Transport Intelligence reports that 86% of the United States' commercial jets are now Stage 3 compliant, and it appears that 100% will be compliant by January 1, 2000. The tougher noise requirements, apply to all non-military aircraft weighing over 75,000 pounds: 7,538 aircraft in all.

Airlines at St. Louis' Lambert Field Airport Will Meet January 1, 1999 Deadline for Full Stage-Three Compliance (Aug. 20, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that airlines at Lambert Field in St. Louis expect engine noise on all aircraft to meet quieter stage-three requirements by January 1, 1999. St. Louis-based TWA was well behind that deadline at 75%. TWA is now acquiring a new aircraft every ten days, and will go from being the oldest fleet in the nation to the youngest by 2004. Anti-noise activists claim that stage-three aircraft will not necessarily be quieter

FAA Says It Will Conduct Independent Environmental Review at Orange County, California's El Toro Marine Base; Residents Approve of Non-Political Environmental Review, but Aren't Holding Their Breath (Aug. 20, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that according to its head, the FAA will conduct its own Environmental Review of a proposed commercial airport at Orange County, California's El Toro Marine Base. Environmental studies now being conducted by the Navy and the County are seen by residents as being politically motivated, and the promised scope of the FAA study was welcomed by them. But although residents welcome an independent review, they are not convinced that the FAA will necessarily follow through on their leader's promises.

Major US Airlines 86% Compliant with New Noise Standards (Aug. 20, 1999). The Associated Press reports that 86% of US commercial jets are now Stage 3 compliant, in accordance with a 1990 congressional law that requires compliance with the tougher noise standards by January 1, 2000. Stage 3 planes are 5 times quieter than the older, Stage 2 airplanes

Major US Airlines Poised to Comply With January 1, 2000 Noise Standards; See How Well They're Doing (Aug. 20, 1999). The Boston Globe reports that major U.S. airlines have spent $100 billion to comply with quieter Stage 3 engine requirements by January 1, 2000, and appear to be positioned to do just that. Major carriers are in good shape, but smaller carriers have approached the FAA, asking that they be allowed to fly with some Stage 2 aircraft after the deadline. Not all airlines are at the same point in converting their fleets. Though residents say the efforts are "admirable," they say that the difference for airport neighbors is negligible.

National Park Service Plans to Ban Cars from Grand Canyon National Park by 2003 (Aug. 20, 1999). USA Today reports that the National Park Service plans to ban personal vehicles from Grand Canyon National Park by 2003. Their plans also include restricting air-tour flights over the park, and strive to meet a goal of having at least 50% of the park dominated by natural sounds by 2008. As alternatives, they plan to develop a light-rail system and bus service that bring tourists from parking lots outside of the park. Also, they are planning an ecologically-conscious commercial development on the edge of the park that will recycle, conserve energy, and import water; currently, the high demand for the park's available groundwater is being taxed by more and more hotels and increasing suburban sprawl in nearby Tusayan.

Postal Service Moves Western Hub from Oakland, California to Sacramento's Mather Airport After Reno -- the Service's First Choice -- Raises Objections Over Noise (Aug. 20, 1999). The Sacramento Business Journal reports that the U.S. Postal Service has moved its West Coast hub from Oakland, California to Sacramento's Mather Airport. Oakland no longer wants the hub, and after Reno said it was worried about noise, the Postal Service (USPS) settled on Mather, although residents have been complaining about cargo plane noise there. 11 flights will go in and out of the airport each week for the USPS starting August 28, increasing traffic there by half.

Air Cargo Operator to Double Flights Into Sacramento, California's Mather Airport on a Trial Basis (Aug. 19, 1999). The Sacramento Bee reports that an air cargo operator has crafted a deal to add 12 flights into Sacramento, California's Mather Airport on a trial basis. The company wants to use Mather to handle a new $264 million contract with the U.S. Postal Service that involves routing packages to thirteen major cities on the West coast. There have already been noise complaints from communities under the incoming flight path at Mather, and they are likely to get worse with the increasing number of flights. The FAA is planning to propose a new landing approach to lessen noise complaints.

California's Burbank Airport to Hold Public Hearing on Proposed New Terminal (Aug. 19, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that Burbank, California officials are holding a public meeting tonight on the proposed new terminal at Burbank Airport. The 14-gate terminal will close between 11 PM and 6 AM, and expansion will not be allowed unless a night curfew is implemented. The new 330,000-square-foot terminal would replace the current 60-year-old one. Older, noisier Stage II aircraft will be phased out completely over the next five years.

Connecticut's Bradley International Airport Confirms that FAA's Flight Path Directs Too Many Flights Over Nearby Enfield; Alternatives Include Earlier Turns (Aug. 19, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports that Bradley International Airport has confirmed that having planes turn after a relatively straight first four miles takes too many planes over nearby Enfield. Enfield officials were worried when the early summer tests increased aircraft noise substantially in their community but airport officials assured them today that the flight path shift will not be permanently adopted. The airport's noise consultant said that it knew four miles was too long, but the tests proved this to the skeptical FAA, which will probably now allow the turning point to be placed before the 4-mile point.

Orange County, California Supervisor and Laguna Hills Councilman Debate Whether El Toro Air Base Should Be Converted into a Commercial Airport or Residential Areas with Parks and a Research Facilities (Aug. 19, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that 150 people turned out to hear an Orange County, California supervisor debate a Laguna Hills councilman over the best use for the former El Toro Air Base. Cynthia Coad -- the supervisor -- believes that a commercial airport should be located at El Toro. Allan Songstad -- the councilman -- "argued for the Millennium Plan, which calls for a large central park, up to 6,000 homes, a sports stadium, a university and high-tech research and development." Coad claims that John Wayne Airport would expand without the new airport, but Songstad said no additional air traffic capacity is needed.

Park Service Employs Panel of Acoustics Experts to Recommend Best Places to Collect Noise Data in Grand Canyon National Park (Aug. 19, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that the Park Service and the FAA has asked a panel of eight acoustics experts to review plans for collecting noise data in Grand Canyon National Park, intending to head off potential critics concerning the accuracy of the $800,000 study. The data will help to determine changes to flight paths designed to reach the goal of making 50% of the park quiet 75% of the time.

Airline Trade Association Writes Letter to the FAA Opposing Tests of Alternative Flight Paths at Los Angeles International Airport; El Segundo, California Mayor Furious (Aug. 18, 1999). The City News Service reports that a letter sent by the Air Transport Association (ATA) to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) opposing tests of alternate flight paths at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) has infuriated officials in El Segundo, California. The ATA says that there will be more delays, and noise will only shift from one community to another. El Segundo officials say that the ATA is ignoring the noise problems of residents under the current flight paths.

Colorado Springs Airport to Encourage Pilots to Depart Northward More Often, Spreading Noise Pollution More Evenly (Aug. 18, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that Colorado Springs Airport is encouraging pilots to take off the North more often. Currently, pilots use the southern departure 70% of the time. Airport officials want a more even distribution of noise, but residents in the North are upset. Officials say that a designated flight path -- as suggested by a recent study -- would take noise away from residential areas.

Environmentalists and Air Tour Operators Clash at a Flagstaff, Arizona Public Hearing on Whether to Freeze the Number of Flights Over the Grand Canyon National Park (Aug. 18, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that environmentalists and air tour operators presented differing opinions at a public hearing in Flagstaff, Arizona that focused on a proposed freeze on the number of flights allowed over Grand Canyon National Park. Air tour operators say the current no-fly zones and the proposed freeze would put them out of business, and that the majority of tourists don't mind the noise. Environmentalists say that boaters and hikers enjoy natural quiet only 19% of the time, and only 10% of the river is covered by no-fly zones.

Debate Rages Over Options for Second Airport in Sydney, Australia (Aug. 17, 1999). The AAP Newsfeed reports that Canberra, Australia politicians are divided between several alternatives that would increase air capacity near Sydney. A new airport is proposed just west of Sydney, but some are opposed because of the dangers of potential noise and environmental pollution. A second option is to make improvements at a nearby Bankstown airport that could then take some of Sydney Airport's flights. A third option would install a very fast train (VFT) link to a distant airport, but most say that would be unfeasible.

Enfield, Connecticut Officials Oppose New Flight Paths for Bradley International Airport that Would Increase Flights Over Their Community (Aug. 17, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports that after a test of alternative flight paths at Bradley International Airport, officials in Enfield, Connecticut say they oppose the paths that would send planes over Enfield.

FAA Says Minneapolis' Metropolitan Airports Commission Can Not Use Airport Revenue for Future Noise Mitigation Because Such Money Must Be Used for Actual Costs (Aug. 17, 1999). The Star Tribune reports that the FAA has told Minneapolis, Minnesota's Metropolitan Airports Commission (MAC) that it can not use $30-million in airport revenue to mitigate noise because the expected work is not considered an "actual cost." The state legislature had designated the money in a law, and had thought it could fend off FAA disapproval "by including a provision that the MAC should not have to violate federal law or rules to comply with the state law."

Medical Chopper Recently Acquired By Police In Wauwatosa, Wisconsin May Be Parked Off Grounds (Aug. 17, 1999). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that a new police helicopter may not be based on nearby hospital grounds, where the sheriff had hoped. Residents surrounding Milwaukee Regional Medical Center are concerned about potential noise pollution. To use the airport, a $200,000 hangar would have to be built; the sheriff would prefer to use an existing, unused hangar at the hospital.

Politician Up for Election in Florida Pledges to Prohibit Airports from Expanding in Ways that Violate Local Growth Plans (Aug. 17, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News prints a letter to the editor from a politician hoping to be elected as a Florida state representative. He cites his experience as an environmentalist and jet pilot, and pledges to prohibit state airports from expanding in ways that violate local comprehensive growth management plans. He specifically mentions Witham Field in Stuart Florida as having a problem with noise and pollution.

Public Health Report Regarding Greymouth, New Zealand Helipad Says Noise and Fumes Are Unreasonable, Sets Requirements for Improvement (Aug. 17, 1999). The Press reports that after Franz Josef, New Zealand's Westland District Council received a public health report requiring noise and fume mitigation at a local helipad, a special committee developed possible solutions. These could include limitation of total helicopters to 9, relocation of the pad farther from residences, limitations on flights before 7 am and after 9 pm, and mitigation of noise from "ground operations."

U.S. General Accounting Office Audits International Space Station Project; One Noted Cost Is Mitigation of Russian Equipment Noise to Protect Astronauts from Hearing Damage (Aug. 17, 1999). The Federal Document Clearing House, Inc. prints a report from the U.S. General Accounting Office on the status of the International Space Station, including potentially damaging noise levels from Russian equipment. NASA and the Russian contractor are jointly working to reduce noise levels, but will fully implement the measures after the component is launched.

Insulation of Houses Around Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport -- Designed to Reduce Noise Levels -- Is Getting Expensive (Aug. 16, 1999). The Star Tribune reports that now that noise mitigation funds at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport in Minnesota have been used to soundproof smaller homes nearest the airport, larger homes are next in line and will cost more to soundproof. Predictions estimate that the program may pay for work on 14,000 homes at a cost of about $435-million by the time it's completed.

Property Values Near a Proposed Airport at the Former El Toro Marines Base Stay Strong Despite Predictions of Airport Critics (Aug. 16, 1999). The Orange County Business Journal reports that property values near the former El Toro Marines Base -- and potential home of a commercial airport by 2005 -- have stayed strong despite the predictions of airport critics. The demand for the sometimes multi-million-dollar-homes is also an indication that people are willing to accept some airplane noise, or that the noise simply isn't all that intrusive." Critics of the airport claim that property values will only start to dip after people realize the extent of the noise impact from a 24-hour airport.

Lightplane Operators Experience Substantial Noise, and Often Use Active Noise Reduction Earphones (Aug. 15, 1999). Chief Executive reports that many lightplane pilots -- who are subjected to noise from a 250-horsepower engine -- use Active Noise Reduction (ANR) technology to give their ears a break.

Vero Beach, Florida Resident Criticizes Flight Safety Company For Noisy Touch and Go Flights, Praises Mayor for Beginning Use of Noise-Monitoring Equipment (Aug. 10, 1999). The Press Journal prints a letter to the editor which criticizes Flight Safety International's noisy touch and go flights. The author says that the company has done nothing to mitigate noise, and praises the mayor for instituting a noise-measurement program at the airport.

Federal Aviation Administration, Louisville International Airport, Kentucky's Legislature, and the 450-Family Minor Lane Heights Community Work Together to Relocate the Entire City For Noise Mitigation Purposes (Aug. 9, 1999). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports that the 450-family community of Minor Lane Heights, with help from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Kentucky's Legislature, and Louisville International Airport, will relocate their entire city for noise mitigation purposes. The efforts that led to this innovative approach to noise mitigation are detailed below.

Commerce Magazine Criticizes Burbank, California's Fight Against Terminal Construction and Expansion at Burbank Airport (Aug. 9, 1999). Traffic World prints an article suggesting that Burbank, California has been unreasonable in its fight against terminal construction and expansion at Burbank Airport. It criticizes anti-noise efforts as an extension of the "not in my backyard" philosophy, and said a proposed night-time ban, and another proposed ban on engine hush-kits, would be a scary, first example of unreasonable restrictions on Stage 3 aircraft. Industry representatives claim that an informal curfew has encouraged 95% compliance, but don't discuss how much less disruptive it is to have your sleep interrupted by 5% of planes as opposed to a larger percentage.

Van Nuys Airport Hearing Attendee Furious With Los Angeles Airport Commissioners for Not Voting With Anti-Noise Sentiment (Aug. 8, 1999). The Los Angeles Times prints a letter to the editor from a Sherman Oaks, California resident. The author abruptly and concisely trashes the Los Angeles airport commissioners for ignoring resident protests over noise.

Legality of a "Back-Door" Curfew at Burbank Airport is Uncertain; Industry Officials Say It Would Be a Bad Precedent, But the FAA Remains Silent (Aug. 8, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that the nighttime closure of the terminal at California's Burbank Airport was designed by city officials attempting to sidestep federal requirements for a nighttime flight curfew; the nighttime closure is part of a deal to build a new terminal at the airport. Airline industry officials claim the closure is not legal, but airport officials say they've done it before; the FAA has not commented. One anti-noise activist says the effective curfew would only push nighttime flights into the daytime, increasing noise. Also, general aviation flights will not be affected by the terminal closure.

Franz Josef, New Zealand Residents Want Noisy Helicopter Base to Relocate, but Operators Say That Would Hurt Business; Local Officials and Operators Have Tentatively Agreed to a Relocation Slightly Down-River (Aug. 8, 1999). The Sunday Star-Times reports that residents in Franz Josef, New Zealand want a noisy helicopter base -- which serves mainly to shuttle tourists to and from the Franz Josef glacier -- to relocate. Some say helicopters bring in tourists, others say noise drives them away. Operators say they don't want to move their operation too far out of town, but are open to moving further down the river. Health reports and local officials have also supported a relocation.

New Orleans International Airport Is Conducting a Noise Study; Public Hearing Scheduled Tuesday (Aug. 7, 1999). The Times-Picayune reports that a second hearing on airport noise is scheduled for Tuesday in New Orleans, after residents said they didn't have enough advance warning about the first one in May. The hearing will present information on a current study at New Orleans International Airport and highlight noise-reduction efforts at other airports.

Clinton Administration Announces Grants for Improvements at California Airports; Much of the Grants Are Earmarked for Noise Mitigation At Los Angeles International Airport (Aug. 6, 1999). The City News Service reports that a $32.3-million grant for improvements at California airports was announced today by the Clinton administration. $17.3-million will be used for noise mitigation around Los Angeles International Airport.

FAA Refining Plans for a Sharper Left Turn at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport in Florida; Turn Should Ease Noise for Many on Mainland, Increase Noise for Some on Longboat Key (Aug. 5, 1999). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is refining its plans for a sharper left turn to be used by aircraft at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport in Florida. The turn will reduce noise for many on the mainland, but some people -- though the FAA notes the number is smaller than those helped on the mainland -- on Longboat Key will be subjected to increased noise.

California's Burbank Airport and Burbank City Council Agree on New Terminal; Airport Gets Bigger Terminal Without Night-Flight Curfew, But Gets No More Gates Until Curfew is Implemented (Aug. 5, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that California's Burbank Airport and Burbank's City Council have agreed on conditions for the building a new terminal. Critics of the agreement believe that the city of Burbank are "traitors", saying that the airport is still being allowed to build a larger terminal -- albeit with the same number of gates -- without a curfew that would help existing noise problems. Proponents of the plan claim that "There will be no expansion of the airport without protection against noise and traffic," and site other restrictions that give them control over the airport.

Japanese Government Foregoes Appeal and Agrees to Pay 170 Million Yen For Noise Caused By Military Airfield (Aug. 5, 1999). The Japan Economic Newswire reports that the Japanese government has decided not to appeal a High Court decision that required a payment of 170 million yen to 134 residents who live near a noisy military base. Residents filed a suit in 1984 that the noise caused by aircraft activity at the base caused substantial mental anguish.

Letters to the Editor From Residents East of San Diego, California's Miramar Naval Base Upset Over Proposed New Flight Path for Noisy Helicopters (Aug. 5, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune prints a series of letters to the editor from residents who are upset about an eastern flight path for helicopters from San Diego's Miramar military base. The letters allege that the flight path will impact middle-class people more than the rich, and say that just because the flight path will affect fewer people doesn't mean it's better. Residents say that although they knew of the base when they moved in, they didn't know the flight paths would be moved over their heads and be used increasingly for louder aircraft. Some alternative routes are suggested.

If Proposed Airport at Former El Toro Marines Base in California Is Not Approved, John Wayne Airport May Be Expanded; Expansion Could Exacerbate Problems in Newport, California (Aug. 5, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that if the proposed airport at the former El Toro Marines Base in Orange County, California is not approved, John Wayne Airport may be expanded. Critics of that plan fear it would bring increased problems with environment, traffic, noise and property values. Some also believe that El Toro would help tourism and business in the area, although critics say that only select businesses would be helped while others were hurt.

Noise Committee Votes to Support New Runway at Boston's Logan Airport; Committee Says Runway Will Help Mitigate Certain Overburdened Communities, While Opponents Say Other Communities Will Be Hurt (Aug. 5, 1999). The Patriot Ledger reports that Milton, Massachusetts' airplane noise committee voted unanimously to support a new $22-million, 5,000 foot runway at Boston's Logan Airport. They say that the new runway will help reduce the percentage of takeoffs made to the west of the airport. Many in South Boston -- traditionally a less wealthy area -- oppose the new runway which would send more flights over their communities. Projections show a 3.4 % increase in flights at Logan, regardless of whether the new runway is approved.

Commons Representative From Leicestershire, U.K. Pushes For Regulation of Aircraft Activity Beyond Current Proposals, Including A Cap On Numbers of Flights (Aug. 5, 1999). The Leicester Mercury reports that a Commons representative from North West Leicestershire in the United Kingdom is calling for even more airport noise-control measures, especially at night, including restrictions on "the number of air traffic movements and the types of aircraft being operated, along with a control on the times of operation."

Los Angeles Columnist Dubs Van Nuys Airport 'Van Noise' Now That the Airport Commission Will Allow Private Jet Flights By Celebrities, the Wealthy, and Corporations to Continue Until 2010 (Aug. 5, 1999). The New Times Los Angeles prints an amusing, sarcastic, no-punches-pulled column against a recent Los Angeles Airport Commission 'plan' to reduce noise that allows noisy, private jets of celebrities and corporate types to continue flights out of Van Nuys Airport until 2010. "By that time, areas near the jets' extensive flight patterns will be nothing more than slums-in-training." She discusses history of the problem, common airport excuses, the names of the jet owners who would rather not be named, and one-sided economic justifications.

Apartments Near Dallas/Fort Worth Airport to Be Soundproofed With Airport's Money; Many Property Owners Who Are Eligible for the Soundproofing Have Declined, Since a Condition of the Soundproofing is a Permanent Easement for Aircraft Overflights (Aug. 5, 1999). The Fort Worth Start-Telegram reports that although several apartment complexes near Dallas/Fort Worth Airport in Irving, Texas will be soundproofed, many property owners don't wish to grant the permanent easement that is required before soundproofing takes place Only $3-million of the $18-million available has been spent.

Burbank, California Reaches Agreement with Burbank Airport Regarding Expansion Plan; Residents and the City of Los Angeles Continue to Disapprove (Aug. 5, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that Burbank, California has reached an agreement with the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority over plans for expansion at Burbank Airport. A new terminal with the same number of gates has been approved in exchange for night closure of the building. Certain additional conditions must be met to allow the airport to expand to 16 and 19 gates from the current 14. Residents feel that the deal "is a total and complete sellout of the principles we have fought for for years." Los Angeles also dislikes the deal, because of a section that institutes a permanent ban on eastern takeoffs, shunting the overflight burden to L.A.

Greensboro, North Carolina Creates Growth Plan, Taking Into Consideration the Effects of Noise from a Proposed Federal Express Runway (Aug. 4, 1999). The News & Record reports that a group of residents, business leaders, and local planners have agreed on a development plan for Greensboro, North Carolina, influenced by potential noise from a proposed new airport runway. There will be a moratorium on providing city services such as water and sewer in potential high-noise areas to discourage development.

Proposed Airport Near Dublin, Ireland Would Thrust Noise Upon Wealthy Suburb Residents (Aug. 4, 1999). The Irish Times reports that a proposed new airport in Baldonnel, Ireland would irritate residents of several upscale Dublin suburbs. The airports flight path would pass over suburbs at altitudes as low as 1,000 feet, and that even if the airline reduced its noise intensity, the frequency of flights "can be as disturbing as the actual noise, particularly at night."

FAA Officials Hear Noise Complaints From Previously Unaffected Neighborhoods In Orange County, California and Concerns About a New Airport at Former El Toro Marines Base (Aug. 3, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) recently addressed concerns over increasing noise in previously unaffected areas in Orange County, California. Residents also worry that a new airport at El Toro could make the noise problems even worse. FAA officials claimed that no flight paths, which take most jets over Orange County at 15,000 feet, have changed. The FAA would not comment on its opinion regarding a possible commercial airport at El Toro before Orange County supervisors complete a master proposal.

Palmerston North, New Zealand City Council Supports Strict Noise Controls on New Night-Testing of Jet Engines, Now that Variance for Specific Tests Have Lapsed (Aug. 3, 1999). The Evening Standard reports that since an unpopular noise variance granted by Palmerston North, New Zealand's City Council has expired, the council is working towards stricter noise limits for night-time jet-engine testing. The council now supports a required enclosure for any night-time engine testing. Proposed limits include a maximum of 70 decibels as measured from a residential boundary, and a maximum hourly average of 55 decibels, "with an allowable rise one night a month to 60."

Knoxville, Tennessee's McGhee Tyson Airport Receives $3.2-Million From Federal Government, In Part to Pay for Noise Mitigation (Aug. 3, 1999). The Knoxville News-Sentinel reports that Knoxville's McGhee Tyson Airport will soon receive $3.2-million from the federal government, $2.6-million of which will help pay for past noise mitigation. Additional land may be purchased with the money as well. The airport authority hopes to perform another $6-million in noise abatement work; it will be responsible for 10% of the costs.

Burbank Airport's Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority Passes Resolution to Reduce All Residential Average Noise Impacts to Below 65-Decibels (Aug. 3, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that Burbank Airport will try to reduce average noise levels in all surrounding residential areas to below 65 decibels.

San Diego Letters to the Editor Sound Off On Aircraft Noise From Miramar Military Base (Aug. 2, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune prints several letters to the editor on the issue of noise from Miramar Military Base. Some residents criticized city officials for dumping a new Port District administrator's ideas for not following the proper chain of command. Others criticized the relocation of flight paths that would put noise control ahead of safety, or shift noise to a more rural area.

Residents Around Dekalb-Peachtree Airport In Atlanta, Georgia Oppose Expansion Project (Aug. 2, 1999). The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reports that a plan to rezone 3.5 acres at 765-acre Dekalb-Peachtree Airport in Atlanta, Georgia for a new corporate hangar is being vehemently opposed by residents, saying they want no more jet traffic at the airport: already Georgia's second largest. An active community group wants to prevent all expansion at the airport.

Noise Restrictions and Runway Layout Blamed for Congestion at Sydney, Australia's Kingsford Smith Airport (Aug. 2, 1999). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports that Sydney, Australia's Kingsford Smith Airport (KSA) is facing inefficiency and safety problems due in large part to noise restrictions. Regulations which encourage the frequent switching of runways to spread noise is "tiring, demoralizing and overwhelming [to] air traffic controllers." Pilots are often asked to land on runways against high winds, even when safer runways are available, for the sake of noise reduction. Flight-paths are often restricted in an attempt to reduce noise, which pilots say are futile and wasteful. Some successful noise-regulation measures have included maximization of flight-time over water, and a night curfew on passenger jets.

Tokyo High Court Grant Residents Living Near U.S. Air Base Monetary Compensation, But Won't Ban Night Flights; Residents Won't Appeal (Aug. 2, 1999). The Mainichi Daily News reports that the Tokyo High Court ruled that the government must pay 170 million yen to residents living near the U.S. Asugi Naval Air Facility who have been disturbed by aircraft noise. All night-flights will be allowed to continue, although even the lower courts were considering a ban on some flights. The residents will not appeal the ruling.

Complaints Over Noise From Aircraft Engine Testing Spurs Revision of Local Laws (Aug. 2, 1999). The Evening Standard reports that the planning commission in Palmerston, New Zealand may limit noise from aircraft engine testing. The limits wouldn't go into effect until January of 2001. The issue became controversial when a particular airline began routinely servicing -- and testing -- engines at night; that airline has since moved its servicing operation.

Protesters in Sham Tseng, China Stage Silent Sit-In to Urge Adoption of Noise Control Measures When New Runway Begins Operations (Aug. 2, 1999). The South China Morning Post reports that protesters in Sham Tseng, China staged a silent sit-in to protest aircraft noise near their homes. Protesters want a noise law limiting aircraft noise in certain districts, but officials say that an environmental impact conducted before a second runway was added showed acceptable noise levels.

Indianapolis International Airport Asks FAA to Require Higher Altitude Before Turning Over Communities to Reduce Noise Impact (Jul. 31, 1999). The Indianapolis News reports that in a noise study performed for the Indianapolis International Airport, the airport authority has asked the FAA to require pilots to climb higher before turning over communities in order to reduce noise impacts. The new requirements would require pilots to fly at least 4.5 miles before turning. Planes would not only fly higher but would also keep to a narrower corridor instead of spreading out over several communities. Already, the airport has bought over 1,000 homes for $100 million in the area, and this year 380 more residents have been offered noise-abatement in some form, such as soundproofing

Northern Kentucky International Airport Near Cincinnati to Test Noise Cancellation Technology (Jul. 31, 1999). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that the Northern Kentucky International Airport near Cincinnati plans to test noise cancellation technology to help reduce airport noise. The new technology picks up sound from a microphone and uses a computer to create a negative copy of it; when the negative sound is played back, it cancels out the original sound. While indoor applications have existed for years, it's never been tested at an airport or in other outside situations. Testing the system indoors and out would cost about $450,000, with funds coming from an existing noise-abatement budget.

Commissioners at Van Nuys Airport in Los Angeles Forbid Additional Noisy Aircraft from Airport, Set 2010 Deadline for Phasing-Out of Existing Noisy Planes (Jul. 30, 1999). Los Angeles Times reports that the Los Angeles Board of Airport Commissioners passed a rule that would forbid any additional Phase 2 aircraft - noisier than the newer stage 3 variety -- from using the airport. Existing Phase 2 aircraft can remain, but must be phased out by 2010. The rule has drawn criticism from both sides of the noise issue; anti-noise advocates say that the remaining noisy aircraft will still be a problem, while airport advocates say the measure is more "anti-airport" than "anti-noise."

First Results from Noise Study at Louisville Regional Airport Presented at Public Meeting; Public Upset with Seemingly Wandering Flight Paths and Data that Presents Noise Disturbances Too Coldly (Jul. 30, 1999). The Courier-Journal reports that the Louisville Regional Airport Authority presented preliminary data from noise-monitors to its volunteer Noise Compatibility Study Group. Some residents said that increased disruption wasn't reflected because "A machine does not live and breathe (the noise)." Noise monitors were placed in 20 locations; at one particular monitor, noise passed a 60 decibel threshold 117 times, often passing the FAA's level of 65 which is considered undesirable. Residents also noted that the flight paths looked like "spaghetti", raising the question of whether enforcement of existing flight paths could solve much of the noise problem.

Grand Canyon Hiker Writes to Editor Giving First Hand Account of Disruptive Aircraft Noise (Jul. 30, 1999). The Arizona Republic prints a letter to the editor by a Grand Canyon hiker, citing the disruptive aircraft noise he experienced on a recent visit to the canyon. He provides a first-hand account of the aircraft noise that is often left abstract in articles about this subject. He supports a freeze of flights over the canyon.

Sea Plane Tours in New York City Will Soon Be Illegal, Despite Claims by Unlikely Supporters that They Disturb No One (Jul. 30, 1999). Newsday reports that a pending law in New York City will make seaplane tours -- which fly 1,500 feet above the East River -- illegal. Regulation is complicated, since the federal government regulates air space, the city regulates the marina, and the Coast Guard regulates the water. Some unlikely allies have emerged for the company; members of a local Community Board were convinced that the noise is not irritating, and teachers at the United Nations School say that the takeoffs and landing is far from disruptive.

New Flight Patterns Will Spread Aircraft Noise More Evenly Around Sydney Airport in Australia (Jul. 29, 1999). AAP Newsfeed reports that Sydney Airport in Australia will be implementing its long-term operating plan which will spread aircraft noise more evenly around Sydney. The airport claims that residents will now bear the burden more evenly, while politicians representing the areas to be more affected claim that the changes have not been sufficiently researched and are an outrage.

Official From Australia's Canberra Airport Is Cleared of Allegations Made By a Developer Who Said He Had Broken the Trade Practices Act (Jul. 29, 1999). The Canberra Times reports that the executive director of Queanbeyan, Australia's Canberra International Airport was cleared in court of making statements forbidden by the Trade Practices Act. The judge said that his comments, which condemned a planned development near the airport that he fears will block future airport expansion, were legal since they weren't made in the course of commerce. The judge acknowledged that the comments was misleading, since airport projections for 2020 place the development out of the areas most affected by airport noise.

San Diego, California Group Works with Marine Corps to Design New Helicopter Flight Paths that Disturb Fewer Communities (Jul. 29, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that because of a lawsuit settlement with San Diego, California group Move Against Relocating Choppers Here (MARCH), the Marine Corps is considering flight path changes for its helicopters. MARCH has suggested a more easterly alternative to the current northern route along the highly-populated Interstate 15 corridor. The military also has ideas, but a study considering noise, regulations, and especially safety will need to be done.

200 Orange County, California Residents Demand End to Plans for Commercial Airport at El Toro Marines Base After Jet-Noise Tests Disrupt Their Lives (Jul. 28, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that over 200 residents of Orange County, California packed a Board of Supervisors meeting to demand an end to plans for a commercial airport at the former El Toro Marines Base. Jet-Noise tests in June shook roof tiles and caused many residents to worry about safety and property values. The county's jet-noise expert was conspicuously absent from the meeting, as was noise data the County was supposed to have gathered at the test. Some residents of nearby communities downplayed the noise, noting that John Wayne Airport -- which may experience less traffic if El Toro goes through -- subjects them to more noise. Supervisors will decide on the project in December.

San Mateo County Supervisors in California Promise to Explore Ways to Reduce Touch and Go Flights Outside of the Work-Week at San Carlos Airport (Jul. 28, 1999). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that San Mateo County Supervisors promised at a recent meeting to try to reduce the number of touch and go flights that disrupt communities surrounding San Carlos Airport. They approved new flight procedures that avoid communities, and a voluntary curfew proposed by the local pilots association that would stop practice flights between 11 PM and 7 AM. Worried pilots who value touch and go practices were also in attendance. Members of Neighbors Against San Carlos Airport Noise want "pattern flying" restricted to 9 AM to 5 PM Monday through Friday, claiming that the Board's proposal, which would allow weekend flights, doesn't go far enough.

Surprise, Arizona Disagrees With State's Law Requiring Use of Out-Of-Date Noise Contours to Zone Around Luke Air Force Base; Pentagon Sides With Surprise (Jul. 27, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that Surprise, Arizona's disagreement with state-required use of old noise contours from 1988 has gained support from the Pentagon. The newer, smaller 1995 contours will allow planners to zone more appropriately and avoid potential lawsuits from homeowners whose property value is lowered according to 1988 noise contours that show greater noise exposure than they currently receive

Burbank, California Airport Commissioners Have a Choice: Make Good on an Agreement to Buy Land for a New Terminal that May Never Be Approved or Face a Lawsuit From the Landowner (Jul. 26, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority in California has a choice today: buy land for a terminal that the city of Burbank may never approve or default on their agreement and face a lawsuit from Lockheed Martin: the landowner. Burbank has threatened not to approve expansion unless a curfew on night-flights is instituted. The curfew is undesirable to the airlines, and the FAA has never granted such a ban. Burbank is pushing for the purchase, and hopes that Glendale's representatives on the Authority will agree since most of Glendale's city council -- which has recently become more anti-expansion with the arrival of several new members -- has been pushing for a settlement to the expansion question.

Number of Flights Over Grand Canyon May Be Frozen as Early As January In Order To Restore Natural Quiet to the Park (Jul. 26, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that federal officials may freeze the number of flights passing over the Grand Canyon as early as January. Many of the 250,000 hikers and rafters that come to experience the wilderness of the park each year applaud the measure, but air tour operators claim that some of their 800,000 passengers will be deprived of that experience. The two-year freeze is meant to restore quiet to 50% of the park for 75% of the day, as ordered by a 12-year old federal law, and noise will be monitored throughout that time to determine how much quiet has been restored. The FAA hopes to meet the mandated goal by 2008. The $151 million air-tour industry stands to lose $25.5 million each year for ten years.

Yomiuri, Japan Residents Disappointed in Court's Rejection of Night-Flight Ban; One Resident Particularly Angry Since Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Forced Her Son to Give Up His Dream (Jul. 24, 1999). The Daily Yomiuri reports that the Tokyo High Court rejected a bid by residents of Yomiuri, Japan to ban noisy night-flights at Atsugi Air Base. The court required the government to pay 170 million yen in damages for pain and suffering to residents and to continue soundproofing homes in the residential area, but set no date to move night operations to another location. The article goes on to tell the sad story of a particular resident's son, which included his being forced to give up his dream of musical arrangement because of noise-induced hearing loss caused by lifetime exposure to the airport noise.

Court Orders Government to Pay 170 Million Yen to Residents Suffering Anguish from Constant Noise at Atsugi Air Base near Tokyo (Jul. 22, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Tokyo High Court ordered the government to pay 170 million yen to 134 residents who sued over constant noise from Atsugi air base. The court dismissed the residents' demand that night flights from the base be halted, and their request to be compensated for future noise. Only those plaintiffs who experience an average perceived daily exposure of 70 decibels are being compensated, leave twenty or so uncompensated. The residents and the government both appealed the decision.

A Day at the Noise Compatibility Office of the Dallas/Fort Worth Airport (Jul. 21, 1999). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram prints an article that describes the role of the Noise Compatibility Office at Dallas/Fort Worth Airport (D/FW). The Office is similar to offices at every major airport around the country, and serves primarily to "monitor aircraft noise and flight patterns around the airport, take complaint calls about it and investigate anything out of the ordinary." They sometimes advise potential home buyers of loud areas or city planners considering rezoning. Armed with data from 35 noise monitors and three video screens full of flight patterns, workers at the noise compatibility office are ready to address any noise complain.

Flight Management Systems for Aircraft May Reduce Flight Delays and Noise Footprints by Making Flight Paths More Precise (Jul. 20, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that new Flight Management Systems (FMS), which integrate information from global positioning satellites, instruments, and engines to guide aircraft on more exact routes, may reduce flight delays and noise footprints on the ground. Noise footprints will be reduced since planes will be able to adhere to designated paths that minimize residential overflights. While few planes currently use the technology, 75% of planes made today have FMS installed.

Letter to the Editor Recommends the Dissolution of the "Endlessly Complaining" Airport Noise-Abatement Committee (Jul. 20, 1999). The Press Journal prints a letter to the editor from a resident who believes that the Vero Beach, Florida Airport Commission should dissolve the Noise Abatement Committee. The author has previously worked with another airport commission, and says that the "endless complaints" of their noise-abatement committee were effectively silenced by the commissioner when he dissolved that committee.

Helicopter Tour Operators in Juneau, Alaska Ask for Increase in Permitted Ice Flow Landings; Residents and Hikers Say Noise From the Flights Is Already Too Much (Jul. 18, 1999). The Anchorage Daily News reports that helicopter tour operators in Juneau, Alaska -- who are asking the National Forest Service to increase the number of ice flow landings they are permitted -- are bothering residents and hikers with their noise. Tours have increasingly been routed over wilderness areas in order to avoid residential areas where complaints often originate, but now hikers say they "can't get away" from civilization anymore. 86,000 of 500,000 tourists who come to Juneau each year take helicopter tours, spending at least $13 million in the process.

Editorial Authored by Greensboro, North Carolina Resident Proposes Erection of Berms Around the Airport to Reduce Noise Pollution from Engine Testing (Jul. 17, 1999). The News & Record prints an editorial written by a resident of Greensboro, North Carolina. He says that berms -- with baffles installed on top -- would deflect much of the noise from engine tests that occur at 11 PM and 6 AM on a regular basis. He says that berms would reduce the impact of the imminent arrival of FedEx and their new runway, and says that the reluctant Airport Authority should have no problem gaining approval since the FAA has approved berm construction at so many other airports.

Ocean-Front Municipalities Near Newark, New Jersey's Airport Oppose "Ocean Routing" Designed to Reduce Noise for Other Communities (Jul. 17, 1999). The Asbury Park Press reports that residents and politicians from ocean-front municipalities near Newark, New Jersey's Airport are opposing the airport's proposed 'ocean routing'. Several ocean-front community councils have opposed the proposal which would take planes over the ocean until they gain altitude, thus reducing noise on the ground; they believe that because they are near the ocean, noise will impact them if the proposal goes through. The routing was proposed in order to avoid new flight paths that would have taken planes over communities; supposedly ocean-routed planes will be far enough out to sea that ocean-front communities won't hear anything.

San Diego, California Residents Near Marines' Helicopter Flight Path Continue Campaign to Move Path or Be Compensated (Jul. 17, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that San Diego residents along the Marines Helicopter flight path -- roughly Interstate 15 -- are continuing the campaign to either move the noisy path or receive compensation. In a letter to the Marines, a San Diego Councilwoman asks the Marines to eliminate the flight path, institute a noise monitoring system and reduce the frequency of some helicopter operations. A Del Mar lawyer plans to help 20 residents with "inverse condemnation" suits to force the government to buy their homes or purchase easements. Several alternative routes have been proposed, and the Marines are currently reviewing all of the alternatives. because of negatively-affected property value.

Seattle, Washington Resident Writes Letter to the Editor Urging Seattle/Tacoma Airport to Distribute Noisy Air-Traffic More Evenly from Third Runway (Jul. 16, 1999). The Seattle Times prints a letter to the editor from a Seattle, Washington resident who wants the Seattle/Tacoma Airport to spread out air-traffic from a third runway more evenly. He also says that he hadn't called the complaint line after awhile because he didn't know calls were being counted. Finally, he wants a moratorium on after-midnight flights. "I'd be willing to give up fresh peaches in December for a full night's sleep."

Federal Legislation to Set Standards Requiring Aircraft to Use Next Generation Stage Four Aircraft Engines By 2012 (Jul. 15, 1999). The Daily News reports that the pending introduction of the 1999 Silent Skies Act will require aircraft to meet next-generation Stage 4 engine-noise requirements by 2012. Stage 3 engines were 50% quieter than Stage 2, and now Stage 4 engines will reduce noise by an additional 40%.

Editorial by Virginia Beach Resident Claims Local Government Has Gone Too Far In Seeking Economic Growth By Inviting Jets to Relocate There, While Not Addressing Noise Concerns of Residents (Jul. 14, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot prints an editorial by a Virginia Beach resident who believes that local government went too far in promoting economic growth when it invited additional jets to Oceana Air Base without addressing the existing noise problems in communities surrounding the base. She hears noise from jets who fly overhead as many as 50 times in just a few hours; the noise may continue until 2:30 AM, and begins again at dawn.

Swiss Air Warns Switzerland that Higher National Requirements for Compensation of Noise-Affected Residents Will Reduce Its Ability to Compete Internationally (Jul. 14, 1999). Flight International reports that Swiss Air has warned Switzerland's government that an increase in what they must pay to residents who deal with aircraft noise and must soundproof their homes will cripple their ability to compete nationally. Ticket prices would rise by about $5.25 each. Swiss Air says that it has invested heavily in newer, quieter aircraft and they shouldn't be asked to pay the additional money.

Board of Zoning Appeals in Dayton, Ohio Grant Variance Allowing Developers to Insulate Homes Less Effectively Against Noise from Nearby Air Force Base (Jul. 13, 1999). The Dayton Daily News reports that the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Board of Zoning Appeals (BZA) decided to grant variances to two housing developers allowing them to forego more expensive noise-proofing treatments for cheaper, less effective ones. Most County Commissioners from the four counties surrounding the base agreed, saying that it was important to encourage the base to remain open near their communities. The BZA itself is made up of three commissioners from each of the four surrounding counties. Two BZA members opposed the variance.

Pending Congressional Bills Designed to Increase Airline Competition Would End Limits on Regional Flights at Four Major Airports; Residents Worry About Increased Air Traffic (Jul. 12, 1999). Newsday reports that two new bills in Congress are designed to allow more regional jets into airports in New York City, Washington D.C., and Chicago. Planes with fewer than 70 seats would be eligible. The House bill proposes a total end to flight limits by 2007 and puts no limit on the number of exemptions; the Senate version restricts its exemptions to small planes for the foreseeable future, and allows the Transportation Department to set a limit on the number of exemptions. New York City residents worry about increased noise and pollution. New York Senators are pushing for guarantees that the bills, if passed, would improve air service and competition in upstate New York.

Vancouver, British Columbia's International Airport Concentrates Operations On One Runway As Two Others Are Repaired; Complaints Don't Increase (Jul. 12, 1999). The Vancouver Sun reports that the north runway at Vancouver International Airport in British Columbia is being used more while two other runways are being repaired. The $4.25 million project will last 28 days, and will strengthen the runways, improve the electrical system, and resurface several areas. Airport officials say that many planes have taken off over the water, keeping increased noise away from residents, but some residents have definitely noticed the increase.

Hyannis, Massachusetts Residents Oppose Improvements at Barnstable Municipal Airport, Claiming That Inevitable Expansion Will Bring More Tourist Traffic Making Noise Problems Worse (Jul. 11, 1999). The Boston Globe reports that residents of Hyannis, Massachusetts oppose $10.3 million in proposed improvements at Barnstable Municipal Airport. They say the project, which airport officials say will just bring the airport into the current century, will increase traffic and destroy environmentally-sensitive land. They resent the burden of tourist flights that stop on the way to Nantucket where they spend their money, and claim that airlines are using Barnstable to do noisy maintenance to avoid disruptions at the flashy Nantucket airport. Residents have used intimidation tactics to try and get their message across: "Too low, too loud, too often."

New Orleans International Airport to Soundproof Homes in Kenner, Louisiana (Jul. 11, 1999). The Times-Picayune reports that Louisiana's New Orleans International Airport will soon begin a $20 million soundproofing project in Kenner. The project is part of the noise mitigation required by a 1989 lawsuit settlement; the airport purchased 700 homes in the loudest areas in the first phase, and soundproofing is the second phase. Residents whose homes are soundproofed -- at a cost of about $20,000 each -- must grant an easement promising not to sue the airport over noise. In homes where renovations would need to be paid by the homeowner before soundproofing could even begin, residents may have the option of receiving cash for the easement instead of insulation. The contractors in charge of soundproofing will be required to remain in the state for at least a year to answer for any homeowner complaints.

Residents Near Los Angeles' Van Nuys Airport Will Bring Grievances to Top FAA Official at Public Hearing Today (Jul. 10, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that a public hearing today will give residents a chance to talk to the top regional official of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) about noise levels surrounding the Van Nuys Airport. A local Representative set up the meeting after a 1998 survey prompted 5,000 responses from angry residents who are bothered by noise.

FAA Proposes Rules to Limit Air Tours Over Grand Canyon National Park In an Effort to Restore Natural Quiet (Jul. 9, 1999). The M2 Presswire reports that the FAA has announced its plan to reduce air-tour noise over Grand Canyon National Park as the next step in realizing a 1987 law that calls for restoration of natural quiet in the park. The law calls for at least half of the park to be free from aircraft noise for greater than 75% of the day; currently only 32 percent of the park is quiet that often, and the new plan will increase that number to 41 percent. The FAA has revised air tour routes over the park, modified 'flight-free' zones, and designed a system that allocates limited numbers of flights to individual air tour operators.

Sacramento County Developers May Have To Disclose Airport Noise to Buyers (Jul. 8, 1999). According to the Sacramento Bee, the proposed Sunrise-Douglas development is near Mather Airport, and developers may be required to include an aviation disclosure statement to prospective buyers, informing them to expect aircraft noise since the development is near the airport.

California Towns Protest Marine Helicopter Flight Path (Jul. 8, 1999). According to the San Diego Union-Tribune, marine helicopters may soon hover over East County. Officials from three towns are concerned that the north-south flight corridor above Interstate may be moved. The flight path is above Interstate 15 from the Marine Air Station in Miramar to Escondido.

Noise Activists in England Call For Stronger Ordinances (Jul. 8, 1999). The Birmingham Post reports that excessive noise ranging from quarreling neighbors and overly loud stereos to jet noises overhead have prompted an increase in noise activism in England.

UK Noise Advocates Provide Education on National Noise Action Day (Jul. 7, 1999). Complaints about noise are increasing, says the Evening Herald, and the complaints come from people who live near quarreling neighbors, nightclubs and airports, just to name a few.

Letters To the Editor Tell of Residents' Protest Over LAX Expansion (Jul. 7, 1999). No more planes

Increasing Noise Complaints in UK Prompts Activists to Call for Strategy (Jul. 7, 1999). The Press Association reports that noise is a health hazard as well as an irritant, but we're not doing enough to mitigate it.

Noise Action Day Reveals Noise Complaints On the Rise (Jul. 7, 1999). According to the Press Association, politicians are campaigning on Noise Action Day, asking people to be more thoughtful of their neighbors. The article revealed that noise complaints are increasing in number, especially noise from arguing neighbors, airplanes and loud music from nearby clubs. Local authorities, however, show no signs of enforcing a national noise policy.

London Says New Rolls-Royce is Quieter Car (Jul. 5, 1999). The Air Transport Intelligence reports that if industry and state funding are available, the Rolls-Royce airplane will be quieter by 10 decibels (dB) by 2010.

France To Enforce Tough Noise Ban At Airport (Jul. 5, 1999). According to the Air Transport Intelligence, Stage 2 aircraft will no longer be able to land at Lyon-Satolas Airport at night in southeastern France. The French government approved new plans submitted by airport officials. Older aircraft such as old generation Boeing 727 may not land between 11:15 pm and 6:15 am.

Greensboro Airport Noise Statistics Are Deceiving (Jul. 5, 1999). The noise consultant, Andy Harris, stated that FedEx would want to fly its planes away from the hub (and away from residential areas) for greater efficiency. But on some nights wind conditions will force them to fly over residential areas.

Southern California Residents Complain About Airplane Noise More Than Safety (Jul. 4, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that southern Californians complain more about airport noise than aircraft emergencies. The article emphasizes, however, the most important issue is safety, citing four emergency landings on San Fernando Valley streets within a few week And in the middle of the discussion is the Burbank-Glendale-Pasedena airport expansion, vigorously opposed by the city of Burbank.

Arizona Airport Prompts Residents To Write Letters (Jul. 2, 1999). The Arizona Republic prints letters to the editor regarding plans to build a park near the Tempe airport.

Florida Airport Runway Construction Prompts Noise Debate (Jul. 2, 1999). The Palm Beach Post reports that Palm Beach International Airport's (PBIA) runway construction work has some residents consulting heir attorneys.

Lord Corporation Active Noise Technology Can Reduce Aircraft Noise by 95% (Jun. 30, 1999). Flight International reports that NVX Active Noise and Vibration Control Technology, designed by the Lord Corporation, has received approval from the FAA. The system, which has been successfully tested for a year on Air Canada flights, is designed to reduce noise by up to 25 decibels or 95% on DC-9s and MD-80s. The system also reduces vibration on cabin floors and fixtures.

Noise from Shifting Flight Patterns at Sky Harbor International Airport Continues to Irritate Ahwatukee Foothills' Residents; Petitions and Elected Officials Pressure FAA and Airport to Reduce Noise (Jun. 30, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that residents in Ahwatukee Foothills, Arizona are still being annoyed by noise from Sky Harbor International Airport; in March, the airport began increasing use of a route over the community to better balance the use of its two runways and to deal with increasing winds from the West. Officials still claim that the change only resulted in 48 more flights per day for the first eighteen days in June. At a village planning commission meeting, concerns from a U.S. Senators, a Representative, and a Phoenix Councilman, together with a petition signed by 647 residents, aimed to pressure the FAA to do something to reduce noise in the community. The FAA -- which was in attendance -- says that it is looking at some measures, but says that redirecting flights will only shift the noise burden to other communities.

Orange County, California Board of Supervisors Hear Complaints from Recent Jet-Noise Testing at El Toro Marine Base (Jun. 30, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that more than three dozen residents turned out with their children at the last Orange County Board of Supervisors meeting to emphasize the effect that noise from a proposed new airport at the former El Toro Marine Base would have on their families. Recent jet-noise tests -- which included 25 jet takeoffs and landings -- disturbed many of these families. "My kids were outside playing when the test was going on, and they held their ears as hard as they could," said Aliso Viejo resident Rod Rangel of his daughter Chenoa, 8, and son Gabriel, 5. "It's wrong, it's wrong for our children. "

Neighbors of Los Angeles' Van Nuys Airport Live with Noise and Crashes (Jun. 28, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the latest airplane crash in the communities surrounding Los Angeles' Van Nuys Airport is just part of living in the flight path of America's busiest general aviation airport. This time, a twin-engine Cessna crashed into two school busses, miraculously causing only two minor injuries; the gauges had been acting strangely earlier that day, and the plane was being returned for an inspection. In recent years there have been four emergency landings in the same area. Despite the crashes, neighbors say they are more concerned about the incessant noise from airplanes that 'buzz' their homes regularly.

Debate Rages Over Potential Noise Impacts of Proposed Fedex Hub at Greensboro, North Carolina's Piedmont Triad International Airport (Jun. 27, 1999). The News & Record reports that the debate is still raging in Greensboro, North Carolina over the potential impacts of a proposed $300-million FedEx hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport. Already, parts of Greensboro are in the 'noise cone' of the airport, and neighbors say that the proposed hub could cause similar impacts elsewhere in the community. The hub is scheduled to open in six years, and the overwhelming majority of the opposition cite increased aircraft noise as the problem.

Limits on Noisy Nighttime "Touch and Go" Operations at Vero Beach, Florida's Municipal Airport Cause Declines in Takeoffs and Landings; Decrease May Affect Eligibility for Federal Grants (Jun. 27, 1999). The Press Journal reports that limitations on noisy night operations at Vero Beach, Florida's Municipal Airport may affect the airport's eligibility for federal grants, including one that was expected to help build an approved $4.6 million control tower. The 95-foot tower would replace the old one, which has structural problems and technological inadequacies according to the FAA.

Dane County International Airport Near Madison Wisconsin Is Receiving Fewer Noise Complaints Since a New Runway Opened (Jun. 26, 1999). The Capital Times reports that noise complaints received at the Dane County Regional Airport near Madison, Wisconsin are down after a new 7,200 foot runway opened last year. The newer runway is angled towards the northeast, away from dense residential areas, and will eventually be used in one third of the airport's operations. Plans to repave the 9,000 foot main runway may divert so much traffic to the newer runway so much that noise complaints will again rise. Newer, quieter planes are also helping to quiet noise from the airport.

Residents of Apache Junction, Arizona Upset at Noise from New Phoenix Airport Flight Path, Airport Officials Say Their Hands are Tied by Federal Rules (Jun. 26, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that more than 100 residents of Apache Junction, Arizona -- which has been experiencing noise from increasingly numerous flights using a newly revived flight path -- were told by Sky Harbor International Airport officials at a recent meeting that it's up to the federal government. A Phoenix Councilman and U.S. Representative are backing a Congressional bill that would require a noise study of the affected area.

Fewer Calls to Noise Hotline for Chicago O'Hare Airport May Not Mean Less Noise (Jun. 25, 1999). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that calls to Chicago O'Hare Airport's noise complaint hotline are down for the first quarter of the year from 8,200 calls from 3,751 people to 5,044 calls from 1901 people. Chicago aviation spokesman claims that individual 'noise events' as measured by noise monitors are down, but many say that the drop in complaints is just due to resident frustration with the perceived futility of their calls to the 2.5-year-old hotline. Park Ridge Mayor Ron Wietecha says "Most people are frustrated. And the noise hasn't gotten better for us." Most callers complain of low-flying planes, followed by those who complain of the number of planes.

Rhode Island Airport Corporation Seeks Grants to Buy Homes of Noise-Weary Neighbors (Jun. 17, 1999). The Associated Press reports the Rhode Island Airport Corporation is hoping to buy the homes of neighbors near the T.F.Green Airport. The board of directors also plans to create alternative flight paths and insulate some homes against noise.

South County Residents Protest Plans for International Airport (Jun. 17, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports South County residents have mobilized against the threat of a proposed international airport, saying county-sponsored noise tests were inaccurate.

Warwick, RI Airport Corporation Creates Noise-Reduction Plan (Jun. 17, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the Rhode Island Airport Corporation approved a plan to reduce noise problems for airport neighbors.

Arlington, IL Residents Protest Increased Night Noise at O'Hare, Say Flight Path Usage Violates "Fly Quiet" Plan (Jun. 16, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports Arlington, IL's village board is getting fed up with increased noise at O'Hare International Airport. The board says the extra noise is caused by greater use of the airport's southeast-to-northeast runways, which the board says runs contrary to the recommended patterns of Chicago's "Fly Quiet" program.

Magnolia, WA and Seattle Suburbs Protest Night Flights At Boeing Field (Jun. 16, 1999). The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports residents of Magnolia, WA and other Seattle suburbs are seeking an alternative night flight path into Boeing Field, instead of the current one directly over Magnolia.

Procedures and Staffing to Change at Los Angeles, CA's Van Nuys Airport (Jun. 16, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports procedural and administrative changes have begun at Los Angeles Van Nuys Airport in an attempt to resolve problems.

South County, CA Residents Respond to Jet Demonstration at El Toro Base (Jun. 16, 1999). The Los Angeles Times recently included letters to the editor regarding the El Toro base in South County, CA. One letter stated a test done at the base supported claims of excessive noise, while one felt noise was not a problem there.

Raytheon Aircraft Co. Shows Wares at Paris Airshow, Including Beech 1900D with a Quiet-Cabin Feature (Jun. 15, 1999). A press release from the M2Presswire Company details the Raytheon Aircraft Company's new showings at the Paris Airshow, including a Beech 1900D model with a quieter cabin.

NASA Predicts Aviation Advances, Including Less Noise, if Program Is Better-Funded (Jun. 14, 1999). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports NASA predicts great improvements in aviation design in the next two decades, but only if program funding increases substantially.

British Professor Says Owls' Wing Feathers Are Key to Quiet Flight; Suggests Airplane Engineers Take Note (Jun. 13, 1999). The Ottowa Citizen reports a British professor says the key to owls'quiet flight is in their wing feathers and may offer suggestions to airplane engineers.

Clark County, WA Group Fights Proposed Amphitheater (Jun. 13, 1999). The Columbian reports residents of Clark County, WA fear a proposed amphitheater will ruin their peace and quiet. For ammunition, they have examined what life is like near Virginia's GTE Virginia Beach Amphitheater.

Lake Campbell, Alaska Resident Writes of Necessity of Co-Existing with Local Airplane Noise (Jun. 13, 1999). The Anchorage Daily News recently ran an opinion piece by a Lake Cambell Resident who notes residents there must accept airplane noise since airplanes are a key mode of transportation there.

Noise Complaint By Cornwall, U.K. Resident Leads British Airways to Slow Concorde Flights Earlier, Causing Sonic Boom Farther Away From Land (Jun. 9, 1999). AFX News reports that British Airways, in response to a two-year campaign by a resident in Cornwall, England, will slow its Concorde flights earlier in their approach to the shore. Harry Pusey, former aviation expert, has had his sleep disrupted by the Concorde's sonic boom just before 10:00 PM in winter along with many other residents living on the north coast. The Concorde will now slow from 1,920 to 96 kph 11 kilometers earlier, causing the boom while the aircraft is still out of sound range of land; the alteration will add less than a minute to the 3-4 hour trip between New York and London.

Public Invited to Attend Volunteer Committee Meeting in Louisville, Kentucky to Discuss Ways to Reduce the Impact of Airport Noise (Jun. 8, 1999). The Courier-Journal reports that a volunteer committees on airport noise -- sponsored by Louisville, Kentucky's regional airport authority -- is inviting the public to attend a meeting to discuss ways to reduce the noise's impact. The committees make up the Airport Noise Compatibility Study Group, which is working with the airport authority's consultants to recommend ways to measure and abate aircraft noise.

Supreme Court Rejects Appeals from Environmentalists that Claim the Government is Moving Too Slowly to Address Noise from Sightseeing Planes Over the Grand Canyon. (Jun. 8, 1999). Greenwire reports that the Supreme Court rejected an appeal from Environmentalists that said the Federal Aviation Administration's plan to reduce noise by 2008 violates Federal Law which requires noise-abatement steps. Air-tour operators had also filed suit, claiming the government was moving too quickly. The Supreme Court Decision agreed with a previous U.S. Court of Appeals decision, which said that it was unfair to say that no noise-abatement steps had been taken. Environmentalists claimed that "Under this approach, no delay is unreasonable."

Supreme Court is Latest Court to Reject Environmentalist Arguments that Government Must Move More Quickly to Reduce Aircraft Noise over the Grand Canyon and Other National Parks (Jun. 8, 1999). The Tennessean reports that the Supreme Court rejected an appeal from seven environmental groups -- including the Grand Canyon Trust -- to more quickly reduce noise from planes flying over the Grand Canyon. In a similar case over helicopter landing pads -- used by tourism companies -- near Tennessee's Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the court similarly refused to hear arguments. In 1987, a federal law was passed that noted safety concerns and the negative impacts of noise from aircraft flying over the Grand Canyon; after years of study, a 1994 report said more noise reduction was needed. The FAA created flight-free zones and limited flights, to be in place by 2008. Air tour operators complained this was too fast, while environmentalists argued it was too slow.

FAA Approves Terminal Expansion and Parking Garage at Jackson, Wyoming's Jackson Hole Airport, Rejects Plans for New Radar System and Noise-Reducing Restrictions (Jun. 7, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that the Federal Aviation Administration approved a terminal expansion and new parking garage at Jackson, Wyoming's Jackson Hole Airport. The 10,000 square foot terminal expansion will make room for additional gates. Plans to move rental-car company parking off-site may free up more parking for the public, eliminating the need for the new parking garage. The proposals were part of an environmental assessment presented to the FAA as part of a long-term plan for airport expansion. Other parts of the plan, such as noise-reduction initiatives, were rejected because costs involved were not clearly justified.

Bensenville, Illinois -- located near O'Hare Airport --to Continue Selecting Homes for Soundproofing by Block Instead of Along Noise Contour Lines to Avoid Resentment Between Neighbors (Jun. 7, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that the Village Board of Bensenville, Illinois -- a Chicago suburb affected by aircraft noise from O'Hare airport -- will continue to select homes for soundproofing by block. The airport's noise contour lines sometimes designate only portions of a given block as eligible for soundproofing, but the Board holds that soundproofing only part of a block is arbitrary and can cause resentment among neighbors.

Supreme Court Rejects an Appeal by Environmentalists that Claimed the Government is Moving Too Slowly to Reduce Aircraft Noise in the Grand Canyon (Jun. 7, 1999). AP Online reports that the Supreme Court rejected an appeal from environmentalists that claimed the government was moving too slowly to reduce aircraft noise from sightseeing flights over the Grand Canyon. The decision confirmed what lower appeals courts asserted: even the slow pace of progress is something, and it is unfair to say no steps have been taken. The appeal had claimed that at the current rate of action, "no delay is unreasonable." In contrast, a group of air tour operators have claimed the government is moving too quickly. Both claims have been rejected by appeals courts.

Resident Near Proposed Greensboro, North Carolina's Piedmont Triad International Airport Notes Problems with Proposed FedEx Hub: Lowering of Already Low Water Table, Pollution, and Noise (Jun. 6, 1999). The News & Record prints an editorial which discusses problems with the proposed FedEx hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport in Greensboro, North Carolina. Beyond traditional problems with airports such as noise and air pollution, the proposed 9,000 foot runway and 300-acre FedEx building will prevent 84 million gallons of rainwater from permeating the ground; this comes after a summer when the community almost ran out of drinking water. In addition, water that did reach the ground would be more polluted with toxic de-icing chemicals and spilled fuel. Further, the author believes that the community, which will shoulder most of the burden of the airport while sharing its economic benefits with ten other counties, should have other financial priorities; growth should be encouraged by drawing tax-paying corporations, not by giving tax-breaks to wealthy FedEx and allowing it to decrease surrounding property values while local schools sit hopelessly overcrowded and lacking in funds.

Chicago O'Hare Airport's Noise Compatibility Commission Asks FAA to Ban Older, Noisy Planes (Jun. 5, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that Chicago O'Hare Airport's Noise Compatibility Commission -- following the lead of the European Union -- is asking the FAA to ban noisier aircraft that don't meet quiet-engine standards. Hush-kits can muffle some noise from older airplanes, but the engines still don't run as quiet as those in newer aircraft. New federal standards take effect next year, but O'Hare also encouraged the FAA to begin cooperative work on an even quieter set of noise standards that could be accepted internationally.

First Day of Jet-Noise Demonstrations in Orange County, California Met with Mixed Reactions from Residents (Jun. 5, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that after the first day of $1.3 million jet-noise tests at the 4,700 acre El Toro Marine Base in Orange County, Florida, neighbors were mixed in their reactions. Today will be the second day of the demonstrations, which are designed to help people make up their mind as to whether to support a commercial airport at El Toro; the proposed airport could handle up to 28.8 million passengers each year by 2020. Critics say the tests are worthless because only under-loaded planes are using unrealistic flight paths, and air traffic is no comparison to an actual commercial airport.

Jet-Noise Demonstration at El Toro Marine Base in Orange County, California Draws Mixed Reactions from Neighbors (Jun. 5, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that after the first day of $1.3 million jet-noise tests at the 4,700 acre El Toro Marine Base in Orange County, Florida, neighbors are mixed in their reactions. Many critics turned out with noise monitors -- despite the fact that the County had stationed their own -- and measured noise of up to 107 decibels. Some scheduled demonstration flights in the early morning were scrubbed because of bad weather; critics said this supported their claim that the demonstration flight paths were misleading because they would eventually be forbidden by federal officials due to safety concerns. Officials claimed that the flights were scrubbed only because the foul-weather landing system -- which would be in place at a functioning commercial airport -- had been removed by the Marines when they vacated the base.

Minnesota's Legislature -- Which Initiated Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport Expansion Plans Near Richfield -- Reluctant to Help Fund Noise Abatement (Jun. 5, 1999). The Star Tribune reports that the Minnesota Legislature -- which initiated plans for a new north-south runway at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport near Richfield -- does not seem willing to help pay for noise abatement that the project would necessitate. Last year, the city of Richfield almost sued the Metropolitan Airport Commission (MAC) over lack of designated funds for noise abatement. The settlement included plans to seek funds from the Legislature, but so far there has been no success.

Residents in Arlington, Florida Don't Want Runway Expansion at Craig Municipal Airport (Jun. 5, 1999). The Florida Times-Union reports that a residents in Arlington, Florida are worried that a proposed $6 million, 2,000 foot runway extension at Craig Municipal Airport would increase air traffic to a point inappropriate for their small community. The airport currently has two 4,000-foot runways; the extension would allow larger -- but still relatively small -- general aviation airplanes currently using Jacksonville International Airport to use Craig instead.

Residents in Orange County, California Have Mixed Responses to Jet-Noise Demonstrations at El Toro Marine Base (Jun. 5, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that after jet-noise demonstrations at Orange County, California's El Toro Marine Base, residents have mixed reactions. One resident said "When it went over, I just thought, 'I'm moving... this is no way to live." Another claimed they were"within tennis ball-throwing distance from them." Still others worry about peripheral problems like traffic, pollution, and congestion. Conversely, some admitted the noise wasn't as bad as they expected.

Airport Expansion Opponents in St. Charles, Missouri Speak to an Unmoved St. Louis Airport Commission About Increased Noise and Safety Concerns (Jun. 4, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the St. Louis Airport Commission was unfazed by a statement from St. Charles, Missouri's Citizens Against Aircraft Noise (CAAN). The statement said that a real-time study should be performed before a third runway -- which would be two miles closer to St. Charles and increase noise -- is approved at Lambert Field. CAAN co-chairman Pat McDonnell asked for a real-time study of the expansion plan, which would include a computer model of predicted impacts. "We need your assurances that our families and homes are not in danger," McDonnell said. "You would demand the same for your families."

Change in Flight Paths over Communities Near Arizona's Sky Harbor International Airport Blamed for Increased Noise (Jun. 4, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that residents in Apache Junction and the Ahwatukee Foothills -- two communities near Arizona's Sky Harbor International Airport -- are complaining about an increase in jet-noise in mid-March. Residents say there should have been a public hearing to discuss a change in flight paths, since the noise impact has increased so much in their communities and over a Superstition Mountain wilderness area. The FAA made seemingly euphemistic claims that there was "no 'flight pattern change' and no environmental impact; they implemented a 'flight departure procedure change' from Sky Harbor."

Columnist Takes Sarcastic Look at What He Asserts is an Overly Expensive, Unnecessary Jet-Noise Demonstration at Orange County, California's El Toro Marines Base (Jun. 4, 1999). The Orange County Register prints a column, taking a sarcastic look at the $1.3 million jet-noise test at Orange County, California's El Toro Marine Base. The author Jeff Kramer asserts that the County has a knack for spending large amounts of money to reveal the obvious: in this case, whether a commercial airport at El Toro would cause annoying noise. He takes us through his own low budget survey of various sounds that are annoying.

Controversial Flight Demonstration at Orange County, California's El Toro Military Base to Take Place Saturday (Jun. 4, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that a flight demonstration at Orange County, California's Marine Base which is intended to show the public what a commercial airport at the base would be like will take place Saturday. Critics claim that the demonstration is misleading because planes will be lighter and there will be relatively few flights. Also, some fear that the demonstration is not safe, since the two flight paths to be used are deemed to dangerous by the nation's two pilot unions. The article then lists the schedule for takeoffs and landings.

Queanbeyan Council in Australia to Ask Yarrowlumla Shire for More Land After Council Takes Heat For Approving Development Under an Existing Canberra Airport Flight Path (Jun. 4, 1999). The Canberra Times reports that Queanbeyan Council will meet with Yarrowlumla Shire in an attempt to obtain more land for residential development. In 1996, the Council approved a proposal for a 500-unit development under an existing flight path for nearby Canberra Airport. The transport minister criticized the approval then and now as irresponsible, since the current flight path has already been moved several times in response to resident protests. The Minister of Planning is to make a decision on the proposal in about a month.

Residents Near Orange County, California's El Toro Marine Base Not Happy With First Day of Jet-Noise Demonstrations (Jun. 4, 1999). The City News Service reports that after the first day of a $1.3 million jet-noise demonstration at Orange County, California's El Toro Marines Base, residents are not pleased. One man who lives near the flight path said "I think it's really intolerable, particularly every three minutes to have that going by...." Three of the five county supervisors are for the conversion of the El Toro base to a commercial airport, and the demonstration is meant to give residents a feel for how loud a commercial airport would be.

Residents of Arizona's Ahwatukee Foothills to Petition FAA and Get Answers Explaining Increased Airplane Noise (Jun. 4, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that residents of Ahwatukee Foothills in Arizona are scheduled to meet with FAA officials to discuss increased airplane noise over their community. Two residents will be collecting names of those who wish to complain about the increased traffic which began in mid-March after flight patterns from Sky Harbor International Airport changed. The FAA acknowledges that 40-80 more flights are flying over the community using an older route due to increased air traffic and shifting wind patterns; they also claim that the planes should be 7,000-10,000 feet high and away from the foothills area, and shouldn't cause much noise on the ground.

Weather Remains Biggest Threat to Jet-Noise Test at Orange County, California's El Toro Marines Base (Jun. 4, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that weather may be a problem for the morning flights scheduled in a jet-noise test at Orange County, California's El Toro Marines Base. FAA regulations say the flight must be scrubbed if clouds are below 3,000 feet or visibility is under three miles; Marines removed electronic equipment from the airport that would have allowed landings in 'foul weather." If the first flight is scrubbed, it will be sent to Ontario International Airport and attempt another El Toro landing at 4 PM.

Burbank, California Airport's Request for Rehearing Denied; Original Decision that Affirmed Burbank's Veto Power Over Airport Expansion Still Stands (Jun. 3, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that a rehearing, requested by California's Burbank Airport on the issue of Burbank's veto power over airport expansion, was denied. The original decision held that the city of Burbank must approve any expansion plans at the airport. The airport could still take the case to the Supreme Court, but they hope that a new, scaled-down version of it's original proposal will meet with the city's approval.

Letter to the Editor in Lake City, Georgia Accuses Atlanta Airport Officials of Lying to Gain Support for a Proposed New Runway (Jun. 3, 1999). The Atlanta Journal prints a letter to the editor that accuses the city of Atlanta of unfairly exploiting surrounding communities with Hartsfield International Airport's proposed fifth runway. The runway was originally to be for commuter traffic only, but there is already talk of expansion to support jets. The letter also mentions a previous promise broken by the airport to fly a designated path that would reduce noise. The author calls for another major airport in another area of Atlanta to more fairly distribute air-traffic impacts.

Noise Monitoring Procedures at Louisville, Kentucky's International Airport More Acceptable to Residents than Study Done Six Years Ago; Study Hopes to Give Insight Into Noise Abatement Strategies (Jun. 3, 1999). The Courier-Journal reports that Leigh Fisher Associates has begun a noise study at Louisville, Kentucky's International Airport. The study utilizes noise monitors that record noise simultaneously at four locations for 24-hour periods; this time -- as opposed to a study six years ago -- monitor locations will be kept secret from Airport Authority officials, and a grassroots advisory committee has input into which 20 monitoring sites were selected. The consultants acknowledge that it would be hard for the authority to reroute planes away from noise monitors, but the secrecy has given residents more confidence in the study's eventual results. The results will be compared to a computer model, and the model will be adjusted if necessary.

Pilot Reveals Details of Why Orange County, California's El Toro Airport Jet-Noise Demonstration is Deceptive (Jun. 3, 1999). The Orange County Register prints an editorial by George Serniak, a pilot with a major airline, which gives specific reasons as to why a jet-noise test at Orange County, California's El Toro Marine Base will be deceptive. He notes that the demonstration, purported to show residents what a commercial airport at El Toro would sound like, will use only one arrival path and two departure paths; he further notes that most often pilots and air-traffic controllers determine the safest, most efficient 'visual approach', which follows no prescribed flight path. He says that contrary to the impression that one arrival path will give, "arrivals will blanket the majority of south Orange County residential areas."

Attempt by Cleveland, Ohio's Hopkins Airport to Preserve Homes' Eligibility for Noiseproofing Results in Expansion of Eligible Area (Jun. 2, 1999). The Plain Dealer reports that as Cleveland, Ohio's Hopkins Airport phases in quieter aircraft and reduces its noise impact area, some homes that were eligible for soundproofing in the past would no longer be eligible. The proposed solution is to lower the decibel limit from 65 decibels to 60 decibels, which would assure that those who have already applied for soundproofing would not be removed from the list. As a result, hundreds of homes that were never eligible for soundproofing will now be able to apply. City council supports the idea, with the stipulation that those who have been on the list the longest be given priority.

Judge Rejects Arguments to Bar Jet-Noise Test at Orange County, California's El Toro Marines Base (Jun. 2, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that a judge has dismissed claims by environmentalists that jet-noise tests at Irvine, California's El Toro Marines Base require a state environmental impact report. Environmentalists and other critics have claimed that the $1.3 million demonstration, which is intended to give residents an idea of noise from a proposed commercial airport, is misleading because planes will be flying lighter and thus quieter, a danger to the environment because of noise, and dangerous because of hilly terrain on the takeoff path. The judge said that while all of that may be true, the test will cause insignificant environmental harm, and will be used to gather information: a fact that exempts the demonstration from needing a state environmental report.

Two Schools in Warwick, Rhode Island are Frequently Disrupted by Jet Noise from T.F. Green Airport, but FAA Says Levels are Too Low to Qualify for Soundproofing (Jun. 2, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that while noise from Providence, Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport is disruptive at nearby schools including two in Warwick, the FAA says that noise levels at the schools do not justify money for soundproofing. A member of one of the school's committees said "I would say the most accurate tool is the human ear; if you cannot teach or you cannot hear in the classroom, that model (being used by the government) doesn't matter."

Celebrity Late Night Flights in Teterboro Fuel Local Concern and Action (May 31 1999). The New York News reports that Hollywood celebrities, professional sports teams, and corporate executives who jet into the Teterboro Airport during late night and early morning hours have prompted neighborhood residents to lodge formal complaints, calling for an investigation by nearby municipalities, noise monitoring organizations and state and federal legislators. (May 31, 1999). TETERBORO, N.J. - The Daily News (New York) reports that the jet set is welcome at Teterboro Airport but not their noisy planes.

Congress and Air Tour Industry Criticize NPS Noise Proposal for Grand Canyon (May 31, 1999). Politicians and air tourism officials testified at a recent House subcommittee against a National Park Service Proposal (NPS) banning sections of the Grand Canyon as off limits to commercial tours according to the Weekly of Business Aviation. Both groups challenge the motives and methods of park service officials, claiming extremism has taken over.

Late Night Celebrity Flights at New Jersey Airport Fuel Local Concern and Action (May 31, 1999). The New York News reports that Hollywood celebrities, professional sports teams, and corporate executives who jet into the Teterboro Airport during late night and early morning hours have prompted neighborhood residents to lodge formal complaints. The residents have asked municipalities near the airport, noise monitoring organizations, and state and federal legislators to investigate.

AIRPORT'S REBATE PROGRAM HELPS LAND QUIETER FLIGHTS (May 30 1999). According to the Ft. Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel, airport officials at Palm Beach International Airport are paying airlines over $200,000 in rebates if they use quieter airliners. (May 30, 1999). The article also quoted Waters regarding the protocol airlines must follow the regulations. "If a carrier backslides from quarter to quarter, or if they increase number of nighttime Stage 2 operations, they get nothing," she said.

Airport's Rebate Program To Aid in Quiter Flights (May 30, 1999). According to the Ft. Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel, airport officials at Palm Beach International Airport (PBIA) are paying airlines over $200,000 in rebates if they use quieter airliners.

Residents in Orange County California Debate Proposed El Toro Airport (May 30, 1999). The Los Angeles Times printed letters to the editor against the opening a former military airport to commercial traffic in Orange County.

Airport Report Goes to Missouri City Council (May 29, 1999). The Kansas City Star reports that the Board of Aeronautical Commissioners unanimously approved a report on the environmental impacts of a proposed expansion of the Lee's Summit Municipal Airport. The report is scheduled to go before the City Council and, if approved, will go on to the Missouri Department of Transportation. Once approved by the department, the project will proceed. If it is rejected, the department will determine that a more in-dept environmental impact is needed.

JET NOISE RATTLES AHWATUKEE FOOTHILLS; FLIGHT-PATH SHIFT ANGERS RESIDENTS (May 29, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that the residents of the Ahwatukee Foothill have complained that their once peaceful and serene neighborhoods are destroyed by increased noise from airplanes leaving Sky Harbor International Airport. The article says that although residents are pressuring local and federal officials for help, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said the problem may lessen somewhat on its own. (May 29, 1999). Phoenix, AZ - The Arizona Republic reports that the residents of the Ahwatukee Foothills have complained that their once peaceful and serene neighborhoods are being destroyed by increased noise from airplanes leaving nearby Sky Harbor International Airport.

Jet Noise Distrubs Arizona Foothills and Angers Residents (May 29, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that the residents of the Ahwatukee Foothills have complained that their once tranquil neighborhoods are being destroyed by increased noise from airplanes leaving nearby Sky Harbor International Airport.

Louisiana Residents Angered by Airport's Delay To control Noise (May 28, 1999). The Times-Picayune reports that residents of Kenner, a small town near the New Orleans airport attended a public hearing about airplane noise. The purpose of the hearing was to explain recommendations given by the federal government, but residents were suspicious that the hearing was merely window dressing, and that the results simply justify what airport officials are already doing.

California City To Sue Orange County Over Flights (May 27, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that the Irvine City Council took an aggressive legal position instead of merely accepting flight demonstrations scheduled at the Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro.

California Senate Approves Budget Increase For Airport Noise Remedies (May 27, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the California Senate approved a $400,000 budget increase to insulate homes in the flight path of Burbank Airport against noise.

California State Senate Oks Funds For Flight Path (May 27, 1999). The Los Angeles times reports that the state Senate voted to add $400,000 to the state budget for insulating 50 homes that lie under the flight path of Burbank Airport.

California Town's Support of Curfew Critical in Ending Airport Battle (May 27, 1999). According to the Daily News of Los Angeles, a turnover in airport commissioners from the Glendale City Council has resulted in an imminent end to a four year battle with the city of Burbank over a noise curfew and the expansion of the airport terminal.

California Town's Support of Curfew Critical in Ending Airport Battle (May 27, 1999). According to the Daily News of Los Angeles, a turnover in airport commissioners from the Glendale City Council has resulted in an imminent end to a four year battle with the city of Burbank over a noise curfew and the expansion of the airport terminal.

California and the federal government will pay residents in Burbank, California who live under Burbank Airport flight paths to noise-proof their homes (May 27, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles: Glendale/Burbank Edition reports that the state Senate has designated $400,000, together with $1.6 million from the federal government, to help residents affected by noise from Burbank Airport noise-proof their homes.

City Council Approves Noise Abatement Policy (May 27, 1999). According to the Bangor Daily News, Bangor city councilors on the airport committee approved a noise abatement policy for Bangor International Airport. (May 27, 1999). BANGOR - According to the Bangor Daily News, city councilors on the airport committee approved a noise abatement policy for Bangor International Airport (BIA).

City Council Approves Noise Abatement Policy (May 27, 1999). BANGOR - According to the Bangor Daily News, city councilors on the airport committee approved a noise abatement policy for Bangor International Airport (BIA).

English Businessman Wins Damages Over Aircraft Noise (May 27, 1999). The Press Association of England reports a High Court awareded a wealthy resident É10,750 because of the effect of aircraft noise on the value of his home. The PA article the judge as stating that it was not as if the residence - 15 miles from Gatwick Airport- was "on the end of a B52 runway", but it was a question of degree of noise. The article stated that the resident, Graham Farley, was not an overly sensitive man and had done his best to tolerate the situation. Farley attempted to avoid problems initially by giving instructions to Michael Skinner, a surveryor whom he had paid, to check the effect of the house's proximity to Gatwick, and now his view now was that he shouldn't have to tolerate the noise.

Illinois Airport Plans To Monitor Airplane Noise (May27, 1999). (May 27, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that esidents near Schaumburg Airport have registered so many complaints about airplane noise that airport officials are now monitoring noise levels. Officials added, according to the report, that pilots have emphasized their intent to be as considerate as possible of residents in the area.

Ontario's Mississauga East Election Issues Include Increased Noise from a New Runway at Pearson International (May 27, 1999). The Toronto Star reports that the candidates in the provincial riding in Mississauga East, Ontario are going head to head on the issues, including airport noise; noise-related complaints have doubled since 1997 when a new runway was introduced at Pearson International Airport.

Roselle (Chicago Suburb), Illinois' Schaumburg Airport to Monitor Noise Ordinance Compliance in Response to Resident Complaints (May 27, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that Schaumburg Regional Airport, on the outskirts of Chicago, plans to implement a noise abatement monitoring program in response to continued resident complaints. The program would track flights on random days and record whether pilots are legally high enough when they turn to fly over residential areas.

Vote On Noise Ordinance Delayed at Pennsylvania Township Meeting; More than 50 Protest Proposal (May 27, 1999). The Morning Call reports that over 50 residents attended an Upper Saucon Township Board of Supervisors meeting to stop a proposed noise ordinance that defines and enforces noise levels and restricts the location of shooting ranges.

Airplanes' Noise Affects Quality of Life in Vero Beach, Florida (May 26, 1999). Anyone remember the introduction to the "Fantasy Island" TV show?

Board of Lehigh and Northampton Airport, Near Allentown, Pennsylvania Compromises to Begin Noise Monitoring Program Before Senate Funding Passes (May 26, 1999). The Morning Call reports that after heated debate, a compromise to begin a noise-monitoring program was reached at the Lehigh and Northampton Airport near Allentown, Pennsylvania. One grant meant to fund the program had been eaten up by other projects, and a second federal grant is still pending in the Senate. To avoid further delays, the Authority agreed to fund the design stages until the grant came through; then, those costs could be reimbursed and the necessary equipment could be purchased.

Chicago's O'Hare Airport Slacking on Use of Preferred Night Runways that Disturb Fewer Residents, but Introduction of Quieter Planes Helps to Lessen Noise Complaints (May 26, 1999). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that O-Hare Airport's "Fly Quiet" guidelines, created in 1997 to limit noise between 10 PM and 7 AM, are not always being adhered to. Use of two designated night runways, selected because their flight paths avoid most residential areas, has declined. Despite this fact, nighttime noise complaints have declined from 2,234 to 1,246, due in part to the phasing out of noisier "Phase II" aircraft.

Chicago's O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission Asked City to Identify Airlines Not Adhering to Preferred Flight Paths (May 26, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that O'Hare's Noise Compatibility Commission has asked city officials to identify which airlines stray from routes designed to limit airport noise in residential areas. Many flights are ignoring the designated runways, or turning earlier than suggested.

Consultants Recommend that Warwick, Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport Buy Homes Subjected to Most Noise, and Consider Extending Shorter Runway (May 26, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that Landrum & Brown, noise consultants for Rhode Island's Airport Corporation, recommended the $20 million purchase of at least 135 residences surrounding Warwick's T.F. Green Airport. The residences selected are subjected to at least 65-70 dB of airport noise each day, caused by ever-increasing air traffic at the airport. The $100-300 million extension of a shorter runway, which would redistribute more flights over less populated areas such as an industrial park, was not in the noise consultants report; the consultants did encourage a second look at extending the runway, saying that other benefits other than noise abatement may help to justify the cost. The Corporation's Board of Directors will vote on the proposals and forward them to the FAA for adoption.

Consultants for Warwick, Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport Recommend Buying Homes as Most Cost-Effective Way to Reduce Noise Exposure to Residents (May 26, 1999). The Associated Press reports that consultants for Rhode Island's Airport Corp. have recommended the purchase of at least 135 homes who are exposed to 70 dB or more of noise from T.F. Green Airport over a 24-hour period. The recommendation came after many homes had already been soundproofed, and options such as extending a secondary runway were explored.

Consultants for Warwick, Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport Recommend Buying Homes as Most Cost-Effective Way to Reduce Noise Exposure to Residents (May 26, 1999). The Associated Press reports that consultants for Rhode Island's Airport Corp. have recommended the purchase of at least 135 homes who are exposed to 70 dB or more of noise from T.F. Green Airport over a 24-hour period. The recommendation came after many homes had already been soundproofed, and options such as extending a secondary runway were explored.

Glendale, California's City Council Voted to Support a Proposed Curfew on Burbank Airport Night Flights (May 26, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Glendale, California city council voted to support a curfew on night flights at Burbank airport. For at least four years, Glendale's city council had been against the curfew, but with two new council members the council has come to side with the other members of the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority. The airport had already applied to the FAA for the curfew, and so the vote serves more to identify Glendale as a new ally in the city of Burbank's battle against unrestricted airport expansion and excessive noise.

Greensboro, North Carolina's Piedmont Triad International Airport Remains the Choice for Federal Express Hub (May 26, 1999). High Point Enterprise reports that FedEx intends to go through with the $3 million hub project at Greensboro, North Carolina's Piedmont Triad International Airport (PTIA). Five other Carolina airports were in the running, but most seem to have accepted that PTIA has won; Charlotte/Douglas International Airport, in the preliminary phases of constructing a cargo complex, says they would still be interested, if the deal fell through for any reason. FedEx picked PTIA thirteen months ago, and remains firm in its decision despite community opposition.

Irvine, California's City Council to Sue Against Demonstration of Commercial Jet Noise at El Toro Military Base on Environmental Grounds (May 26, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that Irvine, California will sue the County to stop a two-day demonstration of commercial jet noise at El Toro military base. The demonstration is intended to give residents a taste of how noisy it may be if the base is converted into a commercial airport. Eight different kinds of planes will land and take off up to five times each. Also, ten noise monitors will be set up, although data collected over only two days will not be scientifically significant.

Irvine, California's city council Sues County Over Planned Jet Noise Test at El Toro Marine Base, Insisting on Environmental Review (May 26, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that the Irvine, California's City Council will sue the County over a planned test of commercial jet noise at El Toro Marine base. The council wants the county to obtain an environmental review, and consider public safety issues involved, before the two-day test, during which noise from 27 takeoffs and landings will be recorded using 10 noise monitors. The study is intended to determine whether commercial jets can use the facility without excessive disturbance of the surrounding residential communities. The County supervisors, military and federal regulators have all approved the test, saying an environmental study is not needed.

Las Vegas, Nevada Air Tour Operators Upset Over Proposed National Park Service Rule To Limit Noise to Levels Below Ambient Sounds (May 26, 1999). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that Nevada's air tour industry believes a new rule proposed by the National Park Service could destroy their industry by limiting noise levels for Grand Canyon National Park. The rule would limit non-natural noise to 8 dB below natural sounds, although a federal court ruled that 3 dB above natural sounds would be sufficient; the park has been divided into different sound regions, so the natural noise limit would range between 20 and 40 dBs, depending on the location within the park.

New Orleans International Airport's Noise Consultants Begin Study, Hold First in Series of Public Hearings (May 26, 1999). The Times-Picayune reports that Barnard Dunkelberg and Associates, a noise consulting firm for the New Orleans International Airport held the first in a new series of public hearings. The firm has begun their 15-month study which will evaluate the effect of airport noise on neighborhoods in nearby Kenner, Louisiana. Noise monitoring sites have been chosen, but which will be used on any day will remain secret.

Residents Upset at Noise from Sky Harbor International Airport's Increased Use of a Flight Path Over Arizona's Ahwatukee Foothills (May 26, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that since Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix increased its use of an older flight path over the Ahwatukee Foothills, residents have been subjected to increased noise. While many residents are upset, airport officials say they have no solution. Some local legislators are concerned, but maintain that this is fundamentally a federal issue.

Stuart, Florida's County Commission Meeting Packed by Witham Field/Martin County Airport Watch Committee Members Demanding Airport Noise Reduction (May 26, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports that 100 members of the Witham Field/Martin County Airport Watch packed a County Commission meeting in Stuart, Florida with a list of several demands relating to reduction of airport noise. They claimed that the Commission had basically relinquished control of the airport to the FAA, and was not sufficiently curbing increased air traffic and noise in accordance with their existing limited growth policies. Commission Chairwoman Janet Gettig agreed with their concerns, citing her opposition of several commission actions including recent approval of a new airport lease; she plans to place the issue on the Commission's agenda in the near future.

Burbank, California's Airport Reworks Expansion Proposal, Reducing Terminal Size and Gate Count (May 25, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that Burbank Airport officials adjusted their expansion proposal to better address the concerns of Burbank's City Council. The adjusted document requests 30% less new terminal space, promises steps towards reducing noise in surrounding communities, and proposes that the number of gates be expanded to only 16; the airport would have the option to add three more gates in or after the year 2010. Burbank has long been concerned about airport expansion, and the airport commissioner says the revised proposal "gives the Burbank City Council long-term control over expansion of the terminal."

Louisville, Kentucky Volunteer Committee on Aircraft Noise to Present Findings (May 25, 1999). The Courier-Journal reports that volunteer committees studying aircraft noise, sponsored by the Regional Airport Authority, will present their findings. The committee intends to help Leigh Fisher Associates decide how to measure and deal with airport noise.

Oceana Naval Base Near Virginia Beach Reports Noise Complaint Increase, Blames Added Squadrons, Weather and Repairs (May 25, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot reports that Oceana Naval Air Station saw a 30 percent spike in aircraft noise complaints last month. Normally the base receives about 50 complaints each month, but with several squadrons of loud jets relocating from Florida and unpredictable weather redirecting flight paths, noise has increased.

Queens Representative Hails Increase of Federal Funds for Reducing Airplane Noise (May 25, 1999). The Daily News reports that the House has passed a legislative amendment designating $10 million per year for three years to reduce airplane noise. The money will go to NASA's aircraft noise reduction research, representing a 44% increase in current funding.

Suburban Communities Surrounding Chicago's O'Hare Airport Say Soundproofing Should Include More Homes, Citing Noise Monitor Data Collected Independently (May 25, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the anti-noise Suburban O'Hare Commission (SOC) has been monitoring noise from the airport independently of the city. SOC claims that the data shows high levels of noise up to 80 decibels in communities not covered in this year's soundproofing eligibility list. Gigi Gruber, mayor of one nearby community, says "they average out the silent times with the noisy times and come up with a number. But when airplanes fly over, noise is still at a high level.

Several Mayors in the Peninsula Region Near San Francisco, California's International Airport Push to Have Noise Issues Considered in Terminal Expansion Plan (May 22, 1999). San Francisco Chronicle reports that eight mayors from the Mid-Peninsula region near San Francicso International Airport asked airport management to take noise-control measures as part of the current $2.4 billion terminal expansion. Measures would include maximum noise levels for new flights over Peninsula cities, reduction in noise of current flights, penalties for non-compliance, and public hearings to help determine the placement of new runways. The mayors made their request public at a news conference, after sending their request to the airport in writing three months ago.

Lawsuit Filed by Anti-noise Group in Norfolk, Virginia to Stop Navy Relocation of Jets Dismissed; Group Plans to Appeal (May 21, 1999). The Virginian-Pilot reports that a lawsuit, filed by Norfolk, Virginia's group Citizens Concerned About Jet Noise, that challenged the navy's relocation of jets to Virginia Beach's Oceana naval base was dismissed. The suit alleged that Virginia Beach was chosen as the relocation site arbitrarily, and that the navy's environmental impact statement was not sufficient. The group wanted a supplemental study of how the louder jets would affect communities in the area. The group plans to appeal the decision.

Businesses in United States Say Airport Delays Curbs Growth; Residents Say Growth Hurts Quality of Life (May 19, 1999). Financial Times reports that longer and more numerous flight delays at crowded U.S. airports are limiting business' rate of growth, and many businesses are supporting airport expansion. Passenger flights have increased 42 percent over the last seven years, and the next ten years could see even faster increases in demand. Residents continue to be upset by airport growth, citing the resulting noise as an enemy of quality of life, and claiming that business executives who don't live near airports have no right to dictate what noise is tolerable.

Consultant to Check Accuracy of Chicago O'Hare Airport Noise Monitors (May 19, 1999). Chicago Sun-Times reports that a noise consultant hired by Chicago, O'Hare's Noise Compatibility Commission will analyze the airport's 28 noise monitors for accuracy. The monitors record aircraft noise in neighborhoods and send data to the airport, so noise can be correlated with particular runways and airlines. The commission, which includes several school districts in the area, wants to use the data to help fight noise.

County Supervisors Approve Jet-Noise Tests at California's El Toro Base Despite Protests Against Its Safety and Accuracy In Conveying Impact of a Constant Operation (May 19, 1999). Los Angeles Times reports that a $1.3 million commercial jet-noise demonstration at El Toro Marine Base in Orange County, California was approved by County supervisors 3-2. The test is intended to give residents an idea of the noise they would experience if the proposed commercial terminal is built on the base, and ten temporary monitoring stations will be set up to objectively gauge the noise. Critics claim that the take-off directions to be used are dangerous and that the test will not accurately convey the impact of a 24-hour commercial airport operation.

America West, Supported by Arizona Senator, Wants DC's National Airport to Loosen Rule and Allow Non-Stop Arrivals from Phoenix (May 18, 1999). Arizona Republic reports that America West Airlines, with support from Arizona Senator John McCain, supports pending legislation that would allow non-stop flights from Phoenix into the District of Columbia's National Airport. Currently, a 1966 'perimeter rule' designed to ease congestion and help nearby Dulles and BWI airports compete, disallows flights of over 1,250 miles to fly into National. Critics say the Air Transportation Improvement Act would not lower fares, and would just create more noise.

Boston's Logan Airport and Others Should Compenstate Neighbors (May 18, 1999). The Boston Globe printed an Opinion piece by an MIT management and economics professor Lester Thurow suggesting that political difficulties with expanding airports, or better yet developing high-speed rail, be solved the way they are in France: financial compensation. In France, residents receive monthly checks depending on how close they live to power plants to compensate them for the risks. Thurow suggests that we pay premiums for houses that have to be torn down, compensate for train noise, and get a real high-speed rail system underway.

New Proposal in Gilbert, Arizona Requiring Disclosure of Williams Airport Flight Patterns to Home Buyers is Opposed by Many Who Weren't Told Themselves (May 16, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that a new proposition in Gilbert, Arizona's Town Council that requires home buyers to be notified of airport noise is being opposed by Williams airport and by present homeowners. The director of the airport claims that a new airport-disclosure law -- which takes effect in August -- will make the proposition redundant, but council members say there is a big gap in the RESALE of homes. Although buyers of new homes will find out about airport noise if it is over a 60 dB average per day, those selling their own homes need not disclose that information, and they are saying they shouldn't have to.

Orlando, Florida Airport Advisory Group Approves Rule to Notify Prospective Home Buyers of Aircraft Noise If It Has Been Recently Rezoned Residential (May 15, 1999). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports that an Orlando, Florida airport advisory board approved a rule that would notify prospective home buyers of aircraft noise if the land was previously not zoned residential. Orlando's two airports are voluntarily adopting the rule to avoid expensive noise abatement measures in the future that have cost airports like Atlanta $400 million. Some buyers will be asked to sign waivers saying they won't sue over noise, while

FAA Rules That Burbank, California's Airport Can't Forbid Night Flights (May 14, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the FAA has told Burbank, California's Airport that it can not impose a mandatory curfew on night flights, despite the fact that local noise restrictions were imposed in 1977. Burbank believed that these local restrictions, in place before the 1990 Airport Noise and Capacity Act that bars airports from making new noise rules, would allow them to impose a curfew.

FAA Tells Burbank, California Airport a Study Must Preclude Any Night-Flight Curfew (May 14, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that the FAA told California's Burbank airport that a noise study must preclude a night flight ban. The city of Burbank had sought a ban on flights between 10 PM and 7 AM, as well as a limit of the numbers of flights. City officials acknowledged the setback, but says it was committed to pursuing a curfew, either through a study or through a voluntary agreement with the airlines involved. A voluntary curfew already exists, though it is not always followed.

Editorial Writer in Los Angeles Asks Those Affected By Airport Noise to Accept It For the Good of the Community (May 14, 1999). The Los Angeles Times editorial staff printed an article asking citizens of Orange County, California to accept the "sporadic and short duration" airport noise as many people accept freeway noise. The author tried to appeal to the reader's desire to "travel the world and share with our fellow men and women our cultures."

MP in U.K.s Parliament Sponsored a Motion to Require Local Governments to Examine and Control Airport Noise (May 13, 1999). The Leicester Mail reports that a county MP from the U.K.s Leicester community is co-sponsoring a parliamentary motion to require local governments to take noise considerations seriously at their regional airports. Other parliamentary members said the legislation would make local governments more responsible and take some pressure off of airports and developers who have traditionally had to fend for themselves regarding noise issues.

Chicago O'Hare Joins Airport Council International in Encouraging the FAA to Phase Out Older Planes, Allowing Much Quieter New Planes to Take Over (May 13, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that many U.S. airports and residents are concerned that while quieter planes are available, airlines are continuing to put hush-kits and performance-modification kits on noisier planes. While these kits quiet planes enough to meet year 2000 standards, the newer, quieter planes are up to 3 times as quiet. Some airports, including Chicago O'Hare, are joining Airport Council International in asking the FAA to phase out the older modified planes.

June 4-5 Jet Noise Test at El Toro Marine Base in Orange County, California Set; Supporters Say It Will Give Residents a Taste of an Airport, Opponents Say It Will Mislead (May 13, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that a test of commercial jet noise at El Toro Marine Base in Orange County, California has been scheduled for June 4-5. The test is intended to give residents in southern Orange County an idea of the noise they would face if the closing marine base becomes a commercial airport. The test will include seven types of jets taking off from two runways between 7 AM and midnight. Opponents say that since frequency, times of day, and length of the demonstration will all be less than an actual commercial airport, it will be misleading.

Oxnard, California's Airport Authority Rejects Master Plan, Saying Potential Noise Concerns From Increasing Air Traffic Must Be Addressed (May 13, 1999). The Ventura County Star reports the Oxnard, California Airport Authority voted to revise their twenty year master plan before sending it to the County Board. Residents said the environmental impact report did not adequately address potential noise problems that could result from increased air traffic. Traffic could increase from about 100,000 aircraft landings to 150,000 in the next 10 years.

New International Airport in Austin, Texas Proposed Buyout Option For Neighbors Concerned with Noise (May 12, 1999). The Austin American-Statesman reports that officials for a new International Airport in Austin, Texas have proposed a buyout to neighboring homeowners. City Council still has to approve the proposal, which would give homeowners the option of selling to the airport. The airport would then try to sell the homes to others, telling them about the noise concerns and requiring the signing of a waiver for noise issues.

European Union Extends Deadline for Registering Hushkitted Aircraft; Hushkitted Aircraft Will Be Banned from European Union Airspace If Not Registered by April 1, 2000 (May 11, 1999). World Airport Week reports that the European Union has extended its deadline for registration of hushkitted aircraft. The deadline, pushed from April 1999 to April 2000, must be met by hushkitted aircraft if they wish to fly in European Union airspace after April 2002. The ruling is intended to require the use of newer, quieter jets, but compromises with the U.S. who argued their hushkit manufacturers were being discriminated against.

FAA Studies Impact that Jet Noise from a Proposed Federal Express Hub Would Have in Greensboro, North Carolina (May 10, 1999). High Point Enterprise reports that the FAA is performing a year-long environmental impact study -- which will include data on where noise impacts will be worst -- for a proposed FedEx hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport (PTIA) in Greensboro, North Carolina. FedEx and PTIA claim noise mitigation measures, such as soundproofing airplane engines, will be taken to minimize morning and evening noise disruption. The hub would serve 20-25 planes a day on a third, parallel runway.

Pilot Critical of Florida Airport Criticism (May 9, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News in Stuart Florida printed the following letters to the editor concerning airport noise:

Noise Monitors at Chicago's O'Hare Airport Say Noise is Decreasing, but Some Say Data May Be Misleading (May 9, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that 8 of 37 noise monitors at Chicago O'Hare's Airport show that aircraft noise is decreasing. Compared to last year, the first three months of this year were quieter by one or two decibels -- the smallest discernible amount measurable -- and noise complaints were down too. Some of the change may have to do with quieter aircraft being used.

Boston Man Claims in Thirty Years of Living in "Problem Neighborhoods", Aircraft Noise Has Never Bothered Him (May 8, 1999). The Patriot Ledger prints an opinion piece, claiming that jet noise from Logan airport has never been a big deal. The author has a thirty year history in the area, living in Quincy and Squantum, and frequently relaxing with friends outside in Houghs Neck, Germantown, Wollaston and Montclair. He has never had problems reading, conversing, or balancing a glass of beer through it all. While he acknowledges that air traffic could increase with a proposed new runway at Logan, he says it could be positioned to take most air traffic out over water, diminishing impact on residential areas.

California Appelate Court Ruled Burbank, California Can Reject Burbank Airport's Expansion Plans, Making Compromise More Likely (May 7, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that a California appelate court decided Burbank, California can reject airport expansion plans. Burbank Airport had claimed that the city had given up such power when it formed a joint airport governing board with neighboring Glendale and Pasadena. The city, which is now in a much stronger bargaining position, hopes to force the airport to scale down its expansion plan.

Massachusetts' Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Office Approves Massashusetts Port Authority (Massport) Environmental Review, Insiders Say MEPA Will Ask Massport to Iron Out Details (May 7, 1999). The Boston Globe reports that the Massachusetts' Port Authority (MassPort) has won preliminary approval of its environmental review of a new Logan Airport runway from the state's Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) office. Insiders say MEPA is asking Massport to revise pieces of the draft before it formally approves it, including specific plans to encourage use of other nearby airports and a 'peak pricing' fare plan that would charge more to airlines during prime flight times. Both revisions are aimed at reducing traffic and peak demand at Logan. MEPA also considered over 1,000 public comments, making the runway the second-most commented on review ever.

Gilbert, Arizona Officials and Williams Airport Pleased with State Legislation Requiring Disclosure of Airport Noise Levels to Prospective Home Buyers (May 7, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports that officials at the city of Gilbert and Williams Airport in Mesa, Arizona are pleased with new state legislation requiring developers to disclose the airport's existence and noise patterns. The legislation requires disclosure when the average noise exceeds 60 decibels. The bill gained support from more than 200 homeowners with lawsuits against developers who misled them about Mesa's Williams Gateway Airport, saying it saw little flight activity.

Selfridge Air National Guard Base in Harrison, Michigan Released a 10-year Study of Flight Patterns and Related Noise (May 6, 1999). The Detroit News reports that the Selfridge Air National Guard Base in Harrison, Michigan is releasing a study of changing flight patterns to assess noise impacts of military flights on surrounding communities. The study was conducted from 1987-97, and can help the community designate less noisy areas as residential in future zoning decisions. Twin engine fighters have been replaced with quieter single engine ones, night flights have been reduced, and engines are now tested in soundproofed 'hush houses.'

Court Rules Burbank, California Can Block Expansion at Burbank Airport, Contrary to Airport's Claims (May 6, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports that a California appellate court ruling gives Burbank, California the right to block any future expansion at Burbank Airport. The Airport Authority had claimed that Burbank had given up such power when it formed the authority jointly with the communities of Glendale and Pasadena in 1977, but the court ruled that a city "may not delegate discretionary powers in such a way that results in a total abdication of those powers." The decision should encourage the airport compromise, since a more moderate expansion plan would reduce resistance from the city.

Airport, City Officials, and Citizen's Group Reach Compromise Over Airport Expansion In Lee's Summit, Missouri (May 5, 1999). The Kansas City Star reports that Airport officials, city officials, and the citizen's group Airport Expansion Evaluation Committee (AEEC) have reached a compromise over the expansion of an airport runway in Lee's Summit, Missouri. The proposed $20-$30 million project would extend the airport's major runway from 4,000 to 5,500 feet, but the city has agreed to hold off on the project until they learn whether Kansas City's Richards-Gebaur Memorial Airport is closing. Expansion at Lee's Summit depends on the ability to relocate pilots from the Kansas City airport closing.

FAA Approves Air National Guard's Low-Level Training Flights Over Southern Colorado (May 4, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that the FAA has approved the Air National Guard's plan to conduct low-altitude F-16 training flights over southern Colorado. Several organizations opposed the plan, and Bob Senderhauf, president of the Custer County Action Association, said "They really completely ignored a lot of the concerns...." Residents are worried that the noise will affect their lifestyle, livestock, wildlife and tourism. The Air Force said it has considered resident concerns, and halved the area that will be affected by low-altitude flight. The flights would be as low as 300-feet over some areas. At least one resident/businessman has planned to sue if the plan goes through.

Activist from National Campaign for Hearing Health Insists Airline Passengers Need Hearing Protection (May 4, 1999). USA Today reports that John Wheeler, president of the National Campaign for Hearing Health (NCHH) , insists that airline passengers need ear protection. He demonstrated on a twin-engine turboprop airplane that noise during banking maneuvers can reach 115 decibels; if this were a passenger's workplace, OSHA would insist on ear protection for periods of more than 15 minutes. Even during the quieter 110 decibel portion of the flight, OSHA would require ear protection for periods of more than 30 minutes.

International Civil Aviation Organization to Negotiate "Difficult" Agreement with U.S. and EU on Reducing Airplane Noise (May 4, 1999). AFX News reports that the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) will try to negotiate an agreement between the United States and the European Union on reduction of noise and pollution from aircraft. The European Union's recent decision to outlaw older airplanes with 'hush kits' by 2002, intended to encourage the use of even quieter planes, means that the U.S. will have difficulty reselling their hush-kitted airplanes and lose an estimated $1 billion in lost sales. Negotiation within ICAO may be difficult, because many members are from developing countries where noise isn't seen as a primary concern.

Cleveland Hopkins International Airport Waits on FAA to Approve and Fund New Runway While Negotiating to Acquire Necessary Land (May 2, 1999). The Plain Dealer reports that Cleveland Hopkins International Airport is waiting for an FAA decision, due in March of 2000, on the fate of their proposed new 6,500 foot runway which would cost well over $300 million. A long-term plan for a new runway has been held up by a battle between the airport and the nearby Brook Park community over a key piece of real-estate; while airport officials still claim they will need that runway within 15 years, the currently proposed runway would help reduce congestion at the airport over the short-term. The currently proposed runway would be 1,200 feet from an existing runway, which would allow simultaneous use of two runways only in good weather; the runway needed in the long-term would be 4,500 feet from any other runway, allowing simultaneous use in any weather.

Communities Surrounding Boston, Massachusetts Weigh In on Logan Airport's Proposed New Runway (May 2, 1999). The Boston Globe reports that many of the communities affected by noise from Boston, Massachusetts' Logan Airport oppose proposed new 5,000-foot runway 14/32 , but their concerns differ slightly. Airport officials claim the new runway would reduce delays and spread noise more evenly over the area surrounding the airport; opponents believe the runway will add noise in the long run. Some opponents criticize the use of computer models instead of real noise monitors, but the airport claims that the FAA prefers computer models because there is no noise from other sources such as traffic or construction.

Bensenville, Illinois Village Board Plans to Continue Soundproofing of Homes Nearest Chicago's O'Hare Airport Despite Shift in Noise Impact Areas Indicated by 1999 Computer Modeling (May 1, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that the Village Board of Bensenville, Illinois will continue to give soundproofing priority to homes located closest to Chicago's O'Hare Airport. The latest noise-maps from the Chicago Department of Aviation that show the 70-decibel impact area shifting northeast and away from Bensenville. Bensenville officials say the maps are ridiculous, saying that they are based on computer models when they had agreed with the airport to use actual noise monitor data. The Aviation Department funds soundproofing of homes in areas where noise impacts reach or exceed 70 decibels over a 24-hour period.

Bill Passed to Change Method of Appointments to Boca Raton, Florida's Airport Authority (Apr. 30, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel reports that the Florida Legislature passed a bill that will change the way that members are appointed to the Airport Authority in Boca Raton, Florida. Members of the Boca Raton Airport Action Group say have said that some of the current five members on the airport authority are "arrogant, contentious, and disingenuous." The new bill will create a seven-person authority; previously, members had been appointed by the Chamber of Commerce, but now the City Council will appoint five while the County Commission will select two. Three of the city's choices must live east of the airport, and one must live to the west; these stipulations help to insure that authority members will understand what it's like to live in a flight path. The bill is intended to make the authority more understanding and responsive to residents' concerns.

Cook County, Illinois Residents Living Near Midway Airport Appeal Property Taxes, Saying Airport Noise Lowers Property Values (Apr. 30, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that about a dozen Cook County, Illinois residents living near Midway Airport are asking the County Board of Review to relieve some of their property tax burden, saying that airport noise lowers property values. Residents told of " jet fuel being dropped in swimming pools, levels of noise so high that phone conversations are not possible and windows that don't stop rattling," but the Board would not take action.

New Flight Path Used By Jets at Utah's Hill Air Force Base Stays Out of Commercial Airspace but Draws Complaints (Apr. 30, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports that a new flight path used by military jets traveling from Utah's Hill Air Force Base to the Utah Test and Training Range is drawing increased noise complaints from area residents. The route was changed to quell fears from Salt Lake International Airport Officials that military jets were flying to close to commercial jets. In addition to the flight path change, the fighters must fly 500 feet lower at 6,500 feet, increasing noise even further. While many residents are upset about the increase in noise, some say that they enjoy watching the fighters fly overhead.

European Union Postpones Implementation of Legislation Banning Hush Kits, Giving U.S. More Time to Resell their Hush-Kitted Aircraft (Apr. 29, 1999). The Financial Times reports that the European Union has agreed to postpone legislation by one year that would ban hush-kitted airplanes from EU airspace. Originally, the 2002 ban was to be applied to hush-kitted planes that had not operated in the EU before May 1999. The ban is aimed at quieting airplanes, since older hush-kitted airplanes -- like the Boeing 727, the DC-9, and early Boeing 737s -- are still louder than newer, quieter planes.

Residents in Greensboro, North Carolina -- Divided on New FedEx Hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport -- Attend Update Meeting (Apr. 29, 1999). High Point Enterprise reports that over 400 residents of Greensboro, North Carolina, who attended a recent meeting to update them on the new $300 million FedEx hub planned for Piedmont Triad International Airport, remain divided in their opinions. Proponents say that the 1,500 jobs that will be created, and the hub's attractiveness to other industries, make the hub a great idea. Opponents are worried that the pollution and other environmental concerns will be a problem, in addition to increased noise over surrounding neighborhoods.

Vero Beach, Florida Residents Unfazed By Fatal Plane Crash in Their Backyard (Apr. 29, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports that residents of Vero Beach, Florida, who have endured years of noisy low-flying planes from the Municipal Airport, came home to find wreckage of a plane crash in their backyard near the children's swing set. John O'Neal, owner of the home, was unfazed, saying "If you're going to live near an airport, you have to live with noise and whatever else." Four people died in the crash.

Chicago's O'Hare Airport Noise Compatibility Commission Requests Study of How Precisely Airlines Adhere to Prescribed Flight Paths that Reduce Residential Noise Impacts (Apr. 28, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that the Noise Compatibility Commission of Chicago's O'Hare Airport asked airlines to determine how well their pilots adhere to prescribed "fly quiet" paths between 10 PM and 7 AM. The flight paths are determined to avoid most residential areas and reduce subsequent noise impacts, but "strong wind, erring compasses, and pilot or air-traffic control decisions" can cause deviations.

Chicago's O'Hare Airport to Expand Use of Flight Management Systems Technology That Allows Planes to Follow Flight Paths More Tightly, Reducing Noise Impact Areas (Apr. 28, 1999). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that O'Hare Airport plans to begin using Flight Management Systems (FMS) after two months of successful testing showed that they are effective. FMS relies on electronic navigation to guide planes more tightly along designated flight paths; currently, pilots rely on compass readings from the control tower and can not completely compensate for factors such as wind. Following tighter flight paths would mean reducing the residential areas that are impacted by noise from aircraft.

California's Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority Use Less-Strict Noise Limits in Environmental Impact Statement; Los Angeles Objects (Apr. 27, 1999). Aviation Litigation Reporter reports that after the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority used noise standards that were less strict than traditional California airport noise standards, the city of Los Angeles argues that "the Authority should not be allowed to use a "less sensitive" standard in connection with a planned expansion of airport operations." The Authority argues that the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) does not specify which noise standards must be used, and that their use of alternative "incremental" criteria instead of the standard 65 dB limits is completely legal.

Canada's Montreal Urban Community Claims Police Helicopter is Valuable Tool Producing Low-Noise; Residents and At Least One City Counselor Want It and Its Noise Grounded (Apr. 27, 1999). The Gazette reports that the Montreal Urban Community (MUC) released a favorable report, touting the benefits of its single police helicopter, which costs between $80,000 and $110,000 each year. Some residents, along with Mile End city counselor Helen Fotopulos believe that the benefits are overstated and noise disruption is too much to justify its continued operation. The MUC believes that the public does not realize all of the benefits, and hopes that education could reduce objections.

Some Residents in Albany, New York Oppose New Hospital Helipad Due to Noise While Others Say Noise is Negligible Next to Potentially Saved Lives (Apr. 27, 1999). The Times Union reports that plans for a $1-million helicopter landing pad atop Albany Medical Center Hospital in New York's capital is drawing different opinions from neighbors. Some believe that the noise will be too much, saying that a test-run shook his floor and windows; in addition, residents worry about dropping property values and the risk of crashes, and they asked the Zoning Board of Appeals to reject the hospital's proposal. Others including members of the Park Slope Neighborhood Association, which believes that any problems will be negligible next to the potential to save human lives.

Stuart, Florida Resident Opposes New Witham Field Runway, Discounting Claims that the Runway is for Safety and Noting Environmental Impacts; Encourages Public Comment (Apr. 27, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News prints the following Letter to the Editor, by a resident who discounts the claims that a new Witham Field Runway is being built for safety concerns. He notes the relocation of two jet repair businesses to the area as proof that the airport plans to expand. He also notes increased noise and pollution from an expanding airport.

European Aircraft Muffler Law Tightened to Calm U.S. Fears (Apr. 26, 1999). The AFX News reports that European air transport legislation may be tightened in order to address U.S. concerns that planes not fitted with the proper muffler may be prohibited from flying into the EU and will lose value for resale.

New Monitoring System for St. Louis, Missouri's Lambert Field Airport Will Produce More Specific Information About Noise Impacts from Aircraft (Apr. 26, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that 20 new noise-monitoring devices spread throughout communities surrounding St. Louis, Missouri's Lambert Field Airport will show airport officials the details of airport noise impacts. The devices determine day-night level decibels (DNLs), and will also include "aircraft types, flight times and altitude related to noise levels." The FAA's Regulation Part 150 sets noise mitigation guidelines that include the use of monitoring devices. Airport officials also hope that the increasingly-used, quieter Stage 3 aircraft will help reduce noise as well.

Newington, New Hampshire Residents Have Nothing to Fear From Local Airport (Apr. 26, 1999). The Associate Press reports that at Pease International Tradeport, residents have had fewer opportunities to complain about air traffic or noise problems due to less use of the airport, a condition that is likely to stay the same for some time.

Pasadena Park, Missouri Airport to Install Monitors in Community to Monitor Noise Levels (Apr. 26, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Lambert Field Airport will install computer-driven monitors in Pasadena Park in order to come into compliance with Federal Aviation Administration guidelines for noise mitigation. The airport also offers homes and businesses affected by the noise several compensatory options.

Greensboro, North Carolina Residents to Hear Status of FAA's Environmental Impact Statement on Proposed FedEx Facility and Runway at Piedmont Triad International Airport (Apr. 25, 1999). The High Point Enterprise reports that the Federal Aviation Administration will hold a public meeting for concerned citizens on the status of their environmental impact statement regarding the proposed Federal Express hub to be located at the Piedmont Triad International Airport.

Neighbors Will Remain Neighbors as Louisville, Kentucky Suburb is Relocated (Apr. 25, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports that residents of Minor Lane Heights, Kentucky may have to leave their homes behind because of airport expansion, but they will be keeping their neighbors.

Burbank, California Airport Neighbors Will Receive Funding to Soundproof Their Homes (Apr. 24, 1999). The Los Angeles Daily News reports that funding is being sought from the state by Senator Adam Schiff in order to help residents living near the Burbank Airport soundproof their homes from noise pollution caused by airflight.

O'Hare Residents Place an Ad To Combat Increased Daytime Air Trafic (Apr. 24, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that concerned communities near the O'Hare International Airport have taken out a full-page ad in order to motivate people to contact their lawmakers and voice their concerns about increased air traffic which they feel will lead to more noise pollution and collisions.

Opponents of El Toro Airport Question Safety and Noise Pollution Associated With Increased Air Traffic (Apr. 24, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that recommendations by the Orange County Board of Supervisors for enlarging the El Toro Airport to about half the size of the Los Angeles Airport are being met with opposition by those who say the airport will cause increased noise pollution for residents of neighboring communities as well as increase the likelihood of accidents due to the increased traffic.

EPA Official Tells FAA that the Proposed New Runway at Boston's Logan Airport is Not Justified (Apr. 23, 1999). The Patriot Ledger reports that John P. DeVillars, the Environmental Protection Agency's regional administrator, wrote a 16-page letter to the FAA saying that a proposed new mile-long runway at Boston's Logan Airport is not justified. He discussed problems such as increased noise, pollution, and environmental injustice, and emphasized the need to encourage a more regional approach to transportation. This approach would include encouraging the use of other regional airports, and promoting the increased use of Amtrak and its soon to be introduced high-speed line between Boston and New York.

El Toro, California Flight Test Will Let Residents Sneak Preview Sounds of Proposed Commercial Flights (Apr. 23, 1999). The Orange County Register reports that a simulation of air traffic intended for an El Toro Marine Corp base has been approved and that the test flights will give neighbors an idea of what the noise would be like if the airport was used for commercial flights.

Logan Expansion Faces Legislative and Environmental Hurdles as Opponents Rally To Halt Runway Plan (Apr. 23, 1999). The Boston Globe reports that Senator Thomas Birmingham and environmental groups are rallying the EPA to halt the construction of a runway that they say will negatively affect residents of Chelsea and surrounding communities and that a supposed increase in flights does not warrant the construction.

Investors Query Los Angeles Travelers To Determine If a Coast-to-coast Service Out of Burbank, California Airport Would Be Utilized (Apr. 22, 1999). The Los Angeles Daily News reports that a start-up company is hoping to integrate coast-to-coast flights into the services currently offered at Burbank Airport despite the concerns of Burbank officials that nonstop flights will trouble neighbors with noise problems.

Noise Activists Bussing Their Message Up to State Legislature Regarding Airport Expansion (Apr. 22, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that a citizen group formed to fight noise pollution emanating from Lambert Field is heading up to the Missouri Legislature en masse in order to get their point across.

Residents Hope Monitors at Schaumburg Regional Airport, Illinois Will Help Bring Back Some Peace and Quiet (Apr. 22, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that at Schaumburg Regional Airport in Illinois, citizen complaints have prompted airport officials to begin monitoring the noise levels of departures and arrivals in order to ensure that the airport is complying with FAA regulations.

San Carlos, California Airport Officials Eager To Proceed With Airport Expansion (Apr. 22, 1999). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that San Carlos Officials have voted to move ahead on construction of a longer runway which residents fear may lead to larger planes and increased noise pollution.

Manatee County, Florida Officials Enforce Noise Ordinance To Bring Peace and Quiet To Neighborhoods (Apr. 21, 1999). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports that the Manatee County has had so many noise complaints from residents that they have decided to crack down on offenders by giving the existing noise ordinance more of a bite.

U.S. Policy Makers Speak Out Against Ineffectual European Law Regarding Quieter Airplanes (Apr. 21, 1999). The International Herald Tribune recently printed an editorial by Rodney E. Slater, David L. Aaron and Stuart E. Eizenstat stating how they feel about the recent European Union "hush kit" rule that will supposedly bring more peace and quiet to airports on both sides of the Atlantic.

300 Witham Field Residents Vent Frustration Over Airport Noise and Pollution at Public Meeting (Apr. 20, 1999). The Palm Beach Post reports that residents who live near Witham Field in Stuart, Florida gathered at a public meeting to hear airport officials and experts address their concerns regarding noise and air pollution created by the huge jets taking off and landing at the airport.

Letter to the Editor: Problems at Witham Airport in Stuart, Florida Must Be Addressed Sooner Than Later (Apr. 20, 1999). The Palm Beach Post printed a letter to the editor from John Decker stating that the expansion of Witham airport in Stuart, Florida is causing pollution and health problems for those living near the airport, and that something has to be done to address these concerns.

Residents Gather To Express Their Opinion on Growth of Witham Field in Stuart, Florida. (Apr. 20, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News reports that there was a huge turnout for a community meeting held to discuss the future of Witham Field in Stuart, Florida. Residents have become increasingly concerned over the growing number of landings and takeoffs, as well as the increase in noise from large jets.

Residents Living Near San Carlos Airport, California Show Opposition to Proposed Runway Expansion (Apr. 20, 1999). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the proposition to expand the runway at San Carlos Airport in California is meeting with opposition from residents who say that the noise is already bad enough, and that a bigger runway will mean bigger planes and more noise.

Residents Near New Orleans Airport Want A Say in the Growing Noise Problem -- They'll Sue If They Have To (Apr. 19, 1999). The Times-Picayune reports that Kenner, Louisiana homeowners, sick and tired of noisy jets, are getting ready to sue airline pilots and airports at New Orleans International Airport for punitive damage under a bill sponsored by state Reps. Glenn Ansardi and Danny Martiny of Kenner.

Chicago Suburbs Struggle to Fairly Allocate O'Hare Soundproofing Money (Apr. 18, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports trustees in Elk Grove Village, Illinois, have approved a plan to select houses for soundproofing this year although it doesn't please everyone.

Florida Residents Complain of Increasing Noise from Witham Field Airport (Apr. 18, 1999). The Palm Beach Post reports residents of nearby communities are protesting noise and increased air traffic at Witham Field in Stuart, Florida.

Navy Official Stresses Need for Air Training (and Noise) (Apr. 18, 1999). The Times-Picayune published the following article from Maj. Tom Deall, a public affairs officer for the Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base in Belle Chasse, Louisiana. In his article, Maj. Deall addresses complaints from homeowners who live in the take-off or landing paths of military airplanes:

Third Mass. Congressman Opposes New Runway at Logan Airport (Apr. 18, 1999). The Boston Globe reports a third Massachusetts congressman, citing noise pollution, recently joined the opposition of a new runway at Boston's Logan Airport.

Encroaching Development, Along with Noise and Safety Issues, Could Close Additional Arizona Air Bases (Apr. 17, 1999). The Associated Press reports as development and a growing number of people move to areas around Luke Air Force Base and Arizona's other military airports, the danger may be increasing for both residents and military bases alike.

Letter: Noise from Stuart Airport Robs Residents of Peace and Quiet in Former Florida Paradise (Apr. 17, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News published a letter from Dorothy Coutant of Stuart, Florida. Ms. Coutant contends increased noise at the nearby airport is robbing residents of peace and quiet. She writes:

NH Business Loses 1st Round to Block Runway Plan; Will Return to Court to Collect Noise Damages (Apr. 17, 1999). The Union Leader reports a New Hampshire Superior Court judge yesterday refused to block a runway expansion at Manchester Airport, but the plaintiff will return to court to seek damages from noise.

Foes Insist Airport at California's El Toro Won't be 'Quiet and Friendly' (Apr. 16, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports despite a flawed study, opponents of an airport at El Toro insist noise from departing aircraft would disturb 250,000 California residents.

MN Lawmakers Vote to Address Airport Noise Before Building New Runway (Apr. 16, 1999). The Associated Press reports noise and pollution issues should be addressed before any more construction happens at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, a Minnesota House panel decided.

US May Ban Concorde Landings in Retaliation for EU Hush Kit Restrictions (Apr. 16, 1999). The Financial Times reports the United States plans to ban landings of the Concorde airliner in the US if the European Commission restricts hush-kited aircraft in Europe.

U.S. Offers to Negotiate with EU to Avert Hush Kit Ban (Apr. 16, 1999). Reuters reports the United States said yesterday it had proposed a multilateral solution to prevent a retaliatory trade war over European Union plans to ban aircraft fitted with noise mufflers known as hush kits.

Conn. Residents Say NIMBY to Heliport and Noise; Planning Commission Gets Final Say (Apr. 15, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports Salem, Connecticut, residents said Wednesday they fear a heliport proposed for their neighborhood will bring noise and safety concerns.

NY State Reps Work to Maintain Flight Restrictions at JFK and LaGuardia (Apr. 15, 1999). Newsday reports four members of the state's congressional delegation met with U.S. Transportation Secretary Rodney Slater yesterday to argue against lifting restrictions on the number of flights at New York City's two airports.

Neighbors Fight Proposed FedEx Hub at NC Airport, Fearing Noise and Loss of Property Values (Apr. 15, 1999). Cox News Service reports a neighborhood coalition, objecting to noise and loss of property values, is threatening to block a proposed Federal Express hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport in Greensboro, North Carolina..

Taos, New Mexico, Will Fight Noisy Air Force Training Flights (Apr. 15, 1999). The Albuquerque Journal reports government officials and residents on Wednesday unanimously opposed a proposed low-level military flight training route across northern New Mexico.

FedEx Expansion at NC Piedmont Airport will Damage Quality of Life (Apr. 14, 1999). News & Record (Greensboro, NC) published an editorial written in response to a defender of a proposed expansion of North Carolina's Piedmont Triad Airport to accommodate a Federal Express hub. The author, Joan Black, contends FedEx at the airport doesn't mean progress but rather a lower quality of life for residents of Guilford County.

Hull, Mass. Voices Grievances to Massport about Logan Air Traffic and Noise (Apr. 14, 1999). The Patriot Ledger reports town officials from Hull, Massachusetts, last night did not accept Massport's rationalization for an additional runway at Boston's Logan Airport. Instead, they voiced a list of airport-related grievances.

Ohio Town Protests Airport Expansion, Citing Noise and Decreased Property Values (Apr. 14, 1999). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports neighbors opposed to the expansion of the Warren County Airport in Lebanon, Ohio, presented town officials with a petition Monday asking for several restrictions.

Foes of Third Runway at Boston's Logan Airport Question Environmental Justice of Project (Apr. 12, 1999). The Boston Globe reports opponents of a third runway at Boston's Logan Airport are wielding a new argument these days: environmental injustice.

Neighbors North of Orlando International Airport Will Hear More Noise for Next 6 Months (Apr. 12, 1999). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports Orlando International Airport will begin resurfacing a portion of one of its busiest runways today, sending more noisy jets over the airport's neighbors to the north.

Texas Town Fines Low-Flying Plane; FAA Says Cities Don't Control Airspace (Apr. 12, 1999). The Austin American-Statesman reports in its latest attempt to control noise from the Addison Airport, the town of Fairview, Texas, recently fine a pilot for violating the town's noise ordinance by flying too low.

Long Island Towns Place Restrictions on Noisy Helicopters (Apr. 11, 1999). The New York Times reports in recent years the freedom to use helicopters has been reduced on Long Island as more and more towns have passed regulations restricting where they can take off and land. And in some areas where helicopters can still operate on private property, neighbors are becoming more vocal about the noise.

NC Resident Defends Arguments Made by Critics of FedEx Hub (Apr. 9, 1999). The News & Record (Greensboro, NC) published a letter from Diane Warren of Greensboro, North Carolina. In her letter, Ms. Warren defends arguments made by critics of the FedEx hub at the Triad Airport.

Letter: Airport Noise Impacts Quality of Life in Stuart, Florida (Apr. 9, 1999). The Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News published a letter from Mary Warren of Stuart, Florida. In her letter, Ms. Warren details how noise from Witham Field Airport destroys her quality of life:

Entire Kentucky Town Relocated in Unique Airport Noise Buyout (Apr. 9, 1999). The New York Times reports a Kentucky town near the Louisville International Airport agreed to an airport buy-out only if the entire town could be moved together. FAA officials consented to the request, the first of its kind in the United States.

Entire Kentucky Town Relocates to Escape Airport Noise (Apr. 9, 1999). The New York Times reports in the wake of a relocation effort by the Louisville International Airport, a Kentucky town has made a demand so unusual that that Federal Aviation Administration officials now say it could be a model for other communities.

Contractors Educated on Installing Noise Insulation for Homes Near Indianapolis International Airport (Apr. 9, 1999). The Indianapolis Star reports work will begin soon to insulate hundreds of Hendricks County homes from the noise of jets from Indianapolis International Airport.

Mass. Business Leaders and Politicians Choosing Sides in New Logan Runway (Apr. 8, 1999). The Boston Herald reports Boston business leaders last night stated their support for a new runway at Logan Airport along with Gov. Paul Cellucci and Logan Airport officials while Mayor Thomas M. Menino and some members of the state's congressional delegation strongly opposed the addition.

West Texas Ranchers Threaten to Sue Over Noise from Air Force Bomber Training (Apr. 7, 1999). The Associated Press reports a large group of West Texas ranchers and farmers have joined together to voice their opposition to Air Force bombing practice that they say will bring noise to ruin their way of life and spook their animals.

Town Near New Orleans Airport Vows to Fight New Runway Plan (Apr. 7, 1999). The Times-Picayune reports a proposed new runway at New Orleans International Airport has the support of the Louisiana Governor but the strong opposition of a nearby town that fears increased noise from roaring jets.

RI Residents Question Justice of Proposed New Flight Tracks at T.F. Green Airport (Apr. 6, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports some Rhode Island residents who will likely hear more noise if proposed new flight paths become a realty at Warwick's T.F. Green Airport questioned last night the justice of such noise distribution.

Noise is the Thing in the Greensboro, North Carolina FedEx Debate (Apr. 6, 1999). The News & Record published an editorial from resident Ray Rimmer of Greensboro, North Carolina, who says noise, not economics, is the issue of debate in considering FedEx development. Rimmer writes:

Noise Study of Bradley Airport Presents Dilemma for Suffield, Conn. (Apr. 5, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports the results of a mini-study show reducing noise in one part of Suffield, Connecticut, will only increase noise in another section of town.

Brochure Informs Residents of Temporary Noise Shifts at O'Hare Airport (Apr. 5, 1999). The Chicago Sun-Times reports summer maintenance projects at O'Hare Airport are expected to create noise shifts over Chicago area communities.

US Rep. Charges Massport with Environmental Injustice in Plan for Third Runway at Boston's Logan Airport (Apr. 4, 1999). The Boston Globe reports a US Congressman representing districts near Logan Airport has objected to Massport's plan for a third runway on grounds of "environmental injustice," saying noise will be unequally distributed over poor, minority communities.

Calif. Writer Says Noise Violates Even Sacred Places in Our Modern World (Apr. 4, 1999). The Ventura County Star published a column in which the author tells of a recent vacation across Coconino National Forest of northern Arizona, where she rediscovered the sounds of silence. But in her attempt to embrace it, she notes the pervasive lack of silence in our modern world.

Queens Residents Vehemently Object to More Flights at New York Airports (Apr. 4, 1999). The New York Times reports New York residents have a hard time believing "The skies will be getting quieter" as the Federal Government considers eliminating flight caps at La Guardia and JFK Airports.

Judge Rules Florida Landowners Must Prove Decreased Property Value in Airport Noise Suit (Apr. 3, 1999). The Palm Beach Post reports a judge's ruling may have crippled the case of Palm Beach, Florida, landowners who claim their peace of mind is shattered by the noise of 85 air flights a day over their homes from Palm Beach International Airport.

Roxbury, Mass., is Loser in Noise Turf Battle, Say Residents (Apr. 3, 1999). The Boston Globe reports the Runway 27 Coalition in Massachusetts now has former members saying one faction benefited at the expense of another community in its battle over noise pollution from Logan Airport.

Friends of the Earth Supports EU Directive to Ban Noisy Aircraft in Europe (Apr. 2, 1999). According to the European Report, two non -governmental organizations have criticized the European Union for giving in to pressure from the United States to delay a ban on older and louder "hushkitted" aircraft in European skies.

Lawmakers Unite to Impose Noise Restrictions, Including a Curfew, at Teterboro Airport (Apr. 2, 1999). The Record reports federal and state lawmakers are urging the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to impose curfews at Teterboro Airport and force other restrictions on jet traffic to improve living conditions for neighboring residents.

New Grant Will Soundproof More Homes Affected by Noise from Burbank Airport (Apr. 2, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports a new grant of federal funds will provide sound insulation for more homes affected by noise from the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport.

RI Residents Invited to Comment on Plans to Limit Noise from T.F. Green Airport (Apr. 2, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports on Monday, residents of Cranston and Warwick, Rhode Island, will have a final opportunity to comment on a list of noise controls proposed for T.F. Green Airport, including significant changes in the flight paths over the city.

Letters: California Residents Continue the El Toro Airport Debate (Apr. 1, 1999). The Los Angeles Times published two letters from California residents expressing their views about El Toro Airport issues. The first letter is written by Michael Steiner of Costa Mesa, California, who criticizes the idea of test flights at El Toro Airport. Steiner writes:

Acoustic Ecology: Hearing Care and Preserving the Rare Sounds of Silence (Apr.1 1999). Cooking Light Magazine reports natural quiet in the United States is difficult to find in these modern times of more cars, more planes, more appliances, and more people. What we hear and how well we hear it is a major concern of both audiologists and a movement called acoustic ecology.

FAA Accused of Having "No Decency;" Residents of Queens, NY, Say More Flights and Noise at LaGuardia and Kennedy Unacceptable (Mar. 31, 1999). Newsday reports residents who live near New York's LaGuardia and Kennedy Airports met in Queens last night to tell FAA officials they are dead set against increased flights and the accompanying noise.

EU Delays Hushkit Ban for One Month, Will Consult with US (Mar. 30, 1999). The New York Times reports the European Union today delayed for a month a law on aircraft noise that that has given rise to fears of a trade dispute with the United States.

EU Delays Vote to Ban Hushkitted Planes to Allow US to Propose Compromise (Mar. 30, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports the European Union's transport ministers have postponed a vote on the ban of older aircraft, giving U.S. officials more time to work with European Union executives on a compromise.

Pearson Official Pleased with Noise Trials; Rockwood Residents Cry, "Scam!" (Mar. 29, 1999). The Toronto Star reports while a spokesman for the Greater Toronto Airports Authority called the recent trial flight routes at Pearson International Airport "encouraging," residents of Rockwood, Ontario, see little hope of noise relief.

Opposition to Logan Expansion Builds in Massachusetts (Mar. 28, 1999). The Boston Globe reports the Massachusetts Port Authority's momentum to get a new runway built at Logan Airport is slowly being matched by the opposition of residents, activists, leaders, and politicians.

EU/US Continue to Disagree over Hushkit Regulations (Mar. 27, 1999). According to the European Report, the US Transportation Secretary told the press in Brussels that the airplane-hushkit dispute between the US and the European Union risks a new trade dispute

Noise Levels Rise in Europe to Unhealthy Levels (Mar. 27, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports noise is a problem in all major cities in Europe, and environmentalists and social scientists believe the shrieks and roars of urban life may cause serious long-term health effects.

Residents Seek Monetary Damages from Arizona Town, Claiming Lack of Airport Use Disclosure (Mar. 27, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports a group of residents is seeking monetary damages from the town of Gilbert, Arizona, for failing to enforce its own rules about airport disclosure.

Chicago Official Insists Expanded O'Hare Terminal Won't Mean More Noise (Mar. 26, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports a Chicago official on Thursday defended Mayor Daley's planned terminal expansion at O'Hare International Airport as one that will not increase noise.

Arlington Heights Officials Cite Low Compliance with O'Hare Noise Commission's Fly Quiet Program (Mar. 24, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports the board of trustees in Arlington Heights, Illinois, is closely watching the city-suburban O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission these days and voicing its concerns about noise.

Letter: Scottsdale Resident Accepts Airplane Noise as Here to Stay (Mar. 24, 1999). The Arizona Republic published a letter from Michael Straley of Scottsdale, Arizona. Straley accepts airplane noise as a given and believes related safety concerns in the Scottsdale area are exaggerated. Straley writes:

Port of Seattle "Puts Kids First" and Funds Jet Noise Study at Highline Schools (Mar. 24, 1999). The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports the Port of Seattle yesterday agreed to fund the noise study for Highline School District whose schools are seriously affected by noise from nearby Seattle-Tacoma International Airport

Toronto Airport Authority will Test Departures over Industrial Corridors to Reduce Noise from Pearson International Airport (Mar. 24, 1999). Canada NewsWire Ltd. published a press release by the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) detailing the planned departure trials for the new north/sough runway at Lester B. Pearson International Airport, (LBPIA). The press release reads as follows:

Bills in the Mass. State House Could Block Logan's Proposed New Runway (Mar. 23, 1999). The Boston Herald reports supporters and opponents of a new runway at Logan Airport are expected to face each other this morning at a contentious Massachusetts' State House hearing on bills that would block the runway's construction.

Floridians Complain of Increased Jet Noise from Jacksonville Naval Air Station (Mar. 23, 1999). The Florida Times-Union reports more fighter jets have been flying training exercises from Jacksonville Naval Air Station -- a situation that has prompted complaints from Florida residents to the Navy and elected officials.

Opponents Call Proposed El Toro Test Flights a Waste of Money (Mar. 23, 1999). The Orange County Register reports the proposed El Toro flight demonstration plan that will be considered by the California's Orange County Board of Supervisors is under criticism from opponents.

Inglewood, California, Burdened with Jet Noise from Los Angeles International Airport (Mar. 22, 1999). City News Service reports Inglewood, California, officials say their town in unfairly burdened with overflights from Los Angeles International Airport.

New Jersey Citizens' Group Sues to Stop Expansion at Newark until Noise Concerns Resolved (Mar. 22, 1999). The Associated Press Wire Services reports a New Jersey citizens' group has decided to sue to stop all expansion at Newark International Airport until the noise issue is resolved.

Noise Study at Louisville International Airport Makes Neighbors Key Participants (Mar. 22, 1999). The Courier-Journal reports a new noise study at Kentucky's Louisville International Airport is aimed at soothing eardrums as well as hard feelings that linger from expansion there a decade ago.

Some Neighbors of Nashville International Airport Wait a Decade for Noise Insulation (Mar. 22, 1999). The Tennessean reports while the majority of houses in the noise contour map for Kentucky's Nashville International Airport have been soundproofed, some residents are still waiting on a list began in 1992.

Anti-Noise Group Hires Law Firm to Battle Expansion at Newark Airport (Mar. 21, 1999). The Associated Press reports a New Jersey group has hired a law firm to battle all expansion at Newark International Airport until the issue of air noise is resolved.

Letter: Third Runway at Logan Airport Will Only Dump More Noise on Boston's Citizens (Mar. 21, 1999). The Boston Globe published a letter from Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, resident Moira Raftery. In her letter, Raftery protests a new runway at Boston's Logan Airport where the congested city's citizens are already adversely affected by airplane noise. Raftery writes:

Letters: Los Angeles Area Residents Speak Out About Airports (Mar. 21, 1999). The Los Angeles Times published the following letters from Los Angeles area residents about voters' rights in the wake of new and expanded airports. The first letter is from Leonard Kranser of Dana Point. Kranser writes to clarify the Safe and Health Communities Initiative:

Test Flights at El Toro Still Waiting Approval from Orange County Supervisors (Mar. 20, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports Orange County, California, supervisors will decide March 30 whether to grant final approval for several commercial test flights at El Toro air base.

US Transportation Secretary Headed to Europe to Tackle Airplane Noise Dispute with EU (Mar. 20, 1999). Agence France Presse reports the US Transportation Secretary will travel to Europe to tackle a US-European dispute over airplane noise.

Florida's Boca Raton Airport Begins Noise Study with FAA Grant (Mar. 19, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel reports Florida's Boca Raton Airport Authority received a federal grant Thursday for a noise study.

Public Summit Held on Proposed New Terminal for California's Burbank Airport; No Agreements Reached on Long-Running Noise Issues (Mar. 19, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports participants at a recent forum on a new terminal at California's Burbank Airport could not agree on whether to seek local or federal solutions to long-standing noise, safety, and regulation issues.

Air Traffic Controllers Join Others in Opposing Expansion at Missouri's Lambert Field Airport (Mar. 18, 1999). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports a leader of a St. Charles, Missouri, group fighting the expansion of Lambert Field said more people are joining St. Charles in filing court papers opposing the expansion plan.

Arlington Heights Panel Says O'Hare is Ignoring "Fly Quiet" Noise Abatement Program (Mar. 18, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports the Arlington Heights Village Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise plans to meet with O'Hare officials in an effort to convince the airport to turn down the volume.

Citing Noise and Increased Use, Neighbors Wants Restrictions Placed on Britain's Oldest Working Airfield (Mar. 18, 1999). The Western Daily Press reports a public meeting is being called over families' complaints that their weekends are being ruined by noise from light planes using Britain's oldest working airfield.

Editorial: City of Burbank's Noise Lawsuit Threatens Airport Safety (Mar. 18, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles published an editorial by Joyce Streator, president of the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority. In her editorial, Streator calls for the city of Burbank to stop holding hostage the safety of airport users and return to the bargaining table.

Ontario Board Rejects New Residential Development Near Pearson Airport (Mar. 18, 1999). Canada NewsWire Ltd., reports the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) celebrated victory with the Ontario Municipal Board's (OMB) decision to reject a residential development proposal in the City of Mississauga, which falls within the GTAA Operating Area.

Opinion: Too Much Noise about Navy Jet Flyover at Little League Park (Mar. 18, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune published an opinion article charging that the negative reaction to the recent Navy flyover at Solana Beach, California, is creating much more noise than the criticized incident.

Mississippi Homeowners Renew Request for Berm to Muffle Airport Noise (Mar. 17, 1999). The Commercial Appeal reports a Mississippi homeowners association has renewed its plea for trees and berms to mitigate noise from the Memphis International Airport.

Airports Add Noise and Safety Issues to Expanding Urban Sprawl in Arizona (Mar. 16, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports safety and noise drive the airport encroachment debate in the Phoenix, Arizona, area as crowded airways rival congested freeways.

FAA Considers City of Burbank's Exemption Claim that Allows Mandatory Noise Curfew at Airport (Mar. 16, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports the FAA is considering the city of Burbank's claim that that Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport can impose a mandatory noise curfew under an exemption.

Some Say Airports and Urban Sprawl on Collision Course in Arizona's Valley (Mar. 15, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports Arizona's population is growing along with air traffic, spurring noise and safety concerns.

Action Group wants Ban on Night Flights at Boca Raton Airport (Mar. 14, 1999). The Palm Beach Post reports Boca Raton, Florida, resident Ellen Lohr who lives northeast of the airport, wants a nighttime ban on all planes and wants a complete ban on what the Federal Aviation Administration calls "Stage One" planes, the loudest and oldest of aircraft. The FAA recently allowed the Naples airport to ban Stage One planes at night. The number of jets taking off and landing at the Boca Raton airport has dramatically increased in the last ten years. In 1990, there were just eight jets based at the airport. Today there are 45. And takeoffs and landings have jumped 42 percent in that time, from 96,000 in 1990 to 136,700 last year - one every four minutes if spread over every hour of every day. The airport's noise hot line logged 318 complaints in January and February, more than triple the amount from the same period last year. About half were for nighttime flights, though most flights occur during the day. When Ellen Lohr moved to Boca Raton in 1990, she fell in love with a relatively quiet South Florida suburb. Now, she's afraid it's turning into a transportation hub. "The planes here, they zoom over the houses," she said. "You can't talk, you can't sleep. It's gotten horrible. Since I've been living here, the quality of my life has severely deteriorated as a result of the noise from the airport," said Lohr, who founded the Boca Raton Airport Action Group (BRAAG) in 1996.

Islip, NY, Residents Demand Night-Time Curfew at MacArthur Airport (Mar. 14, 1999). Newsday reports residents of Islip, New York, are protesting late-night flights at MacArthur Airport and asking for a night-time flight curfew.

Resident Sees FedEx Hub as Detrimental to Quality of Life in Greensboro, NC (Mar. 14, 1999). The News & Record published a letter to the editor from resident Hildegard Kuehn who sees the proposed FedEx cargo hub along with subsequent noise, third airport runway, and other changes as severely detrimental to the quality of life in Greensboro, North Carolina. Ms. Kuehn writes:

BAA Says Fifth New Terminal at London's Heathrow Won't Increase Noise; Environmental Group Wants Flight Numbers Capped (Mar. 13, 1999). The Financial Times (London) reports BAA yesterday called for legislation to ensure the proposed fifth terminal at London's Heathrow airport did not lead to an increase in aircraft noise. However, a local environmental group said it still believes the additional terminal will unduly disrupt lives.

Reagan National Airport: Editorial Criticizes McCain Senate Bill; Supports House Effort (Mar. 13, 1999). The Washington Post published an editorial criticizing Sen. John McCain's bill that would, in part, increase slots at Reagan National Airport. The editorial takes exception to leverage that can be taken by the chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee in efforts to get certain bills passed, calling it "bad national policy."

Massport Promotes New Runway at Logan; Noise Activists Charge Misuse of Funds (Mar. 12, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire Associated Press reports the Massachusetts Port Authority is using paid advertisements to promote a new runway at Boston's Logan Airport, a move that has angered some airport and noise activists.

Letter: Former Chairman of Florida's Boca Raton Airport Authority Highlights Noise-Reduction Accomplishments of Group (Mar. 12, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel published the following letter from George W. Blank, past chairman of the Boca Raton Airport Authority and Chairman Emeritus, Federation of Boca Raton Homeowner Associations. Mr. Blank writes to advocate for the Airport Authority and inform readers of the work accomplished towards reducing noise during his tenure:

Town of Hull Organizes to Fight Third Runway at Massachusetts' Logan Airport (Mar. 12, 1999). The Patriot Ledger reports Massport has agreed to study the noise impact a new Logan International Airport runway would have on the Hull peninsula, a town whose residents have already had enough of airplane noise.

NJ Lawmakers Advocate for Quieter Skies in Aviation Spending Bill (Mar. 11, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports New Jersey lawmakers took some action Thursday toward making the skies quieter.

Environment Committee at Montreal International Airport(Dorval) Analyzes Noise Complaints (Mar. 11, 1999). The Gazette reports new procedures to reduce noise at Montreal International Airport (Dorval) have been in effect for one month, but it's too soon to judge their effectiveness.

Conn. Residents to Hear Results of Noise Study of Bradley Airport (Mar. 11, 1999). The Hartford Courant reports consultants hired by the Connecticut Department of Transportation, which operates Bradley International Airport, will report this month to residents the results of a noise study.

More Activity at Florida's Zephyrhills Airport Means More Noise for Residents (Mar. 11, 1999). The St. Petersburg Times reports life has gotten louder recently in Zephyrhills, Florida, where quiet living is disappearing for some residents as activity increases at the Zephyrhills Municipal Airport.

Bowing to US Pressure, EU Agrees to Postpone Ban of Hush-Kitted Planes (Mar. 11, 1999). EIU ViewsWire reports the European Union has given in to intense pressure from Washington, DC, and delayed a decision on plans to outlaw new aircraft equipped with 'hush kits.'

Editorial: US Rep. Criticizes Massport's Plan for New Runway at Logan Airport (Mar. 10, 1999). The Boston Globe published an editorial by Michael Capuano, US Representative from Massachusetts's 8th District. Capuano believes a third runway at Logan Airport should not be built for a variety of reasons including the fact it will increase noise in neighborhoods and communities already burdened with aircraft noise.

House Aviation Subcommittee Approves More Slots for O'Hare Airport (Mar. 10, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports a proposal to eliminate flight caps at O'Hare International Airport moved closer to reality on Tuesday.

Mass. Resident Criticizes Logan Expansion; Asks Massport to Consider Noise Effects on Residents (Mar. 8, 1999). The Boston Globe published a letter from Massachusetts resident Jacques Weissgerber criticizing Massport's disregard of residents of Boston and nearby communities as it proceeds with its plan to build a third runway at Logan Airport. Weissgerber writes:

Lake Mary, Florida, Resident Experiences Excessive Noise and Low-Flying Aircraft from Sanford Airport (Mar. 7, 1999). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune published a letter from Randy Neal of Lake Mary, Florida, questioning a recent assertion that jets from the Sanford Airport are quiet. Neal writes that is not at all his experience:

Airlines Flying in Australia May Face Stiffer Fines for Violating Curfews and Breaching Safety Rules (Mar. 7, 1999). AAP Newsfeed reports airlines breaching Sydney Airport's noise curfew could face bigger fines under a review of airport regulations, federal Transport Minister John Anderson announced today.

Chicago Targets Homes to Soundproof Against Noise from O'Hare; Activists Question Accuracy of Noise Maps (Mar. 6, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports Chicago announced its annual soundproofing plan to insulate homes against noise from jets at O'Hare International Airport, officials announced Friday. Meanwhile, activists question the accuracy of noise contour maps used to determine the allocation of soundproofing funds.

Chicago Updates Soundproofing Plan to Include More Homes Affected by Noise from O'Hare (Mar. 6, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports the city of Chicago has updated its soundproofing plan to include homes located just west of O'Hare International Airport previously considered ineligible. Chicago will now soundproof homes in eight communities surrounding the airport.

Endorsement: Vote Yes on Expanding Boca Raton Airport Authority (Mar. 6, 1999). The Palm Beach Post published an editorial giving the newspaper's endorsement of a YES vote on the question of whether Boca Raton Airport should expand the authority to seven members in give more voice to city residents.

First in US: Naples, Florida, Succeeds in Banning Stage 1 Jets; Other Airport Communities Want Same (Mar. 6, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale) reports Naples Airport, Florida, is the first in the United States to receive Federal Aviation Administration approval to ban noisy Stage 1 jets.

House Considers Bill Lifting All Flight Limits at O'Hare; Residents Alarmed (Mar. 5, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports the most drastic proposal yet to ease flight caps at O'Hare International Airport will go through U.S. House committee discussions next week. Chicago area noise activists call the proposal "an accident waiting to happen" if it becomes reality.

Ohio Citizens Want Solutions to Cargo Plane Noise (Mar. 5, 1999). The Dayton Daily News reports residents of Centerville-Washington Townships, Ohio, told FAA officials they want relief from night-time cargo plane noise.

Airport Influence Area and Noise Concern Residents Near Arizona's Williams Gateway Airport (Mar. 4, 1999). The Arizona Republic reports a federally funded noise study will be undertaken and a noise map reconfiguration to answer Arizona residents' concerns in wake of growth at Williams Gateway Airport.

Cleveland Homes Near Hopkins Airport Grandfathered to Get Noise Insulation Despite New Eligibility Rules (Mar. 4, 1999). The Plain Dealer reports Cleveland homes on perimeter of a new airport noise zone will receive sound insulation through grandfathering.

US Finds EU Aircraft Ban Proposal Unacceptable; Threatens Retaliatory Ban (Mar. 4, 1999). USA Today reports the United States threatened the European Union with a retaliatory aircraft ban if Europe follows through with prohibiting some US aircraft from Europe's skies.

An Eye for an Eye: US and EU Trade Aircraft Ban Threats, Citing Noise and Air Pollution (Mar. 3, 1999). AP Online reports the United States House of Representative is considering a bill that could ban the Concorde from American skies if the European Union follows through with its plans to prohibit hush-kitted US planes from flying over Europe.

Illinois Town Debates Opposing New Runways at O'Hare (Mar. 3, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports trustees of Mt. Prospect, Illinois, are debating whether to oppose new runways at O'Hare International Airport.

Study Shows Fewer Noise Disturbed Residents if Pilots Use Shorter Runway at Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport (Mar. 3, 1999). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the final draft of Rhode Island's Airport Corporation's Part 51 noise study on T.F. Green Airport in Warwick arrived this week, giving residents a month to study it before a public hearing set for March 31.

US Official Sees New EU Aircraft Standards as Attempt to Control Market (Mar. 3, 1999). The Journal of Commerce reports at least one United States commerce official sees new European Union aircraft standards as a way to control the aircraft market.

Airport Noise is the Divisive Issue for Local Candidates in Boca Raton, Florida (Mar. 2, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel reports noise from Florida's Boca Raton Airport is the issue to debate with local elections a week away.

EU May Postpone New Hush-Kit Rules that Would Ban Most US Aircraft from European Skies (Mar. 2, 1999). The Journal of Commerce reports Undersecretary of State of Economics, Business and Agricultural Affairs Stuart Eizenstat said in Brussels Friday there were signs that European governments would postpone new rules that would ban some US aircraft from their airspace.

Noise-Burdened Mass. Neighborhoods Oppose New Runway at Logan, Look to Governor and Mayor for Support (Mar. 2, 1999). The Boston Globe published an editorial suggesting it is time for Governor Paul Cellucci's administration, and Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino, to reconsider plans to build a new runway for Logan Airport.

Residents Refuse to Support Massport Plan that Shifts Logan Airport Noise from One Neighborhood to the Next (Mar. 2, 1999). The Boston Globe reports critics contend Massport's tactic to win support for a new runway plan at Logan Airport by promising that flights will decrease over the neighborhoods hardest-hit by noise has backfired.

Longboat Key, Florida Fights Plan to Divert Noise from Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport Over the Island (Mar. 1, 1999). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports while the plan is temporarily on hold, the debate continues about a controversial diversion of airport noise from Florida's Mainland to a section of Longboat Key. Population, economics, justice, and environmental concerns pepper the debate.

Letters from Calif. Residents Voice Opinions about Projected Noise from El Toro (Feb. 28, 1999). The Los Angeles Times published a series of letters from residents about the impact of noise on residents from proposed jet operations from El Toro airport near Los Angeles, California. Reacting to a previously published article about noise complaints from residents who live in an area deemed a "Quiet Zone," opinions varied. The first letter is from Edward F. Gogin Jr. of Trabuco Canyon, California. Grogin writes:

Editorial Declares No Winners in Miramar Helicopter Suit; Noise will Continue (Feb. 27, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune published an editorial lamenting the absence of clear winners in the recent settlement over Marine helicopters at Miramar Air Station in California.

Burbank Attacks Credibility of Airport, Citing Noise Violations of Aircraft; Politicians Enter Fray Before November Elections (Feb. 26, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports the city of Burbank, California, claims the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport frequently violates the nighttime noise ban by flying older, Stage 2 aircraft.

Burbank Points to Stage 2 Violations, Says Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Not Interested in Controlling Noise (Feb. 26, 1999). City News Service reports the city of Burbank, California, accused the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority today of "massive violations" of noise regulations over the last three years, a charge the airport vigorously denied.

Shooters Say Texas Gun Club Closing Unwarranted, Residents Cite Noise and Safety Concerns (Feb. 26, 1999). The Forth Worth Star-Telegram reports a gun club in Fort Worth, Texas, closed yesterday after a number of lawsuits and noise complaints from nearby residents.

Illinois Town Fears Politics will Result in Loss of Soundproofing Money to Mitigate Noise from O'Hare (Feb. 25, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports the town Bensenville, Illinois, believes it will lose soundproofing funds to mitigate noise from O'Hare International Airport due to political maneuvering.

U.S. May Retaliate with Concorde Ban if EU Enacts Ban on Hush-Kitted Aircraft (Feb. 25, 1999). The Financial Times reports the U.S. is considering a ban of its own if the European Union goes forward with a ban on older hush-kitted aircraft.

Calif. Marine Base Agrees to Change Helicopter Flight Path After Noise Complaints and Lawsuit (Feb. 24, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports in response to California residents' complaints about noise, Marine Corps officials said Tuesday they will shift the main helicopter flight path a mile south to avoid Del Mar and other suburbs.

Calif. Supreme Court Rejects Appeal; Rules in Favor of City of Burbank on Noise Impact Issue (Feb. 24, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports the California Supreme Court has upheld a ruling permitting the city of Burbank to argue that terminal expansion at the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport will increase noise in neighborhoods.

California Supreme Court Sends Back Burbank Airport Noise Impact Case to Trial Court (Feb. 24, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports the California Supreme Court has declined to review a case about noise impact area at Burbank Airport.

NY Congressman Introduces Bill to Reduce Noise from Newark Airport (Feb. 24, 1999). The Record (Bergen County, NJ) reports a New York lawmaker has introduced a bill to reduce aircraft noise from Newark International Airport.

Rep. Rogan Says FAA's Opinion on Noise Act Needed for Burbank and Airport Officials to Negotiate Noise (Feb. 24, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports U.S. Rep. James E. Rogan, from Pasadena, California, has asked the head of the Federal Aviation Administration to declare her opinion on whether Burbank Airport needs federal approval for flight restrictions.

Calif. Residents Fear More Noise from Expanded Runways at San Francisco International Airport (Feb. 23, 1999). The San Francisco Chronicle reports a San Francisco city supervisor wants to create a city policy prohibiting noise from San Francisco International Airport to exceed current levels.

Marines Agree to Conduct Noise and Pollution Studies to Settle Lawsuit Over Helicopters at Miramar, Calif. (Feb. 23, 1999). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports the U.S. Marines announced Tuesday an agreement to conduct air pollution studies and pay legal fees to settle a California lawsuit over the transfer of hundreds military helicopters to Miramar Marine Corps Air Station.

DC Residents Angry about Sen. McCain's Effort to Increase Flights at Reagan National Airport (Feb. 22, 1999). The Christian Science Monitor reports Arizona Senator John McCain(R) is proposing to increase the number of flights in and out of Reagan National Airport and to lift the 1,250-mile limit on outbound aircraft from the Washington DC airport.

Impact Statement 'Flawed" Says Group Against Airport Runway Expansion in Leicester, England (Feb. 22, 1999). The Leicester Mercury reports activists in Leicester, England, are pressuring their district council to reject an environmental impact statement addressing expansion at a nearby airport on the basis that it's too limited in scope.

US Calls EU Rule Against Hush-Kitted Planes Discriminatory (Feb. 22, 1999). The Journal of Commerce reports the Undersecretary of Commerce, David Aaron, called the European Union's plan to prohibit hush-kitted planes in European skies pointless and biased.

Mass. Communities Disagree on Logan Airport Expansion; Community Advisory Group Challenges Massport on Tactics, Disclosure, and Equity (Feb. 21, 1999). The Boston Globe reports critics ask tough questions of Massport's plans to new runway at Logan Airport. Residents on the Community Advisory Committee, who represent towns affected by Logan, want answers about airport capacity, long-range planning, equity, and value of residents' quality of life.

Resident in Van Nuys Airport Flightpath Proposes Noise Relief Plan (Feb. 21, 1999). The Los Angeles Times published a letter from Charles Mark-Walker, a resident of North Hills, California. Mr. Walker suggests a noise relief plan for nearby residents of the Van Nuys Airport. Walker writes:

Florida Politicians and Residents Rally at Boca Raton Airport for More Representation on Airport Board (Feb. 20, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel reports protesters gathered at Florida's Boca Raton Airport on Friday to win greater representation on the airport's governing board and more control over noise.

Arlinton Heights Noise Panel Opposes Expansion at O'Hare (Feb. 18, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports members of an Arlington Heights, Illinois, advisory panel on aircraft noise voted Tuesday to oppose expansion at O'Hare International Airport.

Complaints of Boca Airport Noise Intensify (Feb. 18, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel reports residents' complaints about noise from jets flying to and from Florida's Boca Raton Airport are getting louder.

Opponents of El Toro Airport in Calif. Fear Noise in "Quiet Zones" (Feb. 18, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports most noise complaints generated by John Wayne Airport in California last year came from areas miles away, in neighborhoods deemed "quiet" by the county. With much more air traffic planned at the proposed airport at El Toro, South Orange County residents fear there will no quiet zones for them.

US Charges European Union Ruling on Hush-Kitted Aircraft "Discriminatory" (Feb. 18, 1999). Agence France Presse reports the United States on Thursday condemned a recent move by the European Parliament to ban hush-kitted jet aircraft in the European Union.

US Could Outlaw Concorde if EU Proceeds with Ban on Hush-Kitted Planes (Feb. 18, 1999). The Commercial Appeal reports flights to the United States by the Concorde may be prohibited if the European Union follows through with its ban on jets that use hushkits to reduce noise.

Vote in Chicago Districts Links Midway Airport Noise to Property Tax Relief (Feb. 18, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports residents of Chicago wards put a non-binding referendum question on a ballot for Tuesday that makes noise pollution from Midway Airport a reason for property tax relief.

Additonal Flights at O'Hare Worry Arlington Heights' Residents (Feb. 17, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports a consultant for Chicago's aviation department told suburban leaders Tuesday that adding flights at O'Hare International Airport likely would make airplane noise more tolerable, especially at night.

Chicago Area Schools Compete for Slim Soundproofing Funds as O'Hare Considers Building More Terminals (Feb. 17, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports as Chicago officials consider building more terminals at O'Hare International Airport, 15 nearby schools are competing to be one of the four chosen this year to be insulated against jet noise.

Chicago Suburb Asks Legislators to Delay Lifting Flight Caps at O'Hare; Noise Panel Asks for Impact Study (Feb. 17, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports key members of the Illinois congressional delegation have been asked to withhold approval of legislation ending a cap on hourly flights at O'Hare International Airport until an impact study can be done.

Controversy over Sen. McCain's Bill to Increase Flights at Reagan National (Feb. 17, 1999). The Washington News Bureau reports Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., has caused impassioned protests in Washington with his bill that, among other things, would add 48 takeoff and landing slots at Reagan National Airport.

Florida County Commission Stands Neutral on New Jet Route, Urges FAA to Rule (Feb. 17, 1999). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports the Manatee County Commission declined to take a position on a proposed flight path from Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport that will reduce aircraft noise over Manatee while increasing noise over central Longboat Key, Florida.

Study Shows Noise from New Texas Airport will Affect 1,500 Residents (Feb. 17, 1999). The Austin American-Statesman reports an updated study on noise around a new airport in Southeast Austin, Texas, shows an increase in the number of residents who will be affected by noise from aircraft taking off and landing.

Leaders in Air Industry Disagree about Impact of New Noise Regulations (Feb. 16, 1999). The Journal of Commerce reports tougher noise regulations possibly grounding a number of large aircraft was the topic of discussion at a transportation and aerospace conference in Naples, Florida, last week.

Resident's Letter Urges Action Against Proposed Upgrades at Australia's Canberra Airport (Feb. 16, 1999). The Canberra Times published a letter from Murray May, a resident of Hackett, Australia, urging residents to take action about proposed upgrades at Canberra Airport to preserve property values and their quality of life. Mr. Hackett writes:

Letters: California Residents Differ on Noise from Burbank Airport (Feb. 14, 1999). The Los Angeles Times published letters from California residents expressing their views on noise from the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport. The following letter is from John Di Minico of Studio City, California. Mr. Di Minico writes:

Editorial: Despite Political "Mumbo-Jumbo," New Logan Runway Means More Noise for "Working Stiffs" (Feb. 13, 1999). The Boston Globe published an editorial contending that a new runway at Boston's Logan Airport is a done political deal, but only a quick fix. Meanwhile citizens who suffer from airport noise will only suffer more.

Illinois Resident Highlights Health Hazards from O'Hare (Feb. 13, 1999). The Chicago Tribune published a letter from Robert E. Pochron of Park Ridge, Illinois, who highlights the health dangers of air and noise pollution dispersed by O'Hare International Airport. Mr. Pochron writes:

Florida's Boca Raton Airport Considers PR to Quiet Noise Complaints (Feb. 13, 1999). The Sun-Sentinel reports Florida's Boca Raton Airport Authority may hire a public relations firm to improve its image with the public who is fed up with jet noise.

Los Angeles City Council Asks Van Nuys Airport for Noise Reduction Plan (Feb. 13, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports the Los Angeles City Council voted Friday to ask the Airport Commission to develop a new, balanced approach to reducing noise at Van Nuys Airport.

Mass. Moves Forward with Logan Runway Project Despite Objections from South Shore Residents (Feb. 12, 1999). The Patriot Ledger reports the new runway project at Boston's Logan Airport is being touted by the state as an economic boon while residents of at least one South Shore town predict increased noise pollution will be their lot.

Senators Approve Bill to Eliminate High Density Rule at Chicago's O'Hare Airport; Citizens Fear More Noise (Feb. 12, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports a US Senate committee on Thursday approved legislation that would increase the number of flights at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport.

New Runway at Boston's Logan Airport Pits Residents Against Business Leaders (Feb. 12, 1999). The Boston Globe reports a proposed new runway at Boston's Logan Airport divides many business leaders from numerous residents who live in the city and its suburbs.

Local Washington Citizens' Groups Will Fight Increased Flights at Reagan Airport (Feb. 12, 1999). The Washington Times reports the US Senate commerce committee approved a bill yesterday that would add 48 takeoff and landing slots at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, double the number in last year's defeated bill.

US Rep. Appeals for More Aid for Airport Noise Victims in Tennessee (Feb. 11, 1999). The Commercial Appeal reports Rep. Harold Ford Jr. (D-Tenn.) said Wednesday he hopes to re-open the issue of how much to pay noise-suffering residents near Memphis International Airport by increasing federal aid for noise mitigation.

US Senate Will Regulate Air Tour Noise in National Parks (Feb. 11, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports the US Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation today approved steps to address noise generated by airplane and helicopter tours over national parks.

EU Refuses to Delay Hush-Kitted Aircraft Restrictions Despite U.S. Plea (Feb. 11, 1999). The Financial Times reports the European Union's transport commissioner yesterday rejected US attempts to delay EU legislation that would restrict the use of older, noisier aircraft in EU airspace.

Chair of House Aviation Panel Will Visit Calif. to Discuss Burbank Airport Noise and Expansion Controversy (Feb. 11, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports Calif. Rep. James Rogan announced Wednesday he and the chairman of the congressional aviation subcommittee will meet with local officials in April to discuss the city of Burbank's long-running dispute with Burbank Airport.

In Wake of Noise Complaints, San Diego Council Asks Marines to Alter Helicopter Flight Patterns (Feb. 11, 1999). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports the San Diego City Council will ask the Miramar Naval Air Station to modify its helicopter flight patterns after a number of residents voiced noise complaints.

EU Hush Kit Ban Means Revenue Loss for US Aircraft Industry (Feb. 10, 1999). Agence Presse reports a senior US trade official Tuesday forewarned that a European Union anti- noise directive, which could be approved Wednesday, could threaten one billion dollars' worth of US aircraft and aircraft engine orders.

English Residents Say Helicopter Noise Disturbing Their Lives (Feb. 10, 1999). The Western Daily Press reports complaints from villagers in the English countryside about helicopter noise from a nearby air base has prompted a meeting with local officials to address their concerns.

Environmentalism or Protectionism? The EU and the US Spar about New Aircraft Standards (Feb. 10, 1999). AP Worldstream reports the European Parliament, against the wishes of the United States, on Wednesday approved a European Union proposal for new standards aimed at reducing aircraft noise and pollution.

Residents Question Noise Reduction Plan at Anchorage Airport in the Face of Continued Growth (Feb. 9, 1999). The Anchorage Daily News reports communities near the Anchorage International Airport say they're pleased that airport officials are addressing noise; nevertheless, some residents are skeptical the proposed measures will help.

Chicago Residents to Fight Washington Plan to Abolish High Density Rule at O'Hare Airport (Feb. 9, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports federal transportation officials called Monday for lifting the cap on hourly flights at O'Hare International Airport, a limit that nearby suburbs see as one of their strongest defenses against more jet noise.

Arlington Hts. Trustees Request Residents' Noise Complaints about O'Hare Airport (Feb. 9, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports village trustees in Arlington Heights, Illinois, asked residents to voice their concerns over aircraft noise and pressure state legislators about quality-of-life issues.

NY Community Groups Oppose Unlimited Flights at Airports; Say Current Noise Pollution a Health Threat (Feb. 8, 1999). Newsday reports, civic leaders and politicians from Queens, New York are protesting the Clinton administration's plan to end limits on the number of daily flights at LaGuardia and Kennedy Airports, saying the measure will only bring more noise, pollution and congestion.

Letters from California Residents about Van Nuys Airport and Expansion (Feb. 7, 1999). The Los Angeles Times published letters from California residents speak out about the expansion at Van Nuys Airport. The first letter is from Karl Gottesfeld of Encino who opposes expansion:

State's Attorney's Office Joins School in Suit Against Chicago for Funds to Muffle Noise from O'Hare Airport (Feb. 7, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports the DuPage County state's attorney's office has stepped into the legal battle between the city of Chicago and a private school system which sued for funds to soundproof the schools against noise from O'Hare International Airport.

Council Members Want to Rid Van Nuys Airport of Noisy Stage 2 Jets (Feb. 6, 1999). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports city council members from California's San Fernando Valley are dissatisfied with a recent economic-impact survey, and on Friday called for a plan to phase out noisy aircraft at Van Nuys Airport in California.

Los Angeles Council Members Tired of Studies, Want Limits Now at Van Nuys Airport for Noisy Jets (Feb. 6, 1999). The Los Angeles Times reports two Los Angeles City Council members called Friday for an immediate limit on the number of older, noisier jets based at California's Van Nuys Airport.

The Politics of Noise vs. Economics at O'Hare International Airport; Editorial Praises Mayor Daley's Expansion Plan (Feb. 6, 1999). The Chicago Tribune published an editorial praising Chicago Mayor Richard Daley's expansion plans for O'Hare International Airport.

Two New Terminals Proposed at O'Hare Airport Bring Noise Questions (Feb. 6, 1999). The Chicago Tribune reports the chairman of the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission on Friday asked for an analysis of how plans for two new terminals at O'Hare International Airport will affect noise in surrounding communities.

Florida Residents Bothered by Noise from Orlando Sanford Airport Even Though Levels Below FAA Limit (Feb. 5, 1999). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune Seminole reports jets flying over neighborhoods on their way to and from Orlando Sanford Airport are noisy, but according to recent tests and federal standards, they're not a noise problem.

NJ Lawmaker Takes New Approach to Reduce Jet Noise at Teterboro Airport (Feb. 4, 1999). The Record reports a New Jersey lawmaker has introduced a bill to reduce jet noise at the Teterboro Airport.

Rep. Hyde Needs House Speaker to Defeat Expansion at O'Hare (Feb. 4, 1999). The Chicago Daily Herald reports two of Illinois' most powerful congressmen may be about to clash over expansion at O'Hare International Airport.

Noise Won't Fly as Reason for SFO Runways over Salt Bay (Nov. 24, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports San Francisco International Airport officials outlined a plan yesterday to build new runways over the bay. Environmentalists are skeptical.

Firm Designs Quiet Office Next to O'Hare Airport (Nov. 23, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports a manufacturer of ceilings and walls has made its Chicago training center into a "shrine of soundproofing" in office park next to O'Hare International Airport.

Noise, Growth, Aviation Marketplace, All Figure into Chicago Airport Debate (Nov. 23, 1998). The Chicago Tribune published an editorial contending a new group f business leaders is recasting the question of Chicago, O'Hare Airport, and growth in the aviation marketplace. Should the focus be on accommodating growth or attracting it?

St.Charles County, Missouri, Joins Cities in Lawsuit to Block Expansion and Noise at Lambert Field Airport (Nov. 23, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports St. Charles County, Missouri, has joined the cities of St. Charles and Bridgeton in taking legal action against expansion at Lambert Field Airport. The lawsuit objects to increased noise among other issues.

Editorial: Minn. Politics and Bureaucracy Nix Citizens' Chance in Fighting New Runway at Metropolitan Airport (Nov. 22, 1998). The Star Tribune published an editorial contending a Richfield, Illinois, couple who fought runway noise at the Metropolitan Airport, and lost, learned a bitter civics lesson involving the mixing of politics and bureaucracy.

Eightteen Years Later, Lawsuits Settled over Noise at Greater Pittsburgh International Airport. (Nov. 22, 1998). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, last week settled a number of 18-year-old noise lawsuits involving the Greater Pittsburgh International Airport.

Environmentalists Protest Commercial Airport in Homestead, Florida; Noise and Pollution in Nearby National Parks at Issue (Nov. 22, 1998). The New York Times reports plans for turning the Florida's Homestead Air Force Base into a commercial airport have hit turbulence from environmental groups concerned about noise and air and water pollution in two national parks.

Night Flights to Continue; UK Anti-Noise Groups Blast Government Decision (Nov. 22, 1998). The Press Association Newsfile reports anti - noise groups in the United Kingdom today bitterly attacked the Government's decision not to ban night flying at major airports in and around London, England.

Studio City, CA, Resident Criticizes Burbank Airport Authority for Neglecting Noise Mitigation (Nov. 22, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following Letter to Editor from a resident who is critical of Burbank Airport Authority for he sees is a lack of effort to mitigate the airport's noise impact on nearby residents. The letter from Studio City, California, resident Martin Briner reads as follows:

Florida Town Protests New Flight Path at Sarasota-Manatee Airport (Nov. 21, 1998). The Sarasota Herald-Tribune reports the Sarasota-Manatee Airport Authority has moved another step closer to using a new flight path that would shift jet aircraft noise to the center of Longboat Key, Florida.

Homeowners Near Indianapolis International Airport to Get Noise Assistance (Nov. 21, 1998). The Indianapolis News reports the Federal Aviation Administration has approved a new plan to reduce the impact of airplane noise from Indianapolis International Airport on homeowners in Plainfield, Indiana.

Two Calif. Airport Authorities to Share Noise Abatement Manager (Nov. 21, 1998). The Ventura County Star reports California's Oxnard and Camarillo Airport Authorities plan to create a position and a program to deal with complaints about noisy airplanes.

County Official Says Legal Hand Forced over Noise from Missouri's Lambert Field (Nov. 20, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports a St. Charles County Councilman believes a lawsuit could have been avoided over noise at Missouri's Lambert Field if St. Louis officials had been more cooperative.

County Says No Choice Left Except to Sue Over Noise from Missouri's Lambert Field Airport (Nov. 20, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports Missouri's St. Charles County Council decided Thursday evening to sue St. Louis over expansion plans at Lambert Field Airport, claiming the city's expansion plan is flawed and will dramatically increase noise levels.

FAA Says Noise Study for Florida Airport Not a Priority (Nov. 20, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports a study Florida's Boca Raton Airport must complete before it can further restrict noisy airplanes will not be conducted in the near future, if at all.

Fresno, CA, Airport to Replace Hay-Bale Hush House; Metal Muffles Airplane Engine Noise More Effectively (Nov. 20, 1998). The Fresno Bee reports plans are underway to construct a new, more effective "hush house" at California's Fresno Yosemite International Airport.

Editorial Says Airlines Can Solve Dispute with Burbank, California, by Becoming Good Corporate Citizens (Nov. 19, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles published an editorial that contends airlines at California's Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport have the responsibility and power to end the dispute with the city of Burbank by showing respect for their host and its community and agreeing to abide by curfews.

Georgia Town to Send Officials to Airport Noise Symposium (Nov. 19, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports concerned about airport noise and expansion, members of the College Park City Council will return to Sand Diego in February for the 1999 Airport Noise Symposium.

Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport Gets New Runway Despite Residents Charge of Flawed Noise Impact Findings (Nov. 19, 1998). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports a new runway was approved for the Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota International Airport despite protests from citizens criticizing the environmental impact findings of jet noise on their community.

Noise Abatement Manager for California's Camarillo and Oxnard Airports (Nov. 19, 1998). The Ventura County Star reports California's Ventura County's Department of Airports is considering creating a position to deal with noise complaints from residents living near the Camarillo and Oxnard airports.

City of Burbank, Calif. Wins Latest Court Suit over Noise and Expansion at Burbank Airport (Nov. 18, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports Burbank officials won a round in California Appeal's Court in their attempt to strike a noise deal with Burbank Airport.

Legal Battle Wages On; City of Burbank Latest Winner in Appeals Court over Noise Impact of Expansion at Burbank Airport (Nov. 18, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports in the Burbank Airport dispute, a state appeals court has ruled the city of Burbank, California, can proceed with one of its court cases against the Airport Authority on the issue of terminal expansion.

Noise Group Lists Goals in Fighting Noise from Chicago's O'Hare Airport (Nov. 18, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports an advisory committee in Arlington Heights, Illinois, is ready to present their new strategic plan to fight noise from O'Hare International Airport.

Airports Commission Accuses Richfield of Using Insignificant Data to Halt New Runway at Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport (Nov. 17, 1998). The Associated Press State & Local Wire reports the Metropolitan Airports Commission says the city of Richfield has been citing an insignificant noise study to try to stop plans for a new runway at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.

Airports Commission and Town of Richfield at Standoff Over Noise from the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport; Accusations Hurled from Both Sides (Nov. 17, 1998). The Star Tribune reports the Metropolitan Airports Commission and the city of Richfield, Minnesota, are at an impasse over reports on low-frequency noise from jets on a proposed north-south runway at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.

British Government Deems Nighttime Flying Ban Impractical at Country's Busiest Airports (Nov. 17, 1998). Press Association Newsfile reports the British Government today declined to ban night-time flying at Britain's two busiest airports, but continue to consider proposals to reduce noise levels at Heathrow and Gatwick airports.

City of Burbank Wins Appeal on Burbank Airport Ruling; Legal Battle Continues over Noise and Expansion (Nov. 17, 1998). City News Service reports a California state appellate court reinstated a lawsuit against Burbank Airport Authority by the city of Burbank, an attorney for the city said today.

Metropolitan Airports Commission and City of Minneapolis Agree to North-South Runway, Temporary Extension, and No Third Runway (Nov. 17, 1998). PR Newswire published the following press release detailing two agreements regarding development at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport reached between the Metropolitan Airports Commission (MAC) and the City of Minneapolis:

Citizens' Group Sues Navy Over Jets at Virginia Beach Air Station; Uncovered Naval Report Predicts High Noise Costs to Homes, Schools (Nov. 16, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports a lawsuit filed against relocation of Navy Jets to an Air Force Base in Virginia Beach uncovered an unreleased Naval report estimating the high costs of noise-proofing local homes and schools.

Virginia Beach to Study Noise Mitigation Measures for Schools after Luring Noisy Navy Jets to Area (Nov. 16, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports in the wake of the Navy moving 10 F/A-18 squadrons to Virginia Beach, Virginia, city officials will fund a noise-mitigation study for schools in the high-noise zone.

Mayors of City of Burbank Explain Hesitancy to Accept "Good Faith" Efforts and Uncertain Outcomes from FAA and Burbank Airport Authority (Nov. 15, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following perspective from Dave Golonski and Stacey Murphy, respectively mayor and vice mayor of the City of Burbank. In their opinions, agreement by the city to support expansion at the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport in exchange for a willingness to adhere to the results of a FAA noise study is an inequitable exchange, for the results of that study are uncertain and remove all incentive for the Airport Authority to work with the city to maintain quality of life for its residents.

What to do about O'Hare Airport? Opinions Vary on Issues from Expansion to Pollution and Noise (Nov. 15, 1998). The Sunday Gazette Mail reports the only aspects about Chicago's O'Hare International Airport that officials and residents can agree on is it's crowded but it pumps billions of dollars into the economy. On nearly everything else, including expansion, capacity, pollution, and noise, opinions vary and create strange political bedfellows.

Officials of Richfield, MN, and MAC Disagree Over Significance of Previously Unreleased Noise Study of New Runway at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (Nov. 14, 1998). The Star Tribune reports the city of Richfield, Minnesota, charges the Metropolitan Airports Commission withheld a noise study report that held information favorable to Richfield's efforts to secure state and federal noise mitigation funds to address low-frequency noise from a proposed new runway at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.

While Chicago Chamber of Commerce Pushes Growth at O'Hare, Citizens' Groups Stress Noise and Environmental Impacts (Nov. 10, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports the Chicago region could lose billions of dollars in economic activity if O'Hare Airport is not allowed to expand according to a report commissioned by the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce.

Two Chicago Suburbs to Get Mobile Monitors to Measure Noise from O'Hare (Nov. 7, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports mobile noise monitors will soon be placed in Arlington Heights and Rolling Meadows to measure noise from O'Hare International Airport.

Chandler, Arizona, Debates Runway and Heliport Issues at Local Airport (Nov. 6, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports Chandler, Arizona, officials Thursday debated the future of the city's airport, addressing such issues as the length of runways, relocating a heliport, and jurisdiction over the airport.

Airport Debate in Chandler, Arizona, Pits Residents who Want Quiet Against Supporters of Economic Development (Nov. 5, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports officials considering accelerating development around the airport in Chandler, Arizona, face opposition from residents who want peace and quiet.

Burbank Airport Begins Noise Study, Wants City to Abide by Night Flight Findings (Oct. 20, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports Burbank Airport commissioners voted unanimously Monday to begin a study that could lead to required anti- noise measures, which may include a mandatory curfew on night flights.

Burbank Airport Proceeds with Federal Noise Study; City Leaders Reluctant to Commit to Findings (Oct. 20, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports the Burbank Airport's governing body unanimously approved a noise study that could eventually lead to a federally ordered curfew. However, city officials in Burbank are reluctant to commit to findings and withdraw their opposition to a new airport terminal.

County Supervisors Add Noise Monitoring to Flight Tests at California's El Toro (Oct. 20, 1998). City News Service reports county supervisors requested noise monitoring and night flights be added to a series of flight tests conducted at California's former El Toro Marine base, a site being considered for a commercial airport.

Curfew Study could Lead to Deal between City of Burbank and Burbank-Glendale Airport (Oct. 19, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports commissioners of California's Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority will meet today to consider a noise study that could lead the federal government to impose a mandatory curfew on commercial flights.

House Votes Down Call for Increased Flights at NY's Busiest Airports (Oct. 19, 1998). The Daily News (New York) reports New York City residents in the borough of Queens, subjected for years to abnormally high levels of noise and air pollution, got a break last week when JFK and LaGuardia were denied flight increases.

Calif. Residents Voice Opinions about Costs and Benefits of Proposed El Toro Airport (Oct. 18, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published letters to editor from residents about the proposed El Toro Airport. Byron Edwards of Orange County is opposed to the new airport:

Burbank Airport's Airlines Reject Mandatory Curfews; Federal Noise Study May Lead to FAA Sanctioned Curfews (Oct. 17, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports most airlines serving California's Burbank Airport have refused to accept a mandatory curfew, leaving the airport authority to consider a federal noise study.

Burbank Requests Glendale Take Active Role in Calif.'s Burbank Airport Curfew Issue (Oct. 17, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports the Glendale City Council has scheduled an emergency, closed-door meeting today to discuss developments at California's Burbank Airport, where opposing factions have been discussing flight curfews.

House Nixes Added Flights at Reagan National Airport (Oct. 17, 1998). The Washington Times reports Congress won't be adding any new flights this year at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.

Burbank Airport Authority Criticizes City Officials for Refusing to Commit to Results of Noise Study (Oct. 16, 1998). City News Service reports the Burbank City Council today proposed contributing up to $250,000 for a study on noise levels at Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport, but airport officials were skeptical about the offer.

Cleveland Says Airport Expansion Doesn't Mean Noise Increase; Mayor Announces Plans for Further Expansion while Airport Neighbors Continue to Wait for Home Soundproofing (Oct. 16, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports the expansion of runways at Ohio's Cleveland Hopkins International Airport can happen while keeping any noise increase to a minimum, city officials said yesterday.

Airlines Consider Formal Curfew at Burbank; Agreement Could Lead to New Terminal (Oct. 15, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports more than half of the airlines that use Burbank Airport are considering accepting a formal curfew on night flights. Their acceptance of a mandatory nighttime curfew could pave the way for a new passenger terminal.

Extended Limits on Noisy Planes at San Francisco Airport Applauded by Airport Group (Oct. 15, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports San Francisco International Airport has asked the FAA to extend a nighttime ban on Stage 2 aircraft.

Illinois Judge Dismisses Part of Parish's Noise Case Against O'Hare (Oct. 15, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports an Illinois county judge dismissed some elements of a lawsuit filed by a school against Chicago over soundproofing against O'Hare International Airport noise.

San Francisco Airport Asks FAA to Extend Nighttime Noise Ban on Stage 2 Jets (Oct. 15, 1998). The Associated Press reports the San Francisco International Airport has asked the FAA to extend a nighttime ban for some of the loudest jets in use.

Santa Fe Airport Neighbors Seek Noise Abatement Ordinance (Oct. 15, 1998). The Albuquerque Tribune reports a group of airport neighbors contend Santa Fe Airport officials are ignoring complaints about too many low-flying ear-piercing planes over homes in New Mexico at all hours.

St. Charles, Missouri, Council May Join Suit Against Lambert Runway (Oct. 15, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the St. Charles County Council is getting closer to joining in a lawsuit aimed at stopping the construction of a runway at Lambert Field, an expansion that would bring the airport two miles closer to St. Charles.

Airport Foes Say Tests at California's El Toro Won't Show Long-Term Effects (Oct. 14, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports opponents of turning El Toro Marine Base into a commercial airport say planned testing will yield inaccurate results while airport boosters say test results will reduce residents' noise concerns.

Citizens' Group Says Study Shows Increased Flights at Dallas' Love Field Will Create Dangerous Noise and Traffic Levels in Texas Neighborhoods (Oct. 14, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports increasing flights at Dallas Love Field would lead to more noise and longer traffic delays on nearby streets, according to a study paid for by a neighboring homeowners group.

Critics Say Flight Tests at El Toro Won't Give Accurate Noise Picture (Oct. 14, 1998). The Orange County Register reports critics say El Toro flight tests next year won't give accurate noise picture at California's proposed airport site.

Group Outlines Requests in Effort to Live with Noise from New Mexico's Santa Fe Airport (Oct. 14, 1998). The Santa Fe New Mexican reports residents who live near New Mexico's Santa Fe Municipal Airport will bring their requests to county commissioners in an effort to get support in lowering airplane noise.

Officials from Illinois' Palwaukee Airport Request Grant Money for Noise Study and Construction of Taxiway (Oct. 14, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports officials from Palwaukee Municipal Airport bid for millions of dollars in grants for airport improvements. Plans for the grant money include an update of a noise study and construction of part of a taxiway on the main runway's west side.

Public Hearing in Austin, Texas, will Address Noise Study Projections for Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (Oct. 14, 1998). The Austin American-Statesman reports officials in Austin, Texas, will hold a public meeting tonight to discuss a noise study in preparation for the May 1999 opening of Austin-Bergstrom International Airport for passenger traffic.

Santa Fe, New Mexico, Airport Neighbors Seek Noise Abatement Ordinance after "Flying Friendly" Program Fails (Oct. 14, 1998). The Associated Press reports neighbors of New Mexico's Santa Fe Airport are dissatisfied with the level of cooperation they've received from airport officials about noise complaints.

County Council Approves Noise-Reduction Plan for Washington's Boeing Field; Activists Not Satisfied (Oct. 13, 1998). The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports an ambitious program that will reduce aircraft noise at Boeing Field won the unanimous approval of Washington's King County Council yesterday. Some activists and airport neighbors disapprove of the plan.

NC Resident Says No to FedEx Hub in Greensboro; Noise Tops Reasons (Oct. 13, 1998). The News & Record published a letter from Greensboro, North Carolina resident, William J. Powers, who opposes a Federal Express hub at the local airport. Powers' primary objection is noise. He writes:

Officials at Wisconsin's Waukesha County Airport Invite Residents to Discuss Noise and Expansion Concerns (Oct. 13, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports Wisconsin residents will have an opportunity to meet with Waukesha County Airport officials later this month to discuss airport noise and expansion.

1946 Landmark Ruling Could Help NC Residents Fight FedEx at Piedmont Airport (Oct. 12, 1998). The Associated Press reports a 1946 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in favor of a chicken farmer could affect the outcome of the proposed FedEx hub at Greensboro, North Carolina's, Piedmont Triad International Airport.

County Exec. Urges St. Charles to Join Lawsuit Against FAA Over New Runway Plan for Missouri's Lambert Field (Oct. 12, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports a St. Charles County leader is advising the county to join a lawsuit to overturn the approved expansion at Missouri's Lambert Field Airport.

Missouri Town Seeks Enforceable Resolution Over Noise from Lambert Field Airport (Oct. 12, 1998). St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the St. Charles County Council in Missouri is seeking a noise-reduction agreement with St. Louis regarding Lambert Field Airport. If no agreement appears to be forthcoming, St. Charles is threatening to sue the city of St. Louis.

New York Rally Protests Airport Noise and Its Health Effects on Children (Oct. 12, 1998). Newsday reports children and adults gathered in Queens, New York, yesterday to protest noise, pollution, and ill health effects from nearby airports.

Citizens' Panel Suggests Limits on New York's County Airport; Noise and Water Pollution Top Concerns (Oct. 11, 1998). The New York Times reports a citizens' advisory board recommended limited expansion of New York's County Airport, citing a number of quality of life and environmental issues including noise pollution and water quality.

Resident Objects to Expanded Flights at Washington, DC's Reagan National Airport (Oct. 11, 1998). The Washington Post published a letter from a McLean resident who objects to expanded flights at Washington, DC's Reagan National Airport. Mary Wakefield writes:

Calif. Congressmen Seek FAA Exemption of Formal Review for Mandatory Curfew at Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport (Oct. 10, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports federal lawmakers from California are urging the Federal Aviation Administration to allow Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport to enact a mandatory curfew on nighttime flights without a formal review process, officials said Friday.

Landmark Noise Case Could be Foundation for Homeowners' Action Against Airport FedEx Hub in Greensboro, NC (Oct. 10, 1998). The News & Record reports a 52-year-old legal case may be ammunition for property owners near the Piedmont Triad International Airport who opposed a Federal Express hub and a third runway at the Greensboro, North Carolina, airport.

Residents Near California's Los Alamitos Airfield Warned of Increased Flights and Noise This Month (Oct. 10, 1998). Los Angeles Times reports Los Alamitos Armed Forces Reserve Center officials warn that noise from heavy runway activity may disturb residents through the end of the month.

Noise Sources and Solutions in Washington, DC, Area Neighborhoods (Oct. 10, 1998). The Washington Post reports that while noise may be an unavoidable part of apartment life in the Washington, DC, area, as it is elsewhere, developers, property managers, and tenants themselves can take steps to muffle their problems.

Colorado Village Seeks Input for Residents at FAA Hearing with Centennial Airport (Oct. 10, 1998). The Denver Post reports Greenwood Village officials want residents surrounding Colorado's Centennial Airport to have a voice in the battle between the airport authority and a commuter passenger service that has been banned from the airport.

Washington's Boeing Field Will Undergo Noise Reduction Efforts (Oct. 9, 1998). The Seattle Times reports the Metropolitan King County Council next week is expected to authorize the most extensive noise -reduction efforts in the history of Washington's Boeing Field.

Williams Gateway Airport in Arizona Considers Charging Landing Fees for Noisy Military Aircraft (Oct. 9, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports Williams Gateway Airport may start charging military aircraft for touch-and-go landings, the largest source of noise complaints from area homeowners.

Illinois' Rep. Hyde Says, "No New Flights at O'Hare;" House Bill Nixed (Oct. 9, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports a plan that could have added 30 daily commercial flights at O'Hare International Airport appears to be squashed for now. Local activists applauded the move.

St. Charles Will Join Bridgeton Lawsuit Against Expansion at Missouri's Lambert Field (Oct. 9, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports officials in St. Charles, Missouri, are waiting for the full release of a federal report on the expansion of Lambert Field before joining Bridgeton in federal court to challenge that expansion.

Burbank Airport Authority Asks Carriers to Agree to Curfew (Oct. 9, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports airport officials at the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport have urged air carriers to accept an enforceable, mandatory curfew, officials said Thursday. Acceptance of a curfew could ease the longstanding dispute between the airport and the city of Burbank.

European Study Shows City Noise Leads to Serious Ill Health Effects (Oct. 9, 1998). The Evening Standard reports Londoners were warned today that big city noise may be responsible for heart disease.

Overzealous Airline Lobbying Nixes Extra Slots at O'Hare; Anti-Noise Group Thrilled (Oct. 9, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports behind-the-scenes maneuvering by United Airlines gave a senator reason to nix additional slots at O'Hare International Airport.

LA Commission Approves Noise Restrictions for Universal Studios (Oct. 8, 1998). The Associated Press reports noise restrictions for California's Universal Studios were recently approved by the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission.

Calif. Residents Hope for Renewal of Settlement Agreement at John Wayne Airport (Oct. 8, 1998). The Orange County Register reports California's El Toro Airport issue and how it's resolved could have enormous implications for John Wayne Airport and nearby residents.

Residents Demand Formal Oversight at California's Universal Studios, Citing Existing and Projected Noise Problems (Oct. 8, 1998). The Hollywood Reporter reports the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission voted to recommend noise restrictions at Universal Studios in an effort to balance importance of film industry with noise concerns of residents.

Residents Near Ohio's Dayton International Airport Organize to Fight Noise (Oct. 8, 1998). The Dayton Daily News reports residents of Butler Township, Ohio, asked for help with noise from Dayton International Airport.

Richfield, MN, Officials Take Airport Noise Concerns to Washington (Oct. 8, 1998). The Star Tribune reports Richfield, Minnesota, officials brought to Washington, DC, this week their fight against low-frequency airport noise in their suburban neighborhood.

Residents Upset When Airport Put Noise Study at a Low Priority in Wheeling, Illinois (Oct. 7, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that local officials and residents are lobbying state aviation officials for an estimated $90 million in improvements at the Palwaukee Municipal Airport in Wheeling, Illinois.

The U.S. Supreme Court Refuses to Hear Appeal Brought By Burbank's Airport Authorities (Oct. 7, 1998). Los Angeles Times reports that the U.S. Supreme Court has refused to hear the Burbank airport's appeal from a 1997 U.S. District Court ruling. That ruling, according to the article, says the Burbank Airport Authority lacked the legal standing to challenge the city's veto of the airport expansion project in federal court under the California's Public Utilities Code.

England's Birmingham International Airport Welcomes Quieter British Airways Planes (Oct. 7, 1998). The Birmingham Post reports British Airways has announced the purchase of new, quieter, and more environmentally friendly aircraft. The news is welcomed by England's Birmingham International Airport.

Noise Protection Zones Planned near Airport (Oct. 7, 1998). The Washington Post reports that Stafford County and the Regional Airport Commission plan to put in place a number of noise protection zones near Stafford Regional Airport.

Arizona Residents Believe Its Too Late to Secure Peace and Quiet from the Burgeoning Growth of Williams Gateway Airport (Oct. 7, 1998). In this article the Associated Press reports on the plight of homeowners who face increased urbanization and airport noise in the metropolitan area surrounding Mesa, Arizona.

Helicopter Operators Cease Flying Over Hotel Strip in Las Vegas (Oct. 6, 1998). The Associated Press reports that four helicopter tour operators have ceased flying directly over the Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada because of noise complaints from hotel-casinos.

Residents Fear Expansion at Detroit Metropolitan Airport will Increase Noise; They Insist on Noise Study (Oct. 6, 1998). The Associated Press reports that residents fear the expansion of Detroit Metropolitan Airport will increase airport noise, despite county efforts to implement a noise abatement program.

New Homeowners Complain about Airport Noise; Columnist Says Their Complaints Belong to the Politicians of Chandler, Arizona (Oct. 6, 1998). The Arizona Republic published the opinion of columnist Art Thomason who says the noise pollution suffered by new homeowners near Williams Gate Airport is far too often regarded without empathy by the public at large. Thomason points the finger at public officials who failed to protect Williams from encroaching developers.

Airport Neighbors Fear Expansion Project Will Make Living Near Detroit Metropolitan Airport More Miserable (Oct. 6, 1998). The Detroit News reports that more than 700 neighbors living near Detroit Metropolitan Airport want Wayne County to require the airport to take new steps to ease the noise before the airport begins its $1.6-billion airport expansion.

City of Burbank Keeps Pushing for Noise Restrictions at California's Burbank-Glendale Airport (Oct. 6, 1998). Airports(R) reports city and airport officials are seeking ways to resolve the ongoing dispute over noise pollution, airline schedules and a terminal upgrade at Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport.

FAA Worried EU Will Limit Operation of Hushkitted Aircraft (Oct. 5, 1998). Aviation Daily reports the FAA is concerned that the European Union is getting ready to act unilaterally to limit the operation of hushkitted aircraft. According to the article, in a Sept. 14 letter, David Traynham, FAA assistant administrator for policy, planning and international aviation, told Michel Ayral, European Commission director for air transport, that a proposed EU regulation "would serve only to diminish the effectiveness of the ICAO process under a mistaken belief that U.S. carriers will transfer their Stage 3 hushkitted airplanes to EU registers after Dec. 31, 1999."

Noisy Dutch Plane Will Tryout O'Hare's Hush House (Oct. 5, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the Dutch Air Force is scheduled to tryout O'Hare's Hush House. According to the article they plan to use one of their big planes - a Hercules C-130H - to test out O'Hare's $3.1 million structure.

Company Aims to Make Airplanes Less Offensive to the Ears (Oct. 5, 1998). The Associated Press reports about how a small company is taking a forefront position to reduce airplane noise by changing the air flow around wings and fuselages.

Noise Sufferers near La Guardia Airport Complain of Disproportionate Burden of Noise in Early Morning Hours (Oct. 4, 1998). The New York Times published the following letter to the editor regarding the unfair dispersal of early morning noise from La Guardia Airport.

Los Angeles Carrier Decides to Delay Early Morning Departures as a Result of Citizen Protests (Oct. 3, 1998). Los Angeles Times credits citizen protest with air carriers' decision to delay early morning take offs from Burbank Airport.

O'Hare Noise Group Discusses Need to Tackle National Issues of Local Importance for Many Cities (Oct. 3, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission discussed the need to tackle national airport noise issues and the importance of forming alliances with similar groups in other cities.

O'Hare's Noise Commissioner Urges the Panel to Take on National Issues to Reduce Noise (Oct. 3, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission is discussing whether to expand its campaign to Washington, D.C. in an effort to reduce noise levels back home.

Changes to Airspace Plan Charges Debate about Increased Flight Capacity at O'Hare International Airport (Oct. 2, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reported that a Federal Aviation Administration workshop for the public discussing airspace changes was vague about whether the changes would mean increased flight capacity.

County Tries to Block Expansion of Lambert Field Airport in St. Louis, Missouri (Oct. 2, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that St. Charles County may join others in a lawsuit against the Federal Aviation Administration to block the expansion of Lambert Field Airport.

Editorial Points out Problems with Expansion for Cleveland Hopkins

Grants Aimed at Reducing Resident Exposure to Airport Noise in Los Angeles (Oct. 2, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that the community of Inglewood will receive $17 million in grants from the Federal Aviation Administration's airport improvement program to help reduce residents' exposure to noise from Los Angeles International Airport.

Missouri Town Files Suit to Overturn Expansion at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport (Oct. 2, 1998). The Bond Buyer reports the city of Bridgeton, Missouri, filed suit against the city of St. Louis hours after St. Louis won approval for expansion of the Lambert-St. Louis International Airport.

Residents of St. Charles, Missouri Rally to Stop Expansion of Lambert Field (Oct. 2, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports on citizen views and their efforts to stop the expansion of Lambert Field near St. Charles, Missouri.

Bridgeton Files Suit After FAA OK's Lambert Expansion; Various Factions Speak Out (Oct. 1, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday approved southwest expansion into Bridgeton at Missouri's Lambert Field. A few hours later, attorneys for Bridgeton filed suit in St. Louis Circuit Court to try to overturn the plan.

Economic Developers See Benefits if Missouri's Lambert Field Expands (Oct. 1, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports economic development officials predict expansion at Missouri's Lambert Field would have a wide-ranging direct and indirect impact, creating thousands of new jobs, pouring billions of dollars into the local economy, and helping Lambert compete with airport hubs across the United States.

Flight Paths out of Boston's Logan Airport May Stir Neighborhood Tensions (Oct. 1, 1998). The Boston Globe reports that changed flight patterns at Logan Airport may pit Boston neighborhoods against each other.

Plans to Expand Cleveland's Airport Alarms Residents (Oct. 1, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports that a newly released report to expand Cleveland's airport has alarmed area residents who feel the airport noise is already problematic.

Residents Say Quality of Life Ignored in Expansion Plans at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (Oct. 1, 1998). The Associated Press reports Ohio residents of suburbs near Cleveland Hopkins International Airport fear more airport expansion will mean more noise.

Warrenville Joins West Chicago in Publicizing its Opposition to Union Pacific's Proposed Railport (Oct. 1, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the city of Warrenville, Illinois is voicing its clear opposition to the railport proposed by Union Pacific. West Chicago has already publicized its opposition to the project.

Nearby Towns Say the Issue is Noise; Vow to Fight FAA Approval of Expansion of St. Louis, Missouri's Lambert Field (Sep. 30, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports if, as expected, the Federal Aviation Administration gives the green light to the $2.6 billion W-1W plan for expanding Lambert Field, the announcement will set in motion legal actions by public officials in St. Charles County.

Opponents of Expansion at Missouri's Lambert Field Picket in St. Louis (Sep. 29, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports despite expected federal approval of Missouri's Lambert Field's expansion plan, three busloads of opponents picketed outside St. Louis City Hall on Monday.

Reno Air Agrees to Burbank Airport's Voluntary Curfew (Sep. 29, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Reno Air, which had sought to fly before 7 a.m. at Burbank Airport when the voluntary curfew lifts, decided it won't violate the curfew.

Third-Airport Proponents Object to FAA's Air-Use Plan at O'Hare (Sep. 29, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports third airport proponents objected Monday to the Federal Aviation Administration's plan for reconfiguring the use of Chicago's air space at O'Hare International Airport. Objectors say the proposed plan fails to address O'Hare's inability to safely handle growth.

Will New Flight Plan at O'Hare Bring More Noise? (Sep. 29, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports residents of Chicago's suburbs, airport activists, and other leaders fear a federal proposal to redesign flight paths would lead to increased flights at O'Hare Airport and more noise below.

Critics Say National Park Service Study of Aircraft Noise is False and Misleading (Sep. 28, 1998). The Weekly of Business Aviation(TM) reports critics of a National Park Service aircraft noise study at the Grand Canyon spoke on Capitol Hill last week.

European Union's Environment Commission Says it Will Propose Noise Pollution Legislation by the End of 1999 (Sep. 28, 1998). The Economist Intelligence Unit reports that the Environment Commission for the European Union has announced that it will propose, by the end of 1999, a legislative framework to extend ambient noise levels, beyond the current limits, for cars, lorries and aircraft.

Montreal Residents Suffer from Perpetual Transportation Noise (Sep. 28, 1998). The Gazette reports Montreal residents who are assaulted by noise from planes, trains and automobiles believe landlords and homeowners need to speak out about this quality of life issue.

Noise Study Focuses on Private Jets at Burbank Airport (Sep. 28, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports while Burbank city leaders fight a proposed new passenger terminal at Burbank Airport, citing noise factors, two private terminals that house the jets of Hollywood moguls such as Time Warner and DreamWorks SKG escape city scrutiny.

Pro Air Clears Approval from the FAA for 36 Departures Daily from Detroit City Airport; City Officials Express Disappointment (Sep. 28, 1998). Crain's Detroit Business reports that Pro Air Inc. has received approval from the Federal Aviation Administration to fly up to 36 departures a day out of Detroit City Airport, an increase of 28 flights over the former limit of eight.

Expanded Flightpaths in England Bring More Noise; Additional 1 Million Homes Will Be Affected (Sep. 27, 1998). The Times Newspapers Limited reports the British government faces an outcry from residents over its plans for a huge expansion of flightpaths that will lead to at least 1m more homes being disturbed by aircraft noise.

ConnDOT to Begin Noise Monitoring at Bradley International Airport (Sep. 26, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports residents of Simsbury, Connecticut, attended the last of three state Department of Transportation meetings on solving the noise problem at the increasingly busy Bradley International Airport.

Despite Noise and Safety Concerns, Senate Approves Plan to Increase Flights at Washington's Reagan National Airport (Sep. 26, 1998). The Washington Post reports the US Senate approved a plan yesterday to add flights at Washington's Reagan National Airport despite local fears that it would add to noise in neighboring communities and undermine business at Dulles International Airport.

Senate Approves More Flights from Reagan Airport; Washington, DC, Residents Expect More Noise (Sep. 26, 1998). The Washington Times reports residents who live near Washington, DC's Reagan National Airport are angry about Senate approval of a bill to increase flights at the busy airport. Residents say increased flights mean more noise and traffic.

Senate OK's More Flights at O'Hare; Critics Predict More Noise, More Health and Safety Problems (Sep. 26, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports a bill that could add 30 daily commercial takeoffs and landings at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport was endorsed Friday by the U.S. Senate. Activists say more planes means more noise and other serious problems.

Air Tour Industry Accuses Park Service of Exaggerating Noise Report to Expand Quiet Zones (Sep. 25, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports Congress was told Thursday by consultants to the air tour industry that National Park Service noise studies are seriously flawed.

Leaders in Missouri Towns Travel to St. Louis to Voice Concerns over Airport Expansion (Sep. 25, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports St. Charles and Bridgeton leaders are planning a major presence Monday in downtown St. Louis to express their concern over expansion plans at Missouri's Lambert Field Airport. Intolerable aircraft noise lies at the heart of their opposition.

Noise in Nearby Towns Tops Issues at Airport Expansion Forum in New Orleans (Sep. 25, 1998). The Times-Picayune reports although the first forum didn't solve any problems, three Louisiana towns agreed Thursday to continue meeting about the expansion of New Orleans International Airport.

Seasonal Flight Paths at Hong Kong's Chek Lap Kok Shift Noise from Region to Region; Residents Take Turns Complaining about Noise (Sep. 25, 1998). The Hong Kong Standard reports Hong Kong's Chek Lap Kok Airport shifts flight paths with the seasons, and affected residents everywhere complain of the noise.

Seeking Relief, Conn. Residents Urge Expedience in Noise Study at Bradley Airport (Sep. 25, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports Connecticut residents affected by noise from Bradley International Airport urged consultants to avoid any delays of a planned noise study.

Senate Approves Regulation of Air Tour Noise in National Parks (Sep. 25, 1998). U.S. Newswire reports the United States Senate approved measures to address the problem of excessive noise from aircraft in national parks.

Federal Appeals Court Supports Noise Restrictions in Grand Canyon (Sep. 24, 1998). The Arizona Business Gazette reports a federal appellate court has refused to set aside new rules designed to curb aircraft noise at the Grand Canyon in the case of Grand Canyon Air Tour Coalition v. Federal Aviation Administration (97-1003).

Helicopter Pad at English Hotel Brings Noise Complaints from Neighbors (Sep. 24, 1998). The Birmingham Evening Mail reports a helicopter landing at a Birmingham, England, hotel is angering local residents who claim their peace and quiet is being shattered.

Montreal Airport Switch Brings Noise and Aggravation to Some Residents (Sep. 24, 1998). The Gazette reports Montreal, Canada, residents continue to call Aeroports de Montreal to rage about airplane noise since international flights were transferred from outlying Mirabel Airport to Dorval Airport a year ago.

Washington Area Lawmakers Object to Senate Bill Allowing Increased Flights at Reagan National (Sep. 24, 1998). The Associated Press reports a final Senate vote is expected Friday, despite some local opposition, to increase flights at Washington, DC's Reagan National Airport.

Competition for Early-Bird Flights at California's Burbank Airport Could Dispose of Voluntary Morning Curfew (Sep. 23, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Reno Air has requested that Burbank Airport in California allow flights in the early hours, but residents strongly opposed the idea due to possible increases in noise. The airport was set to decide on the request Tuesday, but delayed its decision until at least next week because of the public outcry.

Even with Quieter Planes, O'Hare Neighbors Say Air Traffic Noise Increasing (Sep. 23, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports two reports released Tuesday by the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission highlight a contradiction in the controversy over airplane noise at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport. Even though air carriers use quieter aircraft, O'Hare's neighbors say noise has increased dramatically.

New Zealand Residents Want Airport Noise Reduced Sooner than Later (Sep. 23, 1998). The Evening Standard reports at a meeting about airport generated noise attended by ratepayers and representatives from the Palmerston North city council, airport company, and Fieldair Engineering, New Zealanders' main message was, "Let's curb noise now."

Pennsylvania Airport Buys More Land and Property to Create Noise Buffer Zone (Sep. 23, 1998). The Morning Call reports Pennsylvania's Lehigh-Northampton Airport Authority will purchase land and homes to reduce noise complaints from the Village of Schoenersville.

Developers Plan Open Space Surrounding California's El Toro Airport (Sep. 22, 1998). World Airport Week reports developers for California's El Toro Airport have presented on open space plan to county executives, requesting a park surround the airfield.

Navy Denies Flawed Impact Study; Citizens' Group Files Suit to Stop Jet Relocation to Oceana, VA (Sep. 22, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports the Navy has formally denied allegations made in a federal lawsuit challenging its decision to transfer 156 F/A-18 Hornets to Oceana Naval Air Station in Virginia.

FAA Adds $1Million to Soundproofing Fund at RI's Green Airport (Sep. 21, 1998). The Associated Press reports T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode, Island, is getting $1 million from the Federal Aviation Administration to insulate neighboring homes against jet noise.

FAA Gives RI's Green Airport Additional Funds to Soundproof Homes (Sep. 21, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the Federal Aviation Administration has awarded T.F. Green Airport an additional $1 million to insulate more houses against jet noise.

Florida Aviation Dept. Uses New Technology to Monitor Impact of Jet Noise (Sep. 21, 1998). The Journal of Commerce reports the Miami-Dade Aviation Department in Florida revealed a technology on Friday used to monitor airplane noise. This new system could mean significant implications for the air cargo industry.

Meetings to Focus on Mini-Study of Noise Sensitive Residential Areas Surrounding Conn.'s Bradley Airport (Sep. 21, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports residents will be able to voice their concerns about noise from Connecticut's Bradley International Airport at three meetings this week. Residents will be asked to give input on a planned "mini-study" of noise-sensitive areas.

New Early A.M. Flight at LA's Burbank Airport Likely to Increase Tensions Over Airplane Noise (Sep. 21, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that the administrators of Burbank Airport may allow early departures by Reno Air, angering residents already upset over airport noise.

Texas Rancher Objects to Air Force Plan--Noise from Bombers Threatens Quality of Life (Sep. 20, 1998). The Sacramento Bee reports Texan ranchers are concerned about how noise from an Air Force training range for bombers will effect their animals, ranches, and ways of life.

Maylaysia Limits Singapore's Use of Airspace; Could Mean More Noise for Both Countries (Sep. 19, 1998). Deutsche Presse-Agentur reports Malaysia's new restrictions on Singapore's use of Malaysian airspace could mean more aircraft noise for residents of both countries.

Texas Instruments' Corporate Jets at McKinney Airport Brings Noise Worries to Town of Fairview (Sep. 19, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports while McKinney Municipal Airport's first corporate jet fleet will deliver tax dollars and fuel sales, spark airport improvements and spur industrial and airport development, the town of Fairview, Texas, fears all it will get is increased air traffic and noise.

Anti-Noise Candidate in Australia Claims Death Threats-Continues Campaign Against RAAF Jet Noise (Sep. 18, 1998). AAP Newsfeed reports an independent candidate in Australia campaigning against aircraft noise claimed today she and her family had been subjected to death threats.

Federal Grant Funds Relocation Program for Residents Near Georgia's DeKalb-Peachtree Airport (Sep. 18, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports a relocation program will be funded with a federal grant for residents who live near Georgia's DeKalb-Peachtree Airport.

Minn. Refuge Paid $20 Million for Loss of Quiet Due to Jet Noise (Sep. 18, 1998). The Associated Press reports that silence is worth at least $20 million, according to an appraisal of the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge.

Residents Demand Action on Jet Noise at NJ's Teterboro Airport (Sep. 18, 1998). The Record reports local New Jersey officials and residents fighting increased jet traffic demanded action at a demonstration at Teterboro Airport on Thursday.

Arlington Heights Questions O'Hare's Compliance with Fly Quiet Program (Sep. 17, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports an increase in the number of residents' complaints about noise from Illinois' O'Hare International Airport is causing Arlington Heights officials to question the City of Chicago about compliance with nighttime flying procedures.

Arlington Heights Updates Plans to Fight Noise at Chicago's O'Hare Airport (Sep. 17, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports Arlington Heights' Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise began drafting a new battle plan this week to fight airplane noise.

Living Under Detroit Airport's Flight Paths is "Hell on Earth" (Sep. 17, 1998). The Detroit News reports one New Boston, Illinois, resident who lives in Detroit Metro Airport's southern flight path says the recent Northwest pilots strike gave her temporary reprieve from unbearable noise.

Missouri's Lambert Field to Install New Noise Monitor to Aid Residents (Sep. 17, 1998). The Louis Post-Dispatch reports an easement was approved for a new permanent noise monitor to determine the amount of noise residents are subjected to from Missouri's Lambert Field Airport.

Nevada Home Owners Reject New Noise Zones Near McCarran Airport (Sep. 17, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports Nevada's Clark County Commission indefinitely postponed action Wednesday on a new, noise zone, due to vigorous opposition from residents near McCarran International Airport who fear property devaluation.

US Court of Appeals Rejects Challenges to Noise and Airflight Restrictions over Grand Canyon National Park (Sep. 15, 1998). Greenwire released the following statement announcing a US federal appeals court upheld new noise and flight restrictions in the Grand Canyon National Park. The press release reads as follows:

Illinois Residents Object to Regulation of Law Mower and Snow Blower Noise (Sep. 14, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald published the following letters it received from Arlington Heights, Illinois, citizens in response to a report that the Arlington Heights Environmental Control Commission said it was looking at limiting the hours when people can operate lawn mowers. The first letter is from Jan Berkley:

Most Residents in Chicago Suburb Object to Proposed Regulation of Lawn Mower Noise (Sep. 14, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald published a second set of letters from Arlington Heights, Illinois, residents responding to an article that reported the Arlington Heights Environmental Control Commission was considering imposing restrictions on homeowners' use of lawn mowers and snow blowers to regulate noise. Included as well are two letters from residents addressing other noise issues in Arlington Heights. The first letter about lawn mower noise is from resident Cathy Robertson:

Cargo Business at Seattle's Boeing Field Brings Most Noise Complaints (Sep. 13, 1998). The Seattle Times printed the following letter to the editor from Mike Rees, President of Seattle, Washington's, Council on Airport Affairs. In his letter, Rees contends Boeing Field Airport stopped being a good neighbor when it increased air cargo business. Rees writes:

Changes in Lambert Field's Expansion Plan Means More Noise, Critics Charge (Sep. 13, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch of St. Louis, Missouri, reports opponents of Lambert Field's expansion plan contend that changes made in the proposal would generate more noise south of the airport than originally anticipated.

Editorial Urges Gilbert, Arizona, Town Council and Citizens to do Homework on Proposed Expansion of Williams Gateway Airport (Sep. 13, 1998). The Arizona Republic published the following editorial criticizing the Gilbert, Arizona, Town Council for blindly accepting the Williams Gateway Airport Authority's recommendations for zoning without considering its citizens and the common good.

Los Angeles Area Residents Debate Impact of Proposed El Toro Airport (Sep. 13, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following letters from residents California residents about the proposed El Toro Airport. The following letter was written by Leonard Kranser of Dana Point, California:

O'Hare Business Group Meets with Suburban Legislators to Drum up Support for O'Hare (Sep. 11, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports suburban legislators met Thursday with the Greater O'Hare Association of Industry and Commerce to discuss regional cooperation and support of O'Hare International Airport.

Editorial Criticizes Residential Growth Near Arizona's Luke Air Force Base (Sep. 11, 1998). The Arizona Republic published the following letter to the editor from Bill Lipscomb of Surprise City, Arizona. In his letter, Lipscomb warns citizens of the dangers of allowing residential growth under the flight paths at Luke Air Force Base. Lipscomb wrote:

Airport Activists Question Aim of O'Hare Meeting (Sep. 11, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports a closed-door meeting between Illinois state and local officials and airline executives Thursday caused some noise activists to suggest the aim of the meeting was to discuss expansion at O'Hare International Airport.

Government Rejects Activists' Attempts to Restrict Night-Flights at England's Largest Airports (Sep. 11, 1998). Times Newspapers Limited reports anti-noise groups lost their fight to restrict night-time flying at England's three major airports.

Exploring Methods to Quiet Fighter Noise at Tulsa International Airport (Sep. 11, 1998). Tulsa World reports military jets are the loudest aircraft at Oklahoma's Tulsa International Airport and cause the most complaints among airport-area residents. But a recent study found certain departure procedures can reduce noise from the military aircraft.

NY Town Debates Loud Train Whistles: Nuisance or Necessity? (Sep. 10, 1998). The Buffalo News reports Depew, New York, officials will consider banning train whistles at a public hearing Monday.

Airport Opponents Will Fight Cargo Flights at California's El Toro (Sep. 10, 1998). The Orange County Register reports a new effort is under way to start commercial air-cargo flights at the proposed El Toro airport next year. Airport opponents vow to fight the effort.

Citizens in Gilbert, Arizona, Demand to be Heard about Noise from Williams Gateway Airport (Sep. 10, 1998). The Arizona Republic published the following letter to the editor from Gilbert, Arizona, resident Nick Champion. In his letter, Champion challenges the town council's position on airport noise and its effects on residents' property values. Champion wrote:

Runway Work at John Wayne Airport Causes Pilots to Fly Lower and Louder; Residents Complain about Noise (Sep. 10, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that during runway repair at John Wayne Airport in California, pilots are flying a different approach before landing. The path is more towards the west than usual, and at lower altitude, which has angered residents who have gotten more noise than they're used to. The Federal Aviation Administration says there's no safety problems involved with the new approaches.

FAA Says It's Illegal to Ban Commercial Traffic at Colorado's Centennial Airport; County Vows to Fight FAA (Sep. 9, 1998). The Denver Post reports there's controversy over bringing in commercial air traffic to Centennial Airport in Colorado's Arapahoe County.

Leaders Meet to Discuss O'Hare Airport; Noise Reduction Likely on Agenda (Sep. 9, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports Chicago's Mayor Richard M. Daley, state legislators, major airline executives, and north suburban business leaders will meet to discuss O'Hare International Airport on Thursday during a closed-door meeting.

Resident Opposes Larger Jets at California's Camarillo Airport, Citing Existing Noise Problems (Sep. 9, 1998). The Ventura County Star published the following letter to the editor about the existing noise jet noise problem at Camarillo Airport from resident Al Knuth of Camarillo, California. Knuth opposes proposals to allow larger jets at the airport. Knuth writes:

Aircraft in U.S. Complying with Airport Noise and Capacity Act (Sep. 9, 1998). The Federal Department and Agency Documents reports airplanes in the United States are ahead of the required deadlines to transition to quieter aircraft, reports Secretary of Transportation Rodney E. Slater.

Housing Development Approved Near Illinois' Palwaukee Airport, Clause Prevents Noise Lawsuits from Residents (Sep. 9, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports the village board of Wheeling, Illinois unanimously approved a new subdivision on a piece of land north of Palwaukee Municipal Airport.

Groups Picket St. Louis City Hall Over Expansion Plans for Missouri's Lambert Field Airport, Citing Noise and Safety Concerns (Sep. 9, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports three organizations that oppose the expansion plan for Missouri's Lambert Field are scheduled today to picket the St. Louis City Hall. After the picketing, they hope to meet with St. Louis Mayor Clarence Harmon to voice their complaints.

Calif. Residents Fear Extended Runway Means Larger, Noisier Planes (Sep. 8, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports a plan to extend the runway at California's San Carlos Airport makes neighbors fear bigger and noisier aircraft. Airport officials stress the project is necessary to increase airport safety.

Letter Asks for Equal Coverage of North Carolina Residents' Concerns about FedEx Hub (Sep. 8, 1998). The News & Record published the following letter to the editor from Jeff Johnson, a resident of Greensboro, North Carolina. In his letter Johnson contends recent articles published in the newspaper about the new FedEx hub unfairly deny equal space to citizens' concerns. Johnson writes:

Pilots' Strike Brings Some Quiet to Noisy World of Minneapolis, Minnesota (Sep. 8, 1998). The Star Tribune reports an unintended consequence of the pilots' strike against Northwest Airlines: natural quiet beneath the airport flight paths in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Increased Night Flights at O'Hare Limits Chicago's Fly Quiet Program (Sep. 8, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports Chicago's Fly Quiet program produces negligible results as night flights from O'Hare Airport increase.

Noise Decreases at Nashville Airport, But Some Tenn. Residents Still Wait for Home Soundproofing (Sep. 8, 1998). The Tennessean reports the Federal Aviation Administration is reducing the size of the noise contour map at Tennessee's Nashville International Airport, saying the airport is quieter than it was in 1993 when the map was made.

Is it Noise or Publicity that Prompts Residents to Call O'Hare Hotline? (Sep. 8, 1998). The Associated Press reports complaints about airplane noise from Chicago's O'Hare International Airport often come from residents in the towns that are the least affected by airplane noise problems.

Shared-Noise Strategy at Australia's Kingsford Smith Airport Criticized by Safety Experts, Air Traffic Controllers, Pilots and Others (Sep. 7, 1998). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports Australia's government shared- noise strategy significantly reduces capacity at Sydney's Kingsford Smith Airport while increasing safety concerns.

Letter: Don't Neglect to Mention Noise from Santa Monica Airport in Real Estate Articles (Sep. 6, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following letter to the editor from two Los Angeles, California, residents who chided the newspaper for omitting the existence of airplane noise in any article about Sunset Park real estate. The Schechters wrote:

Airlines' Strike Brings Quiet to Tennessee Neighborhoods (Sep. 6, 1998). The Commercial Appeal reports there are fewer planes and quieter skies in the Memphis, Tennessee, area since the Northwest Airlines strike began.

Increased Air Traffic and Noise Over Upper Manhattan Neighborhoods Due to Runway Work at La Guardia (Sep. 6, 1998). The New York Times reports New York City residents are annoyed by the increased flights over their neighborhoods in the last several months. The sharp rise in air traffic and its attendant noise are due to runway work at La Guardia Airport.

Airport Activist Calls New O'Hare Flight Path Plans 'Two-Lane Highways' (Sep. 5, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports new flight path plans favored by the Federal Aviation Administration at O'Hare International Airport are causing alarm in airport activists who fear more flights, along with increased noise and pollution.

Citizen Defends Noise Abatement Demands at Warwick's T.F. Green Airport (Sep. 5, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin published the following letter to the editor from Warwick resident Peg Magill defending noise abatement procedures suggested by citizens for Rhode Island's T.F. Green Airport. Magill wrote:

Neighbors of Pittsfield, Maine, Airport Object to Additional Hanger, Citing Noise, Traffic and Safety Concerns (Sep. 5, 1998). The Bangor Daily News reports Maine's Pittsfield planning board will meet Wednesday, Sept. 16, to review a conditional use application for a new hangar at the municipal airport. Neighbors are concerned about increased noise and traffic that the new structure may bring.

Albuquerque Considers Ordinance Restricting Heliports after Residents Complain of Noise from TV News Helicopters (Sep. 4, 1998). The Albuquerque Tribune reports the Albuquerque, New Mexico, Environmental Planning Commission is considering an ordinance restricting heliports after residents complained of noise from news helicopters that take off and land near their homes.

Finger Pointing and Blaming When Residents and Local Officials Discuss Noise from Warwick's Expanded T. F. Green Airport (Sep. 4, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports Warwick, Rhode Island, Councilman Gene Kelly held a meeting on airport noise last night. The incumbent mayor, a mayoral candidate, and a state airport official turned out to respond to residents' concerns about noise and expansion at Warwick's T. F. Green Airport.

New Flight-Control Plan at O'Hare Raises Concerns from Activists and Traffic Controllers (Sep. 4, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports the Federal Aviation Administration's plan to reconfigure flight paths for the Chicago area's airspace has launched a debate over whether the plan is a part of a strategy to increase flights at O'Hare International Airport. Meanwhile, air traffic controllers voice their safety concerns about the new flight plan.

O'Hare Air Traffic Noise on the Rise in Chicago Neighborhoods; Frustrated Noise Panel Wants FAA Help (Sep. 4, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports despite the efforts of the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission, the noise problem at O'Hare appears to be worsening. Commission members are requesting from the Federal Aviation Administration stronger support of a plan to steer aircraft away from residential areas.

San Francisco Airport Gets Three Year Variance to Comply with California's Noise Standards; Local and State Leaders Oppose Extension (Sep. 4, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports California's San Francisco International Airport received a variance for another three years to comply with state noise standards and become a quieter neighbor.

Who Is A Reliable Source of Information for the El Toro Airport? (Aug. 23, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following four editorials regarding the proposed conversion of the El Toro Military Airbase. Two of the editorialists are residents. The two other editorialists are members of the El Toro Airport Citizens Advisory Commission (CAC).

Airplanes are Unbearably Loud for Family Living Near Palm Beach International Airport (Aug. 22, 1998). The Palm Beach Post published the following editorial from a resident living near Palm Beach International Airport (PBIA). The editorialist articulates his feelings of powerlessness amidst discussions of further PBIA expansion.

Burbank Airport Expansion Plan Lamented and Praised by Editorialists (Aug. 22, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles ran the following editorials regarding the fairness of the El Toro Airport plan and relocation of the terminal at Burbank Airport.

Residents Let out Their Fury Regarding Noise at Manchester Airport (Aug. 21, 1998). The Union Leader report that a raucous and angry crowd released their fury about noise from New Hampshire's Manchester Airport at last night's meeting. Promises from airport officials to begin a new noise survey failed to quieten their anger.

The City of Burbank Launches a 35-Page Attack on Airport Noise Study (Aug. 21, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that Burbank city officials have launched at 35-page attack on the Burbank Airport's noise study. City officials claim the document "fails to lay a foundation for real, effective aircraft noise abatement."

Neighbors and School Districts near Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport Need Answers; FAA Sources Say They'll Have to Wait (Aug. 20, 1998). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that about 400 residents and school officials from Boone County filled a public meeting room to express concerns about how improvements to the runways at the Cincinnati - Northern Kentucky International Airport would affect their homes and classrooms.

No New Noise Monitor for Chicago Area's Fly Quiet Program (Aug. 20, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that a noise committee for the village of Arlington Heights debated whether to get a second stationary monitor from the city of Chicago. According to Trustee Virginia Kucera, the committee's vice chairwoman, failure to reach a consensus meant the village would not be getting a second monitor for tracking O'Hara aircraft noise.

Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise Want Compliance with Night-time Flight Rules (Aug. 19, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the Village of Arlington Heights is fuming about O'Hare's noncompliance with nightime-flying rules.

Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport May Have to Close for Several (Aug. 19, 1998). AP Worldstream reports that Amsterdam Schiphol Airport, the busiest airport in the Netherlands, may have to close down for weeks at the end of this year if the government doesn't relax noise pollution guidelines.

Appellate Court Denies City its Noise Lawsuit against the Minneapolis Metropolitan Airport. (Aug. 19, 1998). The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports that the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals denied the city of Richfield its noise lawsuit against the Metropolitan Airport. The suit contested the validity of the environmental impact statement that the airport used to win federal approval for the airport's crosswind runway.

County Commissioners To Work to Keep Airport Noise Levels in Check near Northern Kentucky International Airport (Aug. 18, 1998). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports monitors show that Northern Kentucky International Airport has slightly exceeded noise limits set out in an agreement between the airport and the Sisters of Charity.

Homeowners' Sentiments Concerning the Proposed Federal Express Hub Aired at Public Meeting in Greensboro, North Carolina (Aug. 18, 1998). News & Record in Greensboro, North Carolina reports that a public meeting brought out a torrent of public sentiments concerning the proposed Federal Express hub and third runway for Piedmont Triad International Airport.

Planes Flying Below Recommended Altitudes Thwart Noise Control Efforts near Baltimore Washington International Airport (Aug. 18, 1998). The Capital reports that a state study concludes that about one-third of planes flying over Severna Park to Baltimore Washington International Airport are flying lower than the altitude recommended by the state to control noise.

Residents Angry that Their Ideas to Reduce Airport Noise at T.F. Green Airport Dismissed by the Experts (Aug. 14, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that noise experts for T.F. Green Airport shot down the mandatory controls demanded by airport neighbors yesterday, saying they would be too costly, would disrupt service, and would never be approved by the Federal Aviation Administration.

New Procedures at Vero Beach Airport Aims to Reduce Noise (Aug. 14, 1998). The Press Journal reports that the Vero Beach Airport Commission has approved a master plan that outlines development through 2020. Much of the projected development aims to reduce noise and includes specific procedures established by the airport director for meeting that goal.

Cincinnati - Northern Kentucky International Airport Board Affirms the Idea of Including a Ohioan as a Voting Member of the Board (Aug. 14, 1998). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that there is a possibility that an Ohioan could serve as a voting member on the Cincinnati - Northern Kentucky International Airport Board. According to the article the idea was resurrected Thursday and was given support from most of the elected officials attending a joint meeting of Ohio's Hamilton County commissioners and Kentucky's Kenton Fiscal Court commissioners.

Tulsa International Airport Proposes 2.5 Million Noise Abatement Budget (Aug. 14, 1998). The Tulsa World reports that the Tulsa International Airport has proposed a budget for 1999, which includes $2.5 million for noise abatement. If the trustees adopt the budget it will mark the first year airport trustees have directed local funding to a five-year $20 million aircraft noise abatement program.

Changes in Land-use Policies Recommended to Mitigate the Impact of Airport Noise in Albuquerque, New Mexico (Aug. 13, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reports that noise consultants are recommending new land-use policies for the city of Albuquerque, New Mexico and the surrounding county to help mitigate the impact of airport noise.

Bradley International Airport Gears Up for a Noise Study (Aug. 13, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports that state officials have hired a national engineering firm to study ways to reduce noise caused by planes departing from Bradley International Airport in Connecticut.

FAA Official Says FAA Has Yet to Approve Requested Flight Curfews and Growth Caps (Aug. 12, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports on a recent meeting between Burbank's city officials, airport officials and FAA Administrator Jane Garvey. According to the article Garvey said any application to the FAA for flight curfews and growth caps would be welcome but cautioned that six U.S. airports have sought already sought FAA approval for curfews and growth caps and none of them have been accepted by the agency.

Warwick, RI, Mayor Suggests Ways for Airport to be a Good Neighbor (Aug. 11, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin published the following editorial by Lincoln Chafee, mayor of Warwick, Rhode Island, about Warwick's T.F. Green Airport. Mayor Chafee outlines ways for the airport to be a good neighbor:

The FAA To Assist the City of Burbank and the Airport in Reaching a Solution Regarding Airport's Proposed Expansion (Aug. 11, 1998). City News Service reports that Federal Aviation Administrator Jane Garvey is willing to help the city of Burbank and the airport come to a solution in their dispute over the airport's proposed expansion.

Rhode Island Airport Corporation Hears Residents' Proposals for Noise Reduction at T.F. Green Airport (Aug. 11, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports Rhode Island's state Airport Corporation will sponsor a public meeting Thursday to focus noise and ways to reduce it from Warwick's T.F. Green Airport.

City and FAA Asked to Lower Decibel Level for Homes to Qualify for Insulation from LAX Noise (Aug. 11, 1998). Copley News Service reports the FAA has been asked by the Los Angles County Board of Supervisors to change noise standards so more homes will qualify for federally funded noise insulation from the Los Angeles International Airport.

FAA Exec. Will Try to Resolve Dispute between City of Burbank and Airport (Aug. 10, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports Jane Garvey, the chief executive of the Federal Aviation Administration, will arrive in Burbank, California, on Tuesday to try to secure an end to the 16-year war over the proposed expansion of Burbank Airport.

Enforce Noise Abatement Laws on Illinois' Waterways, Says Editorial (Aug. 10, 1998). The Chicago Tribune published an editorial criticizing the lack of enforcement of quiet boating on Illinois' inland waterways.

County Aviation Official Says New Nevada Airport Necessary (Aug. 9, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal published the following editorial by Randall H. Walker, director of Nevada's Clark County Department of Aviation. Walker advocates for the Ivanpah Airport project, deeming it a necessity to accommodate the Las Vegas Valley's future needs. Walker writes:

Executive's Helicopter Permitted Daily Trip Despite Maryland Residents' Complaints about Noise (Aug. 8, 1998). The Washington Times reports Rite Aid Chairman Martin Grass has received permission from Baltimore County officials to take off and land in his company helicopter at his home in Lutherville, Maryland, despite complaints from neighbors about the noise.

Minn. Town Objects to Airport Expansion, Citing Noise Concerns and Charging Breach of Promise (Aug. 7, 1998). The Star Tribune reports despite pressure from the Metropolitan Airports Commission (MAC), officials and residents in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, object to expansion of their "reliever" airport because they fear an increase in noise and an alteration in their quality of life.

Noise Levels Shift Back to Usual After Summer Work at Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport (Aug. 7, 1998). The Star Tribune reports on Monday about 170 daily airplane takeoffs will be shifted back to their usual runways at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, meaning quieter skies for some nearby communities and a return to the usual noise level for other areas.

Residents of Housing Project Near Georgia Airport to be Relocated (Aug. 6, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports residents of Lottie Miller Homes public housing project in College Park, Georgia, should soon get relief from airplane noise roaring overhead day and night, a city lawyer said this week.

Arizona Residents Battle Runway Expansion, Fearing Noisier Skies (Aug. 6, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports residents who live near Arizona's Chandler Municipal Airport object to proposals to lengthen one of the airport's two runways and to rezone most of the land around it for commercial or industrial development.

As Air Traffic Increases at San Francisco Airport, More Towns Affected by Jet Noise (Aug. 6, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports the outrage over jet noise is spreading to communities further and further south of the San Francisco International Airport as air traffic increases.

Night Flights Upset Neighbors Near OíHare International Airport (Aug. 4, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports an increase in overnight flights at O'Hare International Airport. The increase is being publicized by Chicago's Fly Quiet program, and organized effort established last year to help reduce noise at the world's busiest airport.

Meeting Will Hear Out Neighbors' Grievances About Noise From Ohioís Port Columbus Airport (Aug. 3, 1998). The Columbus Dispatch reports that a workshop will take place to allow neighbors to air their grievances about sound noise from nearby Port Columbus Airport. According to the article these workshops are periodically scheduled as a part of the noise compatibility program and are necessary if airports are to receive Federal Aviation Administration funds for noise abatement.

Soundproofing Plan for New Orleans International Airport Comes to a Halt (Aug. 3, 1998). The Times-Picayune reports that the soundproofing program for residential areas near New Orleans International Airport in Louisiana has come to a halt while airport officials negotiate with project architects.

Expected Increase in Air Travel Seen as Justification for Airport Expansion and Development in Southern California (Aug. 2, 1998). The Sacramento Bee reports that air traffic in Southern California is expected to double over the next 20 years. Plans are in the works for both (1) expansion at the Los Angeles International Airport and for (2) development of a new airport at Orange Countyís El Toro Maine Corp Air Station after it closes next year. The anger of residents is being waged against both plans. And seventy-five (75) million travelers are caught in the middle.

Burbank Airport in California Receives Variance in Caltran Decision (Aug. 1, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Burbank Airport and the city of Burbank each claimed victory Friday after Caltrans decided to renew the airport's noise variance - with some new conditions.

China Accesses the Number of People to be Affected by Proposed Flight Path (Jul. 31, 1998). South China Morning Post reports that officials are being urged to provide more details on flight paths and the people affected by aircraft noise.

FAA and Congress Need to Help the Burbank Airport Reach a Positive Settlement (Jul. 31, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles published the following editorial regarding the need to reach a positive settlement to reduce noise, eliminate safety hazards, and improve service at Burbank Airport in California.

National Organization to Insure a Sound-controlled Environment Elects New Executive Board at its Annual Symposium (Jul. 31, 1998). The Rocky Mountain News reports that members of the National Organization to Insure a Sound-controlled Environment elected Mike Benallo, a councilman from Commerce City, president and Jo Thorne, a councilwoman from Thornton as vice-president.

Noise Mitigation Measures Need Consideration at Burbank Airport in California (Jul. 31, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Burbank Airport officials have proposed several noise-mitigation strategies, but a recent study says none of those may ever be implemented.

Experts Proposal Noise Reduction Measures for Burbank Airport (Jul. 30, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that noise at the Burbank Airport could be reduced with night curfews, sound walls and re-routing of night flights. The recommendations were unveiled in a preliminary study made by Coffman Associates, a noise consultant hired by the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport.

OíHare Impact Study Warranted According to Mayor of Park Ridge, Illinois (Jul. 30, 1998). Chicago Tribune published the following poignant commentary from the Mayor of Park Ridge, a suburb of Chicago, and neighbor to OíHare International Airport. The commentary takes issue with the opinion of the Chicago Tribuneís editorial board which concluded that any review of the environmental impact of safety, noise and air pollution implications from a shift of 100 military slots at O'Hare International Airport to commercial usage will, in all likelihood, show minimal adverse impact.

Public Meeting for Neighbors Affected by Aircraft Noise in Chandler, Arizona (Jul. 30, 1998). The Arizona Republic announced a public meeting July 30, 1998 to give residents a chance to talk about airplane noise and future development at Chandler Airport.

California County Votes to Ban Homeowners From Suing Proposed El Toro Airport Over Noise (Jul. 29, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Orange County, California supervisors decided to require "avigation easements" from all new homeowners near the proposed El Toro Airport. Mission Viejo Company, a developer, will now build 1,800 housing units. Anyone buying one of the units must sign an easement promising not to sue the airport over noise problems, but real estate agents are also required to disclose explicit details about potential jet noise.

Opponents of Sixth Runway at Denver International Airport Say Indicted Lobbyist Responsible for Ending Federal Ban on Funding (Jul. 29, 1998). The Rocky Mountain News reports that opponents of a sixth runway at Denver International Airport (DIA) say the city used an indicted lobbyist to overturn a 3-year-old ban on federal funding for the project. According to the article, the federal ban was put in place to force Denver to address noise problems.

Study Finds 400 More Homes Will be Impacted by Noise in Burbank Air Traffic Growth (Jul. 29, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that a study released Tuesday found that air traffic growth at the Burbank (California) Airport will increase the number of homes impacted by noise by about 400, raising the total to about 2,700, during the next 12 years. The report will be presented today to the airport's Community Study Advisory Committee, made up of airport officials and community stakeholders. The article notes that the study adds fuel to the long legal and political battle between airport and city officials over a proposed expansion at the airport. City officials want to replace the terminal but not expand the facility because of the potential increase in traffic and noise. Airport officials want to increase the airport form 14 to at least 19 gates for economic development and safety reasons.

Third Runway to be Built to Accommodate FedExís New Hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport in North Carolina (Jul. 29, 1998). News & Record reports Piedmont Triad International Airport in North Carolina will open a new runway parallel to the existing main runway to accommodate extra flights expected from Fedexís new hub.

Florida Officials Pave Way for Large Development by Prohibiting Future Residents From Suing Over Aircraft Noise (Jul. 28, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports that the City Council in Orlando, Florida voted on Monday to approve an agreement that mostly prohibits future residents in a project known as Vista East from suing nearby Orlando International Airport over airplane noise. The article explains that the council's action paves the way for the $500 million residential and commercial project to begin.

Fight is Shaping up Over Proposal for Airpark in Kentucky (Jul. 27, 1998). The Courier-Journal reports that a battle is shaping up over a proposal to build a 3,000-acre airport and industrial-park complex outside Bowling Green, Kentucky, near Smiths Grove, a town of about 700. Today, the article says, a feasibility study compiled by HNTB Corp. will be released that will identify at least two proposed sites for an airpark. Meanwhile, a residents group has formed that opposes the airpark.

The Devastating Effects of Noise Pollution and Some Ways to Ease its Impact (Jul. 27, 1998). Time Magazine reports noise pollution is increasing across Europe. While noise can damage health and destroy peace of mind, there are ways to lessen its impact.

FAA Proposes New Flight Paths for Some Jets at Seattle Airport to Reduce Noise (Jul. 26, 1998). The News Tribune reports that a new plan has been proposed that would shift some nighttime flight paths at the Sea-Tac Airport in the Seattle, Washington area to reduce noise over Federal Way. There are conflicting accounts of whether the plan has been proposed by the Federal Aviation Administration or the office of U.S. Representative Adam Smith. The article reports that a similar proposal involving daytime flights was rejected by the FAA in April, surprising and disappointing many local officials.

Residents Continue Debate on Commercial Airport at California's El Toro Marine Base (Jul. 26, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letters-to-the-editor from residents in the Irvine, California area regarding the proposed commercial airport at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station:

Kentucky Residents Complain About Airport Noise (Jul. 25, 1998). The Courier-Journal printed the following letters-to-the-editor from residents in Louisville, Kentucky, regarding noise from the airport:

Gripe Session on Airport Issues Held in Rhode Island Town (Jul. 24, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that about 165 residents attended a "gripe session" in Warwick, Rhode Island last night and aired their feelings about noise and development at the T.F. Green Airport. The session was held by City Councilor Gerry Gibbons. Also attending the meeting were Lincoln Chafee, Warwick's Mayor, George Zainyeh, the Democratic candidate for mayor, and Elaine Roberts, executive director of the state Airport Corporation.

Group Holds Annual Airport Noise Conference in Colorado (Jul. 24, 1998). The Rocky Mountain News reports that the National Organization to Insure a Sound Controlled Environment (NOISE), based in Washington, is holding its annual conference through Saturday in Thornton, Colorado. The article notes that members of the group are mostly elected officials, but community groups and airport officials also belong to the organization.

Columnist Argues That Hong Kong Residents Don't Have a Case on Jet Noise From New Airport, But They Should Have Been Told About Flight Path Routes (Jul. 23, 1998). The South China Morning Post printed an editorial in which the writer argues that residents complaining about jet noise coming from the flight paths of the new Chek Lap Kok airport in Hong Kong don't have a case against the government. But, the editorial says, the government should have informed residents about the flight path routes, or at least provided a channel through which they could easily find out the information.

Maryland State Officials Enlarge Airport Noise Zone, Throwing a Wrench in Developer's Plans (Jul. 23, 1998). The Baltimore Sun reports that the Maryland Aviation Administration changed the noise zone boundary, an area in which homes cannot be built, for the Baltimore-Washington International Airport in March. That move has angered developer Earl Armiger, who already had started plans for a 31-home development in Elkridge that now falls within the noise zone. Armiger has appealed to the Board of Airport Zoning Appeals, asking for permission to build in the noise zone. The board is scheduled to hear the case on October 16.

U.S. House Subcommittee Votes to Allow Denver Airport to Pursue Funding for Sixth Runway (Jul. 23, 1998). The Denver Post reports that the House Appropriations subcommittee on transportation voted Wednesday to approve a $47 billion transportation spending bill for 1998-1999 that would allow the Denver (Colorado) International Airport to compete for funding to build a sixth runway. The article notes that the bill is scheduled to be voted on by the full House and Senate in coming weeks.

Airline Companies Place More Orders for Hushkits to Meet Noise Regulations (Jul. 22, 1998). Flight International reports that AvAero Aircraft Noise Reduction and the Nordam Group, two companies that specialize in installing Boeing 737 hushkits, have collected orders and options for more than 500 hushkits, used to quiet jet engines. The article notes that both companies have reported a new flurry of activity in the hushkit market as deadlines for meeting the Stage 3 noise regulations approach.

FAA Makes No Decision on Missouri Airport Expansion Plan; Opponents Say FAA Will Reject Plan (Jul. 21, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that officials with the Federal Aviation Administration met with Leonard Griggs, the director of Lambert Field near St. Louis, Missouri, on Monday to discuss plans for Lambert's proposed expansion. However, the article says, the federal agency gave no indication on whether it intends to approve the controversial expansion plan. Meanwhile, some opponents of Lambert's expansion predicted that the FAA would soon reject the plan. A meeting between FAA Administrator Jane Garvey and a delegation of local officials on the same topic is slated for Thursday in Washington.

Hong Kong Resident Belittles Outcry Over Jet Noise From New Airport (Jul. 21, 1998). The South China Morning Post printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Andrew Lee, a Kowloon City, Hong Kong resident, regarding noise from the new Hong Kong airport:

Neighbors Near Massachusetts Rail Line Fear More Noise from Helicopters Patrolling Tracks (Jul. 21, 1998). The Patriot Ledger reports that residents who live near the Old Colony rail line in the Quincy, Massachusetts area are critical of a recent decision by the MBTA, the transit authority, to patrol commuter rail lines with helicopters. MBTA officials and state police are undertaking the action to clear the track of trespassers and bands of partying teens, the article says.

TV Helicopters Break New Mexico City's Noise Laws; City Officials Want to Mediate Problem (Jul. 21, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reports that a recent study in Albuquerque, New Mexico found that three area television stations have news helicopters that operate above the city's noise laws. The article notes that the city monitored the stations helicopter ports in March and April in response to residents' complaints about the noise, fumes, and potential danger of the helicopters taking off and landing near their homes. City officials have offered to set up meetings between the news stations and the residents. Some residents said they are unhappy with the city's response.

Arizona Town Officials Seek to Build 3,000 Homes Near Air Force Base; Military Opposes the Plan (Jul. 20, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that city officials in El Mirage, Arizona hope to approve more than 3,000 new homes during the next several months for locations directly below the flight path of the Luke Air Force Base. In response to the plan, the Airport Military Preservation Committee, a group of state lawmakers and military and community representatives, voted last week to ask the state Attorney General's Office to examine whether El Mirage would be violating an Arizona statute if the subdivisions are built.

Missouri Residents Lodge Complaints About Barking Dogs; New Noise Monitoring Stations Installed at Lambert Field (Jul. 20, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that residents in Pasadena Hills, Missouri have called Mayor Scott Livingston during evening hours to complain about barking dogs. Livingston said last week that there's little he can do personally about the problem. In other news, the Pasadena Hills Board of Alderman last week heard a report about new noise monitoring stations to be installed at Lambert Field.

Editorial Argues that FAA Should Take Greater Role in Determining Flight Patterns at Proposed California Airport (Jul. 19, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed an editorial that says the Federal Aviation Administration should be more involved in determining feasibility of the El Toro Airport in Orange County, California. Currently, debates over takeoffs to the East and North are not grounded in the way that they would be if the FAA -- whose prime responsibility is assuring safety and efficiency of airport operations -- would give a firm opinion on the safety of the proposed runways usage.

Money from Englandís Birmingham International Airport Intended to Mitigate Noise for School Children (Jul. 18, 1998). The Birmingham Evening Mail reports that the Birmingham International Airport is spending 400,000 pounds to mitigate the effect of noisy planes flying over local schools.

Montreal Police Monitor Neighborhood by Helicopter, Angering Residents (Jul. 17, 1998). The Gazette reports that police in Montreal, Quebec have been regularly patrolling the Mile End district of the city by helicopter for the past several weeks to secure the area from crime. But residents are complaining about the helicopter's noise, saying it keeps them from sleeping and the searchlights make them feel like they're in a war zone.

Resident Says Washington State Airport Officials Didn't Follow Federal Guidelines in Noise Mitigation Program (Jul. 17, 1998). The Seattle Times printed the following letter-to-the-editor form Minnie Brasher, a Burien, Washington resident, regarding noise from the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport:

U.S. Senate Strikes a Deal for 30 More Flights at Chicago Airport Instead of 100 (Jul. 17, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that a U.S. Senate committee brokered an agreement Thursday that calls for 30 more daily commercial takeoffs and landings at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport instead of the 100 flights proposed last week. The article notes that the revised bill still must be approved by the full Senate and then reconciled with a House bill that calls for 29 new daily commercial flights.

Debate in California Anti-Airport Suburb on El Toro Airport Doesn't Sway Audience (Jul. 16, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that a debate was held Thursday in Irvine, California on the proposed commercial airport at El Toro Marine Corps Air Station between Norman Ewers, a retired Marine Corps pilot and airport supporter, and Larry Agran, the chair of Project 99 and the former Irvine mayor. The article notes that most residents in Irvine oppose the airport; thus, Ewers got little sympathy, while Agran preached to the choir. After the debate, the 65 residents who attended remained undaunted in their opposition to the airport, the article says.

New Hong Kong Airport Generates Noise and Protests (Jul. 16, 1998). The British Broadcasting Corporation reports that, according to a Radio TV Hong Kong audio web-site report on July 14th, about 30 residents demonstrated outside Central district government offices over jet noise from the new Hong Kong area airport. Meanwhile, Christine Loh, the new chair of the Environmental Panel, said jet noise at the airport will be the top priority for the panel.

North Carolina Residents Want to Know How Airport's Growth From FedEx Hub Will Affect the City (Jul. 16, 1998). The News & Record reports that residents in Greensboro, North Carolina concerned about a proposed FedEx hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport called on the Airport Authority Wednesday to lay out how the hub and the airport's growth will affect the city. Residents are worried that the proposed growth to accommodate FedEx will result in unacceptable levels of noise, traffic congestion, and air pollution. Meanwhile, the state House gave final approval Wednesday to a series of economic incentives for FedEx, including $115 million in tax breaks over 20 years.

Residents in Chicago Suburb Voice Frustration Over Noisy Jets and Misleading Noise Measurements (Jul. 16, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that Park Ridge Citizens O'Hare Airport Council in Park Ridge, Illinois met Wednesday to discuss residents' frustration over jet noise from O'Hare International Airport. Residents complained about misleading noise measurements done by the airport, and suggested that fines be charged to airlines that fly too close to the town or limits be placed on when planes can fly overhead.

Virginia Citizens Group Files Lawsuit Against U.S. Navy Over Plan to Bring Military Jets to Town (Jul. 16, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports that a citizens group filed a lawsuit against the secretary of the U.S. Navy on Wednesday, seeking to postpone the transfer of 10 military jet squadrons to Oceana Naval Air Station near Norfolk, Virginia until a study is done on the impacts of the jets on the region.

Washington, DC Residents Fear Increasing Noise if Senate Bill Increases Airport's Flights (Jul. 16, 1998). The Washington Times reports that residents living near the Reagan National Airport in Washington, DC aren't happy about a proposal to add 24 more daily flights at the airport. The article explains that the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee on Tuesday approved a bill that would add the flights. But residents say they already experience too much jet noise. The bill must still be passed by the full Senate and then reconciled with a similar bill passed by the House.

Activist Decries Lack of Public Process for Proposed Air Cargo Airport in Nevada (Jul. 15, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal printed an editorial by Randy Harkness, chair of the Southern Nevada chapter of the Sierra Club, regarding a proposed air cargo airport near Jean, Nevada. The writer criticizes an earlier editorial in the paper on the subject, and goes on to say that the proposed airport could create many noise and environmental problems. The project should not be undertaken without a complete public process, which is not now happening, the writer says. The Sierra Club is opposing a provision regarding the airport in an appropriations bill because it would further prevent public input, the editorial says.

Florida Airport Officials Ask Condominium Developer for Noise Liability Waivers, But Developers Refuse (Jul. 15, 1998). The St. Petersburg Times reports officials at the Albert Whitted Municipal Airport in St. Petersburg, Florida are worried about the location of Vinoy Place, a proposed condominium development below the final approach path for one of the airport's runways. The article says airport officials asked the developers to require buyers to sign liability waivers, protecting the airport from noise lawsuits. But developers, on the advice of the city's legal department, have refused; however, they say they will provide full disclosure to buyers about the airport's proximity.

Florida Resident Says Newspaper Shouldn't Print Comments About Jet Noise From People Living Far From Airport (Jul. 15, 1998). The Palm Beach Post printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Marilyn Jordan, a West Palm Beach resident, regarding noise from the Palm Beach International Airport:

Hong Kong Residents Propose Alternative Flight Path to Cut Noise, But Government Says There's Little Hope for Change (Jul. 15, 1998). The South China Morning Post reports that an activist group in Hong Kong, China is protesting against jet noise at the Hong Kong area airport, saying that an alternative flight path would solve the problem. But meanwhile, officials with the government's Civil Aviation Department say there is "little scope" for change.

Proposed Noise Controls on Aircraft Testing at New Zealand Airport May Be Relaxed (Jul. 15, 1998). The Evening Standard reports that the city council resource management and regulatory committee in Palmerston North, New Zealand voted Monday to proceed with the public notification of a variation to the proposed district plan that would allow noise from the testing of aircraft engines at Palmerston North Airport to be louder than the district plan proposes.

Residents in New Mexico Complain About Noisy Training Flights (Jul. 15, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reports that residents living near the Four Corners Regional Airport in Farmington, New Mexico are angry about noise from the training flights initiated by the Mesa Air Group. According to the article, residents had hoped that after Mesa Air Group officials announced recently they would be moving their operation, that the noisy training flights would leave the area. But Mesa officials said their subsidiary, the pilot training company Mesa Pilot Development, would remain at the airport and would be increasing flights. Residents are expected to air their complaints at a meeting today of the Farmington Airport Advisory Commission. The commission plans to make a recommendation to the City Council on how to resolve the problem.

U.S. Senate Committee Approves 100 More Daily Flights at Chicago's Airport (Jul. 15, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that the Senate Commerce Committee voted 11-9 Tuesday to approve legislation that could add 100 commercial flights per day at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, the world's busiest airport. Senators voted on the legislation after listening to a last-minute, unannounced appeal against the bill from U.S. Senator Carol Moseley-Braun (D-Illinois), who is not a member of the committee. The article notes that the legislation is part of a national aviation bill, and it now advances to the full Senate, where a fight is expected between senators who want to increase flights around the country and those who represent constituents battling airport noise and traffic.

Hong Kong Residents Complain About Jet Noise, But Officials Refuse Compensation for Residents Outside Noise Contour (Jul. 14, 1998). The South China Morning Post reports that China's Civil Aviation Department has received about 300 complaints from residents since the Hong Kong airport opened. While residents continue to protest, government officials say that compensating residents who live outside the "noise contour" is out of the question. Meanwhile, decibel levels on the ground below the flight path range from 60 to 70 decibels.

Hong Kong Residents Complain About Jet Noise (Jul. 14, 1998). The Emerging Markets Datafile (Hong Kong Standard) reports that residents in Hong Kong, China are complaining about jet noise from the Hong Kong International Airport. The article says that at a public forum held near Tai Wai on Monday, residents living in the area expressed anger at the Civil Aviation Department for bringing the jets over their neighborhoods. Meanwhile, airport officials said the flight path would be difficult or impossible to change.

Residents in Washington State Object to Airport Expansion, But Officials Pass Expansion Plan (Jul. 14, 1998). The Seattle Times reports that residents in the old Georgetown neighborhood of Seattle, Washington already experience significant jet noise from Boeing Field. Despite their objections, however, the Metropolitan King County Council yesterday unanimously approved a proposal to bring more cargo flights to the airport and move the runway closer Georgetown's homes. The proposal now moves to county environmental reviews. But, the article says, given yesterday's unanimous vote, the plan is likely to get final approval from the council sometime next year.

California Airport Completes Soundproofing Demonstration Program, and Offers Soundproofing to More Residents (Jul. 13, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that nine families living near the Burbank Airport in Burbank, California were the first to have soundproofing against jet noise installed in their homes in an airport-sponsored program. Now, the airport plans to spend $110 million to soundproof 2,300 more homes in Burbank, Sun Valley, and North Hollywood over the next 10 to 15 years. The article says that airport officials are hoping their success at soundproofing the first nine "demonstration" homes will encourage more families to sign up for the program, will help meet government sound-reduction mandates, and will generate goodwill in the community over their controversial plan to build a larger air terminal. But the city of Burbank, which is opposing the airport expansion, has not backed the soundproofing program, saying it is a stopgap measure and not a cure for jet noise. In addition, the city has objected to the agreement residents must sign with the airport pledging to never sue the airport over noise, smoke, or vibration in exchange for the free soundproofing.

Congressional Plan to Add Flights at Chicago Airport Draws Sharp Outcry from Residents (Jul. 12, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports residents living near the O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois last week sharply protested a proposal by U.S. Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) to add 129 commercial flights per day at the airport.

Environmental Impact Statement Process Begins on FedEx Hub in North Carolina; Meanwhile, Residents Angry at Airport for Not Considering an Alternate Expansion Plan (Jul. 12, 1998). The News & Record reports that a consulting firm is expected to be hired in the next three weeks to begin compiling an environmental impact statement for a plan to build a FedEx package-handling hub at Piedmont Triad International Airport in Greensboro, North Carolina. The airport's plans include constructing a third runway parallel to the existing main runway. Meanwhile, residents who oppose the FedEx hub offered airport officials a compromise map which they believed would have reduced the impact of the hub, but officials rejected it, angering residents.

FAA Will Get Involved in Fight Over California Airport Expansion (Jul. 11, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports California Representatives Howard Berman (D-Mission Hills) and Brad Sherman (D-Woodland Hills) announced Friday that they will lobby the federal government to resolve the long-running dispute over expansion of the Burbank Airport. The Representatives also announced that Jane Garvey, the head of the Federal Aviation Administration, will come to Los Angeles on August 11 to mediate a solution to the fight between city of Burbank and the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority. The city is involved in legal battles with the airport authority over the proposed airport expansion, saying the airport's plans will cause more jet noise for its residents. The Representatives made their announcements at a summit on Los Angeles area airport issues sponsored by the Valley Industry and Commerce Association.

Chicago Suburb Officials Urge Residents to Call Senators About Proposal to Add More Flights at O'Hare (Jul. 11, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that local officials in Itasca and Wood Dale, Illinois are urging residents to call Illinois' two senators to protest a plan to add 100 daily flights at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago. The article notes that the proposal is championed by Senator John McCain (R-Arizona), the chair of the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee, and is scheduled for a final vote in the committee on Tuesday.

Illinois Congress Members Seek to Halt Senator McCain's Plan to Add Flights at O'Hare (Jul. 11, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Illinois Congress members stepped up pressure on Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) Friday, trying to stop him from moving forward on his plan to add 100 daily flights at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago.

Washington Officials Angry About Plan by Senator McCain to Add Flights at National Airport (Jul. 10, 1998). The Washington Times reports that the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee yesterday approved new rules that would allow 24 more planes per day to fly into Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport and lift restrictions on how far away the flights could come from. Senator John McCain (R-Arizona), the chair of the committee, is the chief sponsor of the bill, and says that the provisions would allow more competition in the Washington market. But local officials said McCain was meddling in their affairs for the benefit of Congress members who want more convenient flights to Washington. The committee still must take up the bill on Tuesday to approve final amendments, the article notes. If approved by the full Senate, the bill would have to be reconciled with a similar bill in the House. That bill would add only six flights at Reagan National, and would eliminate the restriction on long-haul flights.

Senator McCain Gets Praise and Criticism for Flight-Related Bill (Jul. 10, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that Arizona Senator John McCain was praised by many on Thursday for a bill to reduce aircraft noise over national parks, but was then criticized by citizen groups opposed to a provision in the bill which would increase flights at such airports as Chicago's O'Hare and Washington's Reagan National. McCain also was accused of pushing the bill in order to benefit America West Airlines, based in Tempe, Arizona. The bill would allow America West to fly non-stop from Phoenix to Washington's Reagan National Airport. The article notes that the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, which McCain heads, gave preliminary approval to the bill, and will return next week to consider some minor amendments.

Virginia Citizens Group Will Challenge Navy in Federal Court Over Bringing Jets to Town (Jul. 10, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports that the group Citizens Concerned About Jet Noise has announced it will bring a lawsuit against the U.S. Navy over plans to bring 10 squadrons of Hornet jets to Oceana Naval Air Station in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The article says about 100 residents attended a meeting Thursday to lend their support to the group. The group has until Thursday to file their lawsuit.

NYC Loses Appeal to Prevent More Flights at La Guardia (Jul. 9, 1998). Newsday reports a federal appeals court has upheld the U.S. Department of Transportation's plan to add 21 daily flights into New York's LaGuardia Airport.

NYC's Heliport and Helicopter Master Plan Criticized by Activists (Jul. 9, 1998). The New York Times reports a study of New York City's heliports and helicopter flights supported a current ban on tours from one heliport in the city, but failed to endorse new regulations for helicopter flights. The results of the study produced mixed reactions from activists, politicians, and industry representatives.

Legislation Will Address Noise from Air Tours in National Parks (Jul. 9, 1998). U.S. Newswire issued the following press release concerning regulation of air tours over national parks:

Senate Plan to Add Flights at Chicago Airport Draws Angry Reaction from Local Residents and Officials (Jul. 9, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that activists in the Chicago, Illinois area are angry about a bill in the Senate that would add 100 daily flights at O'Hare International Airport. The bill is scheduled for a vote in a Senate committee today, the article notes. It would still need the approval of the full Senate, and then would need to be reconciled with a House bill.

Airport Noise Shifts from One Town in China to Another; Environmental Groups Demand Compensation for Residents (Jul. 9, 1998). The South China Morning Post reports airport noise has shifted from Kowloon to Lantau and Sha Tin despite promises that Chek Lap Kok would solve the problem, green groups said yesterday.

Ariz. Sen. McCain Backs Proposal to Add More Flights at O'Hare; Chicago Area Residents Outraged (Jul. 9, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports Chicago area residents reacted with outrage to a U.S. Senate proposal to add 100 daily flights at O'Hare Airport.

Runway Work at Portland Airport to Shift Flight Patterns and Noise (Jul. 9, 1998). The Columbian reports work on Portland International Airport's south runway will shift aircraft flight patterns and bring more noise to areas north of the airport.

NYC Loses Suit to Stop More Flights at La Guardia; Appeal Probable (Jul. 8, 1998). The New York Times reports a Federal appeals court ruled yesterday in favor of allowing increased flights into and out of New York City's La Guardia Airport.

FedEx and Airport Reject North Carolina Residents' Proposal for Alternate Hub Site (Jul. 8, 1998). The News & Record reports FedEx and Piedmont Triad International Airport officials on Tuesday rejected an alternative site for the company's new hub and declined to change their plans to build a third runway. Officials still plan to meet with residents about noise and safety concerns.

Citizens Group Says it Will File Suit Against the Navy for Bringing Jets to Virginia (Jul. 8, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports that Citizens Concerned About Jet Noise in Virginia Beach, Virginia plans to file a lawsuit challenging the U.S. Navy's decision to move 10 squadrons of Hornet jets to the Oceana Naval Air Station in Virginia Beach. The group has hired an attorney and will meet Thursday to discuss the issue and solicit donations. The group has until July 16 to file the suit, the article notes.

Olmstead Falls, Ohio, Fights Noise and Expansion at Cleveland Hopkins Airport (Jul. 6, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports residents and public officials in Olmsted Falls, Ohio, have been working together to prevent more aircraft noise from the planned expansion at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport.

Residents in Babylon, NY, Oppose Expansion of Republic Airport, Fearing Increased Noise and Property Devaluation (Jul. 5, 1998). Newsday reports Babylon, New York, residents oppose expansion of Republic Airport, saying more runways mean larger planes and more noise, along with more pollution, property devaluation and the higher probability of accidents.

ElToro Airport Activists Network with Anti-Airport Groups Worldwide for Support and Lessons (Jul. 4, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that those fighting El Toro Airport in Orange County, California have found allies over the Internet in the U.K., South Africa, and Australia who are fighting the same airport problems.

Monitors Track Noise But Don't Reduce Noise from BWI Airport, Residents Say (Jul. 4, 1998). The Capital reports the Mary land Aviation Administration monitors noise daily from BWI Airport to make sure aircraft stay within the allowed noise levels. Residents commend them for these noise abatement measures, but they say it does nothing to reduce the amount of noise they are exposed to.

Pilots' Union Objects to Takeoffs Proposed at El Toro Airport; They Say Safety Risks Outweigh Noise Concerns (Jul. 4, 1998). The Orange County Register reports the Air Line Pilots Association this week released its response to two Orange County, California, safety studies of El Toro Airport's takeoffs.

Pilots Union Suggests Alternative Runway Plan for Proposed El Toro Airport in California (Jul. 4, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that members of the Air Line Pilots Association, the nation's largest pilots union, believe if a proposed commercial airport is built at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station near Irvine, California, county officials should build two new runways to address potential safety problems. The association suggested that the existing north/south runway should be used for landings, and the proposed southeast/northwest runways should be used for takeoffs. Meanwhile, county officials called the proposal unreasonable because it would create new noise problems over at least a dozen cities.

Residents Protest Expansion at Washington's Boeing Field; They Say Noise Rattles Windows Now (Jul. 3, 1998). The Seattle Times reports at a council meeting yesterday, residents in Washington's South Seattle neighborhoods protested a plan that would increase air traffic at Boeing Field and move the airport's runway closer to their neighborhoods.

Proposed Settlement Fair in Tennessee's Memphis Airport Case, Editorial Says (Jul. 2, 1998). The Commercial Appeal published the following editorial contending that the settlement proposed by the Tennessee's Memphis/Shelby County Airport Authority to resolve a class-action lawsuit filed by homeowners is "fair and reasonable." The editorial says:

Cleveland's City Council Asks FAA to Follow Through on Home Insulation Despite New Noise Exposure Map (Jul. 1, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports Cleveland City Council members are working to make sure residents near Cleveland Hopkins International Airport who have waited years to get their homes insulated from jet noise actually receive the government-financed improvements. The council is also urging the Federal Aviation Administration to block the sale of land north of the airport unless a consultant conclusively determines the land is not needed for the airport.

Group Meets with Pilots to Discuss Ways to Reduce Suburban Noise from O'Hare (Jul. 1, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports members of the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission met with two chief pilots from United and American airlines Tuesday to brainstorm ideas for reducing noise pollution in the Northwest suburbs.

Letter Says the FAA Fails to Protect Citizens' Interests in Expansion of Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (Jul. 1, 1998). The Plain Dealer published the following letter from Matthew Englehart of Olmsted Falls, Ohio. In his letter, Englehart questions the employment of the firm hired to study the impact of expansion of Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. Englehart also criticizes the FAA for failing to provide checks and balances for airport planners. Mr. Englehart writes:

Councilman Says Constituents Will Suffer for Burbank Airport Expansion in Noise, Traffic and Pollution (Jun. 30, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles published the following editorial by Dave Golonski, a Burbank City Council member. In his response to a recent commentary about the expansion of California's Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport, Golonski contends his constituents will pay for the current plans for airport expansion in noise, traffic, and pollution.

Residents Consider Proposal to Quiet Washington's King County Airport Inadequate (Jun. 30, 1998). The Seattle Times reports yesterday, after months of community protests over noise from Washington's King County International Airport, a King County Executive proposed a compromise that some residents already consider inadequate.

Anti-Aircraft Noise Activists Win Concessions at Australia's Perth Airport (Jun. 29, 1998). AAP Newsfeed reports Australia's Perth airport owners have given in to pressure from anti-aircraft noise activists, imposing several restrictions on the use of a proposed runway extension.

County Vows to Sue if Noise Pact not Reached with Lambert Field Airport (Jun. 29, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports Missouri's St. Charles County will file a lawsuit to stop any expansion plan at Lambert Field unless it gets an agreement that aircraft noise will be lowered from present levels.

France will Phase out Noisier Jets at Charles de Gaulle Airport (Jun. 29, 1998). AP Worldstream reports the French government on Monday agreed to phase out noisier jetliners at Paris' Charles de Gaulle Airport by 2002.

Storms Re-route Aircraft; Vancouver and Portland Residents Annoyed by Noise (Jun. 28, 1998). The Columbian of Vancouver, Washington, reports Friday afternoon thunderstorms caused several dozen complaints about aircraft noise from downtown Vancouver and north Portland residents.

Airport Noise Level Plans Require Future Homes to be Soundproofed (Jun. 27, 1998). The Evening Standard reports rural New Zealand residents living under flight paths are concerned about how proposed new noise level limits near Palmerston North airport will affect future homes and additions to existing properties.

Memphis Airport Authority Votes to Settle Class-Action Noise Lawsuit (Jun. 27, 1998). The Commercial Appeal reports the Memphis/Shelby County Airport Authority unanimously approved a proposed $ 22 million payment to area homeowners Friday designed to settle a 9-year-old airport noise suit.

New Zealanders Look to Preserve Natural Quiet in National Parks; Helicopter Buzzing is Main Concern (Jun. 27, 1998). The Press reports helicopter noise is annoying visitors and ruining the natural quiet in New Zealand's national parks. Conservation and park groups are taking measures to avoid the over-flying that has plagued the US's Grand Canyon.

Sea-Tac Airport Authority and Opponents to Enter Mediation (Jun. 27, 1998). The News Tribune reports the Port of Seattle and opponents of its proposed third runway at Sea-Tac International Airport have agreed to negotiation talks with a nationally known mediator.

Chicago Town Says it Qualifies to Vote on O'Hare Noise Commission (Jun. 26, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports the city of Rolling Meadows, Illinois, wants to have more say about how soundproofing efforts are funded by becoming a voting member of the Chicago-funded O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission.

Congressman's Approval Could Allow Controversial Sixth Runaway at DIA (Jun. 26, 1998). The Rocky Mountain News of Denver, Colorado, reports the chairman of the Transportation Committee has given his approval, freeing up money for a much-disputed sixth runway at Denver International Airport. Some opponents will still fight the runway, based on noise issues.

Former Pilot Says Residents Have Little Reason to Complain about Airplane Noise (Jun. 26, 1998). The Palm Beach Post published the following letter to the editor from Florida resident Roy L. Huber. Huber responds to an opinion article about residents' dissatisfaction with airplane noise standards. Huber writes:

City Official Wants Voting Rights for Rolling Meadows on O'Hare Noise Panel (Jun. 25, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports an Illinois alderman in Rolling Meadows is urging that his city secure voting rights on the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission

New Noise Group Aims to Silence Critics of Boca Raton Airport (Jun. 25, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports a new group, Supporters of Aviation Resources Inc., (SOAR), says complaints about airplane noise during the past year have been exaggerated. Its aim is to silence criticism of the Boca Raton Airport.

New RAF Flight Paths No Improvement for some in Scottish Villages (Jun. 25, 1998). The Aberdeen Press and Journal of Aberdeen, Scotland, reports new flight paths designed by the RAF to reduce noise for villages around the Tain bombing range in Easter Ross are making life noisy and miserable for one farmer.

Noise Insulation Plans Revealed for Homes Near New Zealand Airport (Jun. 25, 1998). The Dominion reports residents who live near New Zealand's Palmerston North airport will hear tonight about new regulations that affect the noise insulation of new homes.

Enviromental Groups Oppose Air Cargo Hub in Nevada's Ivanpah Valley (Jun. 24, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports environmentalists said Tuesday they oppose Clark County's plans for a new airport in the Ivanpah Valley because it would disrupt national parks, stimulate more urban growth, and increase air and noise pollution.

New Monitoring System at Port Columbus Will Identify Noisy Flights (Jun. 24, 1998). The Columbus Dispatch reports a state-of-the-art monitoring system planned for Port Columbus should help airport officials better identify the source of noisy flights that give residents sleepless nights.

Arlington Heights Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise to Update Goals (Jun. 23, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports the village of Arlington Heights has requested the Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise re-issue their plan for mitigating airplane noise in the village's airspace.

Columnist Criticizes Louisville International Airport's Noise Monitoring System (Jun. 23, 1998). The Courier-Journal published a column by Bob Hill that contends officials in charge of the $700 million expansion of Kentucky's Louisville International Airport are deaf to noise pollution concerns of residents.

Expanded T.F. Green Airport Brings More Noise to Rhode Island Residents (Jun. 23, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports the newly expanded T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island, is bringing new noise to its host city, afflicting almost 4 square miles of neighborhoods with enough noise to make them eligible for house soundproofing at taxpayer expense.

San Francisco Airport Receives Multi-Million Dollar Package to Reduce Noise (Jun. 23, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports California's San Francisco International Airport received a multi-million dollar grant yesterday intended to make SFO more safe and efficient. About $11 million will go toward airfield work, while the rest of the funds will be devoted to noise reduction, including $4 million for soundproofing homes in South San Francisco and San Bruno.

Airport Sound Monitors and Radar Systems Identify Noise and Keep Airlines Honest (Jun. 22, 1998). The Courier-Journal of Louisville, Kentucky, reports an increasing number of airports are using sound monitors and radar systems to track the exact paths of arriving and departing airplanes. This information can be used to assist in noise abatement measures.

Louisville Airport Accused of Negligence in Monitoring Noise and Residents' Complaints (Jun. 22, 1998). The Courier-Journal reports Louisville International Airport has done little to track the impact of noise from changes in runways and flight patterns that have occurred under the airport's $700 million expansion.

Converstion of El Toro and Other Options for Los Angeles' Former Military Airbase (Jun. 21, 1998). Los Angeles Times published several letters to the editor relaying opinions about the various options for the conversion of the El Toro Airforce Base. Options discussed in the editorials include: (1) the economic feasibility of the Millennium Plan, an economic development option; (2) conversion of El Toro to commercial airport to meet the increased air travel demands; (3) the possibility of meeting air travel demands by building a commercial airport at Los Alamitos Armed Forces Reserve Center; and (4) the Diego Freeway and meeting increased air demand through the Long Beach Airport. The opinions are as follows:

Study Predicts High Noise Levels for Planned Housing near Colorado's Buckley Air Base (Jun. 21, 1998). The Rocky Mountain News reports a recently released report by the Air Force concerning noise levels from Buckley Air National Guard Base may force Aurora, Colorado, city planners to reconsider already-approved developments.

Is Living Under Heathrow Airport's Flight Paths an Asset or Loss for London's Homeowners and Purchasers? (Jun. 20, 1998). The Financial Times reports that some of Britain's most expensive houses lie on the flight paths into and out of Heathrow airport. The proximity to the airport is considered one of the property's virtues, at least until now. The article poses the question: With construction of the fifth terminal ("Terminal Five") looming on the horizon, will proximity to the airport continue to be an asset or will the proximity push buyers beyond the limits for noise and congestion?

Noise Concerns from Airport Delay New School in Las Vegas (Jun. 20, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports noise concerns may stall construction for a new high school planned near Las Vegas' McCarran International Airport.

Village Officials for Arlington Heights Displeased with Increased Noise from Chicago's O'Hara International Airport (Jun. 20, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the village of Arlington Heights, Illinois is divided over how best to state the its displeasure with the increased level of noise and air pollution generated by nearby O'Hara International Airport, the world's busiest airport.

Airport Noise Monitored at Twenty Sites in Chandler, Arizona (Jun. 19, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that the Sky Harbor International Airport has positioned noise monitors at 20 sites near Phoenix, Arizona. According to the article data collected from the monitors will be used by airport officials to pinpoint particularly noisy aircraft and to better understand planes' flight patterns.

Australian Prime Minister Concedes that the Government's Noise Plan Has Failed to Achieve its Goals (Jun. 19, 1998). The AAP Newsfeed reported that Australian Prime Minister John Howard admitted for the first time that his government could not meet its promises regarding aircraft noise.

Calf. High School Gets More Funds to Soundproof Against Noise from Lindbergh Field (Jun. 19, 1998). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports California's Point Loma High School will get additional funds to provide relief from the constant noise of nearby Lindbergh Field.

Costly Noise Abatement Program Recommended by Consultants for Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma (Jun. 19, 1998). Tulsa World reports that the noise consultant for Tulsa International Airport - Barnard Dunkelberg & Co.,- has recommended a five-year $20 million noise abatement program that includes purchases of easement rights, sound insulation and property buyouts for about 1,000 residents of neighborhoods. The consultant also advised Tulsa Airport Authority trustees to alter takeoff and landing procedures so that low-level aircraft flights over residential areas are minimized.

Florida's Vero Beach Airport Commission to Sit as its Own Noise-Abatement Committee (Jun. 19, 1998). The Press Journal published an article regarding a special workshop to brainstorm ideas for softening the noise of airplanes flying into and out of the Vero Beach Municipal Airport. However, the Vero Beach Airport Commission decided to sit as its own noise-abatement committee during the workshop.

Mayoral Candidates Debate about the Noise from T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island (Jun. 19, 1998). Providence Journal-Bulletin summarized conclusions from a debate between mayoral candidates concerning increased traffic and noise pollution at the T.F. Green Airport. According to the article, two out of three mayoral candidates agree: There isn't much a mayor, by himself, can do about the noise from T.F. Green Airport. The two candidates agreed, however that while the city cannot impose its will on airport operations, by mandating flight hours or flight paths, there are courses of action the mayor can take.

Opinions Regarding the Utility of Expansion at Chicago's O'Hara International Airport Verses Construction of a Third Chicago Airport Debated (Jun. 19, 1998). The Chicago Herald reports that the city of Chicago is projecting 200 more flights a day at O'Hare International Airport within the next 15 years. However, Illinois state transportation officials believe the growth in jet traffic at the world's busiest airport will be substantially higher. At stake in the dispute between those two estimates for growth is the issue of whether a third airport is needed in the Chicago area.

Properties Eligible for Federal Soundproofing Relief Shrinking in Manchester, New Hampshire (Jun. 19, 1998). The Union Leader reports that residents of Manchester, New Hampshire, petitioned the Federal Aviation Administration this week asking why areas once eligible for soundproofing are no longer eligible.

Plans for Expansion at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport in Ohio Creates Tensions with Neighboring Communities and Residents (Jun. 18, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will be looking into the noise complaints of residents and public officials in neighboring communities as a part of an environmental study to be completed before the expansion of Cleveland Hopkins International Airport begins. The expansion is intended to give it the ability to handle more flights. Neighbors are already worried about the loud rumbling of airplanes and are wondering if that noise problem will only get worse, the article said.

The Expansion of Camarillo Airport Prompts Editorials Regarding Expected the Expected Increase in Aircraft Noise (Jun. 18, 1998). The Ventura County Star published the following two editorials regarding the increased airplane noise expected with the expansion at Camarillo Airport. The author of the first editorial sees the expansion as a "legitimate business purpose" and welcomes the noise it brings. The author of the second editorial finds that a decline in land values and loss of tranquility in the entire west end of the county, "is a high price to pay for eight, or even 80, new employment opportunities".

Airport-Area Residents, Pilots, and Airport Officials Try Program to Alleviate Aircraft Noise at the Sante Fe Municipal Airport (Jun. 17, 1998). The Sante Fe New Mexican reports that airport neighbors are asking administrators at Sante Fe Municipal Airport to make changes that will lower the impact of noise. Airport-area residents - called Friends of Noise Abatement - hope a trial program will help reduce the aircraft noise and alleviate the need to advocate for more restrictive regulation by local government.

Claim Made that a Labor Federal Government Would Ensure A Decrease in Noise Impact from Airport in Adelaide, Australia (Jun. 16, 1998). Australian General News reports that a spokesperson for the opposition transport, Lindsay Tanner, said today that a Labor federal government would decrease the impact of aircraft noise around Adelaide Airport. "A Labor government will ensure that every home in Australia seriously affected by aircraft noise is entitled to equal access to insulation," Tanner was quoted saying in the article.

FAA Funds Received by Baton Rouge's Metro Airport to Soundproof 87 Homes (Jun. 16, 1998). The Advocate reports that 87 families living near the Baton Rouge Metro Airport could begin to see some reduction of jet noise in their homes. Over the last 12 years Baton Rouge's Metro Airport has participated in a noise reduction program. During that time, $25 million has been spent buying property, relocating families and repairing homes and schools.

New Zealand's Palmerston North Airport and Its Surrounding Development Given New Limits (Jun. 16, 1998). The Evening Standard reports that new noise limits for Palmerston North Airport in New Zealand have been set. The limits were set after consideration was given on the parts of the Manawatu District Council, the Palmerson North City Council, and Palmerston North Airport Company.

Sky Harbor International Airport in Arizona Announces That it is Keeping Flights on Track with One Million Dollar Monitoring System (Jun. 16, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that their one million-dollar monitoring system at Sky Harbor International Airport indicates that about 95 percent of airplanes follow the correct flight pattern after they take off. Officials at Sky Harbor International Airport officials announced plans June 15 to keep even more flights on track to protect neighborhoods from noise caused by departing planes. They hope to increase compliance to 97 or 98 percent.

Las Vegas Residents and Business Owners Question McCarran Airport's Agenda in Widespread Buyout Tactics (Jun. 15, 1998). The Las Vegas Business Press reports some residents and business owners in areas surrounding Las Vegas are questioning the agenda of McCarran International Airport's seemingly aggressive but selective buyout procedures.

The Department of Transportation Releases $2.5 Million to Acquire Land for Noise Compatibility Purposes at the Baton Rouge Airport, Louisiana (Jun. 15, 1998). The following Congressional Press Release announced that the East Baton Rouge Parish would receive $2.5 million from the Department of Transportation to acquire land for noise compatibility at the Baton Rouge airport.

Maryland Navy Base Proposes More Flights; Public Makes Few Comments at Hearing (Jun. 14, 1998). The Washington Post reports that the Patuxent River Naval Air Station in St. Marys County, Maryland wants to expand its flight operations. Officials at the base held the first of four public hearings on the proposal Wednesday, drawing a crowd of about 50 people. The meeting didn't provoke much comment or controversy, the article says.

Residents Object to Proposed New Runway at Florida Airport (Jun. 13, 1998). The Tampa Tribune reports that county planners in Tampa, Florida will discuss building another runway and other growth issues at Tampa International Airport on Monday night. Members of the Hillsborough County Aviation Authority will present a master plan at the meeting that includes adding a third north-south runway sometime after 2008, the article says. Residents living near the airport oppose a third runway, but according to airport officials, a third runway would reduce noise.

Proposal to Land More Planes at California Airport Has Some Calling for More Noise Study (Jun. 13, 1998). The Ventura County Star reports that a sub-committee of the Aviation Advisory Commission in Camarillo, California reviewed a proposal Thursday to allow additional Boeing 727 planes to land at the Camarillo Airport. Channel Islands Aviation wants to land one or two Boeing 727s per week in order to refurbish them and increase their cargo capacity. In addition, the company wants to build a large hangar to perform the retrofitting work. The plan must be approved by the Board of Supervisors and the city of Camarillo, and now will move to the full Aviation Advisory Commission, the article notes.

Illinois Transportation Official Ties New Runway at O'Hare to Future Success of Airport (Jun. 12, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that Kirk Brown, the Illinois Transportation Secretary, said Thursday in a speech to north suburban business executives and transportation officials in Deerfield that without a new runway, Chicago's O'Hare International Airport will continue to lose domestic flights, diminishing its national role and travel options for residents. Brown said later that he wasn't advocating a new runway at O'Hare, which would put him at odds with Governor Jim Edgar. Meanwhile, opponents of O'Hare expansion said Brown's remarks were troubling.

Almost 90 Percent of Planes at Phoenix Airport Meet Quieter Standards; Residents Say They Can't Hear the Difference (Jun. 12, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that 86 percent of planes at the Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, Arizona have achieved stricter federal standards for noise, according to airport officials. By the end of 1999, all commercial jets are required by federal law to be equipped with the quieter engines, the article notes. But some residents who live in the airport's flight path say they don't notice any difference.

Noise Demonstration Set for El Toro Base Reuse Project in Irvine, California (Jun. 12, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that commercial jetliner flight demonstrations have been scheduled for October at El Toro Marine Corps Air Station to show the public what noise would be like if the military base were converted to an international airport.

Noise Mitigation Efforts Accompany Expansion at California's Palm Springs Regional Airport (Jun. 12, 1998). The Public Record-Palm Desert reports June 8 marked the start of an expansion project at California's Palm Springs Regional Airport. Palm Springs' Director of Transportation, Al Smoot, explained to a group the benefits the expansion will provide. He also outlined noise mitigation efforts that are included in the expansion.

California Churches Debate Whether to Oppose Commercial Airport at El Toro (Jun. 11, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Orange County, California religious leaders are debating whether to join together and oppose the proposed El Toro airport. Some say they will because they don't want jets flying over their places of worship, while others say that airport opposition is not in their mission.

Editorial Writer Says FedEx Hub in North Carolina Would Be a Disaster (Jun. 11, 1998). The News & Record printed an editorial that argues a proposed FedEx cargo hub and new runway in Greensboro, North Carolina would be a disaster for the thousands of residents who live nearby and for the larger community. The writer goes on to give several arguments against a FedEx hub, and suggestions about better locations for the facility.

Minnesota City Sues Airport Commission Over Shifting Jet Noise to Their Community (Jun. 11, 1998). The Star Tribune reports that the city of Richfield, Minnesota is suing the Metropolitan Airports Commission in the U.S. Court of Appeals for shifting jet noise from the Minneapolis - St. Paul International Airport to their community. City officials are suing to stop the daily use of the airport's crosswind runway that has shifted flights away from south Minneapolis and sent them over Richfield and Bloomington instead. The court case is expected to last at least two months, the article says.

Missouri Airport Agrees to Spend $35 Million to Build New Schools (Jun. 11, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the St. Louis (Missouri) Airport Commission voted unanimously Wednesday to spend up to $35 million to acquire land from the Ferguson-Florissant School District in Berkeley, near Lambert Field. The money will be used to purchase about 30 acres where Berkeley High School and four other district buildings are located, and will be used to build a new high school and elementary school. The article notes that the offer needs the approval of the city of St. Louis, as well as the Federal Aviation Administration, which have gone along with the proposal so far. The project is part of the airport's long-range plan to buy property because of airport noise, the article says, but is not related to the proposed airport expansion, according to Leonard Griggs, the airport director.

Local Missouri Officials Will Meet With FAA Over Airport Expansion Plan (Jun. 11, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that officials in St. Charles County and Bridgeton, Missouri will meet Tuesday with Susan Kurland, the associate administrator for airports at the Federal Aviation Administration, over plans to expand Lambert Field. According to Joe Ortwerth, a St. Charles County Executive, the meeting should resolve whether the FAA will conduct a "real time" simulation study that would produce data about the noise levels of the proposed expansion.

Developers' Plans to Build Subdivision Near Tennessee Army Helicopter Base is Scuttled (Jun. 9, 1998). The Tennessean reports that plans for a subdivision near the Fort Campbell Military Reservation near Clarksville, Tennessee have been scuttled due to concerns about noise from the Sabre Army Heliport and other reasons. Developers say that Army officials did not raise noise concerns until they already had invested money in roads and other infrastructure for the subdivision. Now, developers believe they have no alternative but to sell the land to the Army, but say they stand to lose millions on the deal.

Resident Decries Residential Development Near California Airport (Jun. 7, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Sal Del Valle, a resident of North Hills, California, regarding jet noise and residential development near the Van Nuys Airport:

Chicago Noise Commission Seeks Commitment From Air Cargo Companies to Phase Out Noisier Jets Ahead of Schedule (Jun. 6, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission, a Chicago group formed by the city's mayor, has decided to seek a written commitment from the air cargo carriers at O'Hare International Airport to phase out older, noisier aircraft engines before the year 2000. (By 2000, all jets must comply with quieter, Stage 3 noise standards set by federal regulations.) The article says that the decision was the result of a "cargo summit" meeting held May 28 between the commission and representatives of 10 air cargo carriers.

City Councilor Proposes Allowing International Flights at Burbank, California Airport (Jun. 6, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that right in the middle of the ongoing debate over expansion at Burbank, California's Burbank Airport, a Pasadena representative from the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority suggested the introduction of international flights at the airport. He wants a feasibility study to be done before a design is approved for the proposed 19-gate terminal.

Seattle Set to Approve Floatplane Takeoffs and Landings Near Downtown Pier (Jun. 6, 1998). The Seattle Times reports that city officials in Seattle, Washington are set to approve a project that would allow float-planes to take off and land 72 times a day near Pier 54 on Elliott Bay, after reviewing the proposed project for more than a year. If permitted, the project would allow Kenmore Air to operate 20-minute scenic trips from a 25-foot float off the pier. Meanwhile, some residents who live in the downtown are opposing the project, saying it will bring more noise. If the project is approved, the article notes, it likely will be appealed and will face a more lengthy review.

Colorado Air National Guard Base Releases Noise and Safety Study (Jun. 5, 1998). The Denver Post reports that officials at Colorado's Buckley Air National Guard released results on Thursday of a noise and safety study that looked at impacts on Aurora and Arapahoe County, the communities most affected by the base's aircraft operations. The study, known as the Department of Defense's Air Installation Compatible Use Zone Study, was intended to provide non-binding guidelines for local governments as they develop land-use plans in areas surrounding the military installation. The article notes that although residents living near the base have complained about the noise, the city of Aurora has continued to approve residential developments near the base.

Japanese Residents Won't Appeal Jet Noise Compensation Ruling (Jun. 5, 1998). The Japan Economic Newswire reports that residents who filed suit against the Japanese government for noise from the U.S. Kadena air base in Japan will not appeal a high court ruling that ordered the government to compensate the residents for noise pollution from military aircraft. The ruling was issued by the Naha branch of the Fukuoka High Court on May 22, and it ordered the government to compensate 867 people of the 906 who requested compensation, but rejected arguments to halt night flights at the base.

Amsterdam Airport Raises Fees for Noisy Aircraft Starting in August (Jun. 4, 1998). AFX News reports that officials at the Schiphol Aiport in Amsterdam, Netherlands said they will raise the charges for daytime and nighttime landings and take-offs by the noisier Chapter 3 planes starting on August 1. The airport's actions come after the transport ministry approved the plans. The charges are intended to motivate airlines to fly quieter planes and to reduce night flights, according to airport officials.

Noise at National Parks Creates High-Level Debate (Jun. 3, 1998). The Gannett News Service reports that noise in U.S. national parks has created an intense debate between hikers, conservationists, personal watercraft manufacturers, tour plane operators, and the federal government. This summer, the article says, Congress and the Clinton administration are considering actions to lower human-made noise in national parks. In addition, the National Park Service intends to adopt strict rules regulating the use of personal watercraft, or Jet Skis. And, the Senate Commerce Committee is scheduled to vote this summer on a bill by its chair, John McCain (R-Arizona), to restrict tour planes and helicopters above national parks. At the same time, the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Park Service are working on a new regulation that would require each national park to adopt a management plan to detail how many sightseeing flights should be allowed and what routes they should take.

British Residents Say Cargo Airport Development Will Create Unacceptable Noise, Air Pollution, and Traffic (Jun. 2, 1998). The Northern Echo reports that residents in Britain's Northeast are fighting an airport development that would establish the country's second largest cargo handling center after Heathrow airport. A report created for the Darlington council has found that residents near the development will suffer more noise, pollution, and traffic congestion if the project goes forward. The report will be presented as evidence when a public inquiry into the project proposed by Moorfield Estates begins at the airport today, the article says.

Texas Judge Dismisses Three Noise-Related Lawsuits Against Airport (Jun. 2, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports that a judge last week dismissed three noise-related lawsuits by residents in Irving, Texas against the Dallas / Fort Worth International Airport. The decision has prompted airport officials to seek dismissals of more than 200 similar claims. Meanwhile, a lawyer for some of the residents said he is considering whether to appeal or seek a new trial.

Canadian Airport Expansion Doesn't Address "Community Well-Being," Columnist Believes (Jun. 1, 1998). The Calgary Herald printed an editorial by Ed McGowan, the former vice-president of the Inglewood Community Association, regarding the proposed expansion of the Calgary Airport in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The writer argues that the Calgary Airport Authority does not live up to its mission statement to provide airport services in conjunction with "community well-being." The editorial says the proposed expansion will increase aircraft noise in communities that are already under severe stress from the noise.

International Pilots Association Opposes Israeli Bill That Would Prosecute Pilots Who Violate Noise Abatement Procedures (Jun. 1, 1998). Aviation Week and Space Technology reports that the International Federation of Air Line Pilots Associations (IFALPA) is concerned about legislation proposed in the Israeli Knesset that calls for criminal prosecution of pilots who violate noise abatement procedures. The bill was sent back for review after concerns were raised by IFALPA and the Israeli Air Line Pilots Association.

Opponents and Supporters Weigh in on Florida Airport Expansion (Jun. 1, 1998). The Palm Beach Post printed a summary of what some of the key players are saying about jet noise and expansion at the Palm Beach (Florida) International Airport. The summary includes opinions of local politicians, lawyers, airport administrators, and residents.

European Commission Plans to Ban "Hush Kitted" Planes by 2000 (Jun.1 1998). Air Cargo World reports the European Commission plans to ban "hush-kitted" planes in the near future.

California's Burbank Airport Fights to Expand Terminal, While Nearby Residents Oppose Expansion (May 31, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Burbank Airport in Burbank, California is fighting to expand the size of its terminal. The article goes on to detail the level of crowding that takes place in the current terminal, and the growth that's predicted. Lawsuits filed by residents and the city of Burbank over noise, pollution, and traffic are preventing the terminal expansion from going forward, the article says. The latest of the at least seven lawsuits was filed Friday.

FAA Should Propose Serious Flight Plan to Reduce Noise at New Jersey Airport, Activist Says (May 31, 1998). The New York Times printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Ellen Traegar, a Rockaway, New Jersey resident and president of the New Jersey Coalition Against Aircraft Noise, regarding noise from the Newark Airport:

Florida Airport's "Quiet Noise Awards" to Airlines are Laughable, Columnist Believes (May 31, 1998). The Palm Beach Post printed an editorial that argues the awards recently given to seven airlines by the Palm Beach (Florida) International Airport for quiet fleets are laughable. The columnist notes that the Palm Beach County Department of Airports held an award luncheon at the Four Seasons Resort to give the airlines the "Quiet Fleet Award" for meeting "stringent noise standards" while taking off and landing at the airport.

Local Massachusetts Official Will Meet With Federal Aviation Administration About Airport Noise (May 29, 1998). The Patriot Ledger reports that Richard Neely, the Select Board Chair in Milton, Massachusetts, has set up a meeting for June 29 with Jane Garvey, the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration and the former director of Boston's Logan International Airport, to discuss airplane noise at Logan. The article notes that jet noise has afflicted Milton and other towns for years, but local officials have not been able to get the FAA to address their complaints.

Washington School District Rejects Airport Money for Noise Study Because There Are Strings Attached (May 29, 1998). The Seattle Times reports that officials with the Highline School District near Seattle, Washington yesterday rejected the Port of Seattle's offer to pay for a jet-noise study because they say it is too restrictive. The Port operates the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, the airport explains. Last week, Port officials announced they would pay up to $350,000 for a noise study in the school district. But Highline officials have already started their own noise study, and they say using the Port's money would force them to start the study over. Highline officials asked that the Port instead help pay for the study already underway.

Georgia County Commissioners Turn Down Request for Helicopter Pad in Residential Area (May 28, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports that the Coweta County (Georgia) Board of Commissioners voted 5-0 last week to reject a request for a special-use permit for a helicopter port at a residence. The article notes that the commissioners expressed concern over noise and safety issues related to the request.

Japanese Court Upholds Decision to Compensate Residents for Noise from Air Force Base (May 27, 1998). Jane's Defence Weekly reports that the Naha branch of the Fukuoka High Court in Japan has upheld a 1994 court decision to compensate 867 residents who filed a lawsuit over noise pollution from Okinawa's Kadena Air Force Base. The article says that the court ordered the government to increase the amount of compensation to 1.37 billion [yen?] ($10.2 million), but rejected a request to ban flight operations between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m.

Press Release Touts Noise Reduction Headphones for Airplane Travel (May 27, 1998). PR Newswire released the following press release from Noise Cancellation Technologies, a firm that sells noise reduction headphones, regarding the company's product:

Canadian Residents and Officials Protest for a Decade About Illegal Airfield, Without Resolution (May 26, 1998). The Vancouver Sun reports that residents and officials in Surrey, British Columbia have been fighting to have the Airflow Ultralight Aviation airfield in the 4900 block of King George Highway shut down for a decade, without result. The article explains that the airfield owner has never had a business license and the land has never had proper zoning for an airfield since opening in 1981, but local politicians refuse to enforce a city zoning bylaw and shut down the airfield. Now, the article says, it may be too late for the city to get rid of the airfield because officials have allowed it to operate for so long. In the latest development, the Surrey City Council last week again postponed a decision on the airfield.

Air Tour Group Alleges the Park Service Overstated Noise Impact of Flights Over Grand Canyon (May 25, 1998). The Weekly of Business Aviation reports that the United States Air Tour Association (USATA), an industry group of commercial air tour operators, charged last week that the National Park Service significantly overstated the noise impact of flights over Grand Canyon National Park.

Australian Court is Told That Airport Flight Path Changes to Remove Noise from Neighborhoods Were Politically Motivated and Illegal (May 25, 1998). AAP Newsfeed reports that the councils in Randwick and Woollahra, Australia have filed a lawsuit alleging that Environment Minister Robert Hill acted for political reasons last July when he made a decision to introduce a long-term operating plan (LTOP) for planes using the Sydney airport. The LTOP was introduced for the improper purpose of reducing noise from coalition-held federal electorates north of the city, according to attorneys for the plaintiffs. Former Transport Minister John Sharp is also accused of making politically motivated decisions, the article says. The case currently is being argued before the Federal Court, and is expected to last at least five days.

North and South Orange County in California Continue to Fight Over Proposed Airport (May 25, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that the proposal to build an international airport at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station near Irvine, California has created a controversy that has split Orange County along north-south lines, and has strained families, friendships, and political alliances in the area. The article goes on to detail the ways in which the opposing sides have become divided.

More Flights at Dallas' Love Field Would Break Moral Contract with Residents to Limit Noise, Says Editorial (May 24, 1998). The Dallas Morning News published the following editorial about the current litigation over flight limits at Dallas' Love Field Airport. The editorial reads as follows:

Oregon Airport Officials End Experiment to Reroute Planes Due to Noise Complaints (May 24, 1998). The Columbian printed an editorial that says the Port of Portland, which operates Portland (Oregon) International Airport, ended an experiment last Wednesday to reroute jets after hundreds of people complained about the noise. The editorial argues that the complaints are understandable, and that the representation of Vancouver, Washington on a new formal panel to address airport noise issues will be important for the community.

Residents Weigh in on Noise From California's Van Nuys Airport (May 24, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letters-to-the-editor from George Jerome, chair of the Van Nuys Citizens Advisory Council, and Anne Carver, co-chair of the airport committee of the Sherman Oaks Homeowners Association, regarding noise from the Van Nuys (California) Airport:

Japanese Court Orders Noise Pollution Compensation for Residents Living Near U.S. Air Base (May 23, 1998). The Mainichi Daily News reports that the Fukuoka High Court in Naha, Japan ordered the government Friday to compensate residents living near the U.S. Kadena Air Base for noise pollution caused by late-night flights. The court agreed with residents that the jet noise has inflicted psychological damage, but rejected a demand to have the flights banned.

Airport Officials in Seattle Offer to Pay for Noise Studies in Schools (May 22, 1998). The News Tribune reports that officials at the Port of Seattle (Washington), which operates Sea-Tac Airport, offered Thursday to pay $350,000 for a study to determine the jet noise impacts on Highline School District schools.

Cargo Companies at Mather Airport Oppose Nearby Development (May 22, 1998). The Sacramento Business Journal reports cargo companies at Sacramento's Mather Airport fear if new development is allowed closer to the facility, it will be the end of the new hub.

Japan Awards Residents Damages for Airbase Noise; Turns Down Request for Night Time Ban (May 22, 1998). Agence France Presse reports an Okinawa, Japan, court ordered the Japanese government to award monetary compensation to citizens who suffer from aircraft noise.

Mather Airport Says Encroaching Development Threatens Its Appeal to Cargo Companies (May 22, 1998). Business Journal-Sacramento reports that Mather Airport is facing the problem that has bedeviled airports around the country: encroaching development. According to the article Mather Airport has become an important hub for air cargo companies but if development is allowed to come closer to the facility, its appeal to cargo companies will be lost. The article contains three subsections entitled "Shrinking Buffers", "Disputed Noise Readings" and "Housing Wanted."

Nevada County Commission Delays Decision on New Noise Guidelines for Residents Near Airport (May 21, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that the Clark County (Nevada) Commission on Wednesday postponed a decision about whether to adopt new noise guidelines for homes and businesses near McCarran International Airport. The guidelines would adopt a new map that shows noise levels around the airport. Many of the residents and merchants that live in the proposed 60-decibel zone are angry at the proposal, believing it would lower their property values.

Group of CA Residents Charge Marine Corps Plans to Reduce Air Noise Inadequate (May 20, 1998). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports a plan to quiet helicopters and jets flying out of Miramar Marine Corps Air Station was unveiled yesterday by the Marine Corps and San Diego City Councilwoman Barbara Warden's committee of residents. But people who sued last year to stop the Marines from bringing helicopters to Miramar say that there's nothing new about the plan and that it won't reduce noise.

LAX Residential Soundproofing Program Enters Second Phase (May 20, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that as part of the soundproofing program for residents, being undertaken by Los Angeles International Airport, another contract was awarded today. It was the fourth contract awarded that will be part of the program's second stage.

Orlando Airports Strive to Avoid Lawsuits about Noise from Residents of New Development (May 20, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority wants to advise would-be residents of the soon-to-be-developed Naval Training Center property: Don't forget about the planes.

Vancouver Airport Projects Mean Noisy Summer for Nearby Residents (May 20, 1998). The Vancouver Sun of British Columbia, Canada, reports a new runway-improvement project at Vancouver International Airport will result in noisy jets taking off over residential areas. Some residents are anticipating a lousy summer.

Long Island Group Opposes Noise and Night Flights at MacArthur Airport (May 19, 1998). Newsday reports that as the New York Town of Islip prepares to expand the terminal at Long Island MacArthur Airport, a group of residents is urging town officials to focus on the problem of airport noise.

Opponents of El Toro Airport Point to Study of Health Problems in Children Exposed to Jet Noise (May 19, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that opponents of the proposed El Toro Airport in Orange County, California are citing a new study from Germany that shows children's health is negatively affected by noise. How applicable the study is to the El Toro situation remains to be seen.

Researcher Tells California School Board Trustees That Noise Can Create Problems for Schoolchildren (May 19, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that Gary Evans, a professor at Cornell University, spoke to the Capistrano Unified School District board of trustees and the Orange County Acoustical Society in Orange County, California on Monday night on the topic of whether an international airport at the El Toro Air Station would create problems for kids exposed to jet noise. Evans said that chronic exposure to noise can lead to lower reading scores and hypertension among schoolchildren, but he added that there's no evidence yet that an El Toro airport would force kids to endure chronic noise exposure. The article notes that the school district opposes an airport.

Nelson Airport Upgrades Noise Committee (May 18, 1998). The Nelson Mail reports the Nelson, New Zealand, airport authority will form a committee to deal with noise issues arising from the airport.

Calif. Residents Write Letters in Protest of El Toro Airport (May 17, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following letters to the editor about an op-ed article the paper published by former mayor of Newport Beach, Clarence Turner, and his opinions on the controversial El Toro Airport. The first letter is from Larry Agran of Irvine, California:

Editorial Advocates for Balance of Noise and Needs of Residents Surrounding Van Nuys Airport (May 17, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed an editorial that debates the question of how to consider both residents' need for quiet and the economy's need for airport capacity around California's Van Nuys Airport.

Van Nuys Airport Noisy and Unfriendly to Community (May 17, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following letter to the editor from Wayne Williams of Sherman Oaks, California:

Air Cargo Conference Held in Ottawa; Some Industry Members Say Ottawa Could Become Secondary Air Cargo Hub (May 16, 1998). The Ottawa Sun reports that the 7th annual International Air Cargo conference ended yesterday in Ottawa, Ontario. Some industry members said the Ottawa International Airport could be a location in the future for a secondary air cargo hub. But airport officials aren't sure that's a good idea, the article says.

Letter from Dept. of Aviation Clarifies Methods of O'Hare Noise Data Collection (May 16, 1998). The Chicago Tribune published the following letter from Mary Rose Loney, Commissioner, Department of Aviation. In her letter, Ms. Loney seeks to clarify information reported in a previous Tribune article about the collection of noise data from O'Hare to establish noise contour maps:

Three Years into Inquiry, Two Sides No Closer on Heathrow's Terminal Five (May 16, 1998). The Financial Times of London reports the inquiry into Heathrow's Terminal Five has been going on for three years now which makes it the longest inquiry in UK history. Opponents are still vocal, although some are experiencing fatigue and financial strain.

Neighbors of Orlando Sanford Airport Say their Ideas to Curb Jet Noise are Ignored (May 15, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports a group of Florida residents has suggested ways to curb jet noise from Orlando Sanford Airport, but the group feels their ideas have been ignored by the Noise Abatement Committee.

Sea-Tac Negotiates with Schools to Pay for Jet Noise Study and Noise Reduction Improvements (May 15, 1998). The News Tribune of Tacoma, Washington, reports school district officials and representatives of the Port of Seattle, which runs the Sea-Tac Airport, say they're trying to negotiate a solution to the long-running dispute over jet noise in Highline classrooms. Both sides say they could have an agreement within the week over how to pay for a noise study.

Vancouver Residents Say Portland Airport Noise Abatement Test Moves Noise from One Neighborhood to the Next (May 15, 1998). The Columbian of Vancouver, Washington, reports complaint calls to the Port of Portland's noise abatement office are rising along with tests of new routes for jets departing Portland International Airport. The tests are being done to in an attempt to shift noise from areas that get a lot to areas whose residents might not notice. Next week, an airport noise committee holds a special meeting, and could cancel the test.

Anti-Noise Group Asks Government to Fund Fair Fight Against Heathrow's Terminal 5 (May 14, 1998). Press Association Newsfile reports the Heathrow Association for the Control of Aircraft Noise (HACAN) asked the government today for financial assistance in its fight to stop a fifth terminal from being built at Heathrow airport.

Fearing Ground Noise Impact, Residents Ask Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport for Redevelopment Money for Mitigation (May 14, 1998). The Star Tribune reports Richfield residents and officials pleaded with airport officials Wednesday to protect their city from the negative effects of the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport expansion.

Port of Seattle Agrees to Fund Noise and Soundproofing Study for Highline Schools (May 14, 1998). The Seattle Times reports the Port of Seattle and school officials say they're close to reaching a deal that would begin the process of outfitting schools near Sea-Tac Airport with insulation to muffle the noise of jets.

Shorter Runways Mean Less Noise from Cleveland Hopkins Airport (May 14, 1998). The Plain Dealer reports the length of the proposed new runways at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport will be significantly reduced to appease residents who have objected to increases in the noise of aircraft taking off and landing.

Van Nuys' Noise Variance to be Reviewed after Residents Complain (May 12, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that a review of Van Nuys Airport noise concerns will be undertaken by the California Department of Transportation. At stake will be the renewal of a variance that allows Van Nuys Airport to operate above state noise limits.

Residents in Annapolis Area Concerned about Increasing Noise Sources (May 11, 1998). The Capital of Annapolis, Maryland, reports Anne Arundel County residents are exposed to ever increasing sources of noise. While many believe their world is too noisy, experts say it's all in how people perceive noise. The article provides an overview of noise standards, methods by which noise is measured, and some methods of noise mitigation.

LA Residents Write Letters About Airport Noise (May 10, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published two letters to the editor from LA-area residents about airport noise.

Noise Reduction Efforts Continue in Face of Increased Air Traffic at Orlando Sanford Airport (May 10, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports complaints about noise from large jets last month at the Orlando Sanford Airport were fewer than during the same period a year ago. However, numbers of noise complaints will likely rise again with increased international charter flights and larger aircraft during the British tourist season.

Residents Optimistic, Officials Cautious about Airport's Noise Diversion Study (May 9, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports residents who live in an apartment complex near the Palwaukee Municipal Airport welcome the news that airport officials plan to study a possible shift of the airfield's main runway to direct planes over an industrial area instead of the apartments. However, airport officials say it may be too late to make such changes.

Residents Discover Local Regulations Hold No Clout at the Pittsburgh Airport (May 8, 1998). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports Moon, Pennsylvania, has recently discovered that FAA regulations pre-empt local and state regulations as far as noise from Pittsburgh International Airport is concerned.

Airport Sound Insulation Project is Completed in California City (May 8, 1998). The Public Record reports that the Palm Springs Regional Airport in Palm Springs, California announced today that their Residential Sound Insulation Pilot Project has been completed. The article explains that in 1996, ten homes near the airport were selected for noise insulation work to test how much noise could be reduced in the homes. The project was funded by the Federal Aviation Administration and the Airport, the article notes.

Noise Abatement Group Attempts to Quiet Portland Airport (May 8, 1998). The Columbian reports since total elimination of noise from the Portland International Airport is impossible, PDX and the airport's Noise Abatement Advisory Committee are making attempts to mitigate the noise. The article goes on to list some of the mitigation measures and their challenges.

Moon Residents Discover Local Regulations Hold No Clout at the Pittsburgh Airport (May 8, 1998). The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports Moon, Pennsylvania, has recently discovered that FAA regulations pre-empt local and state regulations as far as noise from Pittsburgh International Airport is concerned.

Navy Jets Practice Landings at Atlanta Base Too Loud for Residents (May 7, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports many Atlanta, Georgia, residents are annoyed by the noise from the Navy's Blue Dolphins practicing carrier landings at Naval Air Station Atlanta.

Washington School District Sponsors "A Sound Education;" Explores Ways to Reduce Classroom Noise from Seattle Airport (May 6, 1998). The Seattle Times reports the Highline School District in Des Moines, Washington, has hired a firm to measure noise from the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and to advise the district on ways to reduce jet noise in classrooms. Teachers have involved students in studying the problem and coming up with solutions.

Conn. Seeks Federal Money for Comprehensive Noise Study of Bradley Airport (May 6, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports state transportation officials are seeking federal aid to expand their planned study of noise from Bradley International Airport.

Ventura County Airports Conduct Noise Studies; May Apply for FAA Grants (May 5, 1998). The Ventura County Star reports the Camarillo and Oxnard airports are undergoing a noise study to determine if there is a problem at either airstrip.

Airport Advisory Committee Holds Limited Power to Reduce Noise in Boca Raton (May 5, 1998). The Palm Beach Post reports Boca Raton, Florida, residents heard from members of an advisory committee on airport noise Monday. The committee listed its accomplishments but acknowledged their limited power to decrease airport noise.

City Council Member Pushes for Noise Study at Boca Raton Airport (May 5, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports a public forum, sponsored by Florida's Boca Raton Airport Noise Compatibility Advisory Committee, was held Monday to update residents about changes made by the airport to reduce noise and give residents an opportunity to speak about the noise problem.

Michigan Woman Wants Detroit Airport to Buy her Home, Claiming Health Effects from Noise (May 4, 1998). The Detroit News reports a Michigan resident is battling with the Detroit Metropolitan Airport to buy her home, which lies beneath takeoff and landing flight path. The noise from the planes is slowly deafening her children, she claims.

Calif. Congressman's Letter Addresses Criticism of Airport Noise Questionnaire (May 3, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following letter to the editor from Brad Sherman, Congressman, 24th District. In his letter, Sherman responds to criticism lodged at a questionnaire he sent out about airport noise. Sherman wrote:

Editorial Says It's Time For Vancouver to Object to Portland Airport Noise Exports (May 3, 1998). The Columbian printed an editorial that says Portland International Airport's practice of sending noise over Clark County, Washington, is unacceptable. It's time for residents to object to this noise abuse and secure representation on the Portland Airport's governing board.

Land Purchase by Boca Airport Could Create Noise Buffer Zone (May 2, 1998). The Palm Beach Post reports the Boca Raton Airport is trying to buy property close once planned for residential development to provide a noise buffer between the airport and nearby neighborhoods.

Editorial - Van Nuys Residents Want Equity in Airport Noise Decisions (May 1, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles published the following editorial by Ellen Bagelman, president of the Lake Balboa Neighborhood Association. It's Bagelman's opinion that noise complaints from residents who live near the Van Nuys Airport are ignored. Bagelman wrote:

Lawsuit Continues; Chicago Will Pay for Cost Estimates to Soundproof Church (May 1, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports city administrators tentatively agreed to pay for an estimate of the costs of soundproofing a Catholic school and church in Elmhurst that are suing the city over O'Hare Airport noise.

Palm Beach Airport's Noise-Afflicted Neighbors Will Continue to Fight Expansion Despite FAA Approval for Longer Runway (May 1, 1998). The Palm Beach Post reports Palm Beach International Airport received approval from the Federal Aviation Administration this week to lengthen its main runway. Airport expansion and noise continue to be a source of conflict among residents, city officials, and county commissioners.

Anti-Noise Group Gets Drowned Out by Noise from O'Hare (Apr. 30, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that while a conference on noise reduction and education was held Wednesday at Park Ridge in Chicago, every few minutes or so, a plane would roar by and drown out the leader of the event.

City Council Calls for Curfew at Boca Raton Airport in Effort to Put Officials on Notice (Apr. 30, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports the Boca Raton, Florida, City Council this week approved a resolution mandating airport officials impose a voluntary night curfew, notify all pilots who violate it, and pursue federal approval for a mandatory ban on night flights.

Noise Impact Study May Result in Airport Buying Homes Affected by FedEx Hub (Apr. 30, 1998). The News & Record of Greensboro, North Carolina, reports that because the new FedEx hub and a third runway are expected to alter the high- noise areas around the Piedmont Triad International Airport, the Airport Authority may purchase a number of homes.

Residents Near UK's Teesside Airport Object to Proposed Freight Terminal (Apr. 30, 1998). The Northern Echo of the United Kingdom reports complaints about noise from light aircraft using Teesside International Airport have risen since plans were announced to build one of the UK's biggest freight terminals.

Weymouth Residents Complain of Increased Aircraft Noise from Logan; Massport to Investigate (Apr. 30, 1998). The Patriot Ledger of Quincy, Massachusetts, reports state officials plan to investigate why there is an increase in aircraft noise complaints from residents in Weymouth. Several hundred people living in those areas have signed a petition complaining of increased airplane noise.

Noise Sharing Scheme at Sydney Airport Criticized (Apr. 29, 1998). Flight International of Cairns, Australia, reports airline officials, controllers and pilots are against noise sharing at Sydney's airport, citing safety and economic issues as well as mounting chaos.

North Carolina Residents Concerned about Night-Time Noise from Fedex Hub (Apr. 29, 1998). The News & Record reports leaders in the Greensboro, North Carolina, area are asking for more details about noise from the proposed FedEx cargo hub at the Piedmont Triad Airport.

EU Will Strive for Consistent but Flexible Nighttime Aircraft Standards (Apr. 28, 1998). Airports(R) reports the European Union plans to define a common approach to nighttime movements of aircraft and created a new policy, particularly for cargo shipments, at Europe's airports.

Japanese Residents File Lawsuit Against Japanese Government for Noisy U.S. Navy Air Base (Apr. 28, 1998). The Mainichi Daily News reports that a group of 1,607 people living near U.S. Navy Atsugi air base in Yokohama, Japan filed a class-action lawsuit Monday in Yokohama District Court seeking 1.27 billion yen as compensation from the Japanese government for noise from U.S. and Self-Defense Forces (SDF) planes. The Japanese government is in charge of the base, which stretches over seven municipalities. The article notes that the lawsuit is the third of its kind regarding noise from the Atsugi base.

More Flights at O'Hare or a Third Airport? No Agreement. (Apr. 28, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports O'Hare critics are angered by a plan to add 53 daily commuter flights at O'Hare Airport. Their protests are fueling arguments for a third airport at Peotone.

Activists in Newport Beach, California Wield Power in El Toro Airport Fight (Apr. 26, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Newport Beach residents -- who fought the expansion of John Wayne Airport in the 1970s -- are worried that if the proposed El Toro Airport isn't built, increases in air traffic will occur at John Wayne since expansion limits are scheduled to end in 2005. As a result, residents there have become fierce proponents for the El Toro Airport, often opposing residents in the south of Orange County who worry they will be negatively impacted by El Toro. In addition to past experience, Newport Beach residents tend to have more money and political clout than south county residents.

Chicago Suburb Will Continue to Work with Two O'Hare Noise Groups Despite Vote (Apr. 26, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports the Des Plaines City Council opted against joining the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission. But a vote for one group doesn't necessarily mean disapproval of the other group, according to city officials.

Debate Continues over Burbank, California Airport Expansion (Apr. 26, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letters-to-the-editor regarding the proposed expansion of the Burbank (California) Airport:

Quieter Aircraft Planned for Grand Canyon (Apr. 26, 1998). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that the National Park Service is working to control noise from helicopter and plane flights in Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. A ten-year phase-out of the noisiest aircraft that was enacted last year is the most recent noise regulation, the article says.

Resident Says Airplane Noise from Los Angeles Airport is Already Bad Enough (Apr. 26, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Noel Park, a San Pedro, California resident, regarding noise at Los Angeles International Airport:

Canadian Resident Considers Launching Petition Opposing Second Runway at Calgary Airport (Apr. 25, 1998). The Calgary Herald reports that the Calgary (Canada) Airport Authority voted Wednesday that a study be conducted to look at the feasibility of building a second north-south runway at Calgary International Airport to deal with increasing air traffic. In response, Fred Waterman, a Castleridge resident, said he may launch a petition drive opposing construction of the runway.

Two Chicago Area Schools Get $6 Million in Soundproofing Against Airport Noise (Apr. 25, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports U.S. Transportation Secretary Rodney Slater announced that two Chicago area schools will get $6 million in grants for soundproofing against noise from O'Hare and Midway airports. In addition, Slater announced grants of $6.9 million to other Chicago airport projects, and $14.3 million for other Illinois airport projects.

Calgary Airport Authority Undertakes a Study Looking at Building a New Runway (Apr. 24, 1998). The Calgary Herald reports that the Calgary Airport Authority in Calgary, Alberta, Canada has decided to undertake a study looking at the possibility of building a new north-south runway parallel to the existing main runway in order to accommodate increasing air traffic at Calgary International Airport. Meanwhile, a $30-million office complex is being proposed near the airport. Many members of communities in the northeast are happy about the proposed expansion, and say residents near the airport are already used to jet noise, according to the article.

Columnist Says Jet Noise is Decreasing At Florida Airport (Apr. 24, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel printed an editorial by a writer who argues that jet noise from the Palm Beach (Florida) International Airport is decreasing. The writer says he lives south of the airport under the main takeoff corridor, and he believes the jets are becoming less noisy. His experience was confirmed, he says, when several airlines at the airport recently got awards for using quieter jets.

Europe's Air Cargo Businesses Becoming More Heavily Regulated Due to Noise and Nighttime Flight Restrictions (Apr. 24, 1998). The Journal of Commerce reports that the air cargo industry in Europe is facing an increasingly regulated market due to restrictions on noise levels and night flights. The article notes that the limitations come as express carriers are reporting record volumes in business.

Montreal Airport Officials Offer Little Help to Neighbors Frustrated by Jet Noise (Apr. 24, 1998). The Gazette reports that more than 100 angry residents in the Montreal, Quebec area met with officials from Aeroports de Montreal Wednesday to discuss noisy takeoffs and landings at Dorval airport. According to residents, the noise has become unbearable since international flights were transferred to Dorval from Mirabel airport in September. But residents were disappointed with the meeting, the article says. Officials told residents that studies were underway and they were considering changes in takeoff procedures.

Oregon Airport Experiments With Flying Planes at Lower Altitutes Over a Washington County (Apr. 24, 1998). The Columbian printed an editorial that explains that the Portland International Airport in Portland, Oregon will allow some passenger jets to make their big turns at lower than usual altitudes over Clark County in Washington for 60 to 90 days, beginning Monday. The experiment is a test to determine how sensitive residents are to jet noise in the area. The editorial writer says that airport officials should prepare to get lots of complaints.

Federal Aviation Administration Rejects Florida City's Plan to Quiet Aircraft Noise (Apr. 23, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Wednesday rejected a resolution proposed by City Councilor Bill Glass in Boca Raton, Florida to impose curfews on noisy jets at the Boca Raton Airport. The article says that Dean Stringer, an FAA official, told members of the Boca Raton Airport Authority that if the resolution passes, the airport could lose funding from the FAA and Florida Department of Transportation, and could open itself up to lawsuits.

Nevada County Commission Faces Residents Angry Over Proposal to Let Prospective Property Buyers Know About Jet Noise (Apr. 23, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that hundreds of residents packed a Clark County (Nevada) Commission meeting Wednesday, complaining that a proposal to let prospective property buyers know about jet noise from the McCarran International Airport will lower their property values. Commissioners promised the residents that a compromise would be developed during the next month, and would be considered at the May 20 meeting. The article notes that the proposal also would apply to land around Nellis Air Force Base, but none of the residents living in the proposed zone around the base complained at the meeting.

Orange County, California is Split Over New Airport at El Toro (Apr. 23, 1998). The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that a proposed new regional airport at the site of the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station near Irvine, California has divided the county. Supporters of the proposed airport, including the Orange County Board of Supervisors, say it would allow the county to become a major economic player in the region. Opponents say the airport will just bring more noise and pollution. They want to transform the base into a mixed-use urban center for the county. Many view the controversy as one of the most divisive and most important issues the county has faced.

Toronto Area Residents Attack Government and Politicians for Allowing Increase in Jet Noise (Apr. 23, 1998). The Toronto Star reports that about 200 residents of the Rockwood neighborhood of Mississauga, Ontario attended a public meeting last night at which they said the new runway at Pearson International Airport is making their life hell. The residents also criticized the federal government and the local Liberal Members of Parliament for allowing the new runway, which opened late last year, to be built.

Arlington Heights Noise Group Says Third Airport Won't Reduce Noise (Apr. 22, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that in February, the Arlington Heights Village Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise voted against joining a coalition that supports building a third regional airport. However, committee discussions on the topic continue.

Chicago Airport Construction is Likely to Send More Jet Noise Over Some Neighborhoods (Apr. 22, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois has started its annual maintenance project to repair roadways, taxiways, and runways. The project, which will cost at least $25 million, is likely to bring more noise to some suburbs and less noise to other suburbs.

Chicago Suburb Committee Set to Make Final Decision on Supporting a Third Area Airport (Apr. 22, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that Village Board in Arlington Heights, Illinois has asked the Arlington Heights Village Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise to make a final decision on whether the village should support a third regional airport in the Chicago area. The article notes that the committee voted against joining a coalition that supports building a third airport in the Peotone area in February, saying a third airport would not reduce jet noise in Arlington Heights. The committee will take up the issue again at its May 19 meeting.

Chicago Suburb Votes Against Joining Chicago Noise Group (Apr. 22, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that aldermen in Des Plaines, Illinois voted 7-1 Monday to decline membership in Chicago's O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission. The article says the aldermen made the decision in order to affirm their commitment to the Suburban O'Hare Commission.

New York Politicians Warn FAA Not to Reroute New Jersey Planes Over New York (Apr. 22, 1998). Newsday reports that a New York congressional delegation yesterday warned the Federal Aviation Administration not to direct air traffic from New Jersey's Newark Airport over Long Island in New York as the agency begins to redraw the nation's air traffic routes.

New York's LaGuardia Airport Will Get More Air Traffic Despite Pending Lawsuit Challenging Increasing Flights (Apr. 22, 1998). Newsday reports that the U.S. Department of Transportation yesterday approved nine additional daily flights at New York City's LaGuardia Airport. The decision came in spite of a pending lawsuit in federal appeals court filed four months ago by Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and Queens Borough President Claire Shulman, seeking to reverse an earlier Department of Transportation decision to allow 21 flights at the airport.

Columnist in Arizona Warns Residents About Upcoming Aircraft Noise, Saying They Should Put Up With It (Apr. 21, 1998). The Arizona Republic printed an editorial in which the writer describes a project that will create more noise at the Williams Gateway Airport in Chandler, Arizona starting in July. The project will be conducted by Boeing Co., and will involve refitting more than 500 noisy, supersonic T-38C jets with new avionics gear. The editorial writer says the nearby residents likely will be angry, but insists they should put up with the noise.

Minnesota City Near Airport Proposes Redevelopment Plan to Mitigate Noise from New Runway (Apr. 21, 1998). The Star Tribune reports that city officials in Richfield, Minnesota are proposing a $200 million redevelopment plan to mitigate ground noise that is expected from a new north-south runway at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. The redevelopment plan would destroy 1,000 homes and apartments near Cedar Avenue South and replace them with bigger buildings that would insulate against jet noise. The article notes that city officials are trying to convince the Metropolitan Airports Commission (MAC) to pay for the plan. Meanwhile, the article says, about 50 residents attended a MAC meeting Monday hoping to discuss the matter with commissioners. But they left the meeting in anger, the article reports, after only one resident was allowed to address the Commission.

Oregon Airport Experiments With Flying Jets Over New Area in Washington State (Apr. 21, 1998). The Columbian reports that jets leaving the Portland (Oregon) International Airport will be flying over Clark County in Washington for two or three months starting Monday as part of an experiment to consider permanent flight path changes. The article notes that jets have not flown above this area before. Airport officials are trying the experimental flight path to find out if noise can be reduced over areas with growing populations, and to learn whether residents in Clark County will notice the jet traffic and will complain about the noise.

Citizens Group and State of North Carolina Oppose Moving Military Jets to Virginia Air Base (Apr. 20, 1998). The Periscope Daily Defense News reports that residents in Virginia Beach, Virginia and officials in North Carolina are opposing a plan by the U.S. Navy to move several jet squadrons to Oceana Naval Air Station in Virginia Beach. Residents believe the jets will increase noise over their neighborhoods, and North Carolina officials want some of the jets to go to an air base in their state. The article notes that members of the two groups have been working together, and could join forces in the future to more formally oppose the Navy's plans or sue.

Washington Cities Deserve Explanation on FAA's Refusal to Adjust Flight Paths for Noise Reduction (Apr. 20, 1998). The News Tribune printed an editorial which argues that residents living in the flight path of Sea-Tac Airport in the Tacoma, Washington area deserve a good explanation for the Federal Aviation Administration's recent decision not to adjust flight routes in order to mitigate jet noise.

Florida Resident Calls Airport Noise Progress, But Notes He's Losing His Hearing (Apr. 19, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Bruce Olson, an Oviedo, Florida resident, regarding aircraft noise, especially in the Orlando area:

Chicago Suburb Considers Joining City-Led Commission (Apr. 17, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that officials in Des Plaines, Illinois are considering joining the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission, a group formed by the city of Chicago to address noise issues at O'Hare International Airport. Des Plaines is already a member of the Suburban O'Hare Commission, a group that opposes any expansion at O'Hare and supports building a third area airport. On Thursday night, representatives of the Suburban O'Hare Commission urged the Des Plaines City Council not to join the Chicago group, saying the group supports building new runways at O'Hare.

Chicago Suburb Creates Citizens Advisory Group on Jet Noise (Apr. 17, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Park Ridge, Illinois has formed an eight-member citizens advisory group to give the city a voice in fighting jet noise from O'Hare International Airport. The article says the group met for the first time Wednesday, and about 20 residents attended the meeting and voiced complaints ranging from constant noise, low-flying airplanes, and the averaging of noise data that downplays intense periods.

Editorial Approves Attempts to Quiet Planes at Florida Airport (Apr. 17, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel printed an editorial that argues that city officials in Boca Raton, Florida should continue their attempts to quiet jets at the Boca Raton Municipal Airport. In addition, the editorial says that progress toward effective noise-abatement procedures will ultimately depend mostly on the voluntary compliance of pilots and airlines, and they should help preserve Boca Raton's high quality of life.

Options for Converting California Air Base Into Commercial Airport Unveiled; All Options Call for Smaller Operations Than Originally Envisioned (Apr. 17, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that the master plan for the proposed El Toro Airport in Orange County, California -- which includes four scaled down options for airport configuration -- was presented today. The airport, in any of its incarnations, would handle three to five times more passengers than nearby John Wayne Airport.

Residents Near North Carolina Airport Push Federal Express to Not Build a New Runway (Apr. 17, 1998). The News & Record reports that residents living near the Piedmont Triad International Airport in Greensboro, North Carolina are opposing the construction of a new runway to accommodate a new $300 million hub and flights by Federal Express, set to begin in 2003. The article says that residents believe a new runway is not necessary and will bombard their neighborhoods with noise. Some residents are offering other alternatives in an attempt to keep the FedEx hub at their airport, but without building an additional runway. Federal Express officials, however, insist that a new runway is necessary. Meanwhile, the animosity over the issue accelerated at a community briefing Tuesday that quickly deteriorated into an ugly shouting match, the article says.

California Airport Gets $2 Million Grant to Soundproof Homes (Apr. 16, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that Vice President Al Gore announced Wednesday that the Burbank Airport in Burbank, California will get a $2 million federal grant to soundproof 55 homes in Burbank, Sun Valley, and North Hollywood. The soundproofing measures will include adding double-paned windows and new doors, the article says. The grant money for Burbank Airport was part of a $55 million federal airport grant program that was awarded to 14 airports in six states.

Federal Grant Gives $5 Million to Soundproof Homes Near Detroit Airport (Apr. 16, 1998). The Detroit News reports that vice president Al Gore announced Wednesday that the Detroit (Michigan) Metropolitan Airport will get $5 million to soundproof 110 homes in Romulus and Huron Township, and to buy homes in the loudest areas. The article notes that this is the fourth year the airport has received the $5 million grant, which is part of the Federal Aviation Administration's Airport Improvement Program.

North Carolina Residents Angry Over Proposed Runway for New Federal Express Hub (Apr. 16, 1998). The Chattanooga Times reports that about 150 angry residents in Greensboro, North Carolina attended a community meeting Tuesday to complain about a planned third runway at the Piedmont Triad International Airport. The runway is part of an expansion that would accommodate a Federal Express hub.

Report Finds Six Million People in France Suffer From Excess Noise Pollution (Apr. 16, 1998). The Independent reports that the Economic and Social Council (CES) in France, a consultative body representing industrial, business and social groups, issued a report that finds six million French people suffer from excess noise, mainly from cars, railways, and planes.

Columnist Argues British Government Should Survey People About Noise Around Heathrow Airport Instead of Relying on Computer-Generated Noise Averages (Apr. 15, 1998). The Guardian printed an editorial that argues the British government should survey residents living near London's Heathrow Airport about the aircraft noise they are experiencing, rather than relying on computer-generated noise averages. The editorial argues that only by doing such a survey can the government make the noise consultation currently in progress over Heathrow's expansion worthwhile.

Des Plaines to Hear Groups' Views on Noise from O'Hare (Apr. 15, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports two groups, seen as rivals by some, will present their approaches to dealing with noise from O'Hare International Airport to the Des Plaines City Council starting Wednesday night.

Greensboro Residents Object to Airport's Third Runway for FedEx (Apr. 15, 1998). The News & Record of Greensboro, North Carolina reports noise -wary airport neighbors still vow to fight FedEx and the airport's planned third runway.

Residents Near McCarran Airport Object to Their Homes on New Noise Contour Map (Apr. 15, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports some Spring Valley residents are angry their homes could be included in the updated McCarran International Airport Environs Overlay District Maps, possibly classifying their homes as being in a high aircraft noise area.

Study Says Noise Acceptable from Georgia Firing Range; Neighbors Disagree (Apr. 15, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports a study of noise from a Georgia police firing range shows that noise levels acceptable.

Will New Flight Patterns across the U.S. Mitigate Noise? (Apr. 15, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports the national network of air traffic routes will be redrawn to reduce flight delays and noise on the ground, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Boca Council Member Pushes to Fine Violators of Nighttime Flight Curfews (Apr. 14, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports a Boca Raton City Council member is proposing a resolution that would fine violators of nighttime flight curfews at Boca Raton Airport.

North Carolina Residents Vow to Fight FedEx at Piedmont Airport (Apr. 14, 1998). The News & Record of Greensboro, North Carolina, reports that residents living northeast of the Piedmont Triad International Airport say they want FedEx to choose a different site.

Burbank Fights Airport Expansion; Country Watches Outcome (Apr. 12, 1998). Copley News Service reports plans to expand the Burbank Airport are vehemently opposed by the city of Burbank. The rest of the country is closely watching this debate and how if will affect the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court landmark decision that limited local control of airports.

Myths, Facts & Proposals about Noise and Regulation at Van Nuys Airport (Apr. 12, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published an editorial by Gerald A. Silver, president of Homeowners of Encino, California, and writer, Myrna L. Silver, about jet and helicopter noise from Van Nuys Airport. What follows is their article as published:

Study to Assess Impact of Sea-Tac Noise on Washington Schools (Apr. 10, 1998). The News Tribune of Tacoma, Washington, reports that the Highline School District has hired sound experts to measure acoustic conditions in classrooms affected by the noise from nearby Sea-Tac Airport.

NJ Resident Calls Attention to Noise on Ground (Apr. 9, 1998). The Record of Bergen County, New Jersey, published the following letter about noise from a Washington Township resident:

Illinois Funds Two Studies of Highway Noise Barriers (Apr. 9, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the Illinois Transportation Research Center (ITRC) is funding two traffic noise -related studies at Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville's School of Engineering in response to residents' concerns.

Another California City Joins Lawsuit Against El Toro Airport (Apr. 9, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that the city of Tustin, California recently joined with Irvine and other South Orange County cities in a lawsuit to hold the county accountable for correcting noise, traffic, and air pollution problems in environmental reports on the impact of a proposed commercial airport at El Toro Marine Corps Air Station.

S.C. Residents Object to Noise from Aviation Club (Apr. 8, 1998). The Augusta reports members of The Southern Model Aviation Club and nearby residents who don't like the noise coming from their airport reached no compromise at Tuesday's Aiken County Council meeting.

Massport asked by Resident to Quiet Skies Surrounding Logan (Apr. 8, 1998). The Patriot Ledger reports residents are seeking relief from noise made by aircraft traffic noise near Logan.

Federal Aviation Administration Letter Supports Airport Expansion in Burbank, California (Apr. 8, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports the head of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sent a letter March 28 to U.S. Rep. Brad Sherman, D-Woodland Hills, saying neither the FAA nor the city can force flight curfews upon the Burbank Airport.

El Toro Airport Neighbors in Los Angeles, California Speak Out Against Anticipated International Airport Noise (Apr. 8, 1998). The Los Angeles Times interviews several residents that say aircraft noise from the proposed El Toro Airport will be unacceptable.

Routing Jets North Out of a Proposed El Toro Airport in Southern California Would Reduce Noise Over Some Neighborhoods, Noise Expert Says (Apr. 8, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that officials in Orange County have proposed routing more flights north on takeoff if the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station near Irvine, California is converted into a commercial airport. According to the county's noise expert, routing more planes north could reduce the number of takeoffs and jet noise over communities to the east.

Residents of Future Florida Community Notified about Noise from Bartow Airport (Apr. 7, 1998). The Ledger reports officials representing Florida's Bartow Municipal Airport and those from the nearby Old Florida Plantation said they've reached an agreement on informing residents at the prospective community about noise from overflying aircraft.

Emergency Water Aid to Marshall Islands Delayed by Hawaii's Noise Regulations (Apr. 7, 1998). The AAP Newsfeed reports that Hawaii has refused to allow a Russian-made aircraft - an Antonov 124 cargo plane - to land in Hawaii because it breeches Hawaiian noise standards. The aircraft was on an El Nino emergency aid mission in the Marshall Islands and was scheduled to arrive Tuesday, April 7, 1998. The prohibition against its landing forced it to extend the flight and refuel in Alaska, thus delaying emergency aid. Other aircraft were also due to begin arriving Tuesday, April 7, 1998 in the capital city of Majuro as a part of the first wave of the $US 6.5 million El Nino drought aid program.

An Increase of Noisy Jets at the Van Nuys Airport in California Fuels the Push to Ban the Noisy "Stage 2" Jets (Apr. 7, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the number of noisy Stage 2 jets based at Van Nuys Airport has increased 62 percent in the past four years.

The City Council in Mississauga, Canada Votes to Build Homes Below Existing Flight Paths; Greater Toronto Airports Authority Appeals their Decision to the Ontario Municipal Board in Canada (Apr. 6, 1998). The Toronto Star reports that the City Council for Mississauga, Canada has voted to rezone an industrial site below a Pearson airport flight path to clear the way for home development. The Greater Toronto Airports Authority opposed the decision and appealed to the Ontario Municipal Board, who will make the final decision on whether the project can go ahead.

Chinese Villagers Are Prosecuted After Blocking A Runway in Aircraft Noise Protest (Apr. 6, 1998). The British Broadcasting Corporation printed exerpts of an article published by 'Xinhua Ribao" in Nanjing China on March 20, 1998. The 'Zinhua Ribao' article reported that 26 residents from Zhuanghu Village in Jiangsu Province gathered and blocked the runway of Nanjing Lukou International Airport on February 24, 1998 to protest the adverse affect of the airplanes on their life and demanded compensation.

Noise District Plan for Charlotte/Douglas Airport Discussed (Apr. 6, 1998). The Business Journal-Charlotte of North Carolina reports Charlotte/Douglas International Airport officials are asking city planners to create an airport noise district in their effort to manage the impact of noise on nearby neighborhoods.

The U.S. Air Force Argues that an 11,269 Acres Expansion Necessary for Improved Training at the Mountain Home Airforce Base in Idaho (Apr. 5, 1998). The Idaho Statesman's published in their editorial section an article, in question/answer format, from the United States Air Force concerning their proposed expansion of the training range at Mountain Home Air Force Base.

Albuquerque International Sunport Airport Will Attempt to Limit Noise over Residents while Main Runway in Under Repair in New Mexico (Apr. 4, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reported that the Albuquerque International Sunport Airport in New Mexico was scheduled to shut the airport's main east-west runway for several weeks beginning April 11, 1998 for repairs. That means neighborhoods north of the airport will have to endure the noise from planes using the north-south and northeast-southwest runways to take off and land.

U.S. Representative from New Jersey Seeks Funds to Cut Airplane Noise (Apr. 3, 1998). The Record reports that Rep. Steve Rothman, D-Fair Lawn, New Jersey, is asking Congress to increase spending on airport noise-reduction by 20 percent by bolstering President Clinton's 1998 Airport Improvement Program funding from $200 to $239 million.

A Commissioner in Lake Mary, Florida Wants a Committee to Bring Remedies to Noise Problems Before Further Expansion at the Orlando Sanford Airport is Allowed (Apr. 2, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune in Florida reports that Lake Mary City Commissioner Thom Greene wants the city of Sanford and its airport authority to reduce noise generated by increased flights at Orlando Sanford Airport before more airport expansion occurs.

Committee in St. Louis,Missouri Secures Noise Monitor from Airport Authority as a Response to Residents' Complaints (Apr. 2, 1998). St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the airport authority is placing monitors in residential areas in a response to residents' complaints about noisy aircraft. The monitors will be able to help pinpoint the altitude and position of the plane when a noise complaint is called into the airport.

Overnight Flights at Macdonald Cartier Airport in Ottawa, Canada is Citizen's Main Concern (Apr. 2, 1998). The Ottawa Citizen ran the following letter clarifying a published opinion regarding the expansion of Ottawa's Macdonald Cartier airport in Canada.

Publication of the New Noise Zone at Rickenbacker Airport, in Columbus, Ohio Will Trigger Ban on All Aid to Future Housing (Apr. 2, 1998). The Columbus Dispatch warns developers, land speculators and house hunters to be wary. Homes built after April 1998 that are within the noise impact zone for Rickenbacker Airport in Columbus, Ohio won't qualify for federal money to buy their property or pay for soundproofing if the roar of airplanes becomes a nuisance. The disqualification for payment is based on a new law that covers all airports in the United States.

Residents Lose Sleep Due to New Runway in Louisville, Kentucky (Apr. 1, 1998). The Courier-Journal reports a new west runway at Louisville International Airport, Kentucky, is having its effect on residents who are beginning to complain about increased noise and interrupted sleep.

European Commission Proposal Would Prohibit Hushkits after April, 1999 (Apr.1 1998). The Airfinance Journal reports that a European Commission proposal for a directive on noise pollution would prohibit airlines from hushkitting aircraft after April 1, 1999. Originally, the deadline had been set for 2002.

Florida Resident Thinks Expanded Airport Will Reduce Noise and Provide Important Services (Mar. 31, 1998). The Palm Beach Post printed the following letter-to-the-editor from H.C. Rogal, a Palm Beach Gardens, Florida resident, regarding the controversy over the proposed runway expansion at Palm Beach International Airport:

Florida Resident Says Airport Should Consider Residents' Interests and Abandon Expansion Plans (Mar. 30, 1998). The Palm Beach Post printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Samuel Lederman, the president of the El Cid Neighborhood Association and a resident of West Palm Beach, Florida, regarding the proposed expansion of the Palm Beach International Airport:

Missouri City Officials Prepare to Spend $100,000 on Public Education Campaign Opposing Airport Expansion (Mar. 30, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that officials in St. Charles, Missouri are preparing to spend around $100,000 on a public awareness campaign submitted by St. Charles Citizens Against Airport Noise (CAAN) that would educate community members about the city's opposition to the W-1W expansion plan for Lambert Field, which is owned and operated by St. Louis.

North Carolina City Officials Lobby for New FedEx Hub; Officials in Other Towns Oppose Plan (Mar. 30, 1998). The Herald-Sun reports that FedEx shipping company officials are considering locating their mid-Atlantic cargo hub at the Raleigh-Durham (North Carolina) International Airport. Officials in Durham are lobbying for the FedEx hub to locate at the airport, but officials in Cary, Morrisville, and North Raleigh are opposed to the plan because of the increased noise and congestion it would bring.

Tokyo Airport Monitors Airplanes to Mitigate Noise (Mar. 30, 1998). Airline Industry Information reports that officials at the Tokyo Airport have started to display the flight path of every aircraft taking off or landing at the airport at an information center. Aircraft that don't follow their designated flight path will be controlled in order to mitigate noise to local residents, the article says.

Residents Say Ottawa Airport Expansion Plan Failed to Consider Them (Mar. 29, 1998). The Ottawa Citizen reports that residents in neighborhoods near the Macdonald-Cartier International Airport outside Ottawa, Ontario say the airport authority failed to consult them when deciding on a major expansion plan. The expansion will decrease the quality-of-life of residents Nepean neighborhoods like Barrhaven, residents say. In addition, they say the airport authority did not consider plans that would route some aircraft over unpopulated areas.

Florida Resident Dismisses Residents' Aircraft Noise Complaints (Mar. 28, 1998). The Palm Beach Post printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Norman Lynn, a Lake Worth, Florida resident, regarding the expansion plan at the Palm Beach International Airport:

New Building in Taiwan Dampens Noise From Jet Aircraft Testing (Mar. 28, 1998). The China News reports that a "hush house," designed to test jets while dampening noise, was unveiled in Taichung, Taiwan on Thursday.

Residents Beneath Ottawa Airport Flight Path Fear More Noise After Expansion (Mar. 28, 1998). The Ottawa Citizen reports that residents living near the MacDonald Cartier Airport in Ottawa, Ontario are afraid that the $250 million airport expansion project that includes a new terminal will bring more airline noise, especially over communities such as Barrhaven.

Arizona Airport Delays Defining Noise Boundary Area (Mar. 27, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that the Williams Gateway Authority, which governs the Williams Gateway Airport near Mesa, Arizona, tabled a proposal to define an "Airport Influence Area" that would warn prospective buyers about airport noise. Authority officials said they were uncertain whether the proposed area's boundary's were too large for the type of aircraft expected to operate at the airport, and decided to wait till at least the beginning of 1999 to define boundaries, when airport officials will have updated the airport's 5-year master plan.

California Officials Say Jets Departing From Proposed El Toro Airport Won't Fly Over Communities to the Northwest, Conflicting With FAA Report (Mar. 27, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Orange County, California officials -- pushing for an El Toro Airport -- are telling north-county towns that northbound flights from the proposed airport won't affect them because flights will go right over the Santa Ana Mountains. The Federal Aviation Administration and county consultants disagree.

Australian Residents Organize to Oppose Canberra Airport Expansion (Mar. 26, 1998). The Canberra Times reports that residents in Jerrabomberra, Australia are preparing to mount a fight over aircraft noise and a major expansion at the Canberra Airport. The article notes that several days ago, the airport was sold to a local consortium for $66.5 million, and with a commitment by the new owners to spend $57 million on upgrades in the next 10 years. In addition, the article notes, there are plans to expand the airport to full international status before the Sydney Olympics.

Developer Claims FedEx Distribution Center Won't Increase Air Traffic at Wisconsin Airport (Mar. 26, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that the Planning Commission in Waukesha, Wisconsin approved plans Wednesday for a 90,000-square-foot Federal Express distribution center near Crites Field. The facility will be the largest Federal Express facility in the Milwaukee area, the article says. According to the developer, the distribution center will not immediately increase air traffic at the county airport, but there is not telling what could happen in the future. Meanwhile, residents have complained to county officials recently that aircraft noise has increased around the airport.

Noise Boundaries to be Considered for Arizona Airport (Mar. 26, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that the Williams Gateway Airport Authority, which governs the Williams Gateway Airport near Mesa, Arizona, will consider a proposal this afternoon to place an Airport Influence Area around the airport to warn prospective buyers about airport noise. If the authority embraces the proposal, the airport will be the first in the state to create Airport Influence Area since the state Legislature granted the right in 1997, although some airports have created similar boundaries through zoning, the article says.

Opposition to Proposed El Toro Airport in California Mounts from Northern Communities (Mar. 26, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that communities in the center of Orange county are beginning to wonder if an El Toro commercial airport would cause noise problems for them. County officials are scrambling to find ways to route flights so they don't pass too close to communities.

Suburbs Don't Get Promised Reimbursement for Noise Monitors from Chicago, so They Turn to State for Money (Mar. 26, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that a year ago, Chicago suburbs disturbed by noise from the O'Hare International Airport bought a noise monitoring system that was supposed to be paid for by the City of Chicago. But the money from Chicago never arrived, the article says, and now the suburban mayors have asked the Illinois Department of Transportation to pick up the cost, amounting to $787,000.

Meetings Set in Las Vegas Area to Show New Boundaries on Airport Noise Contour Maps (Mar. 25, 1998). The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that the Clark County (Nevada) departments of aviation and comprehensive planning are holding a series of meetings to discuss the revised noise contour maps for the McCarran International Airport. The maps show how noise levels have affected neighborhoods around the airport during the last seven years. The Spring Valley Town Board will recommend the Clark County Commissioners approve or deny the noise contour map at a meeting Monday. Commissioners are expected to take up the matter on April 22.

Noise Grant to Chicago Suburbs Discussed in Illinois State Legislature (Mar. 24, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Illinois state transportation officials defended a $787,000 grant to suburbs around Chicago for equipment that monitors noise from O'Hare International Airport. State politicians loyal to Chicago's Mayor Daley objected to the grant during examination of the Transportation Department's budget in a Democrat-led House budget committee. In a related matter, Transportation Secretary Kirk Brown revealed that his agency has up to $8 million it could spend this year without legislative input to purchase land for a third Chicago area airport.

State Study in Connecticut Will Identify Noise Levels Around Airport (Mar. 24, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports that officials from the Connecticut Department of Transportation discussed plans for a study of aircraft takeoff patterns and possible ways to lower noise levels around Bradley International Airport near Windsor Locks, Connecticut with members of the selectboards in Suffield, Windsor Locks, East Granby, and Simsbury on Monday.

Chicago Looks for Consultant to Discourage Plans for a Third Chicago-Area Airport (Mar. 23, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that the Chicago mayor's administration is searching for a public relations expert who would help discourage the idea of a third Chicago-area airport at a cost of about $180,000 per year. The consultant hired will help develop a strategy to defeat the movement for a regional airport near rural Peotone, and to prevent any of the more than $100 million in passenger taxes that Chicago collects annually at O'Hare International and Midway Airports from being used to build or operate a competing facility, according to city documents. The money to pay for the consultant would come out of the $3 tax on airline passengers at O'Hare and Midway.

Children Near Munich Airport Stressed by Aircraft Noise (Mar. 23, 1998). The AAP Newsfeed in Overseas News reports that a German medical journal says aircraft noise stresses children according to the results of a study conducted around the new Munich airport.

Chinese Block Lukou International Airport Runway to Protest Noise (Mar. 23, 1998). The Agence France Presse reports that villagers living near the new airport in eastern China's Nanjing last week blocked air traffic in a protest against excessive noise levels.

Transport Minister Criticizes NSW Government Opposition to 2nd Sydney Airport (Mar. 23, 1998). The Australian General News from the AAP Newsfeed reports federal Transport Minister Mark Vaile accused the New South Wales government of mounting a cheap fear campaign against a second Sydney Airport. Vaile said new flight paths will distribute noise more evenly over Sydney.

BWI Airport Avoids New Environmental Restrictions (Mar. 21, 1998). The Capital of Annapolis, Maryland, reports that three bills that supporters say would have forced BWI Airport to be a better neighbor were voted down this week by two General Assembly committees.

Raleigh Resident Says Let More Business Come to the Airport (Mar. 21, 1998). The News and Observer published the following editorial by Raleigh resident, Marla Hicks. In her letter, Ms. Hicks gives her opinion about those who move into areas near an airport and then complain about the noise.

Silence Doesn't Mean Agreement in Charlotte with FedEx Hub at Airport (Mar. 21, 1998). The News and Observer reports that while residents who live near Raleigh-Durham International Airport have voiced their opposition to the noise that a new Federal Express hub would create, residents around Charlotte/Douglas International Airport, one of the four contenders for the project, have not sounded any opposition.

Airport Officials Skip Open Forum at West Palm Beach Public Hearing (Mar. 20, 1998). The Palm Beach Post reports Thursday's public hearing on West Palm Beach Airport's proposed runway extension used a format that prevented a group of people from expressing their views the old-fashioned way: in one large forum. Reviews were mixed.

Congressional Bills Would Lift Flight Restrictions at Washington's National Airport (Mar. 20, 1998). The Washington Business Journal reports that two bills in Congress would lift flight restrictions at National Airport in Washington, DC and open the airport to new competitors. The bills propose to remove the airport's "perimeter rule," which limits flights to 1,250 miles in length. Local officials are opposing the bills, saying they would lead to a loss of jobs and growth at Dulles International Airport, would worsen congestion and noise problems at National, and could create pressure to permit more flights at National

FedEx Possibility at Raleigh Airport Puts Cary Town Council and Chamber of Commerce on Opposite Sides (Mar. 20, 1998). The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC) reports divisions are loud and clear in the town of Cary over the possible location of a Federal Express hub at Raleigh-Durham International Airport.

Resident Groups in Belgium Threaten Action if Noise at Two Airports Doesn't Decrease (Mar. 20, 1998). Aviation Daily reports that resident groups in Belgium are threatening action against two airports in the Brussels area to protest what they say are lax noise standards. Residents living near the Brussels South Charleroi Airport are demanding a halt to night flights and training flights, and residents and city officials in Woluwe-St.-Pierre, a Brussels borough near Brussels Airport International, say the airport is not monitoring or enforcing noise rules for older aircraft.

Allow FedEx Hub at RDU to Create Jobs and Prosperity (Mar. 19, 1998). The Herald-Sun of Durham, North Carolina, published an editorial pointing out the irony of opposition from elected officials in the towns of Morrisville and Cary to the proposed Federal Express hub at the Raleigh-Durham International Airport.

Resident's Airport Complaints Will be Heard in Waukesha (Mar. 19, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports the Airport Commission Wednesday announced it will hold periodic public hearings to allow Crites Field's neighbors to voice their concerns about airplane noise.

Glendale Buys Land as Noise Buffer between Airport and Residences (Mar. 18, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that Glendale officials will purchase a large tract of land south of Glendale Municipal Airport to prevent developers from building too close to the airport.

Noise from Seattle-Tacoma Airport Wakes Bellevue Residents (Mar. 18, 1998). The Seattle Times published the following letter in the "Just Ask Johnston" column:

Raleigh Council Weighing Pro's and Con's of Proposed FedEx Hub at Airport; No Official Position Yet (Mar. 18, 1998). The News and Observer reports that the city of Raleigh has yet to take an official stand in the debate about the noise impact of the proposed Federal Express hub at Raleigh-Durham International Airport while the other three towns who would be most affected have made their positions known.

Second Phase of Repairs Shifts Noise at Charleston Air Force Base (Mar. 18, 1998). The Post and Courier reports moving a repair project at Charleston Air Force Base from one runway to the other means a reduction in noise for some residents while a return of noise for others.

Florida Airport's New Noise Officer Makes Enforcement Priority (Mar. 17, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel of Fort Lauderdale reports the city's Airport Authority on Monday appointed a new noise abatement officer.

National Parks Noisy and Congested with Traffic, National Conservation Group Says (Mar. 17, 1998). Gannett News Service reports vacationers may be shocked at discovering smog, traffic congestion, and noise from jet skis and sightseeing planes in national parks this summer.

Noise Hotline at Palm Beach Airport (Mar. 17, 1998). The Palm Beach Post reports that a call to Florida's Palm Beach International Airport's 24-hour noise hot line will provide residents specifics about the type of plane, airline, flight direction and weather conditions during takeoff if they think the noise culprit is an airplane flying outside set paths.

St. Louis Agrees to Address Airport Noise from Lambert Field (Mar. 17, 1998). The Louis Post-Dispatch reports efforts by St. Charles to convince St. Louis to reduce aircraft noise from Lambert Field Airport has reached an important point.

Cincinnati Airport Brings Jobs, But Not Without Noise and Land Costs in Boone County (Mar. 16, 1998). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports Boone County, Kentucky, residents know the price for the prosperity brought by the Cincinnati - Northern Kentucky International Airport. Among the prices paid: jet aircraft noise, loss of land and homes, and now, the airport wants to close a section of road. Residents have objected to this last request.

Jury Still Out on New Flight Pattern at Newark (Mar. 16, 1998). The New York Times reports an accurate assessment of the new flight pattern at Newark International Airport was thwarted by a northwest wind today.

Residents Oppose Turning Vacant RAF Airfield into International Airport (Mar. 16, 1998). The Press Association Newsfile reports that thousands of angry residents are fighting plans to turn an abandoned airfield in rural England into a 24 hour international airport.

Raleigh-Durham Airport Spells Out Noise Limits to Fed Ex (Mar. 14, 1998). The News and Observer of Raleigh, North Carolina reports that Raleigh-Durham International Airport director John Brantley informed the Airport Authority of discussions he's held with FedEx about noise issues.

Hayden and Riordan Disagree over LAX Expansion (Mar. 14, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles Saturday reports state Sen. Tom Hayden harshly criticized Mayor Richard Riordan's promotion of a proposal to expand Los Angeles International Airport.

EU Freezes Number of Hush-Kitted Aircraft; They're Legal, but Not So Quiet (Mar. 13, 1998). AFX News reports the European Commission is proposing a directive so that "hush-kitted" aircraft - aircraft with older engines muffled to meet tighter modern noise pollution standards - cannot be added to the registers of the EU after April 1, 1999.

Foes Say Fight Against Expanded Terminal at Burbank Airport Far From Over (Mar. 13, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Burbank Airport won a federal court of appeals case which validated an environmental study from 1996 that was called into question. The ruling allows the airport authority to move forward with plans to build a larger terminal.

Noise Pollution Activists Protest New Flight Paths at New Jersey Airport (Mar. 13, 1998). The New York Times reports that noise pollution activists protest the new flight paths for Newark International Airport.

Noise Pollution is Many Americans' Biggest Pollution Problem (Mar. 13, 1998). E Magazine reports that our world is becoming dangerously noisy, with noise pollution and health problems from noise on the rise. The two largest sources of noise pollution, airport and vehicle traffic, are growing at a rate of three to five percent annually, and the most frequent complaint Americans make about their neighborhoods is noise. The article says activists working on noise pollution issues compare the movement today to the campaign against secondhand smoke a decade ago. Like secondhand smoke, they say, noise is both an annoying nuisance and the cause of serious health problems. The article goes on to give an overview of health problems related to noise and to interview several activists involved in the fight against noise.

Idaho Environmentalists Fight Air Force Training Range Expansion (Mar. 12, 1998). The Idaho Statesman reports environmentalists don't believe the Air Force will adequately protect Owyhee Desert wilds from a training range expansion, so they are in Washington, DC, trying to halt the project.

European Commission Proposes Ban on Aircraft with Hush Kits (Mar. 12, 1998). The Journal of Commerce reports that the European Commission has moved to ban certain types of aircraft in a controversial move against noise pollution that has angered the Continent's express carriers and threatens trade relations with the United States.

Washington School Battles Airport For Insulation Against Noise (Mar. 11, 1998). The Seattle Times reports that airport officials at the Seattle Tacoma International Airport in Washington have agreed to insulate schools against noise pollution, including a possible air conditioning system.

Connecticut Residents Still Concerned Over Airport Noise and Safety (Mar. 11, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports that residents and area officials are still not satisfied with the current noise solutions at the Bradley International Airport in Connecticut.

Louisiana Receives Funding for Soundproofing of Homes in Flight Paths (Mar. 11, 1998). The Advocate reports that the Federal Aviation Administration will hand over $1 million to Metro Airport in coming weeks to pay for soundproofing 25 houses near the airport's runway.

Air Force Proposes Bomber Training in New Mexico (Mar. 10, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reports that a U.S. Air Force proposal for bomber training in rural New Mexico has residents inflamed.

North Carolina Welcomes FedEx Hub (Mar. 9, 1998). The Herald-Sun reports that Durham, North Carolina is hoping FedEx will bring new jobs to the area with its recent hub proposal.

Navy Considers Residents Concerns Over Relocation Of Jet Station (Mar. 8, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports that the proposal to relocate the Hornets, the U.S. Navy's jet squad, to the Virginia area is still unpopular.

OHare Noise Compatibility Commission Marks First Year (Mar. 7, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission marked its first anniversary Friday by noting its achievements.

Kentucky Residents Worried About Noise From UPS Expansion at Airport (Mar. 7, 1998). The Courier-Journal reports that residents living near the Louisville (Kentucky) International Airport are worried that making the airport a mega-hub for United Parcel Service will increase the already disturbing noise produced by aircraft. As Regional Airport Authority and Jefferson County officials revise the airport's noise-reduction plan, residents are preparing to voice their concerns.

Wisconsin Resident Argues That Airplane Safety is More Important Than Noise (Mar. 7, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Steve Weinert, a Manitowoc, Wisconsin, resident, regarding homeowners who complain about noise from the Waukesha airport:

Some U.S. Cities Have Noise Committees and Programs to Mitigate Aircraft Noise (Mar. 7, 1998). The Courier-Journal reports that some U.S. cities that have airports close to heavily populated areas have established committees and programs to monitor and mitigate noise for neighbors. The article examines the measures that San Francisco, Minneapolis, and Memphis have undertaken, and discusses how the noise problems are similar to the airport noise issues in Louisville, Kentucky.

Residents Wary of Study that Says Sixth Runway at Denver Airport will Reduce Noise (Mar. 6, 1998). The Denver Post reports Denver officials are hoping a study that says it is possible to reduce noise around Denver International Airport will persuade Congress to release funds for a sixth runway.

"Best Practice" Flying Trials by British Airways Verifies Noise Reduction (Mar. 6, 1998). M2 Presswire issued a press release that reports trials held with British Airways 747-400 aircraft leaving Heathrow confirm that "best-practice" flying procedures during take-off produce the least possible disturbance to local communities.

Court-Ordered Release Reveals El Toro Plans (Mar. 6, 1998). According to OC Weekly, a report written last year but only now released under court order contradicts statements from Newport Beach, California, county officials that runways at the proposed El Toro International Airport will go unchanged.

Opponents of FedEx Hub at Raleigh Airport Pressure Commissioners (Mar. 6, 1998). The News and Observer reports overnight delivery of packages is becoming a political issue in Wake County, North Carolina, as the controversy over the proposed Federal Express hub at Raleigh-Durham International Airport gains momentum.

Study Says More Planes Won't Mean More Noise at Denver's Airport (Mar. 6, 1998). The Rocky Mountain News reports changes in flight paths at Denver International Airport could ease noise problems for 90,000 people, according to a study released Wednesday. The study drew attention because it's the first time anyone has suggested so many people in the area are bothered by airport noise.

Sea-Tac and Schools Discuss Funding for Airport Noise Impact Studies (Mar. 5, 1998). The News Tribune reports the Highline School District of Seattle, Washington, whose schools encircle the airport, recently discussed the impact of airport noise on schools and funding for studies. At the meeting residents heard from Sea-Tac Airport director, Gina Marie Lindsey.

Live with PBI Airport Noise or Move: It's Your Choice, Says Resident (Mar. 5, 1998). The Palm Beach Post published the following letter in its Letters to the Editor section from West Palm Beach resident, Noelle Smith. Smith says dealing with noise from the Palm Beach International Airport is a choice she makes. Others, she says, need to take responsibility for their choice of residence. Ms Smith writes:

Albuquerque Residents Concerned about Noise, Pollution, Danger from News Helicopters (Mar. 5, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reports residents of an Albuquerque, New Mexico, neighborhood claim they've lost their peace and quiet to television-news helicopters that frequently fly over their homes.

Louisville Residents Fear Increased Noise with UPS Expansion at Airport (Mar. 5, 1998). The Courier-Journal reports Louisville, Kentucky, residents who live near the airport or under the flight path, worry that the UPS expansion announced yesterday will mean more noise and other harmful effects.

Coalition Questions New Housing in Potential Flight Paths of Luke AFB (Mar. 4, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that developers plans to build up to 2,200 residences in El Mirage, Arizona, have been put on hold because it's unclear whether the properties are in the flight path of planes from Luke Air Force Base.

Cornell Study Measures Ill Effects of Airport Noise on School-Age Children (Mar. 4, 1998). BC Cycle reports Cornell researchers say that airport noise puts stress on children that may have lifelong effects. The article details the physiological effects of airport noise on a group of children living in Germany over a period of two years.

BWI Airport Works to Get Pilots to Adhere to Higher Altitudes, Giving Residents More Quiet (Mar. 3, 1998). The Capital reports the Baltimore-Washington International Airport is taking steps to reduce low-flying, loud aircraft that disturb residents. BWI will begin employing a new technique to remind pilots to fly higher and, therefore, quieter.

Chicago Suburb Creates Citizens Advisory Council on Jet Noise (Mar. 3, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that Ron Wietecha, the mayor of Park Ridge, Illinois, announced Monday that a citizens advisory council will be formed to provide a forum on noise from Chicago's O'Hare International Airport. The six-member council will be made up of residents from the areas hit hardest by jet noise, the article notes, and will meet monthly to review and interpret the results from permanent jet- noise monitors located in Park Ridge.

Chicago Suburb Discusses Supporting Third Regional Airport to Lessen Noise from O'Hare (Mar. 3, 1998). The Chicago Sun-Times reports that village trustees in Arlington Heights, Illinois met Monday to discuss whether they should support a group that is lobbying for a third regional airport at Peotone in an attempt to lessen noise problems at O'Hare International Airport. About 25 people attended the meeting, and politicians outside the village sent their comments.

Missouri Residents Meet with Airport Authority about Noise Grievances (Mar. 3, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports of a meeting that took place last week between the St. Louis Airport Authority and area residents with noise grievances. The article details residents' concerns and an airport representative's responses.

NYC Can't Preempt Federal Government's Control of Airspace, Appeals Courts Rules (Mar. 2, 1998). The Weekly of Business Aviation reports an appeals court ruled that the city of New York may not restrict routes of sightseeing flights.

Paper on Nighttime Aircraft Restrictions Released in Britain (Mar. 2, 1998). M2 Presswire released a press release that reports a new consultation paper was issued today by Glenda Jackson, Britain's Minister for Shipping and Aviation, regarding night restrictions on aircraft movements at Heathrow, Gatwick, and Stansted Airports. Jackson also announced that a research trial will take place on sleep disturbance patterns by aircraft. The press release goes on to quote Jackson's answer to a Parliamentary Question from a Member of Parliament on the issue.

Residential Development Proposed Near Arizona Air Force Base (Mar. 2, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that a residential development with up to 1,500 homes is being proposed in Surprise, Arizona, near the Luke Air Force Base. If built, the homes would be on the fringe of the air force base noise contour area in which the average noise exceeds 65 decibels, an area where residential developments are discouraged.

Wisconsin County Airport Commissioner Suggests Limiting Airport's Hours to Appease Neighbors Angry at Early-Morning Flights (Mar. 2, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that residents living near the Waukesha County Airport in Waukesha, Wisconsin are angry about early-morning takeoffs and landings at the airport. To respond to the problem, one airport commissioner has suggested that officials consider limiting the airport's hours.

Connecticut Politicians Meet with Local Officials to Reduce Noise from Bradley Airport and Preserve "Main Street" as Airport Expands (Mar. 2, 1998). The Hartford Courant reports state of Connecticut transportation officials are considering new efforts to reduce the noise over Suffield from planes leaving Bradley International Airport. One consideration in the noise mitigation effort is a new voluntary takeoff pattern. Other airport concerns were voice during a meeting last month at the governor's office with local elected officials.

Some Southern California Airport Expansions Face Opposition, While Others Do Not (Mar. 1, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that air traffic demand in Southern California is expected to double in the next 15 years, and pressure to expand Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) and open El Toro's former military airport for commercial use is mounting. Residents near both airport sites are fighting that pressure. Some say that expansion should happen at March Air Force Base and Palmdale Airport instead; both sites are north of Los Angeles. The article discusses the specific problems at each airport that expansion would cause.

Business Association in California Opposes Additions to Airport Noise Regulations (Mar. 1, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed an editorial by Bonnie Herman, president of the Valley Industry and Commerce Association. She says that further restrictions on Stage II jets at Van Nuys Airport will be an economic problem for the community, which will lose jobs and money.

Coalition Fighting Runway at Seattle Airport Releases Documents Detailing the Likelihood of Winning Court Cases (Feb. 28, 1998). The News Tribune reports that the Airport Communities Coalition, a group fighting the proposed construction of a third runway at the Sea-Tac Airport near Seattle, Washington, released documents two weeks ago showing that it considered using lawsuits against the project largely as a means to force airport officials to negotiate a financial settlement. The Coalition documents were made public as a result of judicial action after the Port of Seattle, which owns the airport, requested to review the documents.

Letters to the Editor Regarding Burbank Airport in California (Feb. 28, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published two letters about the controversial expansion at the Burbank Airport. One letter is from Peter Kirsch, Special Counsel to Burbank on Airport Affairs. The other letter is from Thomas E. Greer, Executive Director of Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority.

Meeting Between Air Force and Community Members on Jet Noise Held in New Zealand (Feb. 27, 1998). The Evening Standard reports that a meeting was held Wednesday night between officials at New Zealand's Ohakea Air Force Base and the Sanson Community Committee in the Palmerston North, New Zealand area to discuss noise from jets and from base operations. Also attending the meeting were two Manawatu District Council members and, by invitation, members of the Collier family who live off the Ohakea main runway's east end.

Review Period for Noise Limits at British Airports is Extended and Supplementary Paper is Published (Feb. 27, 1998). M2 Presswire released a press release saying that the consultation, or review period, has been extended on noise limits for jets departing from Britain's Heathrow, Gatwick, and Stansted airports. According to the press release, the Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions has decided to publish a supplementary consultation paper, and has therefore extended the consultation period to eight weeks after the supplementary paper is issued. As a result of this action, the International Air Transport Association has withdrawn its application for leave to apply for judicial review of the paper.

Maine City Tries to Entice Airline to Locate Headquarters There (Feb. 26, 1998). The Portland Press Herald reports that Maine state and local officials are working on a plan to allow Business Express Airlines to locate its headquarters and maintenance facilities near the Portland International Jetport. Last fall, the city said there wasn't enough room for the airline to locate at the 636-acre airport, but the latest plan would allow the airline to locate on state-owned land near the Maine Youth Center, a juvenile detention center.

Noise Wall Will be Built in Japan to Mitigate Noise Near U.S. Air Base (Feb. 26, 1998). The Japan Economic Newswire reports that Japan and the U.S. agreed Thursday to build a concrete noise wall north of the U.S. Kadena Air Station in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, in order to ease noise pollution near the base. The noise wall will be paid for by Japan, the article notes.

Soundproofing Costs Mount Up In Chicago Area Schools (Feb. 25, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that soundproofing is underway at Chicago area schools to protect schools from airport noise, but the price is high.

More Japanese Residents Join In Lawsuit Over US Aircraft Noise (Feb. 24, 1998). Kyodo News Service reports that a group of 648 residents in Kanagawa Prefecture joined another group in a lawsuit over aircraft noise at the US Atsugi Naval Air Station, appealing to the Yokohama District Court for 510m yen in damages from the Japanese government.

New Study Finds Aircraft Noise Harms Psychological Well-Being of Children (Feb. 23, 1998). The Des Moines Register reports that a team of international researchers has found that chronic exposure to airplane noise can affect the health and psychological well-being of children. The researchers studied children living in the flight path of a new international airport near Munich, Germany.

Reporter Profiles Supporter of Proposed El Toro International Airport in California (Feb. 23, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that Gary Proctor, chair of the Orange County (California) El Toro Airport Citizens Advisory Commission, is lobbying to educate and provide evidence to residents who oppose the conversion of the El Toro Air Base near Irvine into an international airport. The article profiles Proctor, and presents two differing opinions on him.

California Residents Debate El Toro Airport Proposal (Feb. 22, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following letters to the editor concerning the El Toro Airport proposal in California:

Southern California Residents Continue to Debate Proposed El Toro Airport (Feb. 22, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letters-to-the-editor from residents in Irvine, Santa Ana, Newport Beach, and Laguna Hills, California, regarding the proposed conversion of the El Toro Air Base into an international airport:

U.S. Naval Jet Team To Relocate To Chesapeake Bay (Feb. 22, 1998). The Virginian-Pilot reports that the U.S. Navy is planning to relocate their jet team, The Hornets, to the Chesapeake Bay area from Jacksonville, Florida. Bay residents are concerned about the noise from the jets.

Arizona Courts Proposal To Launch Satellites From Air Base (Feb. 20, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that a California company says it has an agreement with Williams Gateway Airport in Mesa, Arizona to launch replacement satellites from the former Air Force base.

California Survey Shows Residents Demand More Quiet From Airports (Feb. 20, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports two-thirds of residents near Van Nuys and Burbank airports in California said they can't tolerate any more noise, and more than a third favor extending flight curfews for noisy jets, according to a survey by Rep. Brad Sherman.

Dutch Anti-Noise Activists Protest Jet Noise (Feb. 20, 1998). The Orlando Sentinel Tribune reports that a Royal Dutch airliner bound for Atlanta was stranded at Amsterdam's Schiphol airport on Thursday after anti- noise protesters climbed on to the fuselage and formed a human chain.

Hush House at San Antonio Airport Will Allow Jet Engine Tests Around the Clock (Feb. 20, 1998). The San Antonio Business Journal reports the San Antonio International Airport will complete a new engine run-up facility within two years which will allow companies to test their jets' engines 24 hours a day.

Struggle Continues Over California Airport In Burbank (Feb. 20, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published an editorial that addresses a recent court case in California that will aid proponents of Burbank Airport expansion, although opponents plan to appeal the ruling.

California Judge Affirms Airport Expansion Plans (Feb. 19, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that a judge in California decided that Burbank Airport can not veto the airport authorities plans for expansion.

California Senator Introduces Bill To Strengthen Controls On Airport Noise (Feb. 19, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that State Senator Quentin Kopp plans to introduce a new bill to help communities fight airport noise.

Chicago Community Rejects Third Airport (Feb. 19, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that Arlington Heights, Illinois has chosen to reject the idea of a third Chicago area airport in a recent vote.

Judge Rules That California City Can't Block Airport Expansion Plan (Feb. 19, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that a Superior Court ruling that says Burbank, California can not block airport expansion has paved the way for Burbank Airport to work, unencumbered, toward a 19-gate terminal.

New York City Works To Decrease Noise Pollution (Feb. 19, 1998). The Boston Globe reports that noise pollution continues to grow in New York City. The City is trying stronger measures to lower noise levels.

Seattle Area Faces Two Airport Expansions (Feb. 19, 1998). The Seattle Times reports that a second Seattle-area airport has announced plans to expand, and neighbors of King County Airport - better known as Boeing Field - aren't happy about the idea.

Chicago Community Opts Against Third Airport Because Of Noise Pollution (Feb. 18, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that Arlington Heights, Illinois recently voted not to join a Chicago area coalition in support of a third airport due to concerns over noise pollution.

Study Finds New Runway at Florida Airport Won't Increase Noise (Feb. 18, 1998). The Palm Beach Post reports that a recent study has found that a proposed 2,000-foot extension of the main runway at Palm Beach (Florida) International Airport will not pose a significant environmental impact to neighbors, and will not increase noise levels. The $553,983 study was paid for by the airport authority and reviewed by the Federal Aviation Administration, the article notes.

Washington Airport Considers Safety Requirements Of Runway (Feb. 18, 1998). The News Tribune reports that a plan to shift usable runway at Boeing Field, Washington, 800 feet to the north is drawing complaints from neighbors at that end of the King County Airport.

California Chambers Of Commerce Back Burbank Airport Expansion (Feb. 17, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that an organization representing 23 chambers of commerce in the San Fernando Valley, California area announced that it is backing Burbank Airport's plan to relocate its air terminal and add five gates.

Illinois Community Considers Whether To Back Third Chicago Area Airport (Feb. 17, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that the Arlington Heights Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise will gather to hear more testimony about the need for a new airport near Peotone, in Will County, to curb expansion of O'Hare International Airport.

Study Shows Aircraft Noise Effects Health Of Children (Feb. 17, 1998). The Washington Post reports that chronic exposure to airplane noise can affect the health and psychological well-being of young children, according to a team of international researchers who studied children living in the flight path of a new international airport near Munich, Germany.

Toronto Airport Tests New Runway (Feb. 17, 1998). The Toronto Star reports that Pearson airport's newest runway is fully operational after more than two months of testing - resulting in 50 to 60 noise complaints, an airport official says.

Airport Disturbs Rural Community In South Carolina (Feb. 16, 1998). The Augusta Chronicle reports that residents of Aiken, South Carolina object to noise from recent air field.

Kentucky Resident Voices Complaints About Airport Noise (Feb. 13, 1998). The Courier-Journal published the following letter to the editor:

Indiana Planning Commission Approves Subdivision Near Airport's Flight Path (Feb. 13, 1998). The Indianapolis News reports the Hendricks County Area Plan Commission this week unanimously approved plans for a small subdivision in Danville, Indiana close to the flight path and noise of airplanes from the Indianapolis International Airport. The developer said he would build the homes with extra soundproofing and would warn buyers about the potential jet noise.

California City Fills Vacant Airport Authority Seat With Representative Who Supports Limited Airport Expansion (Feb. 11, 1998). The Los Angeles Times reports that Burbank, California's City Council appointed a new member to the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority, saying he was on their wavelength when it comes to noise issues and expansion questions.

Dallas Airport Locked In Battle With Local Church (Feb. 11, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports that the Dallas/Fortworth Airport is destroying an area Church and community center.

Dallas Church Vows to Fight D/FW Over Buyout (Feb. 11, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports The Church in Irving blames the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport for its demise as a missionary training and conference center. Now the church, involved in a bitter dispute with the airport, contends the airport is obliged to buy out the 50,000-square-foot church.

Rhode Island Prepares Noise Control Bills For Airport (Feb. 11, 1998). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that a House committee will hear testimony on four bills aimed at noise at T.F. Green Airport, at a time when the Airport Corporation says it's making progress on reducing noise without state mandates.

International Air Association Plans Legal Challenge to British Government's Plan to Cut Noise Levels at London Airports, While Airlines Predict London Airports Will Decline Under Rules (Feb. 11, 1998). The Travel Trade Gazette UK & Ireland reports that the International Air Transport Association (IATA) is preparing a legal challenge against the British government's proposal to cut noise levels at London's Heathrow, Gatwick, and Stansted airports. Meanwhile, airline executives are saying that Heathrow airport could lose its spot as Europe's most important airport if the government's noise rules are implemented.

Homeowners' Interests Regarding Aircraft Noise Left out of Noise Reduction Plan Sent by Indianapolis Airport Authority to FAA for Approval (Feb. 7, 1998). The Indianapolis Star reports that homeowners' issues regarding aircraft noise were not included in an aircraft noise reduction plan approved by the Indianapolis Airport Authority board on February 4, 1998. It could take as much as six months for the Federal Aviation Administration to rule on the plan.

Florida Neighborhood Association Will Sue City Over Airport Noise; City May Pay High Price on Lawsuit (Feb. 3, 1998). The Palm Beach Post reports that the Palm Beach (Florida) Neighborhood Association has threatened to sue Palm Beach County over noise at the Palm Beach International Airport. Today, county commissioners will decide whether to hire Cutler and Stanfield, a Washington, D.C. law firm that charges $205 an hour and specializes in airport noise issues. The article says the lawsuit could be one of the most expensive noise suits in the history of the airport, with costs that could amount to $1.8 million for the city.

Californai Residents React to El Toro Editorial (Jan. 25, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letters to the editor in response to a January 18, 1998, editorial titled, "Clarity for El Toro."

English Government Considers Plan to Ban Incoming Night Flights at Heathrow (Jan. 25, 1998). The Independent of London, England, reports the government, as part of its effort to place limits on aircraft noise, is discussing a ban on all incoming night flights at Heathrow, the world's busiest international airport.

Will Hovering Airliners be the Answer to Air Traffic and Noise Pollution? (Jan. 25, 1998). The Sunday Telegraph Limited of London, England, reports that a new kind of aircraft which can take off and land like a helicopter but fly as fast as an airliner could "revolutionize" air travel. According to its manufacturers, this new technology is quieter than conventional aircraft.

Chicago Department of Aviation Member Defends City and Airport's Noise Program (Jan. 22, 1998). The Chicago Tribune printed a letter from Dennis Culloton, member of the city's Department of Aviation. In the following letter, Culloton defends the noise reduction efforts of the city of Chicago and O'Hare Airport. Culloton writes:

Noise Monitors available to Residents who Live Near NY & NJ Airports (Jan. 22, 1998). Newsday reports that residents who live around a major airport in the New York City area can request a mobile noise monitor from Port Authority. These monitors measure decibel levels of aircraft noise to determine if airlines are violating noise limits.

Temporary Re-routing at D/FW Sends Jets over Quiet Neighborhoods (Jan. 22, 1998). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram of Fort Worth, Texas, reports that yesterday when bad weather accompanied the temporary shutdown of a crucial bad-weather landing system at D/FW, noisy jets flew over normally quiet neighborhoods in Grapevine and Southlake, prompting several calls to Dallas/Fort Worth Airport's noise hot line.

Vancouver Resident Questions Closing of Rifle Ranges (Jan. 22, 1998). The Vancouver Sun printed an editorial by Peter Hiebert, a resident of Coquitlam, Vancouver, in which he expresses his displeasure at the closing of the rifle ranges on Barnet Highway. Mr. Hiebert writes:

CA Van Nuys Airport Publishes New Noise Restrictions (Jan. 21, 1998). Press Release to News Editors/City Desks from Stacy Geere at Van Nuys Airport:

Who Will Pay for Quieter but More Expensive Helicopters in Grand Canyon? (Jan. 21, 1998). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Grand Canyon Park employees say it's noisier than ever at the top of rim in spite of aircraft and flight restrictions. Renewed hopes for natural quiet rest on a new helicopter.

Citizens' Group Unhappy with Noise from San Francisco Airport (Jan. 20, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports a new citizens' organization opposed to noise from San Francisco International Airport is urging Peninsula mayors to exert more pressure on the airport to be a quieter neighbor.

Editorial: Stop Throwing Taxpayer Money Away. Burbank Airport and City of LA Need to Come to Terms of Agreement. (Jan. 20, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles published an editorial that urged officials of Los Angeles and of the Burbank Airport to settle their differences.

Detroit Senator Proposes Fund For Communities Effected By Airport (Jan. 19, 1998). The Detroit News reports that Michigan state Senator, Loren Bennett is proposing a bill that would give a portion of revenues from the Detroit Metropolitan Airport's parking tax to a fund for the surrounding communities effected by noise and other consequences of the airport.

Michigan Airport Plans Emergency Landing Pad (Jan. 19, 1998). The Detroit News reports that homeowners on the west side of the Oakland International Airport in the Detroit area may be accepting offers to sell their homes for an airport safety zone.

Noise from Oakland Airport Enough Already; Residents Oppose Expansion (Jan. 19, 1998). The San Francisco Examiner reports thousands of Alameda County residents, civic leaders and educators in the East Bay of California oppose the Metropolitan Oakland International Airport's plan to more than double the number of flights, passengers and cargo passing through Oakland over the next 10 years.

School May Relocate in Wake of New Runway at Dallas/Fort Worth Airport (Jan. 19, 1998). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that Grapevine Middle School officials are discussing relocation, saying that a new runway at Dallas/Fort Worth Airport will bring noisy planes over the building.

Some Mass. Towns Wary of New Logan Runway; They Fear Increase in Noise (Jan. 19, 1998). The Patriot Ledger of Quincy, Massachusetts reports that a 30-year-old Massport plan to build a new runway at Logan Airport, the nation's fourth-busiest airport, is still alive. While some state leaders say the runway will reduce air traffic over the South Shore, other local leaders are afraid it will have the opposite effect and want the plan killed.

Florida Airport Tower Put On Hold (Jan. 17, 1998). Saturday reports that a Federal Aviation Administration ruling concerning the Boca Raton Airport will freeze up funds that would allow for a new control tower. The tower is controversial because its completion would allow for heavier traffic at the Boca Raton airport. Area residents fear the noise that more traffic would bring, while city officials fear the current air traffic congestion as a safety hazard.

Burbank Airport and City Still at Odds over Key Expansion Issues such as Noise and Taxes (Jan. 16, 1998). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports Burbank Airport officials' proposed settlement with the city of Burbank contains several points still barring the way to air terminal expansion.

Chicago Continues To Consider Controversial Third Airport (Jan. 16, 1998). The Chicago Tribune reports that the proposal for a third Chicago airport is raising economic worries in the surrounding communities.

Things You Can Do To Stop The El Toro International Airport (Jan. 16, 1998). The OC Weekly published the following editorial concerning direct action for opponents of the El Toro International Airport in California:

A California Superior Court ruling requiring further analysis of El Toro Airport impacts won't stop planning by Orange county: an interview with El Toro Master Development Program manager Courtney Wiercioch. (Jan. 15, 1998). The Irvine Citizen interviewed Courtney Wiercioch, Orange County, California's program manager for the El Toro Airport Master Development Program. The Citizen talked with Wiercioch concerning San Diego Superior Court Judge Judith McConnell's ruling last week that major revisions must be made to the county's environmental analysis of El Toro airport noise, traffic and passenger demand. The article reports that the ruling requires the county to make additional comparisons based on existing or known conditions, such as road improvements now funded or in place. Wiercioch said that the ruling is not viewed as a major setback and will not stop base-reuse planning.

Atlanta Area Airport Found Beneficial In Recent Study (Jan. 15, 1998). The Atlanta Journal reports that a recent study shows that the benefits of the DeKalb-Peachtree airport proposal outweigh the costs to area residents whose property will lose value due to the project.

Lawsuits Against Oakland Airport Expansion Plan Filed by Two Nearby California Communities (Jan. 15, 1998). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that Oakland International Airport's proposed expansion has prompted two lawsuits from neighboring California communities, where residents fear they'll be stuck with more noise pollution. The city of San Leandro, California filed suit yesterday in Alameda County Superior Court, charging that Oakland Port officials' environmental review of the $600 million project did not adequately address the effects of added traffic, noise and air pollution on San Leandro residents. In addition, a lawsuit against the port is reported to have been filed today by a group of airport neighbors in Alameda.

Metropolitan Washington, D.C. Council of Governments Opposes Two Proposed Bills Designed To Allow More Planes to Land at Washington National Airport (Jan. 15, 1998). The Washington Times reports that the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (COG) unanimously opposed a federal bill that would allow more planes to land at Washington National Airport, fearing increased traffic would mean more noise. COG opposes the Aviation Competition Enhancement Bill, introduced by Sen. John McCain, Arizona Republican in October, which seeks exemptions to a "perimeter rule," which bans nonstop flights longer than 1,250 miles into or out of National. A companion House bill introduced by Rep. John J. Duncan Jr., Tennessee Republican, proposes to add up to six more flights a day at National. According to the report, opponents say this would increase noise.

New Zealand Resident Conducts Survey On Jet Noise At The Palmerston North Airport (Jan. 15, 1998). The Evening Standard reports the results of a recent survey on jet noise from the Palmerston North airport.

Public Support May Be Waning For California's El Toro Airport (Jan. 15, 1998). The Orange County Register reports that public support may be waning for the El Toro International Airport.

Editorial Claims FedEx Proposal Will Create Night-time Noise for Residents of Orange and Durham, North Carolina Counties (Jan. 14, 1998). An editorial in the News and Observer by P. C. Murphy of Chapel Hill, North Carolina wants to make clear two things regarding FedEx's plan for a possible hub at Raleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU). One, the noise involved is largely night-time noise, with arrivals and departures heaviest between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. and two, noise will affect many area communities, not just Cary, North Carolina.

Residents Near Greensboro, North Carolina Airport Concerned About Noise From Proposed FedEx Shipping Hub (Jan. 14, 1998). The News & Record reports that neighbors have mixed feelings about the possibility of FedEx adding 20 flights a day to Piedmont Triad International Airport in Greensboro, North Carolina

Arlington Heights, Illinois Must Decide Whether to Join Group Calling for a Third Chicago Area Airport (Jan. 13, 1998). The Chicago Daily Herald reports many eyes will be watching tonight as the Arlington Heights, Illinois Advisory Committee on O'Hare Noise takes up the question of whether the village should join a pro-third airport group. While many south and west suburban communities have joined the Partnership for Metropolitan Chicago's Airport Future, Arlington Heights would be the first Northwest suburb outside of Suburban O'Hare Committee members Des Plaines, Elk Grove Village and Park Ridge, Illinois to join. "People are looking to see what Arlington will do," said Trustee Virginia Kucera, who will chair the committee's 7:30 p.m. meeting in the council room at village hall, 33 S. Arlington Heights Road. "We're going to have a thorough discussion."

Business for, Residents Against FedEx Hub at Raleigh-Durham International Airport (Jan. 13, 1998). The News and Observer reports that while business leaders applauded news that Federal Express might choose Raleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU) as its fifth U.S. hub, the reaction of residents and local officials of Raleigh, Morrisville, and Cary, North Carolina was guarded. Worried about increased noise from airplanes and more traffic on already clogged roads, some said the new FedEx hub would be better suited for other locations.

FAA Re-Publishes Rules for Interim Compliance Waivers for Stage 2 Aircraft (Jan. 13, 1998). The FAA yesterday published procedures and guidance in the Federal Register for operators of Stage 2 aircraft to submit a request for an interim compliance waiver, although the agency's policies for reviewing those requests have not changed. Under FAA noise regulations, an operator of Stage 2 aircraft by Dec. 31, 1998, must either reduce its number of Stage 2 aircraft by 75% from the November 1990 base level or achieve a fleet mix of airplanes that is 75% Stage 3 airplanes.

FedEx Hub Project Sought by Raleigh-Durham International Airport Could Bring More Jobs and Noise for Nearby North Carolina Communities (Jan. 13, 1998). The Herald-Sun reports that Raleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU) wants to be Federal Express' next national hub. The Memphis-based overnight delivery company has issued requests for proposals to airports in the eastern United States seeking one to be its East Coast hub. FedEx is confirming neither the names of the airports nor the number contacted, but RDU Director John Brantley confirmed Monday RDU is one.

North Jersey Air Traffic Could Increase From Rerouting Plan (Jan. 12, 1998). According to a Wire Services article, the Port Authority plans to reroute air traffic from Newark International Airport to Teterboro Airport in Bergen County using economic incentives to entice air carrier companies. Already subject to the noise from the 4,200 planes that pass over North Jersey daily, the rerouting would increase the frequency and level of unwanted noise, the article stated.

Raleigh-Durham Airport (North Carolina) Could Be Home to FedEx's New Transportation Hub (Jan. 12, 1998). The News and Observer reports Federal Express is considering building a $300 million national transportation hub at Raleigh-Durham International Airport. But Cary, NC officials, concerned the noise will impact their community, oppose the siting.

The United States Federal Aviation Proposes Civil Penalty (Jan. 12, 1998). The Record reports that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has proposed that the Venezuelan air carrier, Servivensa, pay a civil penalty of $144,000 for conducting flights that violated FAA's aircraft noise regulations.

Holler Park, the 'Suburb-Within-The City' of Milwaukee, Wisconsin Fears Increased Noise From Mitchell Airport Expansion (Jan. 11, 1998). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that residents of the Milwaukee, Wisconsin neighborhood of Holler Park are worried about the effects of Mitchell Airport expansion on their community. Holler Park, often called 'the suburb within the city,' is an island of residential tranquility, surrounded by rivers of commerce and a sea of industry. The article reports that a runway at Mitchell, which can now handle only small propeller aircraft, is to be extended to accommodate 19-seat propeller airliners and a few private jets. The runway's flight path leads over Holler Park.

Jet Noise Problems Faced by Queens, New York Residents Look to Get Worse, Not Better (Jan. 11, 1998). The Daily News recently reported on the jet noise problem experienced by Queens, New York residents who live nearest to Kennedy International and LaGuardia airports. The article stated that their noise problem looks to get worse before it gets better as more and more airlines are being given the okay to land and take off at the borough's two airports. This, despite a federally enacted High Density Rule that places limits on the number of flights into and out of Kennedy, LaGuardia, Chicago's O'Hare and Washington National airports.

Letters to the Editor Express Differing Views on the Proposed El Toro (California) Airport. (Jan. 11, 1998). The Los Angeles Times published the following letters:

Relocation of Kentucky Neighborhood Near Louisville International Airport is Held Back (Jan. 11, 1998). An article in the Courier-Journal reports that a plan to relocate a Louisville, Kentucky neighborhood affected by recent Lousiville International Airport expansion has been hampered by the unwillingness of nearby affluent communities to take the residents in. The article reports that the Jefferson County legislature has withheld support for a $20 million state allocation to finally move people out of Minor Lane Heights in Lousiville. It has done this in order to pressure the airport authority into dropping another relocation project, in which anybody displaced from any neighborhood by the airport expansion (such as Minor Lane Heights) could be moved to a new 450-home subdivision in the Cedar Creek area. Residents of the Cedar Creek area oppose the new subdivision.

State Representative Jim Wayne Speaks at Airport Neighbor's Association meeting in Louisville, Kentucky (Jan. 11, 1998). An article in the Courier-Journal reported that Rep. Jim Wayne attended a recent meeting of the Airport Neighbors' Alliance in Louisville, Kentucky. The article reported that Wayne was one of about 50 people at the alliance's monthly meeting held at St. Rose School. At the meeting, people were urged to go to Frankfort, Kentucky this week to support a bill that would add a citizen advocate to the airport board. The meeting also included information about Kentucky's relocation plan for people who live close to Louisville International Airport. This plan has recently come under fire. The Quiet Communities Act was also discussed.

Two letters to the Editor Concerning Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena (California) Airport Noise (Jan. 11, 1998). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letters to the editor:

An Editorial Advocates Cleaning Up Air Pollution in Roanoke, Virginia (Jan. 9, 1998). An editorial printed by the Roanoke Times & World News advocates cleaning up noise pollution in Roanoke, Virginia. Kelly Polykov, a student at Hollins College, says in the editorial that like air and water pollution, noise pollution is a very real problem for millions of Americans across the country. It comes from cars, trucks, airplanes, leaf blowers, air conditioners, construction, the booming bass of car stereos and a plethora of other sources. Noise has been getting louder and the problem more widespread every year.

Noise Monitoring System at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (Texas) Designed to Settle Disputes Between Airport and Residents (Jan. 9, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports that Dallas/Fort Worth (Texas) International Airport officials have unveiled a noise-monitoring system that they say will be the final arbiter in noise disputes between nearby residents and airport officials. Residents of Texas cities around the airport have long complained about noise from planes that they say are too low and off their prescribed flight paths. And for just as long, many have been skeptical of official assurances that most of the planes were just where they were supposed to be.

Soundproofing of California Homes Begins as Part of Program by FAA and Los Angeles International (California) Airport (Jan. 9, 1998). The Copley News Service reports that the first of 25,000 California residences surrounding Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) have been "soundproofed" as part of a program funded by the Federal Aviation Administration and LAX. The soundproofing program is taking place in Los Angeles and three surrounding California cities, could cost $500 million and take five to seven years to complete. While residents say that the soundproofing, which includes installing airtight doors and double insulated windows, helps, it doesn't eliminate the noise from jets flying overhead.

Fewer Flights, More Passengers at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport Says Airport Official (Jan. 8, 1998). Chicago Daily Herald reports that newly released statistics show fewer planes are taking off and landing at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois where aircraft noise has angered many in nearby suburbs. Chicago aviation commissioner Mary Rose Loney said at a recent meeting with suburban business and elected leaders that the number of flights in 1997 dropped about 2 percent from the previous year, from 909,000 to an estimated 890,000. However, some airport noise activists claim that these numbers are too low.

Flight Paths of Stage Two Planes May Change at Albuquerque, New Mexico Airport As a Result of Recent Noise Study (Jan. 8, 1998). The Albuquerque Journal reports that Albuquerque International (New Mexico) Airport officials and a consultant conducting a noise study have been working with airlines and the FAA to change some flight patterns to reduce noise to nearby residents. As a result, some of the older, noisier planes that have plagued residents of Southeast Heights, Albuquerque may start turning south away from the city after taking off. The noisier, stage two airplanes, which include Boeing 727s, must be phased out or outfitted with "hush kits" by 2000.

Both Sides of El Toro Airport Debate Claim Victory Over California Judge's Ruling (Jan. 8, 1998). Los Angeles Times reported that in a decision that made both sides of the debate happy, a Superior Court judge ruled that Orange County must fix its environmental review of its proposed commercial airport at El Toro Marine Base, but it doesn't have to redo the entire thing.

St. Charles, Illinois Officials Consider Ultimatum in Dispute Over Airport Expansion Noise (Jan. 8, 1998). St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the St. Charles, Illinois City Council is frustrated with the lack of noise abatement strategies in the proposed plan for airport expansion favored by St. Louis and Lambert Field Airport officials. If a noise abatement agreement cannot be reached, the City of St. Charles is considering filing a lawsuit against the city of St. Louis and Lambert Field Airport.

Rerouting of Flights at New York's LaGuardia Airport Seen as Answer to Noise by Some, as Public Relations Ploy by Others (Jan. 7, 1998). Newsday reports that two New York, New York city councilmen have called on the Federal Aviation Administration to reduce ear-numbing airplane noise by rerouting flights at LaGuardia Airport. However, some residents are doubtful that this will have a real effect on noise in the communities surrounding the airport.

Boac Raton, Florida Airport Adopts Ban on Touch-And-Go Maneuvers In Effort to Reduce Noise (Jan. 7, 1998). The Sun-Sentinel reports that Boca Raton (Florida) Airport recently instituted a weekend and nighttime ban on touch-and-go maneuvers - repetitive takeoffs and landings by student pilots for training purposes. The ban was one of several recommendations from the Airport Noise Compatibility Committee, an advisory group created by the Airport Authority to boost communication and improve the relationship between pilots, airport officials and homeowners.

Quieter Helicopters at the Grand Canyon May Help Meet Noise Restrictions (Jan. 7, 1998). The Arizona Republic reports that National Park Service officials recently held a news conference to unveil what they hope will put an end to one of the most vexing environmental problems at the Grand Canyon in recent years. Officials are hopeful that the use of the Boeing MD-900 helicopter will enable them to maintain a viable air-tour industry while abiding by a federal law mandating the natural quiet of the Grand Canyon and other national parks. The Boeing MD-900 helicopter produces 73 decibels, compared with the average tour helicopter's 85.

Two NYC Councilmen Join Noise Protest at New York's LaGuardia and Kennedy Airports (Jan. 7, 1998). The Daily News reports that Two New York City Councilmen joined anti- noise activists at LaGuardia Airport yesterday to demand that the city and federal governments act to reduce air traffic noise in the areas around LaGuardia and Kennedy airports.

Tolerance of Dallas Residents Vary with Noise Sources (Jan. 6, 1998). The Dallas Morning News reports that today it is highly unlikely you live without being exposed to somebody else's noise. It may just be the muffled roar of traffic or music from the house next door. Or it may be wailing sirens, the thunder of a passing plane, the muffled roar of traffic.

Noise Zone Reductions at Baltimore-Washington International Airport Not Enough (Jan. 5, 1998). The Capital reports that although noise levels near Baltimore-Washington International (BWI) Airport have been reduced through the use of newer, quieter aircraft, some nearby residents think the airport could do more. The Airport Coordinating Team, a watchdog group, at a recent hearing on BWI's 1998 proposed airport noise zone, told airport officials they need to regulate the use of older, louder aircraft.

California Resident Calls For Legislative Action On Burbank Airport (Jan. 4, 1998). Los Angeles Times published the following letter to the editor:

Grand Canyon Park Service To Unveil Quiet Technology Helicopter (Jan. 2, 1998). U.S. Newswire issued the following press release concerning the dedication of quiet technology helicopters at the Grand Canyon National Park:

Kentucky Residents Halt Airport Relocation Plan (Jan. 1, 1998). The Courier-Journal reports that an expected $20 million from the state to relocate neighbors of Louisville International Airport to the Cedar Creek area in southern Jefferson County is in jeopardy.

Rerouted Flight Plans Postponed At New Jersey Airport (Dec. 31, 1997). The Asbury Park Press reports that the Federal Aviation Administration announced it is indefinitely postponing implementation of its controversial rerouting plan for flights out of Newark International Airport.

Runway Expansion At Florida Airport Worries Neighbors (Dec. 31, 1997). The Palm Beach Post reports that Palm Beach residents are skeptical about a proposal to extend the runway at Palm Beach International Airport(PBIA). Officials say the extended runway will reduce noise. Residents disagree.

The Federal Aviation Administration Rethinks Plan To Reroute New Jersey Flights (Dec. 31, 1997). The New York Times reports that New Jersey noise pollution activists won a minor skirmish today in a 10-year-long battle with the Federal Aviation Administration over airplane noise when the agency agreed to suspend an experiment to reroute some planes leaving Newark International Airport.

Noise Expert Cries Out For Stronger Noise Pollution Control In New York City (Dec. 30, 1997). The Daily News reports that a top environmental expert yesterday called for appointment of a city czar to coordinate a crackdown on the noise explosion tormenting New Yorkers.

After A Decade Of Debate, California Will Decide In 98 The Future Of El Toro Air Base (Dec. 29, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that in 1998, plans to use the former El Toro Marine Corps Air Station for non-military purposes will become clearer, and the debate over the details will likely intensify.

Missouri Continues Plans For Airport Expansion At Lambert Field (Dec. 29, 1997). St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that opponents of Lambert Field's airport expansion vow to fight on, but it looks like their battle will be lost.

Officials Prepare New Flight Plan For New Jersey's Newark Airport (Dec. 29, 1997). The New York Times reports that Federal and local officials plan to meet today to discuss the latest flight plan for the Newark International Airport.

Another Chicago Area Community Joins Forces To Quiet Airport Noise (Dec. 27, 1997). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that Chicago area residents continue to clamor over the noise from O'Hare International Airport.

Soundproofing In Cleveland Area Homes Goes Sour (Dec. 27, 1997). The Plain Dealer reports that efforts by the city of Cleveland to soundproof homes in the Cleveland-Hopkins International Airport area have gone sour.

Seattle Struggles Over Airport Expansion (Dec. 26, 1997). The Seattle Times reports that as preparations begin for building a new runway at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, a coalition of cities is spending millions of tax dollars on lawsuits and public relations trying to stop the massive project. The Port of Seattle, meanwhile, will spend millions in public funds to keep it from being blocked.

Chicago Area School Sues City For Soundproofing From Airport Noise (Dec. 25, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that The Chicago Department of Aviation and the Immaculate Conception School in Elmhurst are struggling through a lawsuit over soundproofing for the school.

Virginia Residents Worry About New Runway (Dec. 24, 1997). The Richmond Times Dispatch reports that residents of Hanover County Virginia are concerned about a proposed airport expansion.

Federal Aviation Administration Completes Environmental Assessment of Airport Expansion In Missouri (Dec. 23, 1997). St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the expansion of the Missouri Airport at Lambert Field won a big endorsement from the Federal Aviation Administration on Monday.

Missouri Community Persists In Struggle Against Airport Noise (Dec. 23, 1997). St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that St. Charles officials and residents say they will continue to press their case for reducing aircraft noise over the county and protecting a historic commercial district as they respond to a federal agency's assessment of the environmental impact of Lambert Field.

Senator McCain Advacates For Changing A Rule That May Reduce Noise At Washington National Airport (Dec. 23, 1997). Airports reports that Senator McCain of Arizona is proposing a bill to lift the perimeter rule at Washington National Airport. McCain suggests lifting the rule may reduce noise at the airport.

Soundproofing Of Homes Near Arizona Airport Continues (Dec. 22, 1997). The Arizona Republic reports that a 1987 noise study by the Federal Aviation Administration targeted homes in Tempe and Phoenix to be "soundproofed."

Area Residents Offer Suggestions About El Toro Airport Proposal (Dec. 21, 1997). The Los Angeles Times published the following letters to the editor regarding the El Toro Airport proposal:

Virginia Airport Expansion Approved Despite Findings Of Greater Potential Noise (Dec. 21, 1997). The Richmond Times Dispatch reports that the Federal Aviation Administration environmental impact study of the proposed Hanover airport expansion do not measure up to community requirements for low noise, though the plan has been approved based on the study.

Los Angeles City Council Expands Curfew At Van Nuys Airport (Dec. 20, 1997). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that after years of debate about noise problems at Van Nuys Airport, the Los Angeles City Council voted Friday to extend the curfew at the airfield so that noisy jets will be barred from taking off after 10 p.m. instead of 11 p.m.

New Orleans Residents Startled By Practice Flights Of B-1 Bomber (Dec. 20, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that practice flights of a B-1 Bomber startled residents of the New Orleans Lakefront with unusually loud noise.

Texas Communities Work To Avoid Airport Noise At Public Library (Dec. 20, 1997). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that expansion of the city library probably isn't a good option because of its proximity to a proposed eighth runway at Dallas/Fort Worth Airport, city officials said this week.

Chicago Area High School Presses City For Soundproofing From Airport Noise (Dec. 19, 1997). Chicago Daily Herald reports that Immaculate Conception High School's hopes of getting Chicago to pay more for airplane soundproofing are growing a bit brighter.

Expiration of Louisiana Airline Contracts Offers Opportunities For Noise Abatement (Dec. 19, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that the expiration a five year contract with airlines presents an opportunity to negotiate any new contract with citizen concerns in mind.

Louisiana Community Council Adopts Zoning Regulations For Airport (Dec. 19, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that the Kenner City Council has adopted legislation to control airport growth.

New Airport In Sydney Australia Would Disturb Children (Dec. 19, 1997). Australian General News reports that classes in 300 schools would be disrupted by aircraft noise if a second Sydney airport was built at Badgerys Creek in the city's west, New South Wales Environment Minister Pam Allan said today.

Chicago's "Fly Quiet" Program A Sham (Dec. 18, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that six months after Mayor Daley's "Fly Quiet" program at O'Hare Airport in Chicago, area residents are still complaining about aircraft noise. Some residents say noise is worse.

Louisisana City Council Plans For Local Airport Regulation (Dec. 18, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that Kenner City Council is expected to vote to give itself veto power over any project at the New Orleans International Airport that would hurt the safety and property values of Kenner residents.

New York City Sues U.S. Department of Transportation Over New Flights At La Guardia Airport (Dec. 18, 1997). The New York Times reports that the City's Corporation Counsel sued the Federal Government to stop it from adding 21 new flights a day at La Guardia Airport, arguing that the extra traffic at the already congested airport would compromise the safety of air travelers and Queens residents.

Virginia Runway Extension Approved (Dec. 18, 1997). The Richmond Times Dispatch reports that Virginia County officials approved a controversial plan to extend the runway at the county's airport. Some residents oppose the project fearing a decrease in property values and greater noise.

Authorities In Oakland California Vote To Expand Airport (Dec. 17, 1997). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that Oakland port commissioners voted to move ahead with a $600 million airport expansion yesterday, saying the benefits of the project for the region outweigh the problems that added noise could cause for airport neighbors.

Virginia Community Struggles Over Runway Extension (Dec. 17, 1997). The Richmond Times Dispatch reports that a municipal airport in Hanover, Virginia recently received approval from a neighborhood association for a runway extension.

Oklahoma Residents Suffer From Airport Noise Pollution (Dec. 16, 1997). The Tulsa World reports that more than 300 people living near Tulsa International Airport recently heard bad news from airport noise consultants.

Detroit Airport Develops Neighborhood Compatibility Program (Dec. 15, 1997). The Detroit News describes the Neighborhood Compatibility Program at Detroit International Airport. The program offers noise abatement opportunities for people in specific areas around the airport.

Illinois Officials Prepare For Airport Expansion (Dec. 15, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that the Illinois Department of Transportation is considering a runway expansion at the Waukegan Airport. Area residents worry about greater noise and traffic and its effects on homes and on wilderness areas.

Surprising Allies Rally For A Third Chicago Airport (Dec. 15, 1997). USA Today reports that a suburban Republican conservative and an inner-city preacher's son and Democrat have bonded to get funds and support to build a controversial third airport about 45 miles south of Chicago, the nation's transportation hub.

Atlanta Airport Expansion Disturbs Historic District (Dec. 14, 1997). According to the Atlanta Journal, an airport expansion option released Friday by a committee advising Hartsfield shows the possibility of a new runway north of the existing airport--a runway College Park Mayor Jack Longino believes would direct jets over his house and could mean construction in areas of the city near Woodward Academy, which sits in the historic district.

Toronto's Pearson Airport Plans Major Expansion (Dec. 14, 1997). The Toronto Sun reports that the Greater Toronto Airport Authority has recently taken over the Pearson International Airport and is currently planning a major expansion of the facility.

Task Force to Consider Noise Over Neighborhoods Near Los Angeles Airport (Dec. 13, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that a meeting with Federal Aviation Administration officials and Los Angeles International Airport representatives resulted in the decision to create a task force to consider noise issues relating to proposed expansion at the airport. The two issues are turns that are made too soon and low-altitude approaches made by landing aircraft.

Noise Keeps Louisiana Airport Talks On the Ground (Dec. 13, 1997). According to a Times Picayune report, lease negotiations between a New Orleans airport and several major airlines have become so deadlocked that a city councilman has suggested that local business leaders mediate before the airline leases expire this month. Jim Singleton suggested the Chamber of Commerce step in to help bring the two sides together.

Committee Wary Of Atlanta Airport Expansion (Dec. 13, 1997). The Atlanta Journal reports that a committee advising Hartsfield International Airport took a preliminary vote Friday against expanding the present airfield, but kept three options for handling growth on the table. Only one of those three calls for a sixth runway ---and it would be built on the north side of the airport.

California's Oakland Airport Preparing to Expand (Dec. 12, 1997). The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the Oakland (California) International Airport will undergo a $600 million expansion intended to capture 50 percent more passengers within three years and to triple cargo traffic by 2010, port and city officials said yesterday.

Airport May Compensate Tulsa Residents For Diminished Property Values Due to Airport (Dec. 12, 1997). The Tulsa World reports that airport consultants are proposing a publicly-funded program that would assist 800 homeowners affected by excessive aircraft noise near Tulsa (Oklahoma) International Airport to sell their properties, airport officials said Thursday.

Chicago Noise Pollution Activists Struggle for Airplane Curfews (Dec. 11, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that Jack Saporito, activist against airport noise and pollution, sits alone in his Arlington Heights home pondering his next move: trying to get a curfew on overnight flights at O'Hare International Airport.

Alaska Becomes First Major U.S. Airline to Fly Quieter, All Stage 3 Fleet (Dec. 11, 1997). According to a Business Wire Press Release, now in addition to having the youngest fleet among the nation's 10 largest carriers, Alaska Airlines has the quietest. Business Wire released the following press release:

Kentucky Neighbors Consider Airport's Relocation Subdivision Plan (Dec. 10, 1997). The Courier Journal evaluates the Louisville, Kentucky's Regional Airport Authority's plan to build a new subdivision for people overwhelmed by airport noise. For people displaced by noise to get comparable homes, builders say they must get breaks on land costs or fees.

New Zealand Residents Propose Extra Fees For Noisy Planes (Dec. 10, 1997). The Evening Post reports that proposals to charge noisy Boeing 737 aircraft more for landing at Wellington Airport in New Zealand have been deferred until February.

Chicago Area School Sues City For Soundproofing From Airport Noise (Dec. 10, 1997). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that area schools are fed up with the noise from the nearby O'Hare International airport. One school intends to sue the city for soundproofing.

Pompano Beach, Florida Suffers From Airport Noise (Dec. 10, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel printed the following letter to the editor concerning the effects of noise pollution from air traffic on Pompano Beach, Florida:

Protestors Demand A Second Airport in Sydney (Dec. 10, 1997). The Agence France Presse reports that traffic was slowed to a crawl around the Sydney, Australia airport for several hours Wednesday because of a protest by officials from 11municipalities demanding a second international airport.

Ottawa Area Considers Airport Expansion (Dec. 10, 1997). The Ottawa Citizen reports that more than 200 area residents expressed concerns last night about expansion at Macdonald-Cartier International Airport.

California Officials Delay Rule Change At Van Nuys Airport (Dec. 9, 1997). Airports reports that changes in rules at the Van Nuys Airport in California are on hold.

Kentucky Community Demands Deeper Look Into Airport Noise (Dec. 9, 1997). The Courier Journal reports that Louisville, Kentucky Alderman Greg Handy said yesterday he hopes the Regional Airport Authority will do more than the minimum in helping residents affected by airport noise.

Airlines Voice Opinions On Changes At Love Field Airport In Texas (Dec. 9, 1997). Airports reports that airlines are voicing their opinions about changes at the Love Field Airport in Texas.

Colorado Communities Fight Commuter Flights (Dec. 9, 1997). The Denver Post reports that Board members of the Arapahoe County Public Airport Authority got an earful Monday from opponents of a controversial proposal to allow commuter charter flights at Centennial Airport.

Lousiana Airport Expansion Plans Continue (Dec. 9, 1997). The Times Picayune reports that the Kenner and New Orleans Ciy Council's are working together on plans to improve the New Orleans International Airport.

Japanese Residents Sue Government For Noise Pollution At U.S. Air Base (Dec. 8, 1997). The AP Worldstream reports that nearly 3,000 Japanese living near a U.S. Navy air base filed suit Monday, demanding that the government pay for allowing the noise of the base to disrupt their lives.

Kentucky Resident Complains About Airport Noise (Dec. 8, 1997). The Courier Journal printed the following letter to the editor concerning noise abatement at the Louisville, Kentucky airport:

Atlanta Area Communities Say Airport Expansion Is At Their Expense (Dec. 8, 1997). The Atlanta Journal reports that the dollar cost for expanding Atlanta, Georgia's Hartsfield Airport may exceed $9.5 billion. But the cost in community dislocation may be even higher.

New Jersey's Newark International Airport Changes Flight Paths To Reduce Noise (Dec. 7, 1997). The New York Times reports that the Federal Aviation Administration has authorized a shift in flight patterns of planes heading west out of Newark (New Jersey) International Airport, to begin Jan. 1. The shift is an attempt to respond to complaints from nearby residents about noise from jetliners.

Cleveland Officials Express Frustration Over Airport Expansion Project at Conference in Philadelphia (Dec. 7, 1997). The Plain Dealer reports that Cleveland (Ohio) City Councilmen Edward W. Rybka and Michael Dolan came to the 1997 National League of Cities conference to pick up new governing ideas that would energize them for the year ahead and expressed frustration over delays in expanding the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport.

Austin Texas Awaits New Airport (Dec. 7, 1997). The Houston Chronicle reports that Austin, Texas is preparing to open a new airport.

Ottawa Plans Airport Expansion (Dec. 6, 1997). The Ottawa Citizen reports that due to increased demand, the Macdonald-Cartier International Airport in Ottawa, Canada will need to expand soon. Citizens are concerned about noise traffic and the expense of the new facility.

California Officials Attempt To Set Curfews For Airport Noise (Dec. 5, 1997). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the city Airport Commission voted Thursday to expand the curfew for airplanes at Van Nuys (California) airport, but delayed new limits on noisy jets located at the airfield after hearing opposition from tenants of the facility.

Colorado Airport Could Face Sanctions if it Rejects Charter Flights (Dec. 5, 1997). The Rocky Mountain News reports that managers from the Federal Aviation Administration said the Centennial Airport in Arapahoe County, Colorado might face sanctions if its board rejects a charter company's proposal to offer regular daily flights from the airport.

Park Service To Fly Quieter Helicopters Over Grand Canyon (Dec. 5, 1997). The Helicopter News reports that the U.S. National Park Service will lease a state of the art quiet-technology helicopter for use over the Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona.

Boca Raton Resident Shares Concerns Over Pollution From Airport (Dec. 4, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel printed the following letter to the editor concerning pollution from the Boca Raton, Florida Airport:

Chicago Area Considers Third Airport (Dec. 4, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that Chicago officials are meeting to consider a third airport in the Chicago area rather than an expansion of O'Hare International Airport.

New Jersey Resident Speaks Out About Airport Noise (Dec. 4, 1997). The Record printed the following letter to the editor concerning airport noise in Bergen County, New Jersey:

Chicago Area Considers Third Airport To Reduce Noise From O'Hare (Dec. 3, 1997). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the Arlington Heights (Illinois) Advisory Committee is considering whether a third Chicago airport would reduce noise from O'Hare International Airport.

Illinois Town Asks Why O'Hare Airport Does Not Follow Noise Abatement Procedures (Dec. 3, 1997). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the town of Arlington Heights, Illinois is sending a letter this week to the city of Chicago asking why O'Hare is not following the "Fly Quiet" noise abatement procedures.

Kentucky Residents Angry About Relocation Plan For Victims Of Airport Noise (Dec. 3, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that residents of the Cedar Creek area of Louisville, Kentucky angrily sounded off last night about a proposal to build a 450-home subdivision nearby for people now living in a handful of neighborhoods plagued by excessive airplane noise.

New Orleans Residents Protest Airport Changes (Dec. 3, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that Kenner, Louisiana officials spent two hours Tuesday telling a Federal Aviation Administration representative that they don't want a taxiway at New Orleans International Airport turned into a runway for private aircraft. Residents and Council members from communities surrounding the New Orleans International Airport fear the noise increased traffic would cause.

Newark International Airport Will Reroute Planes To Relieve Residential Areas From Noise (Dec. 3, 1997). The Asbury Park Press reports that planes using Newark (New Jersey) International Airport will be rerouted next month over industrial areas and the Arthur Kill in an effort to provide noise relief for Central New Jersey residents, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Vancouver Area Residents Plan Legal Action To Fight Airport Noise (Dec. 3, 1997). The Vancouver Sun reports that Vancouver, Canada area residents are preparing to take legal action to fight airport, noise and the third runway at the Vancouver International Airport which has prompted a rise in noise complaints.

Arlington Heights Takes a Step Toward Joining Supporters of a Third Airport in Chicago Area (Dec. 2, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that the Village Board in Arlington Heights, Illinois has asked its Advisory Committee on O'Hare International Airport noise to consider the merits of joining a coalition of supporters of a third airport in the Chicago area. If Arlington Heights decides to join the coalition, the article reports, it would be the first northwest suburb other than those in the Suburban O'Hare Commission (a group opposed to O'Hare expansion) to back a third airport.

Environmentalists Band Together To Oppose Commercial Airport Near Florida's Everglades (Dec. 2, 1997). The States News Service reports that a group of environmentalists is calling for more study before the federal government signs off on a plan to convert defunct Homestead Air Force Base near the Everglades National Park in Florida into a commercial airport.

Environmentalists Call for More Study on Plan for a Commercial Airport Near the Everglades (Dec. 2, 1997). The States News Service reports that a coalition of environmentalists sent a letter to President Clinton dated Monday calling for more study before the federal government signs off on a plan to convert the defunct Homestead Air Force Base, near Everglades National Park and Biscayne National Park, into a commercial airport. The group is worried that the noise from the airport could harm the area's wildlife and ruin visitors' experience, and that the project could cause problems for the area's water systems.

Louisville Airport Gets a New Runway (Dec. 2, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that the new West Runway at the Louisville (Kentucky) International Airport opened yesterday, joining the parallel East Runway that was completed in 1995. The new runway, which is the key feature of the airport's nearly completed $700 million expansion, will allow two planes to land or take off simultaneously, considerably boosting the airport's capacity. The new runway is expected to give UPS, the airport's largest user, the ability to expand.

New York Resident Sues Delta And Boeing Over Claim That Airplane Engine Noise Damaged His Hearing (Dec. 2, 1997). The Buffalo News reports that a Batavia, New York man claims in a $200,000 lawsuit that he began suffering from a constant roaring noise in his ears after he sat next to the engine on a commercial airline flight almost three years ago.

Secret Memo By National Park Service Says New Grand Canyon Air Flight Rules Will Not Reduce Noise Enough (Dec. 2, 1997). Greenwire reports that according to an article by Steve Yozwiak in the Phoenix Arizona Republic, a "secret" National Park Service memo obtained by the newspaper says the new rules for air flights over the Grand Canyon will do almost nothing to reduce noise over the national park.

Virginia Community Questions Runway Extension (Dec. 2, 1997). The Richmond Times Dispatch reports that the Hanover (Virginia) Planning Commission unanimously approved a recommendation last night to extend the runway at the county airport by 750 feet, despite concerns of area residents that the extension would bring on greater air traffic and noise.

Hong Kong Airport to Move; Massive Truck Convoy Will Cause Massive Noise (Dec. 1, 1997). The South China Morning Post reports that the Kai Tak Airport in Kowloon, Hong Kong is scheduled to close next year, and the city is expected to thunder with early morning noise from heavy trucks making hundreds of trips as equipment is moved to the new Chek Lap Kok Airport.

Louisville Airport Officials Struggle to Relocate Residents Displaced by Noise from Airport Expansion (Dec. 1, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that officials from the Regional Airport Authority of Louisville (Kentucky) and Jefferson County are considering building 450 homes on a site in southern Jefferson County, on Cedar Creek Road, in order to relocate residents displaced by noise from Louisville International Airport's reconfigured runway project. Altogether, 1,650 households are eligible to move in Minor Lane Heights, South Park View, Edgewood, and nearby areas. Governor Paul Patton said recently he'd be willing to use $20 million of the state's surplus to help the people move. However, the article reports, many residents already see problems in the relocation process.

Musicians and Artists Say the Grand Canyon is Losing its Essence Due to Increased Noise and Air Pollution (Dec. 1, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that musicians and visual artists are increasingly saying that the Grand Canyon is losing its distinctive essence due to increased noise and air pollution. The article goes on to explore how the works of artist Curt Walters, musician Paul Winter, and other artists have changed over time as the Grand Canyon has experienced increasing impacts from more visitors.

Neighborhood Relocation Near Louisville Airport Leaves Residents Uncertain and Distrustful (Dec. 1, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that the Edgewood neighborhood of Louisville, Kentucky has been designated a "relocation area" due to noise from the Louisville International Airport. As a result, the neighborhood is slowly being emptied, and the residents who are left wonder continually when they will leave and where they will go, the article says. The situation has left many residents uncertain, resigned, and distrustful, according to the article.

New Flight Paths For Australian Airport Would Spread Noise Impacts Around the City (Dec. 1, 1997). AAP Newsfeed reports that new airport flight paths for the Sydney, Australia airport were unveiled today by federal Transport Minister Mark Vaile. According to Vaile, the plan would direct as many take-offs as possible over water and non-residential land, which would have the effect of more fairly sharing the aircraft noise around the city.

Polar Air Cargo Asks U.S. Government to Impose Restrictions on Certain Airlines to Compensate for Strict Noise Restrictions at Amsterdam Airport (Dec. 1, 1997). The Journal of Commerce reports that officials from Polar Air Cargo, a growing U.S. airline that has its European hub at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport, have asked the U.S. government to take steps to punish Dutch air carriers in retaliation for strict noise restrictions set at the airport. Polar Air officials say the airport's new regulations will drive them out of the air cargo market.

Federal Aviation Administration Considers Noise Plan For North Carolina Airport (Dec.1 1997). Business & Commercial Aviation reports that the Federal Aviation Administration will examine a noise compatability plan for the Charlotte/ Douglas International Airport in North Carolina.

Editorial Argues That Airport Expansion Plan Should Move Forward (Nov. 30, 1997). The St. Louis Post-Dispatch printed an editorial that supports the W-1W expansion plan of the Lambert Airfield in the St. Louis, Missouri area. The editorial says the impact of a new, modern airport would be enormous on the development of the region in the next century. In addition, the editorial argues, the recent opening of MidAmerica Airport in St. Clair County has put the region in an excellent position to become a key player not only in air-passenger traffic, but also in air-cargo traffic.

Hong Kong Airport Set to Close; Merchants Predict Losses, But Property Agents Expect Boom in Housing Market in the Area (Nov. 30, 1997). The South China Morning Post reports that the Kai Tak Airport in Kowloon City, Hong Kong is set to close in 1998 when the new Chek Lap Kok Airport opens. The article says that some merchants near Kai Tak expect their businesses to hang on after the airport is gone, while others expect their businesses to fold. Meanwhile, property agents are gearing up for new residential housing in the area, which will be more popular when residents don't have to deal with aircraft noise.

Milwaukee Residents Protest Plan to Extend Airport Runway (Nov. 30, 1997). The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that residents near the Mitchell International Airport in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin area are opposing a plan to extend the airport's smallest runway by 700 feet, which would allow larger planes to land. Officials have approved the plan and the County Board has appropriated money for the project, the article says, although a few more steps are required for final approval. The plan will be discussed at a public information session today, the article reports.

Plans To Cut Air Pollution Over The Grand Canyon Behind Schedule (Nov. 30, 1997). The Arizona Republic reports that new rules for air-tour flights over the Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona will result in virtually no reduction in noise, according to a secret National Park Service memo obtained by The Arizona Republic.

Air Force and National Guard Want to Fly Combat Exercises Year-Round Over Coastal Georgia (Nov. 29, 1997). The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reports that the U.S. Air Force, Navy, and Georgia National Guard want to conduct combat exercises year-round with low-flying jet aircraft over coastal Georgia near Townsend. The proposal is being opposed by some civilian aviators and local government officials, who believe the military's plans would compromise air safety, cause noise pollution on the ground, and discourage business and vacation travelers from landing in the area. Public comments are being accepted by the Federal Aviation Administration on the proposal through Monday.

Residents Protest New Runway Opening in Toronto Area (Nov. 29, 1997). The Toronto Sun reports that a new runway at the Pearson Airport in Mississauga, Ontario (outside Toronto) opened yesterday. The opening was marked by a celebration at one end of the facility and a small protest by residents under the runway's flight path at the other end.

Toronto Residents Protest New Runway (Nov. 29, 1997). The Toronto Sun reports that Pearson Airport's newest runway in the Toronto, Canada area was marked yesterday by a celebration at one end of the massive facility and a small protest at the other.

Dutch Government Report Finds That Restraining Amsterdam Airport's Growth Will Seriously Affect Economy (Nov. 28, 1997). AP Worldstream reports that a Dutch government advisory body, the Central Plan Bureau, released a report Friday warning that limiting the growth of Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport to meet legal noise limits could cost the Dutch economy "tens of billions of guilders" by the year 2020. The report is being hailed by airlines and dismissed by environmental groups.

Ex-City-Councilor in Dallas Campaigns for Expanded Use of Love Field, While Residents Protest (Nov. 28, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that Jerry Bartos, a former Dallas City Councilor, is campaigning for expanded use of Love Field. Meanwhile, the article says, most citizens are opposed to increased use of the airport due to noise problems in many neighborhoods.

Newark Airport Runway to be Extended Over Objections from New Jersey City Officials (Nov. 28, 1997). The Asbury Park Press reports that the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is going forward with plans to extend one of the runways at Newark International Airport, despite objections from officials in Elizabeth, New Jersey.

Opposing Community Groups Struggle Over Expansion Of Dallas Airport (Nov. 28, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that two sharply opposed citizen's groups continue to struggle over the expansion of a Dallas, Texas area airport at Love Field.

Southwest Airlines Enters Fight Over Expanded Service at Dallas's Love Field (Nov. 28, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that Southwest Airlines, which has long stayed out of the fight over expanded service at Love Field in Dallas, has entered the controversy after the city of Fort Worth filed a lawsuit to close or prevent expanded service at the airport. According to Southwest chair Herbert Kelleher, the company is "very much opposed to closing Love Field."

Will Dallas' Love Field Close? (Nov. 28, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that there is growing controversy over whether Southwest Airlines will continue to fly out of Love Field in Dallas, Texas, or whether it should be closed.

Fort Worth Mayor to Launch New Media Offensive Against Expansion of Air Service at Love Field (Nov. 27, 1997). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that Kenneth Barr, Mayor of Fort Worth, Texas, said yesterday that he will launch a new media effort in the city's legal battle with Dallas over the expansion of air service at Love Field. Barr said he hopes the media effort will build more support in the city's legal efforts to protect the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport from additional competition at Love Field.

Kentucky Residents Angry at Airport's Plan to Relocate Housing Development Due to Noise (Nov. 27, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that a "truth rally" was held in Minor Lane Heights, Kentucky last Monday to discuss the frustration residents are experiencing with officials at the Louisville International Airport over plans to relocate more than 1,000 homes because of excessive airport noise. The meeting was attended by a crowd of about 500 people, the article says. This month, airport officials proposed building a relocation housing development, but residents still aren't all happy, according to the article.

Louisville Airport Authority Considers Plan to Create New Housing Development for Residents Displaced by Noise (Nov. 27, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that the Regional Airport Authority of Louisville and Jefferson County (Kentucky) is considering purchasing 287 acres on Cedar Creek Road in order to build 450 homes for people displaced by noise from Louisville International Airport's reconfigured runways. Plans are to offer residents in 1,620 homes to option to move, the article says.

Ontario Mayor Will Boycott Runway Opening at Toronto Airport in Support of Residents Concerned About Aircraft Noise (Nov. 27, 1997). The Toronto Star reports that the mayor of Mississauga, Ontario, Hazel McCallion, will boycott tomorrow's official opening ceremony for Pearson Airport's new $150 million north-south runway. McCallion made the decision to support homeowners who have been concerned about increased aircraft noise from the runway.

Chicago Suburb Prepares for Soundproofing from Aircraft Noise (Nov. 26, 1997). The Chicago Tribune reports that the Bensenville (Illinois) committee of the whole met Tuesday night with more than 40 residents whose homes will be soundproofed against noise from air traffic at O'Hare International Airport. The soundproofing will be paid for with money from a settlement of a Bensenville lawsuit against the city of Chicago.

Louisville Airport Officials Face Criticism for Not Working With Residents on Relocation Project (Nov. 26, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that Dave Armstrong, a Jefferson County (Kentucky) Judge-Executive, has written a strongly worded letter to officials at the Louisville International Airport criticizing them for angering residents of Minor Lane Heights over plans to relocate residents under the airport's flight paths. Armstrong said the engineer that residents have already worked with should be included in designing a new development for displaced homeowners. Armstrong's letter comes after Minor Lane Heights officials were angered last week after the Regional Airport Authority ignored their recommendation to hire Design Engineering for the preliminary work on the town or subdivision where residents may be relocated. Meanwhile, Monday night, 500 residents attended a "truth rally" where the railed against airport and county officials.

New Jersey Resident Believes Traffic Noise is Worse Than Aircraft Noise (Nov. 26, 1997). The Record printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Paul Sveridovich, a New Milford, New Jersey resident, regarding aircraft noise from the Teterboro Airport and traffic noise:

Airport Noise Workshops Held in Connecticut, But Residents Still Unsatisfied (Nov. 25, 1997). The Hartford Courant reports that more than 100 residents attended a series of workshops Monday night to discuss noise issues at the Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks, Connecticut. But, the article reports, the event organized by the airport commission left many residents feeling skeptical and powerless.

British Government Proposes Lower Noise Limits at Three Airports (Nov. 25, 1997). M2 Presswire released the following press release regarding a consultation paper published today by Britain's Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions. The paper proposes more efficient noise monitoring and lower noise limits for aircraft at Heathrow, Gatwick, and Stansted airports.

California Residents and Aviation Operators Clash Over Proposal to Ban More Noisy Jets at Van Nuys Airport (Nov. 25, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that a public meeting attended by more than 250 people, residents and aviation-business owners argued over a proposed ban of the noisiest corporate jets from Van Nuys Airport. Also on the table was the issue of whether to include helicopters in the ban. Business owners said layoffs, economic instability, and financial ruin would result from the bans.

Illinois City Supports Plan For Third Airport (Nov. 25, 1997). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that the City Council of Des Plaines, Illinois unanimously supported a third airport as an alternative to new runways at O'Hare

Kentucky Residents Unload their Anger at a "Truth Rally" on Airport Relocation Project (Nov. 25, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that about 500 residents of Minor Lane Heights, Kentucky gathered last night at a "truth rally" to discuss the relocation project for residents in the flight path of jets from the Louisville International Airport. Officials told residents about plans to relocate residents a 287-acre subdivision on Cedar Creek Road. The residents accused officials from the Regional Airport Authority and Jefferson County of ignoring their input and dismissing their needs.

Ohio Airport Neighbors Oppose Runway Extension on Noise Grounds (Nov. 25, 1997). The Plain Dealer reports that residents and officials in Olmsted Falls, Ohio are opposed to the proposed extension of runways at the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, saying that the plans will increase noise over a village already plagued by too many low-flying jets. More than 300 residents, as well as officials from Olmsted Falls and Olmsted Township, gathered last night to discuss the airport's expansion plans.

Protesters Sleep Over at Brussels Airport to Protest Nighttime Aircraft Noise (Nov. 25, 1997). The Daily Record reports that hundreds of protesters dressed in pajamas bedded down for the night at the Brussels (Belgium) airport to protest nighttime aircraft noise. The article says that residents are demanding a cut in the 65 flights allowed at the airport every night.

California's John Wayne Airport Prepares For Expansion (Nov. 24, 1997). Orange County Business Journal reports that while the debate over El Toro Airport is getting headlines, John Wayne Airport is growing steadily and expanding with several projects either in the works or on the drawing board.

Chicago Suburb Supports Third Airport (Nov. 24, 1997). The Chicago Daily Herald reports that Arlington Heights, Illinois will consider joining a new group touting a third regional airport to open by 2005.

New Jersey Airport's Assets Outweigh its Liabilities, Resident Believes (Nov. 24, 1997). The Record printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Bob Hager, a Rochelle Park, New Jersey resident, regarding the controversy over noise from the Teterboro Airport:

California Airport Expands and Undertakes Effort to Attract More Air Traffic (Nov. 23, 1997). The Fresno Bee reports that the second phase of a three-phase expansion/renovation project at The Fresno (California) Yosemite International Airport started in August and should be completed by February. The project involves concerted efforts to attract more air traffic to the airport, the article says. The article describes the project at length, and mentions in passing that airport neighbors have brought forward some concerns about increased noise from the expansion.

Florida Airport Should Not be Closed, Editorial Argues (Nov. 22, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel printed an editorial which argues that that Pompano Air Park in Pompano Beach, Florida is a valuable asset to the community, and the Federal Aviation Administration is taking the correct action by refusing to close it. Despite residents' complaints about noise pollution, the editorial says, closing the airport would only increase noise for residents near other area airports.

Judge's Ruling on Building Rules for Homes Near New Zealand Airport Ends a Decade-Long Noise Fight (Nov. 22, 1997). The Dominion reports that a judge's ruling Thursday regarding building rules for new homes near the Wellington (New Zealand) airport ends a decade-long battle between airline and airport officials and residents. The article describes the long fight, focusing on the leader who organized residents and led a successful battle, Maxine Harris.

Residents Complain About Proposed Expansion of New Orleans Airport (Nov. 22, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that more than 400 residents from Kenner, Louisiana and the surrounding area attended a public hearing Friday to voice concerns about a proposed plan to convert a taxiway into a runway for small planes at the New Orleans International Airport. Residents vented pent-up frustration about a variety of airport issues, including noise pollution, and many said it was time for the airport to move.

Airport Noise in Connecticut Town is a Growing Problem (Nov. 21, 1997). The Hartford Courant reports that increasing air traffic at the Bradley Airport near Simsbury, Connecticut is creating escalating problems with jet noise for residents. In response to the problem, local officials are asking airport officials to perform a study to determine which parts of the town are experiencing noise. Meanwhile, a public forum on jet noise will be held tonight to detail how the airport measures noise and how residents can register complaints.

Court Ruling in New Zealand Ends Ten-Year Battle Over Airport Noise (Nov. 21, 1997). The Dominion reports that a ten-year fight over acceptable noise levels around the Wellington, New Zealand Airport ended with a ruling yesterday by an Environment Court judge which stipulates where and what kind of housing developments can be built near the airport. The court case involved four parties: the Residents Airport Noise Action Group, the Wellington International Airport, the Board of Airline Representatives, and the Wellington City Council.

Manager of Louisville Airport Opposes Input from Public, Columnist Believes (Nov. 21, 1997). The Courier-Journal printed an editorial which argues that Robert Michael, the manager of the Louisville (Kentucky) International Airport, has badly misjudged two recent situations in which the public wanted input into the airport expansion project and were denied. A residents group asked for representation on the Regional Airport Authority board, and were opposed by Michael. And, after residents worked for two years with a design firm on relocating their community due to aircraft noise, the firm was passed over for other companies when it came time to do the work. The editorial says that Michael is in the wrong and has offended residents.

New Jersey Township Officials Call Meeting on Jet Noise (Nov. 21, 1997). The Record reports that officials of the South Hackensack (New Jersey) Township Committee and the Board of Education have called a public meeting for Tuesday night to discuss noise and air pollution from the Teterboro Airport. The meeting has been prompted by a sharp increase in complaints from residents.

Developer in New Zealand Wants to Build Near Airport (Nov. 20, 1997). The Southland Times reports that at a hearing in Queenstown, New Zealand yesterday, officials from the development company Remarkables Park argued that their proposed subdivision zoning near the Queenstown Airport should be allowed, in conjunction with acoustic insulation in the homes. The developer's comments came after two days of Queenstown Lakes District Council district plan hearings in which opponents of the proposed zoning change -- developer Terrace Tower and airlines Air New Zealand and the Mount Cook Group -- spoke.

Florida Airport Bans Nighttime and Weekend Touch-And-Go Training Maneuvers (Nov. 20, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel reports that the Airport Authority in Boca Raton, Florida on Wednesday voted unanimously to ban touch-and-go training maneuvers at night and on weekends from the Boca Raton Municipal Airport in an effort to reduce noise. Touch-and-go landings, which are repetitive landings and take-offs by student pilots for training purposes, will be limited to weekdays between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., to take effect on January 1. The ban was recommended by an airport noise committee created several months ago to suggest ways to curb noise at the growing airport. The Pompano Beach Air Park instituted a similar ban on touch-and-go maneuvers in the past year, and as a result, the maneuvers have increased at Boca Raton, the article explains.

Kentucky Airport Board Angers Town by Snubbing Engineer the Town Had Chosen to Help it Relocate Due to Jet Noise (Nov. 20, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that the Regional Airport Authority in Louisville, Kentucky has ignored the recommendation of leaders in Minor Lane Heights for an engineering firm to design a new site for residents to move to because of intolerable jet noise from the Louisville International Airport. Minor Lane Heights residents had worked with the firm the town recommended for two years to come up with an acceptable residential development design. In response to the airport authority's decision, leaders of Minor Lane Heights are threatening to move without the airport's assistance, or even to stay put. Leaders also said residents might consider selling their property directly to a private developer or commercial interest and selecting their own relocation site. Minor Lane Heights Mayor Fred Williams said he will get more input from his constituents, but he added, "It would tickle me to death for everybody to tell them to stick it."

Louisville Residents Rail Against Airport Authorities, Saying They're Fed Up with Noise (Nov. 20, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that about 50 residents attended a meeting sponsored by the Regional Airport Authority last night in Louisville, Kentucky to discuss noise from planes at the Louisville International Airport. The meeting was held to play a simulation of the jet noise level that residents can expect after the new West Runway opens December 1 at the airport. But the simulation provoked residents, who said the noise level is already much greater than the simulation, and they are fed up with it. Meanwhile, airport officials told residents that the areas many of them live in are not eligible for assistance from noise problems because they are outside the boundary considered to be too noisy for daily living.

New Zealand Judge Sets Noise Insulation Rules for Housing Near Airport (Nov. 20, 1997). The Evening Post reports that Environment Court Judge Kenderdine ruled yesterday that new housing developments on industrial or commercial land around the Wellington (New Zealand) Airport will have to meet new planning rules, including the use of noise insulation. The article says that the ruling is an attempt to end an 11-year battle over noise at Wellington Airport. Meanwhile, residents that have been fighting for stronger noise controls said that the ruling passes the problem back to the community instead of to the noise-makers.

Small Pilots Safety Group Backs California's El Toro Airport Proposal (Nov. 20, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that a pro-airport group in Orange County, California, called Commercial Pilots for Airport Safety, said that the proposed east/west airport at the proposed El Toro Airport would be safe. This contradicts statements from the two U.S. pilot's unions for commercial airlines.

Development Around New Zealand Airport Would be Limited Under Proposed Plan (Nov. 19, 1997). The Southland Times reports that development surrounding the Invercargill Airport in Invercargill, New Zealand would be restricted to prevent noise complaints under the latest draft of the Invercargill District Plan released yesterday. The plan must be approved by the City Council, the article notes.

Louisiana City Schedules New Forum on Airport Expansion, Criticizing Forum Held by the Airport (Nov. 19, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that officials in Kenner, Louisiana have scheduled a public hearing on plans by the New Orleans International Airport to turn a taxiway into a runway for private planes. Local officials were critical of the way airport officials handled their own public forum on Monday on the same topic, the article says.

Airport Information Booths Anger Kenner Residents; They Still Say No New Runway (Nov. 18, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that a number of Kenner residents expressed their disapproval on Monday of New Orleans International Airport's plans to turn its east-west taxiway into a runway for private aircraft. Residents also were not pleased with the forum designed to receive their input.

Citizens Protest Navy Jet Relocation to Virginia (Nov. 18, 1997). The Virginian-Pilot reports that the U.S. Navy held its final public hearing Monday in Manteo, North Carolina on plans to relocate 180 F/A-18 Hornet jets to the Oceana Naval Air Station in Virginia Beach, Virginia. About 20 people attended the hearing, including a resident from a newly formed citizens action committee opposing the jet relocation on the basis of noise and safety concerns. Meanwhile, the public comment period for the draft Environmental Impact Statement was scheduled to end today, but the Navy announced last week that the deadline would be extended to Dec. 2. North Carolina officials had asked for the extension for additional time to review it.

New Orleans Airport Officials Draw Criticism for Unusual Public Hearing on Proposed Taxiway Conversion (Nov. 18, 1997). The Times-Picayune reports that officials of the New Orleans International Airport held a public hearing Monday to gather input on plans to turn an east-west taxiway into a runway for private aircraft. At the hearing, airport officials staffed five booths addressing different issues, such as noise and land acquisition, and invited questions from the 200 residents who attended. But many residents from Kenner were angry both at the proposed taxiway conversion and at the way the forum was set up to handle their input.

Conservation Group Says National Park Service Should Regulate Air Tours Over National Parks (Nov. 17, 1997). U.S. Newswire reports that an official from the National Parks and Conservation Association today testified at a congressional field hearing that the National Park Service should be given the power to regulate air tours over national parks in order to curb noise. The official said that legislation is needed to manage the operations of scenic air tours, because the tours have grown explosively at the Grand Canyon and have expanded to other parks. Currently, neither the Park Service nor the Federal Aviation Administration has a process in place for regulating or managing flight tour operations over parks, the article notes.

Georgia Planners Gear Up for Increasing Business Sector Air Traffic at General Aviation Airports (Nov. 17, 1997). The Atlanta Journal reports that because businesses are increasingly owning their own fleets of jets, general aviation airports in the Atlanta area are booming. According to Bill Peratta, senior planner for the Atlanta Regional Commission, takeoffs and landings at these airports now outnumber commercial airliner takeoffs and landings at Atlanta's Hartsfield International Airport. Planners in the area are beginning to think about how to help general aviation airports manage the future air traffic growth, including how to deal with noise pollution and transportation congestion issues.

Kentucky Community Seeks $20 Million From State For Relocation Of Residents Effected By Airport Noise (Nov. 17, 1997). Business First-Louisville reports that the Jefferson County (Kentucky) Judge-Executive David Armstrong's chief wish from the 1998 General Assembly is approval of a $20 million bond issue to help speed up the relocation of residents in 1,600 homes near Louisville International Airport at Standiford Field.

Relocation of Residential Neighborhoods Near Kentucky Airport Will Free Up Prime Land for Industry (Nov. 17, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that the communities of Minor Lane Heights and Edgewood, near the Louisville (Kentucky) International Airport, are in the heaviest noise zones surrounding the airport, and residents are expected to be moved to new neighborhoods in an airport buyout plan over the next several years. The article explores in detail the economic benefits that could result from using the land the neighborhoods now occupy for industrial and commercial airport-related development.

California Residents Air Their Views About Proposed Conversion of Marine Base to Commercial Airport (Nov. 16, 1997). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letters-to-the-editor from residents in the Irvine, California area regarding the proposed conversion of the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station into a commercial airport:

Florida City Wants to Close Airport, But FAA Says it Must Stay Open (Nov. 16, 1997). The Sun-Sentinel reports that city officials in Pompano Beach, Florida have been exploring the possibility of closing the Pompano Beach Air Park since September. But the Federal Aviation Administration, which must grant permission to close the airport, recently told city officials the airport is too important to the future aviation needs of South Florida to be shut down.

California Aviation Commission Wants Potential Homebuyers Warned About Airport Noise (Nov. 14, 1997). The Ventura County Star reports that on Nov. 6, the Ventura County (California) Aviation Advisory Commission voted 4-3 against a proposed residential development near the Camarillo Airport. The commissioners said they wanted to ensure that all potential homebuyers are warned about the noise from planes flying over their neighborhood.

Resident Thanks Newspaper for Coverage of New Jersey Airport Noise Problem (Nov. 14, 1997). The Record printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Emma Perez, chair of the Bergen County (New Jersey) Against Aircraft Noise group, regarding jet noise from the Teterboro Airport:

Residents Near Dallas's Love Field Air Frustrations Over More Flights at Local Meeting (Nov. 14, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that about 150 residents living near Love Field in Dallas, Texas attended a meeting Friday to discuss the prospect of more flights at the airport. The residents believe that the new flights authorized recently by Congress could mean more noise, lower property values, and the eventual elimination of all flight restrictions at the 80-year-old facility. The article reports that the two-hour meeting was co-sponsored by Dallas City Council member Veletta Forsythe Lill and state Senator Royce West (D-Dallas).

Indiana Town Officials Present Suggestions for Reducing Jet Noise from Indianapolis Airport (Nov. 14, 1997). The Indianapolis News reports that officials from Plainfield and Mooresville, Indiana offered suggestions for diverting most of the planes from Indianapolis International Airport away from Metro West area towns at a public hearing Wednesday night. The article says that about 30 residents and several of their attorneys from areas in Hendricks, Morgan, and Marion counties also offered suggestions. The Indianapolis Airport Authority held the public hearing to gather comments about the airport's latest planned changes in flight patterns and other steps to mitigate or compensate neighbors for the harmful noise. The public's comments will be reviewed before the airport board votes in January on a new noise mitigation plan, according to airport spokesperson Dennis Rosebrough, after which the plan will be sent to the Federal Aviation Administration for approval.

Local New York City Official Considers Challenging Decision Allowing Additional Jet Flights (Nov. 14, 1997). The Daily News reports that Claire Shulman, the Queens Borough President in New York City, is considering challenging a recent federal decision allowing additional takeoffs and landings at LaGuardia Airport, saying the skies already are noisy and congested enough. Last month, the article notes, the U.S. Department of Transportation granted Frontier Airlines, ValuJet Airlines, and AirTran Airways exemptions to the High Density Rule for new services where slots are limited. The rule limits the number of hourly takeoffs and landings allowed at LaGuardia and Kennedy airports in New York, O'Hare Airport in Chicago, and Washington National Airport.

Workshop Scheduled in Connecticut to Address Airport Noise Issues (Nov. 14, 1997). The Hartford Courant reports that the Federal Aviation Administration, the Connecticut Department of Transportation's bureau of aviation and ports, and the Bradley International Airport Commission will sponsor a November 24 workshop to address noise issues at the Bradley International Airport near Windsor Locks and Suffield.

North Carolina County and School Board Officials Fight Over Proposed Location of New School Near Airport (Nov. 14, 1997). The News & Record reports that members of the Guilford County (North Carolina) school board told Guilford residents Thursday that some of the county commissioners have lied to them and virtually eliminated a property from consideration as a site for a new northwest middle school. County commissioners have twice in the past few weeks rejected the school board's request to approve money to purchase a site on Horsepen Creek Road, citing the high price of the site, and safety and noise concerns because of the site's proximity to the Piedmont Triad International Airport. In response, the school board is now considering the possibility of building elsewhere, including on land that is now part of county-owned Bur-Mil Park and a site owned by the Piedmont Triad International Airport.

Pennsylvania Resident Advises His Neighbors to Accept the Airplane Noise (Nov. 13, 1997). The Morning Call printed the following letter-to-the-editor from George Werkheiser, a resident of Hanover Township, Pennsylvania, regarding noise from the Lehigh Valley International Airport:

Letters-to-the-Editor Debate Benefits and Costs of Rail Acquisition in Ohio (Nov. 13, 1997). The Plain Dealer printed the following letters-to-the-editor regarding the proposed sale of Conrail to Norfolk-Southern and CSX railroads in the Cleveland, Ohio area:

Fines for Helicopter Noise Made by Rich Maryland Executive Thrown Out of Court on a Technicality (Nov. 13, 1997). The Baltimore Sun reports that officials in Baltimore County, Maryland have been attempting to collect $800 in zoning citations from a rich executive who lands his helicopter in Green Spring Valley, an exclusive residential neighborhood in the Lutherville area. But yesterday a hearing officer threw out the fines because county zoning inspectors listed the wrong address on the citation. Zoning officials, however, are vowing to file new complaints against Martin Grass, the Chair and Chief Executive Officer of Rite Aid Corp., who uses the helicopter for his 20-minute commute to the company's headquarters in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

NASA Studies Air Pollution from Jets in Upper Atmosphere (Nov. 12, 1997). National Public Radio reports that NASA is finishing a mission to study air pollution in the upper troposphere, the layer of the atmosphere where jets fly. NASA's research involves collecting air samples using a jet that has been turned into a flying laboratory. Researchers hope that the information they are gathering will teach them about what ozone (smog), which causes global warming, does in this level of the atmosphere.

Dallas / Fort Worth Airport Finalizes its New Noise Monitoring System (Nov. 12, 1997). The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that the Dallas/Fort Worth Airport soon will have its new noise monitoring system finalized. The 34 noise-monitoring stations scattered around the airport and in nearby neighborhoods have been up and running for more than a year, but the computer system to which they were supposed to be attached has been delayed for more than a year. But now airport officials say that part of the project will be completed by Christmas. The noise-monitoring system was promised by airport officials as part of a federally required environmental impact study in connection with the east runway that opened October 1, 1996.

Resident of California Retirement Community Asks That Proposed El Toro Airport Plan be Scrapped (Nov. 12, 1997). The Los Angeles Times printed the following letter-to-the-editor from Dave Schlenker, a Laguna Hills, California resident, regarding the proposal to convert the El Toro Marine Corps Base to a commercial airport:

New Zealand City Councilor Proposes Extra Fees for Noisy Air New Zealand Jets (Nov. 12, 1997). The Evening Post reports that officers of the Wellington (New Zealand) City Council are preparing a proposal that Air New Zealand be forced to pay extra charges every time its noisy Boeing 737 jets land at Wellington Airport. The extra costs paid by the airline would be used to insulate homes around the airport against noise. The proposal is being championed by Councilor Sue Kedgley, who said that if the idea was accepted by the City Council, it would ask Wellington International Airport Limited -- 34% of which is owned by the Council -- to impose the extra charges.

Texas City Proposes Runway to Entice Helicopter Company to Locate There (Nov. 12, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that city officials in Arlington, Texas have proposed building a 1,000-foot runway in an effort to convince Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. to locate a production facility of the tilt-rotor aircraft at Arlington Municipal Airport. The city council's airport development committee discussed the plan at a meeting Tuesday. Officials from Bell Helicopter have raised a number of concerns, including the desire to avoid angering nearby residents with noise that would come from ground-testing of the aircraft.

Texas Communities Vie For Helicopter Production Facility (Nov. 12, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that city officials disclosed a proposal to build a 1,000-foot runway in an effort to convince Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. to house final production of the tilt-rotor aircraft at the Arlington, Texas Municipal Airport.

Airline Officials Complain About Noise Limits at Amsterdam's Airport (Nov. 12, 1997). Aviation Daily reports that officials from the airline Polar Air Cargo are complaining about the consequences of strong noise limits imposed by the Dutch government at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport. The noise limits will lead to airport-wide frequency reductions next spring, the article notes. Polar Air officials also are asking the U.S. Department of Transportation not to approve an application by KLM airlines (a subsidiary of Northwest Airlines) to place Northwest's "NW" code on KLM flights between Amsterdam and Calcutta. Meanwhile, KLM officials also oppose the Dutch regulations, but say they should be granted the code approval.

Amsterdam Airport's Noise Regulations Will Limit Flights and Runway Usage (Nov. 12, 1997). Aviation Daily reports that officials at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport have submitted operational guidelines for the new noise regulations at the airport to the Dutch transport ministry. According to airport officials, the noise limits will require "far-reaching limitations on flights and runway usage" during 1998. Dutch carriers will have to reduce frequencies after April 1, airport officials said.

Proposed Arizona Subdivision Would Place Homes Near Future Freeway, Raising Town Officials' Concern (Nov. 12, 1997). The Arizona Republic reports that a proposed 300-house subdivision near Gilbert, Arizona is being opposed by town officials because the development would threaten town land use plans for development around the Williams Gateway Airport, and because it would place homes next to the future San Tan Freeway, exposing future residents to traffic noise and fumes. However, town officials lack jurisdiction over the 75-acre land parcel, because it is an un-incorporated county "island" surrounded by the town. The proposal for the Hudson Ranches housing subdivision is expected to come before the Maricopa County Planning and Zoning Commission on November 20.

Houses Still Sell in Noise Zones Around Ohio Airport (Nov. 11, 1997). The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that jet noise around the Cincinnati - Northern Kentucky International Airport in Hebron, Ohio hasn't dissuaded people from purchasing homes in noise corridors around the airport. The article says that since April 1996, when the Kenton County Airport Board began a purchase assurance program as part of a federally mandated noise mitigation effort, 105 houses have been sold and an additional six sales are pending. According to figures released by the board's noise mitigation committee, the properties sold for an average of 94 percent of their appraised value and 95 percent of their list price.

Airport Expansion Issue in Mayor's Race in Ontario (Nov. 2, 1997). According to The Toronto Star, longtime Mississauga, Ontario, mayor, Hazel McCallion, is up for re-election. While she is confident she will serve as Mississauga's mayor well into the millennium, she does face some challengers in the upcoming election. While many disagree about how serious her opposition is, her opponents cite some serious platform issues. One controversial issue is the expansion of Pearson International Airport.

California Superior Court Rules Local Power Supersedes Federal in Airport Expansion (Nov. 1, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that Burbank won a court decision that gives it the right to control land use at Burbank Airport. The airport had claimed that federal law didn't allow localities to do this. The judge said "The question is whether you can take away from a local community the right to review an expansion in that community. I don't think federal authority goes that far." Legal representatives for Burbank noted "We have been victorious, not just legally, but in the ability to protect the noise environment around the airport."

Noise Regulation is Part of Indiana Town's Comprehensive Plan (Nov. 1, 1997). A much longer article from The Indianapolis News reports Westfield, Indiana's vision for their comprehensive plan for growth and management that came from two recent planning sessions. Among the priorities of the 140 residents who participated were desires to preserve the rural charm of their area while fostering mixed growth, and subdivisions with houses that aren't mirror images of each other. Among their concerns was the regulation of noise pollution from a nearby airport.

Airport Critic Pushes Pennsylvania's Lehigh Airport to Evaluate Five-Year-Old Noise Reduction Measures (Oct. 31, 1997). The Morning Call of Allentown, Pennsylvania, reports that the Lehigh Valley International Airport agreed to re-examine its efforts to reduce aircraft noise after complaints from longtime critic, Walter Lysaght. At issue is what can be done to steer jets away from residential developments.

Citizens Action Committee Urges Dallas Mayor to Update Love Field Noise Studies (Oct. 31, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reported that Dallas, Texas, Mayor Ron Kirk will ask the City Council to consider updating the city's noise and traffic studies of Dallas Love Field Airport. Behind the Mayor's request to update 5-year-old studies was the Love Field Citizens Action Committee. The Committee of residents have concerns about the impact of expanded airline service on their neighborhoods, specifically noise, traffic and safety issues. More flights are possible, according to this article, because Congress recently added Kansas, Mississippi and Alabama to the list of destinations allowed under the Wright amendment, which had previously limited passenger service from Love Field to destinations in Texas and its four neighboring states.

City of Burbank Gets Control of Airport Expansion (Oct. 31, 1997). City News Service reports that a Superior Court judge ruled that the city of Burbank, California, has authority over a proposed passenger terminal expansion by the Burbank Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority. The Airport Authority says it will appeal the decision.

Denver City Council Incumbent Concerned about Noise at Centennial Airport (Oct. 31, 1997). The Rocky Mountain News printed an article about a three-way City Council race in Denver, Colorado's populous northeast corner between two incumbents and one challenger. The lone incumbent , Clark Upton, is opposed to expansion at Centennial Airport. This is the only contest on District 4's Nov. 4 ballot.

Dallas Resident Questions Love Field Article with Regards to Noise (Oct. 30, 1997). The Dallas Observer printed a letter from a Dallas, Texas, resident who responded to an earlier article by Ann Zimmerman, titled "The (W)right to Fly," an article concerning Dallas' Love Field Airport. Here follows the letter written by Dallas resident, Ed Frick.

Sunjet Planes too Loud for Long Beach, California; Flights Suspended Until Quieter Planes (Oct. 30, 1997). The Seattle Times reports that Sunjet, a public charter airline operated by World Technology System of Atlanta, is suspending flights between Seattle and Long Beach, California, tomorrow because its airplanes don't meet noise regulations in the city of Long Beach. Service will be reinstated when Sunjet can get three aircraft that can operate within the local noise ordinance, Sunjet spokesman Hank Ernest said.

Expansion of New Zealand Airport Raises Noise Issues (Oct. 29, 1997). The Southland Times reports that a hearing into controversial air noise and runway issues at Queenstown Airport in New Zealand was delayed when the Queenstown Airport Corporation asked for more time to put its case together. The corporation had been scheduled to present technical evidence in relation to air noise boundaries and flight paths.

London Mayor should have Power to Regulate Aircraft Noise from Heathrow (Oct. 29, 1997). London's Evening Standard reported that Labor MP Tony Colman advocated that the new mayor should get the power to limit aircraft noise in the capital. Colman also urged London Minister Glenda Jackson to ban all night flights.

Minnesota Resident's Letter Supports Councilwoman's Stance on Noise Issues (Oct. 29, 1997). The Star Tribune of Minneapolis, Minnesota printed a letter from a resident who supports City Council Member Dore Mead. He sees her support of noise reduction and abatement with regards to the Metropolitan Airports Commission as one of her most important stances.

United Airlines Offers Quieter Flights In First and Business Class (Oct. 29, 1997). The Dayton Daily News of Dayton, Ohio, reports that United Airlines is installing an electronic noise signal to the headset at each seat in the first- and business-class sections of its 747, 767 and 777 widebodied jets. This new electronic feature should cancel out the noise from the airplane.

Virginia Politicians Oppose McCain's Airport Legislation (Oct. 29, 1997). The Washington Post reports that at a Capitol Hill hearing yesterday, Virginia Sens. John W. Warner (R) and Charles S. Robb (D), along with Rep.James P. Moran Jr. (D), bitterly renounced a proposal to relax federal flight controls at National Airport. They said this bill would mean more noise and congestion at the busy airport.

Virginia Residents Say More Navy Jets Incompatible with Human Life (Oct. 29, 1997). The Virginian-Pilot of Norfolk, Virginia, reports that at least 150 Chesapeake residents turned out for the Navy's final hearing on its plan to transfer up to 180 F/A-18 Hornets to Oceana Naval Air Station. The majority of the 15 people who spoke made it clear that more jets would not be welcome. The Navy's jets fly so close you can tell how recently the pilot shaved, one resident here complained. Others said the noise gets so bad they plug their ears when they go outside. And some residents worried that more jets would mean a greater danger of a crash in their neighborhoods.

Noise and Safety are Issues for Virginia Residents in Navy's Relocation of Jets (Oct. 28, 1997). The Virginia-Pilot of Norfolk, Virginia, reports that a large group of residents at a public hearing in Virginia Beach opposed the Navy's plan to bring 180 jets to Oceana. While city and state officials Monday night made a strong case for the Hornets, citizens asked the Navy for: peace, quiet and safety.

Residents Near Dallas's Love Field Say Their Noise and Safety Issues Ignored as Wright Amendment Debated (Oct. 28, 1997). The Dallas Morning News of Dallas, Texas, reports that a number of residents who live near Love Field Airport say their noise and safety concerns are being disregarded while a congressional debate about changing the Wright Amendment which would allow expansion at Love Field proceeds.

Senator McCain Sponsors Bill to Further Competition in Aviation (Oct. 28, 1997). The following press release was published in Washington, DC, by Senator John McCain who is sponsoring a bill to enhance aviation competition.

Washington State District Strives for a Sound Environment for Education Near Airport (Oct. 28, 1997). The Seattle Times reported that officials for the Highline School District of Burien, Washington, met yesterday with a public-relations firm to figure out how to deal with noise problems caused by air traffic at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.

Factions will Speak for and against Relocation of Navy Jets to Virginia Beach; Noise is one Issue (Oct. 27, 1997). The Virginian-Pilot of Norfork, Virginia, reports that the Navy will holds the first of two public hearings in Hampton Roads to ask residents if they want the Hornets as their new neighbors. For Virginia Beach, the proposed relocation of 180 Hornets to Oceana, raises a number of issues. For Virginia Beach, a lot is at stake: economics, noise, safety, traffic congestion and water supply.

Florida Commission Incumbents Face Criticism During Campaigns About Not Reducing Aircraft Noise (Oct. 26, 1997). The Orlando Sentinel reports that two Commission incumbents in Lake Mary, Florida are facing criticism over their lack of action on reducing aircraft noise from the Orlando Sanford Airport. The criticism came during a recent debate with their opponents in preparation for the November 4 elections.

Love Airfield in Dallas Looks to Chicago's Midway Airport for Growth Strategies (Oct. 26, 1997). The Chicago Tribune printed an article in which an in-depth comparison is made between the Love Airfield in Dallas, Texas and the Midway Airport in Chicago, Illinois. Both airports are located in inner-city neighborhoods, and both play second fiddle to two of the world's largest airports. While Midway has experienced a small, but promising revitalization in recent years, Love Field's re-development is in an earlier stage. However, Congress currently is debating whether to make changes to the Wright amendment, a federal law that restricts flights from Love Field to destinations within Texas and its four neighboring states. Changes to the Wright amendment could improve the revitalization prospects for Love Field. Meanwhile, some Dallas residents oppose any increase in flights to and from Love Field because of increases in noise, pollution, and congestion.

Pennsylvania Homes Get Soundproofing Against Aircraft Noise in Demonstration Project (Oct. 26, 1997). The Morning Call reports that ten homes surrounding the Lehigh Valley International Airport near Allentown, Pennsylvania are receiving free soundproofing in a project to demonstrate the effectiveness of soundproofing homes against aircraft noise. After work is completed, noise levels will be measured inside the homes, and the data will be used to apply for more federal funding to expand the program.

United Airlines Installs Headsets That Decrease Flight Noise (Oct. 26, 1997). The Houston Chronicle reports that starting this month, first-class and business-class passengers on United Airlines' international flights will be able to reduce flight noise with special anti-noise headsets. The airline is the first to purchase and install headsets with the technology, which creates sound waves that cancel out sound waves from the engine.

Amsterdam Airport Announces Increase in Passengers (Oct. 24, 1997). AP Worldstream reports that officials from the Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam announced Friday that more than 23 million passengers passed through the airport in the first nine months of 1997, an increase of 13.6% over the same period last year. Meanwhile, freight traffic increased 8.2% to about 845,000 tons in the same period. According to the article, more flights to North and Latin America, Africa, and Europe fueled the passenger growth, airport officials said. Environmentalists have decried the airport's continued growth, the article notes, saying that the increase in passenger numbers means more noise pollution for residents near the airport. The Dutch government acknowledges the problem, the article says, but doesn't want to harm the airport's growth. Various ideas are being considered to allow growth but control noise, the article concludes.

Editorial Criticizes Airport Official's No-Show at Meeting About Increased Jet Traffic at New Jersey Airport (Oct. 24, 1997). The Record printed an editorial which criticizes Phil Engle, the manager of New Jersey's Teterboro Airport near New York City, for abruptly canceling an appearance at a meeting where he was scheduled to talk about possible increased air traffic at the airport. According to the editorial, the Port Authority has proposed to increase corporate jet traffic at the airport by as much as 20% in order to relieve congestion at Newark International Airport. Residents are justifiably concerned about the proposal, the writer says, and deserve to hear from officials.

Environmental Group Joins Appeal of Homestead Air Force Base Permit in Florida (Oct. 24, 1997). The following wire report was released by US Newswire of Washington, DC, about the National Parks and Conversation Association's recent action regarding a permit for the re-development of Homestead Air Force Base in southern Florida.

Navy Officials Say Moving Military Jets to Virginia Would Have Little Impact on Coastal Bombing Range (Oct. 24, 1997). The Virginian-Pilot reports that Navy officials said at a meeting Thursday night in Manteo, Virginia that if 180 F/A-18 aircraft are moved from Florida to Oceana Naval Air Station near Virginia Beach, there would be only a slight increase in activity at the Dare County Bombing Range, and no impact on the surrounding environment. Navy officials' comments were made at an informational meeting, followed by a public hearing regarding the draft environmental impact statement on the proposal to shift the jets to Virginia. The article notes that only one Dare resident attended the meeting.

North Carolina County Commissioners Reject School Site Partly Due to Airport's Proximity (Oct. 24, 1997). The News & Record reports that Guilford County (North Carolina) Board of Commissioners Thursday narrowly rejected a purchase of land proposed by the school board for the Northwest Middle School. The Commissioners voted down the proposal because it the land parcel was too expensive, too large, and too close to the Piedmont Triad International Airport, the article says.

SunJet Airlines Suspends Flights From California Airport While Searching for Planes that Meet the City's Noise Regulations (Oct. 24, 1997). The Los Angeles Times reports that SunJet International, which offers chartered jets from Long Beach, California's airport has temporarily stopped operating at the airport in an attempt to find aircraft quiet enough for local noise regulations. The company has 118 noise violations since July of 1995, and had 28 just in September.

New Jersey Airport Manager Skips Meeting About Plan for More Jets at Airport, Angering Officials and Residents (Oct. 23, 1997). The Record reports that Phil Engle, manager of New Jersey's Teterboro Airport, abruptly canceled a presentation before the Bergen County freeholders where he was scheduled to answer questions about the possible 20% expansion of corporate jet traffic at the airport. The move has angered freeholders and others, and has intensified concerns over the airport's plans, the article says.

New Runway at Louisville Airport Will Change Flight and Noise Patterns (Oct. 23, 1997). The Courier-Journal reports that officials at the Louisville International Airport in Louisville, Kentucky will hold four neighborhood workshops to offer previews of the ways flight patterns and aircraft noise will change when the second new runway opens on December 1. Officials said the workshops will include examples of the ways in which jets will sound in the affected neighborhoods.

New Zealand Man Threatens to Shoot Down Air Force Jet Because of Noise (Oct. 23, 1997). The Dominion reports that a man in Palmerston North, New Zealand who threatened to shoot down a noisy air force jet flying over his home was given a 12-month suspended sentence in Palmerston North District Court.

Noise Consultant to Speak to New Jersey Citizens About Effects of Aircraft Noise (Oct. 23, 1997). The Record reports that Arline Bronzaft, an author, researcher, and noise consultant, will speak to the public about aircraft noise in south Bergen County, New Jersey. Bronzaft was asked to speak by a citizens group, the Alliance of Municipalities Concerning Air Traffic, which is fighting possible plans to re-route corporate jets to the Teterboro Airport. Bronzaft will discuss a recent study that found that children living or going to school in areas that experience aircraft noise have poorer reading skills and slower cognitive development, on average.

Angry Rhode Island Residents Turn Out at Meeting to Discuss Airport's Plans for Noise Mitigation (Oct. 22, 1997). The Providence Journal-Bulletin reports that a meeting was held last night in Warwick, Rhode Island by the Airport Corporation to explain plans for noise mitigation efforts at the T.F. Green Airport. Many officials and politicians attended, as well as about 100 residents. Public turnout was down, the article says, compared to two earlier anti-airport-noise meetings: one held last month by U.S. Representative Joseph McNamara, and one held in August by Peg Magill, an anti-noise activist from Cowesett, which drew about 400 people.

Local and State New Jersey Politicians Urge Crowd of 250 to Continue the Fight Against Increased Jet Traffic at Airport (Oct. 22, 1997). The Record reports that officials who represent south Bergen County, New Jersey at the local, county, and state level asked residents Tuesday to continue their fight against a proposed increase in corporate jet traffic at the Teterboro Airport. The article says that a crowd of more than 250 attended the meeting in Little Ferry and heard mayors from Moonachie, Teterboro, and Little Ferry, Bergen County freeholders, and state legislators urge them to sign petitions, write letters, and make phone calls protesting the proposed air traffic increase.

Noise Restrictions at California Airport Approved by Airport Commission (Oct. 22, 1997). The Daily News of Los Angeles reports that the Los Angeles Airport Commission Tuesday approved a plan to impose restrictions on jets at Van Nuys Airport to cut down on aircraft noise. The restrictions would ban flights by noisy jets starting at 10 p.m., instead of the current 11 p.m. curfew, and prohibit any more of the older, noisier, Stage 2 jets from joining the Van Nuys fleet. The article notes that the proposal still needs approval from the Los Angeles City Council, but that approval seems likely.

North Carolina Town Lobbies the Navy to Send its Military Jets There (Oct. 22, 1997). The Virginian-Pilot reports that residents and officials of Havelock, North Carolina are lobbying Navy officials to send 180 Hornets to the Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station in Havelock. The comments came at a hearing Tuesday held by the Navy to gather public input on where to transfer the jets when they are removed from the soon-to-close Cecil Field Naval Air Station in Florida. The Navy has recommended sending the jets to Virginia Beach, Virginia, but Havelock is an alternative location still under consideration. The article notes that about 75 people turned up for the hearing, and about 25 spoke, none of them opposing bringing the jets to North Carolina.

Texas Town Opposes Changes to the Wright Amendment That Would Bring Increased Air Traffic (Oct. 22, 1997). The Dallas Morning News reports that officials in Highland Park, Texas are opposed to possible changes in the Wright Amendment, which they say would increase air traffic at Dallas Love Field. Congress recently approved changes to the Wright Amendment, and the changes are awaiting presidential approval. Meanwhile, Highland Park has been acting as an information clearinghouse, providing information to residents about the proposed changes.

Airport Noise Abatement Information Made Available on the Internet (Oct. 21, 1997). The publication Airports reports that BCS International of Costa Mesa, California has upgraded its Bridge Reports decision support software for managing noise abatement programs to allow airports to provide access to noise abatement programs over the Internet. The article says that according to the company, reports, data, and graphics can be displayed on an airport's website or e-mailed in response to an individual request.

Colorado City Councilor Challenges Proposed Annexation Plan Due to Jet Noise Under Parcel (Oct. 21, 1997). The Rocky Mountain News repo